Alaska Shipwrecks (B)

ABBREVIATIONS:  AluminumALBritish ColumbiaBCCentralCFiberglassFRPFishing VesselFVIndicated Horse PowerIHPLongliner-LLMotor VesselMVNorthNOfficial NumberONRevenue Cutter ServiceRCSSchoonerSchSignal LettersSLSouth CentralSCSoutheastSESouthwestSWSteel oil screwSOSSteam ShipSSUnknownUUnited States ArmyUSAUnited States Coast GuardUSCGUnited States NavyUSNWestcentralWCWood gas screwWGSWood oil screwWOS

B B 1 (1951)     The 7 ton wooden gas screw B B 1 was lost overboard from the oil screw Sea Lark on July 13, 1951 approximately 400 miles southwest of Ketchikan.

Mapping and Location: Alaska Unknown

Comment: Lost overboard along with the 7 ton wooden gas screws G F 1 and G F 6

Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross, Built 1951, ON 261984

Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 955

 

B B 6 (1968)     The gas screw B B 6 burned August 3, 1968 at the Alitak Cannery at Alitak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 56 40 N 154 10 W   Chart 16580

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

B B P 14 (1961)     The 8 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel B B P 14 was consumed by fire October 16, 1961 at Dillingham.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 02 30 N 158 27 30 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 7 Net, Length 30.2, Breadth 10, Depth 3.5, Built 1952 at Seattle WA, SL WL7335, Owner New England Fish Company, Registered Juneau, ON 263122

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) Pg 36, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 929

 

B C CLIPPER (1969)     The Canadian halibut fishing vessel B C Clipper exploded and burned August 1, 1969 off of Twoheaded Island near Kodiak.   A liquid gas line from the galley freezer broke and caused the initial explosion when the gas was ignited by the galley stove.  Winston Tucker of Vancouver BC, his son Clarence Tucker and Charles Stanley of New Westminster BC were lost.  Five others survived on an overturned life raft until rescued by the fishing vessel Peggy Jo.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 54 N 153 35 W   Chart 16580

Sources: 1. Seattle Daily Times (August 12, 1969) “3 B C Men Lost When Boat Sinks” Pg 41, 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

B D CO NO 2 (1940)     The 54 ton 60 foot wooden scow B D Co No 2 foundered 70 miles SSW of Cape Etolin October 12, 1940.  There was no one aboard the vessel at the time of the casualty.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 37 N 158 15 W   Chart 16006

Comment: Probably SSW of sEtolin Point.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 54 Gross and Net, Length 59.9, Breadth 20, Depth 5.1, Built 1938 at Seattle WA, Owner Heinie Berger, Registered Cordova, ON 173932

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1941) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 511, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1939) Pg 331

 

B D CO NO 4 (1942)     The 38 ton 49 foot wooden scow B D Co No 4 stranded and was lost August 25, 1942 at Iron Creek, Norton Sound.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   Unknown

Comment: There are several Iron Creeks near Nome and Solomon on Norton Sound.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 38 Gross and Net, Length 49.5, Breadth 20, Depth 4.5, Built 1939 at Seattle WA, Owner James S Robbins, Registered Seattle, ON 174488

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1946) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 804, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1945) Pg 374

 

B D CO NO 5 (1942)     The 37 ton 49 foot scow B D Co No 5 foundered September 23, 1942 near Sledge Island.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 29 N 166 13 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 37 Gross and Net, Length 49.5, Breadth 20, Depth 4.5, Built 1939 at Seattle WA, Owner Heinie Berger, Registered Cordova, ON 174489

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1943) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 753, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1942) Pg 322

 

B D CO NO 7 (1947)     The 67 ton 60 foot wooden scow B D Co No 7 stranded and was lost in the fall of 1947 on the shore at Cape Suckling.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 59 30 N 145 53 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: Tonnage 67 Gross and Net, Length 60, Breadth 24, Depth 5.3, Built 1945 at Seattle WA, Owner Heinie Berger, Registered Juneau, ON 176293

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 49, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 937

 

B D AND M (1960)     The 13 ton 35 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel B D and M stranded and was lost in 1960 opposite Sunny Point Cannery on Gravina Island, Ketchikan.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 20 30 N 131 38 45 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 9 Net, Length 35.6, Breadth 12.3, Depth 3.9, Built 1947 at Port Angeles WA, Horsepower 50, Owner Charles Swegle, Registered Port Angeles WA, ON 252865

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) Pg 48, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 902

 

B F NO 9 (1948)     The 46 ton 60 foot wooden scow B F No 9 stranded and was lost September 21, 1948 between Crooked and Near Island adjacent to Kodiak.

Mapping and Location:  South Central Alaska   57 46 30 N 152 23 30 W   Chart 16595

Additional Information: Tonnage 46 Gross and Net, Length 60.4, Breadth 18, Depth 5, Built 1929 at Port Blakely WA, Whiz Fish Products Company, Registered Juneau, ON 170374

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1949) Pg 55, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1950) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 925

 

B J (1982)     The fishing vessel B J capsized in heavy weather May 21, 1982 near Hinchinbrook Island 25 miles southwest of Cordova.  The only person aboard was rescued.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 23 N 146 28 W   Chart 16700

Comment: The Camelot and Nasty Habit were also lost in the same area during the same storm.  WG

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

B M CO NO 2 (1937)     The 321 ton wood barge B.M. Co. No. 2 was lost with almost all of her 20 tons of cargo on June 1, 1937 when she broke loose and stranded on Hinchinbrook Island, 30 miles east of Cape Hinchinbrook,  in a heavy gale.  She was being towed from Anacortes, Washington to Alitak, on the south end of Kodiak Island, with a load of fishing gear, lumber and oils valued at $6,500.  Captain Parker of the Shively Tug Boat Company of Seattle was at the helm of the Georgia which was towing the B. M. Co. No. 2 when her tow line broke in a 75 mile an hour gale.  The barge, valued at $10,000, was a total loss but some of the cargo was salvaged.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 14 N 146 39 W

Additional Information: Vessel Insurance $5,000, Cargo Insurance 5,668, ON 227414, Owner Suryans Inc. Anacortes, Washington.

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report, 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 458.

 

B T CO NO 4 (1944)     The 59 ton 75 foot wooden gas screw B T Co No 4 foundered in the Gulf of Alaska July 18, 1944.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska Unknown

Additional Information: Tonnage 59 Gross 56 Net, Length 75, Breadth 28.2, Depth 3.5, Built 1943 at Blaine WA, Service freight, Horsepower 175, Owner B R E Company, Registered Wrangell, ON 243944

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1946) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 804, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1945) Pg 116

 

B & W NO 1 (1956)     The 188 ton 100 foot steel oil screw B & W No 1 stranded and was lost September 29, 1956 approximately southeast of Mekoryuk on Nunivak Island in the Bering Sea.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 23 20 N 166 11 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 188 Gross 167 Net, Length 100.4, Breadth 32, Depth 5.1, Built 1944 at Buffalo NY, Former Name LCT-6-1450 (U S N), Service freight, Horsepower 675, SL WB5015, Owner Yukon Navigation Company, Registered Juneau, ON 255263

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) Pg 46, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 777

 

BABS (1968)     The oil screw Babs foundered and was lost September 16, 1968 in Cook Inlet near Anchorage.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   61 13 05 N 149 53 30 W   Chart 16660

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BABS (1974)     The oil screw Babs foundered and was lost September 30, 1974 at Sullivan Rock.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 53 50 N 135 18 W   Chart 17300

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BADGER (1958)     The 19 ton 39 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Badger was destroyed by a tidal wave July 9, 1958 in Lituya Bay.  An earthquake caused land and glaciers to shift and generated the largest tidal wave every recorded.  Damage reached as high as 1,720 feet in parts of Lituya Bay.  Large waves between 30 and 200 feet were observed by the two vessels in the bay whose crews survived the disaster to tell of it.  A third vessel was lost with two crewmen.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 36 45 N 137 39 30 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: Tonnage 19 Gross 13 Net, Length 39.4, Breadth 12.2, Depth 4.8, Built 1931 at Anacortes WA, Horsepower 141, Owner William S Swanson, Registered Seattle, ON 230928

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) Pg 48, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 800

 

BALAENA (1901)     At 6:40 p.m. on Friday June 7, 1901 the 149 foot American whaling steamer Balaena hit an uncharted reef off of Saint Lawrence Island and was lost.  Her master, General B. Leavitt of Portland, Maine, reported that it was foggy with a moderate SSW wind and heavy swell when an error in soundings and a strong current caused the Balaena to strand on a reef that the watch did not detect.  The vessel, valued at $80,000 and her 300 ton cargo of stores and whaling supplies, valued at $45,000, were both totally lost.  Fortunately none of 50 souls on board, including a crew of 41 and nine passengers were lost.  The Balaena had departed Dutch Harbor May 6th bound for the Arctic Ocean.  This information comes from a U S Customs wreck report filed at San Francisco by General B. Leavitt June 26th.

A San Francisco newspaper, The San Francisco Call, reported a somewhat conflicting story in July when news reached the south.  The following is the accounting from the paper:

“The whaler Balaena of San Francisco, belonging to San Francisco Whaling Company, lies on St. Lawrence Island 20 miles west of Southeast Cape, in the Bering Sea, a total wreck.  Captain P F Cotte and the sixty men in the crew had an almost miraculous escape from death.  Through the bravery of the officers all got to shore.”

“News of the wreck, which occurred on May 1, reached Nome on June 21 and the whaler Alexander was immediately sent to St. Lawrence Island to the relief of the wrecked crew.  Captain Cotte, with several of the crew, reached Nome in a rowboat with particulars of the loss of his vessel and the terrible straits to which starvation had reduced the crew.”

“The Balaena was on a voyage to the Arctic.  She was provisioned for thirty months.  The whaler left San Francisco on April 4 and after battling with the ice for weeks had succeeded in working through the worst of the floes.  She was headed to pass St. Lawrence Island when the wreck occurred.  Shortly after midnight on the first of May the wind rose until it assumed the strength of a gale and the whaler was driven to a point twenty miles west of Southeast Cape, where she struck a rock.  The captain immediately ordered the boats out.  The whaler seemed to have been hung on the rock and although the waves were pounding her terribly she did not founder.”

“In a very short time the boats were manned and the crew started for shore.  The sea was so high that it was impossible for the boats to keep together, but all made the island eventually.  The boat which contained captain Cotte was stove in as it struck the beach, but the captain and all the men succeeded in getting beyond the reach of the waves.  The drenched and half frozen crew remained huddled about in groups during the remainder of the night.  Several had their hands and feet frozen.”

“The Balaena is a total wreck.  She is hanging to the rock where she struck, but is liable to slip off into the water and sink at any time.  She struck on the port side and crushed a hole fully twelve feet in length in her hull.  The waves during the night of the wreck pounded her stern to pieces.  The wrecked whaler is a vessel of 600 tons burden.”

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   63 11 N 163 18 W

Additional Information: Construction wood, Tonnage 390 net, Built 1883 San Francisco, Length 149.5, Breadth 32, Depth 17, NHP 245, Signal Letters KBHL, Registration San Francisco, ON 3244, Owner Pacific Steam Whaling Co. San Francisco, Vessel Insurance $60,000, Cargo Insurance none.

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report of June 26, 1901, 2. The San Francisco Call (July 3, 1901) Pg 8, 3. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 72

 

BALCLUTHA (1904)     According to a wreck report filed May, 25, 1904, the 1554 ton American ship Balclutha struck a reef in the Geese Island Strait at 12:00 p.m. on May 16, 1904 and became a total wreck.  She had departed San Francisco the 27th of April with 80 fishermen, 20 crewmen and a cargo of cannery supplies, sheep and cattle bound for the fishing port of Karluk, Alaska.  The report, signed by her master, B Bremar of San Francisco, mentions the cause of the casualty as “unfamiliar waters, struck reef…foggy and misty, dark….heavy sea running.” “When vessel struck bracing all yards aback to back her off, but in vain.”  The vessel was abandoned with no loss to crew or passengers.

Further research reveals that the wreck was acquired by Alaska Packers Association who successfully floated and towed her to Lazy Bay.  The Balclutha was then patched and returned to San Francisco where $30,249 was spent in repairing the damage to her hull.  She was renamed Star of Alaska and returned to duty in the north.

Mapping and Location: Salvaged

Comment: Evidence of this wreck may still be on site and of interest.  WG

Additional Information: Age 18 years, Registered Port Gamble Washington, Owners Pope and Talbot of San Francisco, Signal letters KQTL, Length 256.3, Breadth 38.5, Depth 17.5, Built 1886 Glasgow Scotland.

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report of May 25, 1904, 2. Salmon From Kodiak (1986) Pg 210, 3. Safeguard the Gateways of Alaska (1918) (Map), 4. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 423.

 

BALD EAGLE (1992)     The 37 foot vessel Bald Eagle parted a mooring line during a storm and was lost on the rocks at Mill Bay Beach on September 28, 1992.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 49 30 N 152 20 30 W   Chart 16594

Source: Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak)

 

BALTO (1957)     The 14 ton 37 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Balto foundered March 6, 1957 in Valdez Arm.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 53 N 146 54 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 9 Net, Length 36.9, Breadth 11.2, Depth 5.6, Built 1926 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 70, Owner John S Totemoff, Registered Juneau, ON 225404

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 49, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 823

 

BANSHEE (1977)     The 11 ton 29 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Banshee stranded and was lost during 1977 on Kodiak Island.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 10 Net, Length 28.9, Breadth 11.4, Depth 4.5,Built 1951 at Seattle WA, ON 261645

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 62, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1979) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2241

 

BARBARA (1925)     The 50 foot wooden gas boat Barbara drifted onto the rocks at 8:15 a.m. on May 29, 1925 when the engine failed, and was lost.  Her four crewmen survived.  A wreck report was filed by the superintendent of the Hunters Bay Cannery on June 10th with the following details:

Barbara left Hydaburg bound for Hunters Bay Cannery 3:55 a.m. Friday May 29, 1929.  5:00 a.m. passed Eik Point, Course East by South, Distance by log 6 ½ miles.  5:45 a.m. engine stopped. 6:05 a.m. engine started again.  6:20 a.m. passes Mellen Rock, Course South East by East, Distance by log 6 ½ miles.  6:55 a.m. passed Point Webster South East ½ South, Distance by log 3 miles.  8:00 a.m. abreast Shipwreck Point, Course South East, Distance by log 6 miles.  8:15 a.m. engine stopped on account of feed pipes plugged and circulating pump out of order.  8:30 a.m. Barbara drifted on rock off Shipwreck Point.  Crew jumped on rock and were picked up by G. B. Carmen at 7:10 p.m. and taken to Hunters Bay Cannery, arriving at Hunters Bay at 8:05 p.m.”

An anchor was put out to try to hold the Barbara but the strong breeze piled them onto the rocks before the anchor could take hold.  The crew stayed perched on the rocks all day until seen by the Mail Boat Carmen and rescued. The vessel, valued at $7,000, was deemed a total loss including fuel and stores.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 53 53 N 132 29 30 W

Additional Information: Tonnage 26 Gross 29 Net, Built 1916, Registered Ketchikan, ON 208434, Master Jim Lou of Hunters Bay Cannery, Owner Northwestern Fisheries Company of Seattle, Cargo none.

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report

 

BARBARA (1965)     The 12 ton 29 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Barbara burned August 15, 1965 at Naknek.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 43 40 N 157 00 45 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 10 Net, Length 29.7, Breadth 11, Depth 4.9, Built 1960 at Bainbridge Island WA, Horsepower 160, SL WM8669, Owner Arctic Maid Fisheries, Registered Seattle, ON 281730

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 63, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1164

 

BARBARA (1994)     The 31 foot halibut longliner Barbara flooded her engine room from a broken fish bin and sank June 8, 1994 in the Shelikof Strait approximately 10 miles south of Karluk.  All three crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessel Victoria Ann.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 34 10 N 154 27 30 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: ON 263385

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Alaska), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BARBARA HERNSTER (1905)     The Barbara Hernster was reported wrecked near Bald Head at the entrance to Plover Bay within Providence Bay on the east coast of Siberia July 24, 1905.  She was a two masted schooner of 148 tons built in Fairhaven California by Bendixsen in 1887 for Robert Sudden of San Francisco.  At the time of the accident the Barbara Hernster was on a prospecting expedition for the Northeastern Siberian Company

Mapping and Location: Siberian Coast

Comment: A detailed accounting of this wreck is available online by researching her captain, Olaf Swenson.

Source: The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 115

 

BARBARA JEAN (2002)     The 42 foot seiner Barbara Jean caught fire and was lost July 5, 2002 near Point Baker.  The only person on board was rescued by the fishing vessel Ruffies One who also helped in the attempt to extinguish the flames.  The master of the Barbara Jean was transported by Coast Guard Helicopter to Juneau for treatment for smoke inhalation.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 21 32 N 133 37 15 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: ON 605605

Sources: 1. U S C G News Release (July 5, 2002) “Good Samaritans rescue man from boat fire; medevaced by Coast Guard”, 2. Michael Burwell Alaska Shipwreck List (2013)

 

BARBARA LEIGH (1992)     The 42 foot cod trawler Barbara Leigh sank at Noyes Island January 12, 1992.  An outrigger collapsed and caused the vessel to list and sink.  One crewman was lost.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 30 N 133 40 W   Chart 17400

Additional Information: ON 250098

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

Web Barbarosa 1989BARBAROSSA (1991)     The 82 foot crab fishing vessel Barbarossa disappeared with all hands February 10, 1991 near Saint George Island in the Bering Sea.  Lost were captain George Brandenburg (39) of Kodiak, Dennis Olberding (38) of Kodiak, Brian McPherson, Tim Schmitt of Kodiak, Darryl Gross of Wrangell and Don Bright.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   56 35 N 169 35 W   Chart 16011

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BARBIE ISLAND (1982)     The gillnet fishing vessel Barbie Island broke apart in the surf and sank September 16, 1982 near Sudden Stream 25 miles from Yakutat.  Only two of her four crewmembers survived the disaster.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 47 N 139 58 30 W   Chart 16761

Comment: Sudden Stream is eight miles southwest of Blizhni Point in Yakutat Bay.  WG

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BARBRO D (1962)     The 8 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Barbro D foundered February 11, 1962 at Juneau.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 18 15 N 134 24 30 W   Chart 17300

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 7 Net, Length 30.3, Breadth 8.6, Depth 3.8, Built 1927 at Ballard WA, Horsepower 14, Owner Samuel L Jackson, Registered Juneau, ON 230842

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) Pg 57, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 929

 

BARCONI (1993)     The 44 foot salmon seiner Barconi burned to the waterline and sank August 7, 1993 at Flat Island near Seldovia.  All three crewmembers made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 19 45 N 151 59 45 W   Chart 16640

Additional Information: ON 633889

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

BARGE 221 (1974)     The 1,255 ton Barge 221 foundered in the Gulf of Alaska October 13, 1974.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   Unknown

Additional Information: Tonnage 1,255 Gross and Net, Built 1970, ON 524580

Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1976) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1637

 

BARGE NO. 2 (1899)     The 300 ton iron Barge 2 owned by the Empire Line foundered September 29, 1899 in the middle of Saint Michael Bay.  She was laden with 200 tons of cargo listed as merchandise, including a deck load, all of which was reported a total loss along with the barge.  The estimated value of the vessel at the time was $30,000 and her cargo $15,000.  Prevailing weather included 40 mile an hour winds and high seas.  The steamer Alaska tried to get a towline out to her to no avail.  The loss was not reported until the following June by Port Captain R J Josie as the agent for the vessel left the day after the wreck.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   63 27 N 162 W

Additional Information: Age two years, Registered New York, ON 31576, Master Peter Bloomberg, Last port Saint Michael Canal, Bound for Nome, Crew 6 (none lost)

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report Alaska Collection District June 27, 1900

 

BARGE NO. 3 (1907)     On Thursday, September 19, 1907, the iron Barge No. 3 drug anchor in Saint Michael Bay during a 40 mile an hour northerly gale with very heavy seas.  There was no crew or cargo aboard as the vessel was at its usual anchorage with a 750 pound patent anchor and plenty of chain set out.  Because of the darkness of night and extremely heavy sea running, nothing could be done to avoid the casualty.  Barge No.3 was valued at $7,500 and became a total loss.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   63 27 N 162 W

Additional Information: Tonnage 383 Gross 355 Net, Age 9 years, Built 1898 Elizabeth N.J., Registered at Saint Michael, ON 31577, Master A J Hilliard of Saint Michael, Owner Northern Navigation Company of San Francisco

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed October 10, 1907 by agent A F Zipf

 

BARGE NO 18 (1958)     Tank Barge No 18 stranded and became a total loss October 22, 1958 on Shemya Island.  The barge was under tow by the tug Wando on her way to the Northwest Orient Airlines Base on Shemya.  There was no loss of life.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 43 20 N 174 07 E   Chart 16012

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BARNES (1918)     It was 5:30 p.m. on Friday June 21, 1918 when the gas screw Barnes caught fire and was lost off Tolstoi Point in Clarence Strait.  In the wreck report filed by her master, M L Burke of Lake Bay, the fire started in the hot box and quickly spread throughout the wooden vessel.  One Pyrene and two powder fire extinguishers were expended on the flames in an effort to quench the blaze but to no avail.  The crew of four abandoned the Barnes in search of aid but when they returned aboard the gas screw Irene Barnes their vessel had disappeared.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 40 10 N 132 23 10 W

Additional Information: Tonnage 41 Gross 27 Net, Built 1917 Tacoma, Registered Portland Oregon, ON 214900, Owner F C Barnes Co Inc of Portland, Last Port Lake Bay June 21, 1918, Destination Ketchikan, Vessel Value $20,000, Cargo none, Insurance none

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report filed at Wrangell June 24, 1918, 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 302

 

BARON (1977)     The 139 ton 75 foot oil screw Baron stranded and was lost December 3, 1977 off of Cape Cheerful.  The crewmen were all rescued by the patrol vessel Vigilant.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   55 00 50 N 166 40 30 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: Tonnage 139, Built 1967, ON 511839

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1979) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2241, 2. Unofficial Wreck List

 

BARRACUDA (1954)     The 17 ton 40 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Barracuda foundered November 15, 1954 between Split Island and Onslow Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 52 30 N 132 22 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 12 Net, Length 40, Breadth 11.4, Depth 4.8, Built 1941 at Seattle WA, Former Names J-259 (U S A) and Barracuda, Horsepower 165, SL WC7567, Owner Alan N McCoy, Registered Wrangell, ON 255306

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 51, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 755

 

BARRACUDA (1963)     The 10 ton 36 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Barracuda stranded and was lost February 7, 1963 at Split Rock near Ouzinkie.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 55 30 N 152 29 50 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 7 Net, Length 36, Breadth 10.9, Depth 3.9, Built 1942 at Brownsville TX, Former Name No.4695 (U S N), Horsepower 115, Owner George Eckenberg, Registered Juneau, ON 255728

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) Pg 61, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 963

 

BASIL (1950)     The 28 ton 47 foot steel oil screw Basil stranded and was lost September 7, 1950 on the beach at Cape Lisburne.

Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   68 53 N 166 13 W   Chart 16005

Additional Information: Tonnage 28 Gross 19 Net, Length 47, Breadth 14, Depth 5, Built unknown, Former Name LCM-3-500004 (U S N), Horsepower 330, Owner Gaasland Company, Registered Bellingham WA, ON 260855

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 48, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 744

 

BAYCHIMO (1931)     The trading supply steamer Baychimo was caught in the ice and abandoned in the Arctic Ocean in the fall of 1931.  One report was that she drifted for 52 months along with the arctic ice pack until she finally disappeared in 1934.  Others have the Baychimo sighted as late as 1969.  She is often referred to as the “Ghost Ship of the Arctic”.

Mapping and Location: Somewhere in the Arctic

Additional Information: Construction steel, Tonnage 1322, Built 1914 Sweden, Owner Hudson Bay Company, Length 230 feet

Source: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest Pgs 419&432, 2. Wikipedia.org (2013)

 

BDL (1920)     The gas screw BDL is reported to have been lost sometime in 1920 at Strawberry Bay near Katalla.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 10 N 144 23 W

Comments : There is a Strawberry Harbor or Cove five miles southeast of Katalla

Source: The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 313

 

BEACHBOY (1978)     The 58 foot vessel Beachboy foundered December 12, 1978 in 20 fathoms of water near Two Headed Island.  Two survivors were found two days later.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 54 N 153 35 W   Chart 16580

Source: Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak)

 

BEACHCOMBER (1951)     The 43 ton 58 foot steel oil screw Beachcomber foundered October 15, 1951 on a trip from Yakutat to Juneau.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   Unknown

Additional Information: Tonnage 43 Gross29 Net, Length 58.9, Breadth 14.1, Depth 5.8, Built 1944 at New Orleans LA, Former Name LCM (6) C-52707 (U S N), Service freight, Crew 2, Horsepower 450, SL WB5753, Owner McKinley Electric Company, Registered Juneau, ON 255417

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 49, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 747

 

BEACHLEY (1908)     The small steamer Beachley was lost at Nome July 1, 1908.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W

Source: The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 156

 

BEAR (1908)     It was 9:00 p.m. on Friday the 13th of March, 1908 when the 38 foot American schooner Bear drug anchor and washed up on a reef at Kashega, 80 miles from Unalaska.  Local natives attempted to assist the master, Edward Lee of Unalaska, and his two crewmen but the nasty weather proved to be too much.  The following are quotes from the wreck report:

“Kechiga, 80 miles from Unalaska, struck a reef of rocks.” “Anchors dragged, chains parted, and vessel washed ashore on reef of rocks.” “Dropped another anchor, but would not hold very good, cable parted.”  “This is a local schooner that runs around Unalaska Island.  Ship’s papers lost.”

The Bear was valued at $1,000 at the time of the accident and had a cargo of $300 worth of provisions.  Some of the two ton cargo was salvaged but the vessel became a total loss.

Mapping and Location: Southwestern Alaska   53 28 50 N 167 10 30 W

Additional Information: Construction wood, Tonnage 11 net, Length 38.7, Breadth 12.7, Depth 4.6, Built 1896 in Seattle, Registration Unalaska, ON 3691

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report Alaska District March 26, 1908, 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 156

 

BEAR BAIT (1965)     The 10 ton 33 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Bear Bait was destroyed by a storm December 1, 1965 at Uyak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 38 20 N 154 00 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 7 Net, Length 33, Breadth 11.3, Depth 3.5, Built 1946 at Seldovia, Horsepower 140, Owner Joe B Maxwell, Registered Juneau, ON 274660

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 69, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1164

 

BEATRICE (1905)     The 48 ton schooner Beatrice was lost at Nome on July 13, 1905.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W

Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

BEAVER (1878)     It was 7:00 the morning of May 17, 1878 when captain Nat H Lane Jr spotted a rock dead ahead of the steamer Beaver.  The vessel was on a trip from Glenora to Wrangell and was just passing the Stickine River 60 miles south.  Captain Lane reported that the “failure of the gong to sound the signal to back” contributed to the accident. The Beaver piled onto a reef and was wrecked.  Lane also stated the “with the exception of her machinery, which was saved in fair condition, she became a total loss.”

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 20 N 132 36 W

Additional Information: Built on the Willamette several years before

Source: Lewis and Dreyden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1961) Pg 264

 

BEAVER (1935)     The American oil screw Beaver foundered at 7:30 a.m. Sunday October 27, 1935.  She was on a fishing trip out of Port McArthur mastered by Einer Hauneg of Port Alexander assisted by one crewman.  They had brought 1600 pounds of fresh caught salmon onboard valued at $287 when the Beaver sprung a leak and filled with water.  The vessel, valued at $4,000, foundered one and a half miles south of Point Crowley and became a total loss.  There was a 35 mile an hour northwest wind blowing and the Beaver went down rapidly, the crew narrowly escaping with their lives.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 07 10 N 134 15 30 W

Additional Information: Construction wood, Tonnage 18 Net, Age 32 years, Registration Ketchikan, ON 3965, Owner P A Hauneg of Port Alexander

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed at Collection District 31, Port of Ketchikan dated November 15, 1935

 

BEAVER (1990)     The 65 foot wooden fish tender Beaver grounded and was abandoned May 1, 1990 near Kodiak.  There was no loss of life.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: ON 252305

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BECCA DAWN (1999)     The 52 foot steel longline halibut fishing vessel Becca Dawn rolled and sank in rough weather November 9, 1999 near Port Chatham.  Three of the four crewmembers were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter and taken to Yakutat.  Lost was Olen Nash (21) from Haines.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 12 30 N 151 47 W   Chart 16640

Additional Information: ON 561933

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

BECKY (1973)     The oil screw Becky foundered and was lost June 27, 1973 in Bristol Bay.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 N 162 W   Chart 16006

Source:  BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BEILBY (1956)     The 15 ton 46 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Beilby stranded and was lost October 27, 1956 at Point Lookout.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 39 N 133 40 30 W   Chart 17360

Comment: There are multiple Point Lookouts but this is the one closest to the home port of the vessel.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 15 Gross 12 Net, Length 46.5, Breadth 10.5, Depth 3, Built 1921 at Wrangell, Horsepower 140, Owner Alice Conant, Registered Wrangell, ON 221246

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 54, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 755

 

BELAIR (1994)     The 91 foot crab fishing vessel Belair stranded and was lost February 1, 1994 at a seal rookery on the south side of Saint George Island.  A helmsman sleeping at the wheel was the cause of the disaster.  All six crewmembers were airlifted by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter from the Coast Guard Cutter Rush to the fish processor Blue Wave moored nearby.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   56 35 N 169 35 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: ON 221429

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Alaska), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BELLA (1879)       It was 10:30 in the morning December 5, 1879 when the American schooner Bella missed stays in a westerly storm and stranded at the north entrance to Oumnak Island.  The crew of 5 made it ashore but the Bella, valued at $4,000 broke up on the beach beyond repair.

Mapping and Location: Southwestern Alaska   53 22 N 167 50 W

Additional Information: Construction wood, Tonnage 34.83, Age 4 years, Registered San Francisco, ON 3003, Master William Peterson of San Francisco, Owner Alaska Commercial Company of San Francisco, Last Port Ounalaska, Bound for the Aleutian Islands

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed by company agent A Greenbaum at San Francisco Collection District December 6, 1880

 

BELLE (1930)     Otto Rosenblad of Ketchikan was alone aboard the gas screw Belle, December 8, 1930, when an engine malfunction caused her to sink.  He had delivered a load of lumber to Ice House Cove and was on a return trip to Ketchikan.  At 6 or 7 in the evening the vessel was abreast of Spire Island between Mountain Point and Bold Island.  The following is an excerpt from a wreck report filed by Rosenblad:

“I heard a heavy noise in the engine.  I looked down at once just in time to see the fly wheel come off and crash through the starboard side of the boat, causing a big hole below the water line.  I had no time to save any of my personal effects.  I dumped the skiff into the water and got away.  I rowed into Ketchikan, a distance of about eight miles and arrived about eleven o’clock P.M.”

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 16 10 N 131 30 W

Comment: This vessel may have been named the Bell E.

Additional Information: Construction wood, Tonnage 8 Gross 7 Net, Built 1904, Registration Ketchikan, ON 201507, Owner Mrs Mary A Charles of Ketchikan, Vessel value $2,000, Cargo none, Insurance $1,500

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed at Ketchikan December 10, 1930

 

BELLE-TECH (1999)     The 38 foot fiberglass salmon fishing vessel Belle-Tech grounded and was lost July 19, 1999 on Gilanta Rocks in Dixon Entrance.  Both crewmembers escaped to a small boat and were rescued by the U S Coast Guard cutter Liberty.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 51 N 130 56 30 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: ON 581613

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

BELUGA (1997)     The 17 foot pleasure craft Beluga lost power, stranded on boulder sized rocks and was abandoned May 9, 1997 on Cheval Island, Resurrection Bay.  All four persons on board were rescued by U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 46 N 149 31 W   Chart 16680

Source: Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

BELVEDERE (1919)     The steam whaling bark Belvedere was abandoned on Tuesday September 16, 1919 at 7:45 in the morning by her thirty crew and three passengers.  She had been trapped in the ice twelve miles N.E. of Cape Jinretlen on the coast of Siberia.  The Belvedere had departed Nome on August 13, 1919 on a voyage to the Siberian Coast.  The financial loss included the vessel’s value at $100,000 and her cargo of 110 tons of general merchandise, furs, ivory, whalebone, walrus oil and hides worth $90,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by her master, Carl Hansen of Seattle:

“Vessel in heavy NE gale, could not weather the ice on the outside and had to follow a lead on inside, and was prevented from maneuvering the vessel.”  “Tried to get into a lead where the water was smooth so I could handle the vessel, but could not.”  “Gale at seventy miles an hour, blinding snow storm and dark.”  “Steering gear carried away at 9:30 P.M. on September 15, ice closed in rapidly and made it impossible to move vessel.  Abandoned vessel at 7:45 A.M. on Sept. 16, with eight feet of water in hold and the vessel sank at 11: 45 A.M. on September 16, 1919.”  All souls onboard survived.

Mapping and Location: Siberian Coast   67 07 N 173 39 W

Comment: Probably Cape Dzhenretlen WG

            Additional Information: Tonnage 523 Gross 406 Net, Built in 1880, Registration Seattle, ON 3126, Owner Hibbard-Stewart Co & Olof Swenson of Seattle

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report filed at Nome Collection District 31 on October 13, 1919, 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 312

 

BEN B (2001)     The 86 foot fish tender Ben B was consumed by fire and sank July 27, 2001 near Shrubby Island in Snow Passage 30 miles southwest of Wrangell.  The two crewmembers aboard abandoned ship to a life raft.  They were rescued by the fishing vessel Middleton and transferred to the cruise ship Vision of the Seas.  A faulty battery charger was reported to have caused the blaze.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 13 N 132 58 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: ON 251491

Source: U S C G District 17 News Release (July 27, 2001) “Fire consumes fishing boat off Wrangell”

 

BEN JON (1971)     The 25 ton oil screw Ben Jon foundered October 15, 1971 in Kamishak Bay.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 15 N 153 50 W   Chart 16640

Additional Information: Tonnage 25 Gross, Built 1936, ON 503378

Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1974) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1635

 

BENDER BROTHERS (1907)     According to a wreck report filed by her master and owner, C C Lutjens of Alameda, California at the Nome Collection District, the 77 foot American Schooner Bender Brothers stranded on the beach about 50 miles north of Good News Bay and became a total loss.  She had a cargo of about 10 tons of general merchandise and furs at the time of the incident valued at $2,000.  The report indicated all but $500 worth of the cargo was salvaged.  The following are excerpts from that report:

“Heavy southerly gale, thick weather, with very heavy sea.  Very Dark.”  “Lying about 5 miles offshore with one heavy anchor out; chain parted; put out light anchor, which dragged ashore.”  “Stranded during high tide, caused by heavy southerly wind.  Employed natives and crew one month in endeavors to float vessel without success.  On account of approaching winter had to abandon vessel, considered getting her off impossible.”  “On beach about 50 miles north of Good News Bay in Lat 59 54 26 (Kuskokwim Bay, Alaska)”.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   59 54 26 N 162 25 W

Comment: H W McCurdy Pg 137 has this vessel wrecked on October 25, 1907 at Unalaska and then on Pg 230 almost totally destroyed by fire on December 1, 1913 in Seattle. WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 80 Net, Length 77.5, Breadth 24.8, Depth 6.8, Built 1889 San Francisco, ON 3429, Passengers 4, Crew 5, Vessel Value $4,500, Vessel Insurance $2,500

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report of October 8, 1907, 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pgs 137 & 230

 

BERG NO. 1 (1925)     The barge Berg No. 1 was wrecked at Cape Saint Elias in 1925 and became a total loss.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 54 N 144 36 W   Chart 16016

Comment: This is probably the 1935 wreck of the same name same place.  WG

Source: The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 368

 

BERG NO. 1 (1935)     The 42 ton 50 foot wooden scow Berg No 1 foundered off Cape Saint Elias May 2, 1935.  No one was aboard the scow and no lives were lost.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 54 N 144 36 W   Chart 16016

Comment: Probably same as 1925 wreck at the same location with the same name. WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 42 Gross and Net, Length 50, Breadth 24.1, Depth 4.1, Built 1932 at Seattle WA, Owner Berg Shipbuilding Company, Registered Seattle, ON 171521

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1935) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1030, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1934) Pgs 678-9

 

BERING (1966)     The gas screw Bering foundered October 1, 1966 in Nelson Lagoon off of Deer Island.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 55 N 160 50 W   Chart 16363

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BERING SCOUT (1981)     The 65 foot tug Bering Scout foundered in Etolin Strait May 19, 1981 while on a trip to Kipnuk in Kinak Bay.  Lost with the vessel were skipper Mike Bosco (37) of Chefornak, Robert Pruit (28) of Seattle and Robert Wangen (28) of Seattle.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   60 N 165 W   Chart 16006

Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak), 2. The Seattle Daily Times (May 22, 1981) “3 crewmen identified from tug” Pg A 4

 

BERING SEA (1933)     The American gas screw Bering Sea drug anchor and became a total loss at 11:00 a.m. on Thursday February 2, 1933 three miles south of Chomley Sound on Prince of Wales Island.  The two aboard including her master, Richard Thompson of Ketchikan, barely survived the incident, but the Bering Sea, valued at $9,750 was lost.  The following are quotes from the wreck report filed by Thompson:

“Blowing strong southeaster which increased in force to a gale.”  “Anchor cable parted while repairing engine allowing vessel to drift on beach.”  “Engineer and myself took to skiff when about 50 feet off shore.  Skiff swamped and we were washed onto rocks.”

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska 55 17 N 132 04 W

Comment: Now called Cholmondeley Sound. WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 44 Net, Age 16 years, Registration Seattle, ON 215039, Owner Skowl Arm Packing Company, Last Port Ketchikan, Destination Skowl Arm via Ingram Bay, Cargo none, Vessel Insurance $5,000

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report filed at Collection District No 31, Port of Ketchikan on February 6, 1933, 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 425

 

Fishing Vessel Bering Sea March 21, 2003 U S Coast Guard Photo by Cmdr. James Manning, pilot, Air Station Sitka

Fishing Vessel Bering Sea March 21, 2003
U S Coast Guard Photo by Cmdr. James Manning, pilot, Air Station Sitka

BERING SEA (2003)     The 45 foot halibut longline vessel Bering Sea stranded and was lost March 21, 2003 on the northwest coast of Yakobi Island near Cape Bingham.  All three crewmembers and a dog abandoned ship to a life raft and were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter and transported to Juneau.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 05 30 N 136 31 W   Chart 17300

Additional Information: ON 593306

Source: U S C G News Release (March 21, 2003) “Coast Guard saves three after boat grounds”

 

BERLIN (1922)     The wood bark Berlin of 1,416 net tons stranded at Egegik Flats southwest of Naknek at 3:00 p.m. on April 17, 1922 and became a total loss.  The 225 persons aboard were all removed to safety.  There were about 1,400 tons of general cannery supplies aboard valued at $111,000, 75% of which were also lost.  The vessel being “out of position” is listed as the cause.  The steamers Nushagak and San Juan assisted in removing all those aboard.  The steamer Akutan put a tow line on the Berlin but was unable to move the vessel.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 13 N 157 31 W

Additional Information: Tonnage 1,634 Gross 1,416 Net, Age 40 years, Registered Portland Oregon, ON 3223, Master E. Wendt of Portland, Owner F M Warren President of Portland Oregon, Destination Naknek, Vessel Value $25,000, Vessel Insurance $25,000, Cargo Insurance $111,000, Weather light wind

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report filed by agent P A Daly Supt.,  June 17, 1922 at Collection District No 29, Port of Portland, Oregon, 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 330

 

BERNICE (1934)     The 15 ton 44 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Bernice was destroyed by fire July 15, 1934 at the Koggiung Cannery Dock on the Kvichak River in Bristol Bay.  The three crewmen aboard made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 52 N 157 00 15 W   Chart 16323

Additional Information: Tonnage 15 Gross 10 Net, Length 44.3, Breadth 13.2, Depth 3.6, Built 1911 at Astoria OR, Horsepower 70, Owner Libby McNeil & Libby, Registered Seattle, ON 208484

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1935) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1028, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1934) Pgs 236-7

 

BERNICE (1948)     The 14 ton 35 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Bernice was consumed by fire April 3, 1948 at Carroll Inlet near Ketchikan.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 17 N 131 30 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 11 Net, Length 35.1, Breadth 11.9, Depth 4.2, Built 1929 at Ketchikan, Horsepower 70, Owner John Smith, Registered Ketchikan, ON 228802

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1948) Pg 47, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1949) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 909

 

BERNICE (1983)     The fishing vessel Bernice flooded and sank August 24, 1983 approximately 20 miles southeast of Icy Bay and Cape Yakataga.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   60 03 40 N 142 26 W   Chart 16016

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BERTA J (1991)     The 38 foot long line fishing vessel Berta J sank April 28, 1991 south of Yakutat.  Very little evidence of the disaster was ever found.  Two crewmen were lost; John Spears and Mike L’Ami.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 33 N 139 44 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: ON 611957

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Alaska), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BERTHA (1910)     The gas powered schooner Bertha was crushed by ice at 4:00 in the morning on June 7, 1910.  She had recently departed Seward bound for Kotzebue Sound with $3,000 worth of general merchandise weighing 18 tons.  The casualty occurred 22 miles west of Carter.

“Heavy SE wind, foggy, choppy seas, twilight.”  “Tried to back vessel and get clear of ice but it closed in on vessel and we could not get clear of it.”  “Ice closed in around vessel and crushed it.  Vessel drifted ashore on June 20.  Engine was dismantled and shipped to Nome by master.”

The crew of three survived but the cargo and Bertha were a total loss, with the exception of the engine.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   59 17 N 161 56 W

Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 8 Net, Built 1910, Registered Seattle, Master Alexander Allan of Seattle, Owner Bertha Allan of Seattle, Vessel Value $2,000, Vessel Insurance $500, Cargo Insurance none

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report filed July 14, 1910 at sub-port Nome, 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 180

 

BERTHA (1915)     The American steam ship Bertha stranded on a spit at the southern point of Harvester Island at 10 p.m. on July 18, 1915.  On July 30th, still ashore, the vessel caught fire and was completely destroyed.  The crew of 23, captained by Charles Glasscock of Tacoma, Washington, escaped.  The 926 ton Bertha, valued at $40,000, and her 1031.4 ton cargo of lumber and building materials for a Bristol Bay cannery, valued at $11,500 were totally lost.  The cause of the fire was believed to be the ignition of lime in the cargo hold.  Cannery tugs from Uyak Cannery rendered what assistance they could.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 39 N 154 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Construction wood, Age 16 years, Registered at Tacoma Washington, ON 3786, Owner Alaska Coast Company of Tacoma, Vessel Insurance $32,493.50, Cargo Insurance none

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report filed by company secretary E B Rogers of Pacific Wasla Navigation Co. at Tacoma Washington, Collection District No 30, Port of Seattle on September 8, 1915, 2. Safeguard the Gateways of Alaska (1918) map, 3. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 258

 

BERTHA (1916)     The 9 ton 30 foot fishing vessel Bertha foundered in Klag Bay in September of 1916.  The one person aboard at the time of the disaster made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 38 N 136 06 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 30.7, Breadth 10, Depth 4.8, Built 1898 at Portland OR, Registered Juneau, ON 3756

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1918) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 440, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Pg 203

 

BERTHA (1985)     The fishing vessel Bertha capsized without warning and sank April 29, 1985 off of Gore Point.  All four crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessel Wilson.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 12 N 150 57 30 W   Charts 16013, 16680

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BERTIE II (1963)     The 12 ton 36 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Bertie II burned November 19, 1962 at Tenakee Springs.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 46 50 N 135 13 W   Chart 17300

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 9 Net, Length 36.3, Breadth 9.5, Depth 4.2, Built 1918 at Gig Harbor WA, Horsepower 143, SL WE8109, Owner Harold O Kravik Sr., Registered Juneau, ON 216279

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) Pg 68, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 963

 

BERTRAM I (1977)     The Department of Public Safety patrol boat Bertram I drifted without power and sank in heavy seas January 25, 1977 in Portage Bay, 21 miles west of Petersburg.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 N 133 20 W   Chart 17360

Source : BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BESSIE (1926)     It was 11:30 in the morning on Sunday October 24, 1926 when the engine aboard the gas screw Bessie backfired catching the vessel on fire.  There was a strong southeaster blowing and seas were rough three quarters of a mile off of Wards Cove Cannery where the incident occurred.  The crew endeavored to quench the fire with Pyrene extinguishers without result. The Bessie burned to water’s edge and drifted ashore near Wacker City.  The crew of two escaped but the vessel, valued at $7,000 became a total loss.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 24 30 N 131 43 30

Additional Information: Tonnage 8, Age built 1916 rebuilt 1926, Registered at Ketchikan, ON 222297, Master George Baggin of Ketchikan, Owner Charles Snipes of Ketchikan, Vessel Insurance $5,000, Cargo none

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed by Charles Snipes at Ketchikan on October 26, 1926

 

BESSIE M (1935)     The wood hulled gas screw Bessie M caught fire Tuesday July 18, 1935 at 1:30 p.m. while at the float dock at Excursion Inlet.  No one was on board at the time.   The vessel was towed away from the dock and a hole was chopped in her side subsequently sinking the Bessie M and “checking the flames”.  Because of the sinking, her engine and the lower part of the hull were saved.  The cause of the blaze has been attributed to “gas fumes”.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 25 N 135 26 W

Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 10 Net, Built 1920, Registration Juneau, ON 220280, Master Shorty Wilson, Owner Astoria & Puget Sound Canning Co. of Bellingham Washington, Vessel Value $1,000, Cargo none

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed September 27, 1935 by cannery superintendant

 

BESSIE REUTER (1892)     The 31 ton schooner Bessie Reuter is reported to have been lost in 1892 with all hands in Alaskan waters.

Mapping and Location: Unknown Alaskan Waters

Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

BETTLES (1966)     The landing craft Bettles grounded and broke up in 65 mile an hour winds and rough seas November 8, 1966 off of Semisopochnoi Island in the Aleutian Islands.  All crewmembers were rescued by the U S Coast Guard cutter Balsam.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   51 55 N 179 36 E   Chart 16012

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BETTS (1964)     The 12 ton 31 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Betts was reported lost in the Good Friday earthquake of March 27, 1964 at Kodiak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 10 Net, Length 30.9, Breadth 11, Depth 4.4, Built 1946 at Seattle WA, Former Name G P C 18, Horsepower 107, Owner G S Gugel, Registered Juneau, ON 249645

Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 72

 

BETTY (1951)     The 16 ton 43 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Betty struck a reef and was lost October 19, 1951 one mile off the east coast of Bronson Island.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 59 N 132 10 W   Chart 17360

Comment: Most likely Brownson Island.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 16 Gross 11 Net, Length 43.5, Breadth 12.7, Depth 4.2, Built 1920 at Wrangell, Horsepower 143, SL WC4958, Owner E J Wheeler, Registered Wrangell, ON 221017

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1951) Pg 54, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 955

 

BETTY B (1991)     The 37 foot fishing vessel Betty B hit a rock, capsized and was lost June 26, 1991 in Atka Pass near Atka Island.  The vessel was fishing black cod when the disaster occurred.  Lost were skipper Patrick Flanery (36) of Sitka and James Weber (36) of Kodiak.  Todd Burns was the sole survivor.  The same vessel had lost another crewman, Thor Plumlee, in a skiff accident off of Umnak Island in March.  The same skipper had also lost another vessel, the Jessica B, on a reef in December of 1990.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 00 N 175 22 W   Chart 16012

Additional Information: ON 252407

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 3. Anchorage Daily News (July 6, 1991) “As boat sinks, crewmen say goodbye”

 

BETTY J (1956)     The 45 ton 57 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Betty J foundered August 26, 1956 about 6.3 miles southwest of Yakutat.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 33 N 139 44 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: Tonnage 45 Gross 31 Net, Length 57.7, Breadth 14.9, Depth 7.3, Built 1927 at Seattle WA, Former Name Thomas J, Horsepower 90, SL WB5628, Owner Pacific American Fisheries Inc., Registered Juneau, ON 226369

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 59, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 755

 

BETTY S (1964)     The 12 ton 38 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Betty S foundered in 1964 off of Ketchikan.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 20 30 N 131 38 45 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 10 Net, Length 38.6, Breadth 8.3, Depth 3.6, Built 1925 at Ketchikan, Horsepower 90, SL WC7763, Owner T H Miller, Registered Ketchikan, ON 224922

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 77, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1164

 

BEV ANN (1979)     The oil screw Bev Ann foundered July 24, 1979 in Prince William Sound.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 45 N 147 W   Chart 16700

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BIDARKAS (60) (1799)     One of the worst disasters in Alaskan waters occurred in 1799 when sixty bidarkas were caught in a sudden storm off of Cape Hinchinbrook and 200 men were lost.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 20 N 146 50 W

Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

BIG DIPPER (1960)     The 13 ton wooden oil screw Big Dipper foundered June 29, 1960 in Valdez Arm.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 53 N 146 54 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross, Built 1944, ON 279969

Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 902

 

BIG SEA (1981)     The fishing vessel Big Sea sank while tied to the buoy in Port Etches on January 1, 1981.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 20 N 146 37 W   Chart 16700

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BIG VALLEY (2005)     The 92 foot Opilio crab fishing vessel Big Valley sank January 15, 2005 approximately 78 miles west of Saint Paul Island in the Bering Sea.  An EPIRB signal was picked up at the U S Coast Guard Station in Kodiak at 7:15 a.m. and search and rescue began immediately.  Four hours later a life raft was found with one survivor; Cache Seel (30) of Kodiak.  Subsequent searches and investigations revealed that the other five crewmen of the Big Valley were lost.  They included owner and captain Gary Edwards (46) of Kodiak, Danny Vermeersch of Belgium, Josias Hernandez Luna (48) of Anchorage, Carlos Rivero (30) of Uraguay and Aaron Marrs (27) of Nashville TN.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   57 10 N 170 15 W

Sources: 1. USCG Press Releases (January 2001), 2. Kodiak Daily Mirror (January 18, 2005) “Spokesman of survivor gives details of Big Valley tragedy”

 

BILL (1917)     The 624 ton scow barge Bill foundered and was lost August 6, 1917 at Saint Michael.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   63 29 N 162 02 W

Additional Information: Built 1907, ON 163265

Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 294, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1918) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 441

 

BILL (1964)     The 12 ton 37 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Bill was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Seward.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 06 30 N 149 26 30 W   Chart 16680

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 8 Net, Length 37.5, Breadth 10.2, Depth 5.1, Built 1918 a Seattle WA, Horsepower 97, Owner Pete DeVon, Registered Juneau, ON 216624

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 63, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1164

 

BILLY (1902)     The wood scow Billy drug anchor in a 40 mile an hour storm about midnight on August 13, 1902 and piled up on the rocks becoming a total loss.  The vessel had been left at anchor the day before, three miles north of Point Alava at the southern tip of Revillagigedo Island for fishermen to load salmon into.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 11 30 N 131 11 W

Additional Information: Tonnage 16, Built 1901 at Ballard Washington, Registered Ketchikan, ON 31692, Master J D Stedman, Owner Fidalgo Island Packing Co of Anacortes Washington, Vessel Value $600, Insurance none

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed by J D Stedman on August 16, 1902

 

BILLY B (1996)     The 30 foot fishing vessel Billy B went awash in the surf and sank December 2, 1996 off of Warren Island near Klawock.  Both crewmembers made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 53 N 133 53 W   Chart 17400

Additional Information: ON 254618

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

BINKI (1987)     The 43 foot fishing vessel Binki rolled over and sank July 25, 1987 south of Admiralty Island.  Four crewmembers were rescued by two passing fishing vessels the day after the disaster.  One crewmember was plucked from the water by a United States Coast Guard Helicopter.  Lee Welsh(25) of Del Mar, California was lost.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 40 N 134 20 W   Chart 16016

Sources: 1. The Marietta Daily Journal (July 28, 1987) “Survival suits save 5 fishermen, 1 dies” Pg 2-A, 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BIRD (1999)     The 52 foot sailboat Bird was believed lost November 5, 1999 in Glacier Bay with one person aboard; David Poole of Mt. View, California.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 22 N 136 W   Chart 16700

Source: Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

BIRGIT N (1987)     The 123 foot crab fishing vessel Birgit N grounded and was destroyed March 8, 1987 in Patton Cove on Ulak Island in the Aleutians.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   51 20 45 N 178 57 W   Chart 16012

Comment: Probably the Birgit – N

Additional Information: ON 616323

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BLACK AND BLUE (1994)     The 26 foot longline fishing vessel Black and Blue grounded and was lost June 11, 1994 at Trinity Point northeast of Whittier.  All three crewmembers made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 48 25 N 148 33 20 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: ON AK2309M

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

BLACK CAPE (1964)     The 10 ton 29 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Black Cape was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 on Kodiak Island.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 7 Net, Length 29.6, Breadth 11.1, Depth 4.3, Built 1945 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 110, SL WM5637, Owner Kadiak Fisheries Company, Registered Ketchikan, ON 247636

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 79, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1002

 

BLAZER (1923)     The American gas screw Blazer drifted onto the beach and broke up at 3:00 p.m. on Saturday, March 10, 1923 four miles southwest of Kanatak near Portage Bay on the Alaska Peninsula.  The Blazer and a crew of three left Kodiak on March 6th bound for Kanatak and encountered bad weather near their destination.  A heavy southwest gale sporting winds reported at eighty to ninety miles an hour managed to wash a coil of tow line off of the deck which found its way to the propeller.  The crew attempted to clear the line from the prop but were unable and the “vessel drifted in on beach and broke up.”  The crew survived the wreck.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 34 05 N 156 02 15 W

Additional Information: Tonnage 48 Gross 39 Net, Built 1920, Age 2 years 8 months, Registered Seattle, ON 320452, Master T S Haynes of Aberdeen Washington, Owner C O Swanson of Aberdeen Washington, Vessel Value $11,500, Vessel Insurance $8,500, Cargo none

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed at Seward March 28, 1923 by T S Haynes

 

BLIGH REEF (2002)     The 52 foot seiner Bligh Reef lost her steering and was abandoned in rough seas September 13, 2002 approximately 31 nautical miles southeast of Cordova near the Copper River Delta.  The crew of the fishing vessel Snug Harbor attempted to tow the Bligh Reef but parted the tow line several times in the 15 to 20 foot seas.  Both crewmen of the Bligh Reef abandoned ship to a life raft and were picked up by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter and transported to Cordova.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 25 N 145 W   Chart 16013

Additional Information: ON 961140

Source: U S C G News Release (September 14, 2002) “Two fishermen rescued from life raft in Gulf of Alaska”

 

BLIND FAITH (1978)     The bowpicker Blind Faith was consumed by fire and abandoned May 22, 1978 near Pete Dahl Slough on the Copper River Flats.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 23 N 145 27 W   Chart 16013

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BLUE BIRD (1935)     The gas screw Blue Bird, owned and operated by Joe Barnes of Ketchikan, caught fire and was lost on Wednesday August 21, 1935 at 5:00 p.m. in Cholmondeley Sound.  The crew of four escaped but the Blue Bird, valued at $2,000 was a total loss.  The report filed by Barnes lists a flooded gas tank as the cause of the blaze.  The diesel screw Atlas offered what assistance they could.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 17 N 132 04 W

Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Net, Construction wood, Age 8 years, Registered Ketchikan, Last Port Ketchikan August 17, ON 224982

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed October 8, 1935 at Ketchikan

 

BLUE FIN (2004)     The 42 foot longline fishing vessel Blue Fin capsized and was lost October 31, 2004 two miles south of Bold Island near Ketchikan.  Both of the occupants of the Blue Fin were rescued from the overturned hull wearing only life jackets.  The Hall Point was the Good Samaritan Vessel who pulled the two crewmembers from the water.  The Hall Point fouled their propeller with a line from the Blue Fin and required a tow to Ketchikan from the Coast Guard vessel that responded from the Ketchikan Station.  The Blue Fin was believed to have sunk in 600 feet of water.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 15 N 131 25 W   Chart 17420

Sources: 1. U S C G News Release (November 1, 2004) “Coast Guard boat crew rescues the rescuer”, 2. A D E C Situation Report (November 12, 2004) “F/V Blue Fin

 

BLUE FIORD (1997)     The 38 foot salmon seiner Blue Fiord flooded and sank when a circulation pump failed August 13, 1997 off of Evans Island in Prince William Sound.  All four crewmembers made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 03 N 148 04 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: ON 559955

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

BLUE FOX (1937)     The 56 ton 60 foot oil screw Blue Fox stranded on the beach at the southeast point of Beaver Bay during a thick snowstorm on Monday, December 13, 1937 at 5:00 in the morning.  She had left Pauloff Harbor on Sanak Island the day before bound for Sand Point with a crew of four, captained by owner Ralph Grosvold of Sand Point.  The following is an accounting by Grosvold from the wreck report he filed February 12, 1938:

“Strong N.W. wind, Snow thick, Heavy S.W swell, Dark.  Flood Tide.”  “After striking the ship filled within a few minutes with seas breaking over her.  Had great difficulty in launching dory and leaving vessel, saving nothing of any personal belongings until two days later.  On the evening of the 17th with a gale of SE the vessel was mashed to bits.  I was relieved at the wheel by the engineer an hour before the striking, who did not steer course set by me causing wreck.”

Grosvold estimated the value of the Blue Fox at $12,000 and had no insurance.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 28 N 160 50 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: Tonnage 56.47 Gross 38 Net, Length 60.4, Breadth 16.6, Depth 17.7, Built 1930 at Seattle WA, Formerly the oil screw Ruth K, Service freight, Registration Seward, ON 229852

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report filed at Sand Point February 12, 1938, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1939) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 511, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1937) Pg 1

 

BLUE OX (1997)     The 32 foot longline fishing vessel Blue Ox foundered August 14, 1997 approximately 60 nautical miles southwest of Homer.  All three crewmembers made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 38 40 N 151 33 W   Chart 16640

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BLUE PACIFIC (1964)     The 16 ton 37 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Blue Pacific was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Seward.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 06 30 N 149 26 30 W   Chart 16680

Additional Information: Tonnage 16 Gross 11 Net, Length 37.5, Breadth 10.9, Depth 5.3, Built 1948 at Anacortes WA, Horsepower 165, SL WE3065, Owner James A Campbell Jr., Registered Juneau, ON 256490

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 85, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1164

 

BLUE PACIFIC (1979)     The 98 foot newly constructed crab fishing vessel Blue Pacific ran aground and was destroyed by wave action August 5, 1979 in Izhut Bay.  There was no loss of life.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 11 N 152 15 W   Chart 16580

Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BLUE SEA (1928)     The 38 ton 56 foot gas screw fishing vessel Blue Sea stranded and was lost at Karluk July 1, 1928.  The three persons aboard made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 34 10 N 154 27 30 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 38Gross 30 Net, Length 55.8, Breadth 14.2, Depth 6, Built 1917 at Shaw Island WA, Horsepower 45, Registered Seattle, ON 215357, Owner Crosby Fisheries

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1930) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 917, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) Pgs 256-7

 

BLUE SEA (1928)     The gas powered boat Blue Sea became a total loss at Saint Michael on July 11, 1928.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   63 29 N 162 02 W

Source: The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 392

 

BLUEBELL (1965)     The 14 ton 35 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Bluebell foundered June 17, 1965 at Whale Pass.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 56 N 152 50 W   Chart 16594

Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 11 Net, Length 35.4, Breadth 10.9, Depth 4.5, Built unknown, Former Names Bluebell (U S L H S) and Institute II (U S Dept. of Interior), Horsepower 110, SL WC6550, Owner Edward Oliver, Registered Ketchikan, ON 255248

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 87, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1979) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2141

 

BLUEBIRD (1987)     The 46 foot fishing vessel Bluebird flooded and sank in a snow storm December 10, 1987 approximately 12 miles southwest of Sitka.  Winds were blowing at 70 miles an hour and seas were at 30 feet.  Jim Blades (33) and his six year old son Clinton were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter in the midst of these impossible conditions.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 135 20 W   Chart 17320

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BLUEBIRD II (1986)     The cabin cruiser Blue Bird II sank May 16, 1986 near Harbor Island 32 miles southwest of Seward.  Two runaway teenage boys from Anchorage were lost with the Bluebird II which they had stolen.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 40 N 149 39 W   Chart 16680

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BLUEFIN (1959)     The 48 foot seiner Bluefin was consumed by fire March 14, 1959 on Station Island in Sumner Strait.  Owner Burt McKay was delivering supplies to a logging camp on Station Island and not aboard at the time of the disaster.  He escaped in a skiff no nearby Vank Island.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 29 35 N 132 46 W   Chart 17360

Source: Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

BLUFF (1929)     The 25 ton wooden scow Bluff was destroyed on the beach at Egavik Village on September 4, 1929 by a heavy northwesterly gale.  “The scow was moored on the beach and the storm came up and was so severe that she was broken up before any assistance could be rendered.”  Alfred J Lomen of Nome was the only crew and he survived the wreck. The Bluff, valued at $2,500, was a total loss.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 02 N 160 55 W

Additional Information: Built 1907, Registration Nome, ON 163588, Owner Nome Lighterage and Commercial Company, Last Port Golovin August 15th, Destination Egavik, Cargo none

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed at Nome on September 10, 1929 by Charles H Milot Assistant Manager of Nome Lighterage and Commercial Company

 

BOB (1910)     The 8 ton 34 foot schooner Bob foundered and became a total loss at Juneau in June of 1910.  The value of the vessel with cargo at the time was $3,000.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 18 15 N 134 24 30 W

Additional Information: Tonnage 8, Length 33.9, Breadth 10.2, Depth 3.9, Built 1895 at Tacoma WA, Registered Juneau, ON 3682

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1911) Pg 410, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

BOBOLINK (1948)     The 16 ton 37 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Bobolink was consumed by fire at Naknek May 31, 1948.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 43 40 N 157 00 45 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 16 Gross 13 Net, Length 37.5, Breadth 12.2, Depth 4.7, Built 1946 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 175, Owner Alaska Packers Association, Registered Juneau, ON 249643

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1949) Pg 62, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1950) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 925

 

BOBBY LEE (1990)     The 32 foot wooden fishing vessel Bobby Lee became disabled in heavy weather and sank January 28, 1990 in Frederick Sound.  Both crewmembers were hoisted off of the vessel by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 50 N 134 25 W   Chart 17360

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BOGDAN (1951)     The 15 ton 39 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Bogdan was lost January 20, 1951 when she blew away from her anchorage and drifted toward Mountain Cape on Nagai Island.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 05 N 160 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: Tonnage 15 Gross 12 Net, Length 39, Breadth 12.5, Depth 3.7, Built 1909 at Seattle WA, Crew 7, Horsepower 70, Owner Andrew I Foster, Registered Ketchikan, ON 206948

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1951) Pg 64, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 955

 

BOHEMIA NO 1 (1905)     The lighter Bohemia No. 1 was lost at Naknek in 1905.  The value with cargo at the time was reported at $10,500.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 43 40 N 157 00 45 W

Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

BOKSETEGORSK (1965)     The Russian motor trawler Boksetegorsk foundered in a gale January 15, 1965 between Saint Matthew Island and the Pribilof Islands.  All 14 crewmembers were lost.  Three more Russian trawlers with approximately 14 crewmembers on each were lost five days later in the same area.  They included the Nahichevan, Sebezh and Sevsk.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   60 24 N 172 42 W   Chart 16006

Comment: May be spelled Boksitogorsk.  WG

Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. Morning Advocate (Baton Rouge LA) (January 22, 1965) “U S is asked to help locate Soviet trawlers” Pg 4 B

 

BOL (1930)     The wooden gas screw Bol ran up on Strawberry Bar at dusk on September 8, 1930 and became a total loss.  Ole Peterson, master of the vessel, and his one crewman made it to shore in a skiff.  A strong breeze and heavy ground swell thwarted their effort to get the Bol off of the sand bar.  They were on a trip from Cordova to the Bering River when the casualty took place.  Estimated value of the vessel was $6,500 with no cargo on board.  Peterson reported that he misjudged the channel crossing the bar.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 24 N 146 03 W

Additional Information: Tonnage 25 Gross 17 Net, Age 16 years, Registered Seattle and Seward, ON 212204, Owner Shepard Point Packing of Seattle, Last Port Cordova September 8, 1930

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report

 

BOLCOM NO. 8 (1924)     The 63 ton barge Bolcom No. 8 became a total loss in 1924 after stranding at Bluff Point.

Mapping and Location: Unknown (too many Bluff Points)

Additional Information: Tonnage 63, Built 1911 at Seattle WA, ON 164611

Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 888

 

BONANZA (1905)     It was Wednesday 7:00 p.m. August 23, 1905 when the wood schooner Bonanza was crushed by ice at King Point in the Arctic Ocean. She was reported to have been beached at Herschel Island by her master, William Mogg of San Francisco.  She departed San Francisco March 30, 1903 bound for whaling and trading.  The value of her cargo at the time of the tragedy was $8,000 worth of ship stores and whaling gear.  The value of the Bonanza at the time of her loss was reported at $6,000.  The crew of 23 all survived. The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by Mogg December 7, 1905:

“Strong southerly wind, clear.”  “Caught in ice pack.”  “Crushed by ice.”  “Leaking so badly, had to beach vessel and was there jammed by ice.”

Mapping and Location: Northern Yukon Territory  69 65 N 138 55 W

Additional Information: Tonnage 152.4, Length 102, Breadth 27.2, Depth 8.7, Built 1875 in San Francisco, Registered San Francisco, ON 2967, Owner Pacific Trading Company of San Francisco

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report Alaska Collection District, 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pgs 115&116

 

BONANZA (1960)     The 38 ton 52 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Bonanza stranded and was lost September 29, 1960.  She struck a reef and sank at Nagai Rock near Chirikof Island.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 49 30 N 155 46 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 38 Gross 26 Net, Length 52.4, Breadth 14.9, Depth 7.8, Built 1924 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 75, SL WC2471, Owner Kaaro Dahlberg, Registered Seattle, ON 223625

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) Pg 73, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1961) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 860

 

BONITA (1937)     It was early in the morning on Sunday August 8, 1937 when an explosion rocked the gas powered fishing vessel Bonita while she was being unloaded at the dock at Chignik.  The following is from the wreck report filed by her captain F R Deveau:

“On the morning of August 8, 1937, at Chignik, Alaska, while unloading fish for the Alaska Packers Association Company, an explosion took place in the engine room, causing fire of such proportions that we were unable to bring it under control, which caused the vessel to sink about three miles off shore in Chignik Bay about 8:00 A.M. the same day.”

Cannery personel helped tow the vessel away from the dock and furnished medical aid to one of the Bonita’s crew that was injured.  The Bonita was valued at $5,000 at the time of the accident.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 18 N 158 24 W

Additional Information: Tonnage 27 Gross 19 Net, Built 1906, Construction wood, Registered Seward, ON 203405, F R Deveau Sr of Seattle, Crew of 5, Insurance none

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed at Seward October 8, 1937

 

BONNIE GALE (1998)     The 33 foot salmon gillnet fishing vessel Bonnie Gale flooded and sank in heavy weather May 18, 1998 at the mouth of the Copper River.  The only person on board made it to safety in the 60 knot winds.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 25 N 145 W   Chart 16013

Comment: The 30 foot salmon seiner Christopher A was also lost nearby in the same storm.  WG

Additional Information: ON AK8965F

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

BONNIE JEAN (1922)     The 11 ton 36 foot gas screw Bonnie Jean foundered in Scow Bay November 15, 1922.  No one was aboard at the time of the loss.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 46 20 N 132 57 50 W   Chart 17375

Comment: I have charted this wreck at the Scow Bay near Petersburg, but it could have been the Scow Bay SE of Goddard.  Further research is warranted.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 8 Net, Length 36, Breadth 10.2, Depth 4, Service passenger, Crew 1, IHP 20, Built 1910 at Seattle WA, Registered Port Townsend WA, ON 207863

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1927) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 861, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1922) Pg 201

 

BON SU MAR (1988)     The 90 foot steel hulled trawler Bon Su Mar was lost December 22, 1988 off of Saint Paul Island.  The crew was rescued by the fishing vessel Amber Dawn.  The following is a statement made by Jim Durda, one of the survivors:

“I was one of the survivors of the Bon Su Mar.  I remember running down the port side of the boat to jump into the raft.  It was not a nice night but the Amber Dawn didn’t let us down.   It was blowing 60 plus and very dark; we were in the raft for about two hours but it seemed like forever waiting for them to find us.”

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   57 10 N 170 15 W   Chart 16011

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. Crewmember Interview WG

 

BOOMER (1949)     The 8 ton 35 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Boomer burned near Cape Georgiana August 26, 1949.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 19 45 N 135 51 30 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 5 Net, Length 30.6, Breadth 9.2, Depth 4, Built 1920 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 110, Owner William T Johnson, Registered Juneau

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1949) Pg 64, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1950) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 925

 

BORNEO (1819)     The 233 ton fur trading ship Borneo was wrecked in a gale near Cape Muzon January 28, 1819.  She had left Boston December 3, 1817.  Her officers and crew were taken aboard the ship Volunteer after escaping local natives.  The ship and her entire cargo of furs were lost.  The survivors were taken to the Sandwich Islands.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 39 50 N 132 41 30 W    

Sources: 1. History of the Northwest Coast (1886) Pg 340, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

BORNEO MARU (1942)     The 5,863 ton Japanese cargo ship Borneo Maru was attacked by U S Army aircraft, stranded and was lost October 5, 1942 at the head of Gertrude Cove on Kiska Island.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   51 56 N 177 26 45 W   Charts 16012, 16441

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BOTTOM LINE (1984)     The 98 foot trawler Bottom Line sank November 13, 1984 approximately 50 miles south of Cape Chiniak toward the south end of Kodiak Island.  Her five crewmembers went into the water in survival suits and were rescued by three Polish fishing vessels.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 37 N 152 10 W   Chart 16580

Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 3. Oregonian (November 14, 1984) “Fishermen rescue five” Pg B3

 

BOUSSOLE (yawl) (1786)     The French explorer LaPerouse led a scientific expedition of the two frigates, Boussole and Astrolabe, and lost a small yawl at the mouth of Lituya Bay July 11, 1786.  The vessels had departed Brest, France August 1, 1785 on a scientific circumnavigation of the globe.  11 men perished in the accident.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 36 45 N 137 39 30 W

Source:  Shipwrecks and Disasters at Sea (1856)

 

BOWHEAD (1884)     The 533 ton steam whaling bark Bowhead was lost on August 11, 1884 at Blossom Shoals near Icy Cape.  She had departed San Francisco December 16, 1883 bound for a whaling voyage in the Arctic.  The crew had made the Bowhead fast to ground ice to clean her boilers when she was struck and holed by a piece of drifting ice. She sank quickly.  The crew was rescued by the vessels Narwhal and Balaena nearby.  Some of the cargo of whale oil, bone and whaling station supplies was salvaged but the Bowhead, said to be worth more than $100,000, was lost.

Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   70 23 N 161 57 W

Sources: 1. U S Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914 Microcopy 641 (1966), 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

BOWHEAD (1900)     The American schooner Bowhead stranded on the beach at the entrance to the Sinrock River, 20 miles west of Nome, on Friday October 5, 1900 at 4:00 in the morning and was lost.  The 50 ton cargo of lumber and coal was salvaged by her crew of seven who survived the incident.  In the wreck report filed at the Puget Sound Collection District by her master O S Everson, the watch failed to report the breakers brought on by the strong southeasterly wind which precipitated the casualty.  The 99 ton Bowhead was valued at $6,000.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 35 N 166 15 W

Comment: Probably Sinuk River. WG

Additional Information: Construction wood, Registration Seattle, ON 3536, Age 10 years, Owners Wheeler & Co and George Morrile of Seattle, Last Port Seattle August 29, 1900, Bound for Nome, Cargo value $800, Insurance none, Length 90.4, Breadth 22.3, Depth 10.8, Built North Bend Oregon 1891

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed at Seattle January 23, 1902 by Everson

 

BRAMIN (1851)     The 245 ton whaling bark Bramin was lost September 25, 1851 about 100 miles from East Cape while on a whaling voyage in the Arctic.  The Bramin had suffered a collision with the whaling bark Adeline during a heavy northeasterly snowstorm and sustained a crippling blow.  The following are excerpts from an accounting given in a letter by her first officer Gilbert Baden published in 1852:

“On the 7th of Sept., the Bramin was driven on the south-west shore of the Arctic Ocean in a gale of wind, about 100 miles from East Cape.  On the 25th, at 3 o’clock, A.M., while lying too in a gale under close reefed main and mizzen top-sails, wind from the North heading East North-East, the weather being thick with snow.”  “We saw a ship on our lee bow under a heavy press of canvass standing directly for us, and before the wheel could be put up or other precautions taken, she came into us with a heavy crash, carrying away starboard anchor, ship’s head and head-frame, foretop gallant and royal masts, jib, flying jibs and booms, all head stays, martingale, shrouds and gear belonging to the bowsprit, and rendering it useless….leaving us in a leaky and unmanageable condition.”  “We wore ship and made what sail we could.  It was so thick we could see no land.  We saw the ship that had run into us at anchor, proving to be the Adeline, of New Bedford.  She was in a bad or even a worse condition than ourselves.”  “…on the morning of the 27th, the fog clearing, we found ourselves close upon a lee shore three or four miles from land in an open bay, the gale increasing.  We found we could not head out on either tack, and were drifting fast upon the breakers which were mast-head high.  We concluded to stand along as near the other ship as we could, let go our anchors and stand our chance with the rest.”  “….when the ship gave an uncommonly heavy plunge, and parted the chain, and with it destroyed our last and only hope of saving the ship, it being time to look out for ourselves. We got the boats ready, all hands got into them, and with much danger shoved off from the ship, being close by the breakers.  We dared not stop to get a second suit, but were glad to escape with our lives.  After much toil and trouble we arrived on board the Adeline

The estimated value of the Bramin and her cargo of whale oil and bone was $20,000

Mapping and Location: Siberia

Sources: 1. New Bedford Mercury / New York Times (January 20, 1853), 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

BRANDY (1991)     The 34 foot fishing vessel Brandy was consumed by fire and sank August 10, 1991 at Anchor Point.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 46 45 N 151 49 50 W   Chart 16640

Additional Information: ON 627150

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

BRANT (1961)     The 44 foot diesel fishing vessel Brant was lost with all hands November 1, 1961 off of the north coast of Kodiak Island.  The vessel was traveling from Larsen Bay to Port Bailey when she disappeared.  Three crewmembers lost with the Brant were skipper Henry Brusco of Rainier OR, Jack Hauten of Rainier OR and Tom Curren of Kodiak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 40 15 N 154 11 45 W   Charts 16580, 16598

Comment: I have charted this wreck at Wolcott Reef near Rocky Point as it is a frequent wreck site and on the Brant’s line of travel.  WG

Source: Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

BREMERTON (1963)     The gas screw Bremerton burned September 27, 1963 in Kasaan Bay.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 24 N 132 06 W   Chart 17420

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BRISTOL (1902)     The 1274 ton British steamer Bristol was lost on January 2, 1902 along with 7 of her crew of 28.  She was on a voyage from Ladysmith, Vancouver Island to the Treadwell Mines in Alaska when she stranded on a reef at 11:00 p.m. off Grey Island, N Dundas Island in Chatham Sound.  The Bristol was laden with coal and struggling in a southeasterly gale when the stranding occurred.  At 7:00 the following morning, the Bristol slipped off of the reef and sank in 34 fathoms of water.  Her master, James McIntyre, her pilot, her chief and her 3rd engineer along with three other crew members were drowned.

Mapping and Location: British Columbia   54 40 N 13 130 44 W

Comment: I have seen this wreck marked in a captain’s log from the period well north of the reported location near Grey Island. WG

Sources: 1. The Annual Report of Canada Department of Marine and Fisheries (1903) Pg 75, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

BRISTOL (1977)     The fishing vessel Bristol swamped and sank July 25, 1977 on Long Sands Bar in Nushagak Bay.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 44 N 158 32 W   Chart 16322

Source : BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BRISTOL STORM (1996)     The 117 foot crab fishing vessel Bristol Storm flooded and sank November 4, 1996 in 38 fathoms of water northwest of Port Moller.  All 6 crewmembers were rescued.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 50 N 162 34 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: ON 270392

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BRITTANY KAYE (2003)     The 29 foot herring gillnetter Brittany Kaye struck a rock and sank April 29, 2003 in Kulukak Bay, 60 miles southeast of Togiak.  Both crewmembers made it to safety.  At last report this vessel was sitting on the mud at low tide but was not refloatable.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 49 N 159 44 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: ON 613865

Source: U S C G Enforcement Report (April 29, 2003)

 

BRIXHAM (1898)     The 530 net ton iron steamer Brixham stranded at the southeast end of Blashke Island, Clarence Strait, near Zarembo Island, at 2:47 a.m. on Thursday October 13, 1898 and became a total loss.  She had departed Seattle October 8, 1898 with 18 passengers, 42 crewmen and a 240 ton cargo of mostly hogs, sheep and cattle, bound for Dyea and Skagway.  The contributing factors listed in the wreck report include a southeast gale, a dark, stormy, rainy night and the vessel overran her distance.  The casualty took place before any danger was realized.  The crew and passengers all landed on Blashke Island and were spared, but the Brixham, valued at $75,000 and her cargo, valued at $12,500, were lost.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 07 N 132 54 W

Additional Information: Tonnage 626.68 Gross, Age 13 years, Registered Boston, ON 3455, Master James Durie of Brooklyn NY, Owner Boston and Alaska Transportation Co of Seattle, Length 183, Breadth 27.1, Depth 21.1, Horsepower 96, Built 1885 at Sunderland England

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed at Seattle by Boston & Alaska Transportation Co secretary October 24, 1898

 

BROWN BEAR (1979)     The 86 foot fishing tender Brown Bear caught fire and sank July 4, 1979

three miles south of Glacier Island in Prince William Sound.  The 5 persons on board were picked up by the Glacier Queen and Lulubell.  The survivors had only 4 life jackets and had been huddled around the 5th person until rescued from the icy waters.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 53 N 147 11 W   Chart 16700

Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Wreck List (2011)

 

BROWNIE (1968)     The gas screw Brownie was consumed by fire August 16, 1968 in Tonki Bay.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 20 N 152 04 W   Chart 16580

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

BRUNVOLL (1928)     The 56 foot wooden diesel halibut schooner Brunvoll disappeared with seven crewmembers on board somewhere southwest of Middleton Island.  She was last seen November 15, 1928.  The gas schooner Imperial with six crewmembers on board went missing in the same severe storm.  Lost with the Brunvoll were skipper and owner Charles Bloomquist of Ketchikan, Jens Peterson, Pete Lindal, Louis Johnson, Magnus Larsen, Fred Lundquist and Elnar Rolfson.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 26 N 146 20 W   Chart 16013

Additional Information: Tonnage 42 Gross 28 Net, Length 56.2, Breadth 15.1, Depth 7.2, Built 1926 at Tacoma WA, HP 75, Registered Ketchikan, ON 226008, Owner C Blomquist

Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. Bellingham Herald (November 26, 1928) “Fears Increasing” Pg 8

 

BUCKEYE (1926)     The American gas screw Buckeye was destroyed by fire while at anchor in Whiskey Cove on the north shore of Pennock Island just south of Ketchikan at 2:30 p.m. January 26, 1926.  The vessel’s master, Glen R Day of Ketchikan heard an explosion found the vessel on fire.  He attempted to douse the flames with fire extinguishers without success.  He was soon assisted by the U S Coast Guard Cutter Cygan and several men from General Petroleum Corporation.  They sank the Buckeye to put out the blaze.  An accident report was filed the following day at Ketchikan by her master.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 19 40 N 131 37 45 W   Chart 17430

Comment: H W McCurdy has this vessel lost in 1920 (Pg 313)

Additional Information: Tonnage 15 Gross 10 Net, Construction wood, Built 1919, Registered Ketchikan, ON 218589, Owner Jane E Angel of Ketchikan, Vessel Value $5,000, Vessel Insurance $3,750, Cargo none

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report

 

BUENA VISTA (1870)     It was June of 1870 when the vessel Buena Vista was lost in the Gulf of Alaska.

Mapping and Location: Unknown

Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

BUFFALO (1918)     It was a very foggy thick dark night May 4, 1918 when George Hogg of Seward, owner operator of the gas powered sloop Buffalo, struck a reef just north of Cape Resurrection and stranded.  Hogg was the only one aboard the vessel having left LaTouch earlier that day laden with about $400 worth of salt fish and barrels.  He managed to float the Buffalo off of the reef and beach her in shallow water.  The vessel, valued at $2,500 to $3,000 became a total loss because of heavy swells, but the engine was saved.  Hogg filed a wreck report at Seward June 28, 1918.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 52 N 149 17 W   Chart 16682

Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 12 Net, Construction wood, Age 7 years 9 months, Registered at Juneau, ON 207949, Last Port LaTouch May 4, Destination Seward

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report

 

BULL MOOSE (1969)     The 47 foot purse seiner Bull Moose capsized and sank July 20, 1969 in Glacier Bay near Point Gustavus, Icy Strait.  David Burns (24) of Studio City CA and Monte Boden (20) of Seattle were lost.  Four other crewmembers were rescued by another fishing vessel.  The Bull Moose was on her way to Bartlett Cove when the disaster took place.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 23 N 135 55 W   Chart 17300

Sources: 1. Seattle Daily Times (July 22, 1969) “Seattle Boat Capsizes; 2 Drown; 4 Safe” Pg 12, 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BULLDOZER (1964)     The 13 ton 33 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Bulldozer was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Valdez.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   61 07 N 146 16 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 9 Net, Length 33.2, Breadth 12, Depth 4.2, Built 1946 at Dayville (Fort Liscum), Horsepower 110, SL WT6171, Owner Andrew S Day Jr., Registered Juneau, ON 254273

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 94, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1002

 

BUSTER (1926)     The American gas screw Buster was destroyed by fire and sank just outside Funter Bay at 11:00 p.m. on Saturday July 17, 1926.  She had just departed Funter Bay with captain T J O’Rourke at the helm and 5 crewmen aboard bound for Icy Strait.  The following is an accounting of the casualty from the wreck report filed at Ketchikan:

“She left the cannery here at about 10:30 PM with her regular crew and brailing or lifting crew aboard to fish traps in Icy Strait.  Engine generating lights gave trouble, and engineer disconnected wiring to endeavor to locate and adjust trouble.  In some way the wires were crossed, creating a spark which ignited gasoline, and fire quickly spread despite the use of pyrenes.  Distress signal brought the Anna Barron and Driva to her assistance.”  “…steam tug Anna Barron pumped water on the vessel.  The M.S. Driva also stood by, and assisted in towing her into a dolphin in Funter Bay.  The line burned out, and she drifted into the Bay.  Burned all night and sank in deep water about 6:30 a.m. July 18, 1926.”

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 14 15 N 134 55 W   Chart 17300

Additional Information: Construction wood, Tonnage 31 Gross 10 Net,  Built 1889, Registration Ketchikan, ON 14481, Owner Sunny Point Packing Company of Seattle, Vessel Value $6,000, Cargo none, Vessel Insurance $4,000, Weather light wind calm sea

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed August 21, 1926 by W N Williams superintendant of Funter Bay Cannery agent for Sunny Point Packing Company

 

BUSY BEE (1938)     Richard Young, owner and master of the vessel Busy Bee, and three crew narrowly escaped with their lives while fishing July 13, 1938.  The crew of four had left Todd on Tuesday, July 12, 1938 on a fishing trip.  The following day, after catching 10 to 12 tons of fish, the overloaded Busy Bee foundered inside Kelp Bay as they were leaving.  There was no wind and seas were calm but the vessel filled too quickly to do anything.  Assistance was rendered by the gas screw Redoubt who helped the crew get away from the wreck.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   Chart 17320

Additional Information: Construction wood, Tonnage 9 Gross 8  Net, Age 19 years, Registered Juneau, ON 219170, Vessel Value $3,500, Cargo Value $180, Insurance none

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed at Sitka by Young December 7, 1938

 

BUZZARD (1990)     The 25 foot fishing vessel Buzzard sank April 29, 1990 off of Naked Island.  All three crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessel Breaker.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 40 N 147 25 W   Chart 16700

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

BYDARKY (1916)     The coal barge Bydarky was blown ashore in a storm while anchored at Bluff Point Coal Mine in Cook Inlet at 2:00 p.m. on September 4, 1916.  The barge, valued at $2,500 and her 90 ton partial load of coal valued at $750 were lost when both anchors drug free and the Bydarky stranded a mile in from her anchorage.  Built as a gas boat in 1910, the vessel was converted to a coal barge in 1914 with her engine taken out and house torn down.  The wreck report was filed by her owner I A Herbert of Seldovia.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 40 N 151 41 W   Chart 16645

Additional Information: Tonnage 53 Gross 36 Net, Built 1910, Registered at Juneau, ON 207690, Master George Rose, Towed by SS Tyonic

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report

 

BYZANTIUM (1871)     The 179 ton brig Byzantium was lost October 19, 1871 after striking a reef in Weynton Passage in Johnstone Strait.  The vessel was on a whaling cruise to the north with captain Thomas Welcome Roys at the helm.  She slipped off of the reef and sank in 60 fathoms of water.

Mapping and Location: British Columbia   Canadian Chart 3546

Sources: 1. Lewis and Dreyden Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1961) Pg 199, 2. Wikipedia.org “History of whaling”

 

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