Alaska Shipwrecks (L)

ABBREVIATIONS:  AluminumALBritish ColumbiaBCCentralCFiberglassFRPFishing VesselFVIndicated Horse PowerIHPLongliner-LLMotor VesselMVNorthNOfficial NumberONRevenue Cutter ServiceRCSSchoonerSchSignal LettersSLSouth CentralSCSoutheastSESouthwestSWSteel oil screwSOSSteam ShipSSUnknownUUnited States ArmyUSAUnited States Coast GuardUSCGUnited States NavyUSNWestcentralWCWood gas screwWGSWood oil screwWOS

L J PERRY (1904)     The 41 ton 77 foot wooden steamer L J Perry was blown onto the beach and lost at 10:30 a.m. Sunday October 23, 1904.  The vessel had departed “Catella” October 16, 1904 with five crewmen aboard bound for Kayak.  Their cargo consisted of 21 tons of general merchandise worth $2,000.  The following are statements made by T D Corlew of “Catella”, owner and master of the L J Perry:

“Blown on beach on Kayak Island.”  “Wind blowing from 60 to 80 miles an hour, daylight.”  “Put out third anchor and run ahead full speed for 6 hours before striking the beach.  Nothing broke.”  “All boats in harbor came ashore as the Perry did.  Nothing could live in it.  There was no possible show to save her from going ashore as I had out 3 anchors and no ropes or chains broke and she could not steam against the wind if I had have cut the anchor lines.”

Corlew lists the value of the L J Perry at $1,500, a total loss with no insurance on the vessel.  Much of the cargo was salvaged, and the $800 worth that was lost was insured.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 59 45 N 144 22 10 W   Chart 16723

Comment: From Katalla to Kayak both villages now abandoned.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 41, Length 77, Breadth 16.6, Depth 5.1, Built 1875 Port Gamble WA, Registered Valdez, ON 140117

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed November 1, 1904

 

LA CONTE (1998)     The 77 foot wooden longline fishing vessel La Conte broke a plank in rough weather and sank January 30, 1998 approximately 60 nautical miles west of Cape Spencer.  Two of the five crewmembers aboard lost their lives including captain Mark Morley and crewman Dave Hanlon.  The other three crewmembers were rescued by U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 12 45 N 136 39 30 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: Tonnage 66 Gross 55 Net, Length 77.1, Breadth 16.9, Depth 6.8, CS WA8541, Built 1919, ON 218507

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013), 3. U S C G Maritime Information Exchange “La Conte”

 

LA FRANCE (1955)     The 18 ton 35 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel La France burned September 4, 1955 between Ketchikan and Moira Sound.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 05 N 132 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 18 Gross 12 Net, Length 35.7, Breadth 12.2, Depth 6.3, Built 1950 at Auburn WA, Horsepower 53, Owner Robert S Dowell, Registered Seattle, ON 260057

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) Pg 282, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 743

 

LA PALOMA (2000)     The 28 foot sloop La Paloma flooded and sank April 30, 2000 approximately 50 miles southwest of Yakutat in the Gulf of Alaska.  The only person on board was rescued by the U S Coast Guard cutter Anacapa.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 33 N 139 44 W   Chart 16016

Source: Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LACLABELL (1912)     The 12 ton 41 foot wooden gas screw Laclabell sank at 6:30 a.m. Wednesday June 13, 1912 a mile and a half west of Guard Island.  Joseph Rose, master of the Laclabell states in the wreck report that planks opened up and the vessel sank very quickly.  The conditions at the time were no wind, calm and daylight.  The Laclabell was valued at $2,000 with no cargo and no insurance.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 26 48 N 131 52 45 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 8 Net, Length 41.3, Breadth 11.4, Depth 4.8, Built 1897 Poulsbo WA, Service passenger, Registered Ketchikan, ON 141512, Owner A W Thomas of Ketchikan, Last port Ketchikan June 13, 1912, Destination Ship Island

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed June 13, 1912 at Ketchikan

 

LADDY (1970)     The boat Laddy was lost January 1, 1970 in Esther Passage.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 53 N 147 56 W   Chart 16700

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LADY ANN (1965)     The 13 ton 39 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Lady Ann was caught in the ice,  destroyed and sunk January 3, 1965 near Ketchikan.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 20 30 N 131 38 45 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 9 Net, Length 39.6, Breadth 12.4, Depth 3.8, Built 1928 at Saxman, Former Name Mary J, Horsepower 90, Owner Manuel Macaguiwa, Registered Ketchikan, ON 227811

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 368, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1169

 

LADY ANN (1992)     The 56 foot longline fishing vessel Lady Ann flooded and sank February 22, 1992 at Cape Cleare.  All six crewmembers were rescued.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 47 N 147 54 W   Chart 16013

Additional Information: 554427

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LADY B (2001)     The 17 ton 34 foot troller Lady B sank March 6, 2001 at the Petersburg Dock.  Sometime later the remains of the vessel were towed to deep water and sunk.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 48 10 N 132 58 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: ON 517624

Source: Burwell Alaska Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LADY BEA (1994)     The 32 foot salmon seiner Lady Bea caught fire and was lost July 24, 1994 at Naknek.  One crewmember was also lost.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 43 40 N 157 00 45 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: ON AK3170B

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LADY BLACKIE (2007)     The 90 foot fishing vessel Lady Blackie flooded and sank November 26, 2007 in Wide Bay on the Alaska Peninsula off of the Shelikof Strait.  All four crewmembers and a dog were rescued from a life raft by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter three hours after abandoning ship.  The crew of the Lady Blackie took the EPIRB from the vessel when they abandoned ship, which alerted the Coast Guard, who then responded to their distressed condition.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 22 N 156 11 W   Chart 16013

Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak), 2. U S C G News Release (November 26, 2007) “Coast Guard Rescues Four Men, Dog From Lady Blackie

 

LADY BLUE (1987)     The 90 foot fishing vessel Lady Blue sank January 4, 1987 at Unimak Pass.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 20 N 164 50 W   Chart 16011

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LADY C (1984)     The crab fishing vessel Lady C sank August 21, 1984 at Kennedy Entrance near Perl Island.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 07 N 151 40 W   Chart 16640

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LADY FAME (1979)     The oil screw Lady Fame was destroyed by a storm June 26, 1979 off of the coast near Cordova.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 33 N 145 45 W   Chart 16700

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LADY JOANN (1995)     The 34 foot wooden fishing vessel Lady Joann flooded and sank due to a hull failure August 22, 1995 in Cold Bay.  All three persons on board made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 59 N 162 28 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: ON 287981

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LADY KINDERSLEY (1904)     The Canadian power schooner Lady Kindersley was caught in the ice and crushed off of Point Barrow August 31, 1924.  The vessel was worth $420,000 with cargo.  The crew was rescued by the schooner Boxer.  The Lady Kindersley carried a cargo of machinery and stores for northern outposts.

Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska    71 N 157 W   Chart 16003

Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 357

 

LADY L (2001)     The 80 foot crab fishing vessel Lady L flooded and sank from the stern January 20, 2001 eight miles south of Gore Point.  There were 25 foot seas and a 40 foot swell at the time of the disaster.  All four crewmen were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.  A leaking hatch was the probable cause of the disaster.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 12 N 150 57 30 W   Chart 16013

Additional Information: ON 511617

Source: U S C G News Release (January 20, 2001) “Four men rescued from sinking vessel in Gulf of Alaska”

 

LADY LAUNI (1996)     The 48 foot fishing vessel Lady Launi flooded and sank while under tow July 18, 1996 approximately 100 nautical miles southwest of Kodiak.  There was no one on board at the time of the disaster.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: ON 584174

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LADY LEE (1980)     The 52 foot fishing vessel Lady Lee foundered January 30, 1980 in Kukak Bay  on the west side of the Shelikof Strait.  The crew was rescued by the fishing vessel Sharon W.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 19 N 154 06 W   Chart 16580

Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LADY LOUISE (1990)     The 49 foot wooden salmon troller Lady Louise struck a rock and sank July 14, 1990 at Point Turbot.  A private helicopter rescued the people on board.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 09 45 N 134 48 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: ON 284537, Built 1961

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LADY NOREEN (1985)     The wooden fish tender Lady Noreen was consumed by an electrical fire August 21, 1985 near Cape Chacon southwest of Ketchikan.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 41 30 N 132 00 50 W   Chart 17420

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LADY OF GOOD VOYAGE (1993)     The 86 foot cod fishing trawler Lady Of Good Voyage disappeared with all hands March 8, 1993.  An oil slick, a crushed life ring and an empty life raft were all that was found northwest of Unimak Island.   Lost were skipper Gregory R Schwindt (32) of Bellingham WA, Jeremy (Jay) Scott Hunter (37) of Bellingham WA, Larry J Hoover (29) of Newport OR and Eddie Hoover of Portland OR.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   54 45 N 165 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: ON 597603

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LADY RAE (1948)     The 12 ton 32 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Lady Rae was destroyed by fire May 14, 1948 at the southeast end of Woronkofski Island.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 23 N 132 30 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 9 Net, Length 32.4, Breadth 11.2, Depth 4.2, Built 1948 at Wrangell, Horsepower 110, Owner Herbert J Bradley, Registered Wrangell, ON 254827

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1949) Pg 294, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1004

 

LADY SARAH (1979)     The 86 foot fishing vessel Lady Sarah sank in the Bering Sea near Akutan October 13, 1979.  The crew was picked up by the fishing vessels Sea Wolf and Ocean Leader.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   54 08 05 N 165 46 20 W   Chart 16011

Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LADY SELKET (1994)     The 175 ton 87 foot crab fishing vessel Lady Selket capsized February 6, 1994 approximately 100 miles NNW of Dutch Harbor in the Bering Sea.  A broken circulation pipe caused the vessel to roll over.  The five crewmembers were rescued from a life raft by the fishing vessel Silent Lady.  The derelict hull of the Lady Selket was sunk by the U S Coast Guard Cutter Rush using 600 rounds of 50 caliber ammunition.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 54 N 166 31 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: ON 959092

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Alaska), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LADY SIMPSON (1981)     The crabber/trawler Lady Simpson flooded through her stern ramp and sank September 9, 1981 approximately 72 miles north of Dutch Harbor.  The crew of six abandoned ship and were picked up 28 hours later by a Japanese trawler.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 54 N 166 31 W   Chart 16011

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LAFRANCE (1911)     The steamer LaFrance struck a rock at Twelve Mile Point and was lost in the spring of 1911.  The vessel was traveling from Fairbanks to Dawson.  The LaFrance caught fire and burned soon after.

Mapping and Location: Central Alaska

Source: The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 197

 

LAIDA (1942)     The 58 ton 64 foot wooden oil screw Laida was sunk by enemy action May 6, 1942, 30 miles NE of Port Moller.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 53 N 160 28 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 58 Gross 39 Net, Length 64.5, Breadth 16, Depth 7.1, Built 1913 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 135, Service freight, Owner Pacific American Fisheries, Registered Seattle, ON 210995

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1943) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 755, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1942) Pg 189

 

LAKE BAY (1922)     The 12 ton 50 foot wooden gas screw sealing vessel Lake Bay drifted onto the rocks and was lost June 5, 1922.  Part owner John Cameron drowned in the disaster.  The Lake Bay left Sitka April 17, 1922 bound for the sealing grounds off of Biorka Island with five passengers and three crewmen.  The following are statements made by part owner and master of the Lake Bay, Don Cameron:

“At mouth of Necker Bay, south side.  Strong westerly breeze, high sea.  Stranded on rock, slipped off, sank.”  “Attempted to swim from shore to boat, drowned.”  “The vessel lay at anchor, everyone having gone ashore but one small boy.  This lad neglected to care for the skiff which went adrift.  One of the owners the endeavored to swim out to the boat but the current carried him past.  On seeing this the boy aboard was told to loosen the anchor line and let the boat drift.  This was done but the boat did not drift near enough to the man in the water so a line or life preserver could be thrown to him.  The wind and tide carried her on the rocks from which she later slipped sinking in deep water.”

The Lake Bay was valued at $3,500 with a cargo of only ballast and stores.  She was not insured.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 40 N 135 05 W   Chart 17328

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 10 Net, Built 1916, Registered Wrangell, ON 213804, Owners D Cameron, J Cameron and C Search of Sitka

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed March 20, 1925 at Sitka

 

LAKEWOOD (1932)     An explosion and fire destroyed the 9 ton gas screw Lakewood in Thomas Basin, Ketchikan at 11:00 p.m. February 4, 1932.  W A Rhymes, owner and Master of the vessel was the only one aboard at the time of the disaster and gave the following explanation:

“No wind, calm, starlight.”  “I was reading and smelled gas fumes, looked at tank and discovered leak which I tried to stop with soap until could drain tank, but leak grew bigger and had to leave tank as was becoming overcome by gas.  Gas exploded and threw me on deck.  Took to skiff, vessel burned so rapidly could not extinguish and is a total loss.”  “Several small boats towed vessel out of channel.”

The Lakewood was valued at $1,500 with no cargo and no insurance.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 20 20 N 131 38 30 W   Chart 17430

Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 8 Net, Age 7 years, Registered Ketchikan, ON 213082

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed by Rhymes February 5, 1932 at Ketchikan

 

LANG (1939)     Ernest Nelson of Wrangell was the only one aboard when his boat, the Lang, stranded and was lost at “Passage Point, Fishwater Bay” in Chatham Strait at 5:00 p.m. Monday July 31, 1939.  Nelson had departed Port Alexander July 29, 1929 bound for Sitka.  The 7 ton wooden gas screw Lang was valued at $1,500 and had no insurance.  Nelson attributes the accident to “carelessness on keeping course”.  The conditions at the time were a “medium SE wind, moderately rough seas and cloudy”.  Nelson was picked up by the vessel Nira.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 51N 134 56 W   Chart 17300

Comment: Probably Passage Point outside of Freshwater Bay.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 5 Net, Built 1923, Registered Wrangell, 232315

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed at Wrangell August 25, 1939

 

LANGLEY (1898)     The schooner Langley struck a rock in Chatham Strait and became a total loss in 1878.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 134 32 W   Chart 17320

Comment: Some reports have this wreck in 1898.  WG

Source: Congressional Reports 1878-1879 (1879) “Public Service and Resources of Alaska”

 

LARCH (1963)     The 28 ton 47 foot steel oil screw fishing vessel Larch foundered October 11, 1963 off of Martin Island in the Gulf of Alaska.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 10 N 144 36 W   Chart 16723

Comment: There is another Martin Island just south of Sitka.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 28 Gross 19 Net, Length 47.3, Breadth 14, Depth 5.6, Built 1943 at Omaha NE, Former Name LCM-3-C-30374 (U S N), Horsepower 330, Owner S&R Fisheries, Registered Seattle, ON 256541

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 373, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1170

 

LARISA (1983)     The crab fishing vessel Larisa caught fire and sank May 6, 1983 north of Unimak Island in the Bering Sea.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 45 N 165 W   Chart 16011

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LARK (1950)     The 17 ton 36 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Lark was consumed by fire October 15, 1950, 12 miles off of Yakataga Beach in the Gulf of Alaska.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 04 30 N 142 28 30 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 14 Net, Length 36.3, Breadth 12, Depth 5.1, Built 1946 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 140, SL WA7010, Owner F P Triber, Registered Seattle WA, ON 249600

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) Pg 286, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 744

 

LARRY (1969)     The tug Larry was destroyed by a storm and sank October 31, 1969 near Cape Menshikof.  All four crewmembers were rescued by bush pilot Orin Seybert and taken to Port Heiden.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 31 20 N 157 49 15 W   Chart 16338

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LARSEN BAY NO 2 (1970)     The barge Larsen Bay No 2 foundered and was lost August 14, 1970 at Perryville.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 54 40 N 159 09 W   Chart 16011

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LARSEN BAY NO 3 (1961)     The 61 ton 70 foot wooden scow Larsen Bay No 3 stranded and was lost April 19, 1961 at Swikshak Beach near Kodiak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 61 Gross and Net, Length 70.2, Breadth 24.3, Depth 4.5, Built 1943 at LaConner WA, Owner Alaska Packers Association, Registered Juneau, ON 175769

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) Pg 311, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 903

 

LARSEN BAY NO 7 (1955)     The 49 ton 60 foot wooden scow Larsen Bay No 7 stranded and was lost June 26, 1955 at East Anchor Cove near False Pass.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 41 30 N 163 04 W   Chart 16535

Additional Information: Tonnage 49 Gross and Net, Length 59.9, Breadth 20.3, Depth 4.8, Built 1945 at Blaine WA, Owner Alaska Packers Association, Registered Juneau, ON 176229

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 289, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 756

 

LASSIE (1959)     The 21 ton 42 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Lassie foundered May 9, 1959 near Midway Island in Stephens Passage.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 50 15 N 133 48 45 W   Chart 17300

Additional Information: Tonnage 21 Gross 17 Net, Length 42, Breadth 11.8, Depth 5.5, Built 1946 at Juneau, Horsepower 165, SL WA7023, Owner John E Crowley, Registered Juneau, ON 250514

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 305, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1961) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 861

 

LAST CHANCE (1955)     The 7 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Last Chance burned November 9, 1955 at Anderson Bay.

Mapping and Location: Alaska Unknown

Comment: Multiple Bays named Anderson.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 5 Net, Length 30.8, Breadth 9.5, Depth 3.7, Built 1946 at Cordova, Horsepower 100, Owner John D Durkes, Registered Juneau, ON 251179

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 289, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 756

 

LAUGHING LADY (1952)     The 10 ton 33 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Laughing Lady burned May 10, 1952 at Latouche.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 03 05 N 147 54 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 7 Net, Length 33, Breadth 9.1, Depth 4, Built 1932 at Cordova, Horsepower 85, Owner Carl Blendhelm, Registered Juneau, ON 238491

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 305, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 824

 

LAURA (1924)     The 8 ton wooden fishing vessel Laura stranded on “Walton Rocks, on Black Island” and became a total loss.  Owner and master Ole Sivertsen of Seattle was the only one aboard when the casualty occurred.  The vessel was carrying 4,000 lbs of fresh fish worth $80.  The Laura was valued at $3,000 and was listed as a total loss with cargo.  There was no insurance.  Conditions at the time were “Wind, Gale, S.E., very dark, raining.”  Cause of the wreck was said to be “Light on Black Island was out.”  A small boat came to the assistance of Sivertsen.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 16 15 N 131 36 20 W   Chart 17434

Comments : Probably Waldon Rocks opposite Blank Island.  See wreck same vessel 1930.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 7 Net, Built 1920, Registered Seattle, ON 219923

Source: U S C G Report of Casualty filed January 5, 1925 by Sivertson at Ketchikan

 

LAURA (1930)     The 8 ton wooden fishing vessel Laura broke her anchor cable and drifted ashore at 2 a.m. November 9, 1930 near Grindall Point outside of Kasaan Bay.  Owner and master Ole Sivertson of Ketchikan was the only one aboard at the time.  The vessel was carrying 200 pounds of fresh salmon worth $60.  The following are statements from the casualty report :

“Near Grindall Point, Kasaan Bay, Alaska….Stranding”  “Gale blowing, dark and heavy sea running”  ”Was at anchor and cable broke and vessel drifted ashore.”  “Gale was extremely bad and vessel drifted ashore and broke up.”

The Laura was valued at $2,000 and had no insurance.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 27 10 N 132 09 15 W   Chart 17426

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 7 Net, Built 1920, Registered Seattle, ON 219923

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed November 12, 1930 by Sivertson at Ketchikan

 

LAURA (1942)     The 15 ton 44 foot wooden gas screw tug Laura was destroyed by fire June 22, 1942 at Wood Island.

Mapping and Location: Unknown Alaska

Comment: Probably Woody Island near Kodiak

Additional Information: Tonnage 15 Gross 10 Net, Length 44, Breadth 13.9, Depth 4.8, Built 1913 at Sausalito CA, Service tow, Horsepower 60, Owner Alaska Salmon Company, Registered San Francisco CA, ON 211382

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1943) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 756, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1942) Pg 190

 

LAURA (1986)     The trawler Laura was presumed to have capsized and sank December 19, 1986 near Wide Bay in the Shelikof Strait.  Two crewmembers were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.  High winds and seas cresting at 50 feet were the cause of the disaster.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 22 N 156 11 W   Chart 16013

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LAURA (1987)     The 48 foot fishing vessel Laura sank January 28, 1987 in the Shelikof Strait.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 30 N 155 W   Chart 16013

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LAURA MADSEN (1905)     The 345 ton 140 foot wooden schooner Laura Madsen was trapped in the ice at crushed at anchor at Point Barrow Saturday October 14, 1905.  The vessel departed Wainright Inlet in August of 1905 with Captain Philip H Cook and his Wife along with eight other crewmen.  The Laura Madsen is listed as having a cargo of whalebone, ivory, furs etc worth $1,000.  She had “arrived at Point Barrow August 29, discharged freight as per manifest, was prevented by early ice from getting away, and after six weeks in ice was crushed, becoming wreck.”  Her value at the time was $12,500 of which only $3,000 was insured.  The cargo was fully insured.

Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   71 23 29 N 156 28 30 W   Chart 16003

Additional Information: Tonnage 345 Gross 328 Net, Length 140, Breadth 38, Depth 10, Built 1882 Gardiner OR, Registered San Francisco, ON 140590, Owner Lyman D Foster M.O. of San Francisco

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed by Lyman D Foster January 31, 1906

 

LAURA MAY (1901)     The 234 ton 122 foot three masted wooden schooner Laura May stranded in the Kvishak River in Bristol Bay at 12 midnight Monday August 12, 1901.  The vessel was being towed by the steamer Fram and had a cargo of 800 barrels or 90 tons of salted salmon worth $4,800.  The Laura May had departed San Francisco April 18, 1901 bound for Bristol Bay with a crew of 23.  Peter Johnson of Alameda is listed as master.  The crew escaped to safety and the cargo was salvaged.  The Laura May, valued at $6,000 became a total loss with no insurance.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 N 158 W   Chart 16006

Comment: Long and Lat come from Wreck Report and are probably not correct as this would put the wreck well outside of the river in deep water. WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 234, Length 121.6, Breadth 32.6, Depth 9.5, Built 1876 Coos Bay Oregon, Owner Ferdinand Gee M.O. of Oakland

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed by Peter Johnson, Master October 11, 1901

 

LAURADA (1899)     The 1,256 ton 230 foot iron steamer Laurada sprung a leak and was run ashore in Zapadni Bay, St George Island at 11 a.m. September 28, 1899.  The Laurada left Seattle September 12th bound for Nome with 18 passengers and 46 crewmen.  She was carrying 1,200 tons of assorted cargo including cattle and sheep on deck.  After the vessel stranded, the USCG cutter Corwin rescued the passengers and crew.  The wreck report states that the cargo was a total loss and the Laurada a total wreck.  The vessel was valued at $30,000 with $10,000 worth of insurance.  The cargo was valued at $50,000 with insurance for $40,000.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   56 34 N 169 41 W   Chart 16381

Additional Information: Tonnage 1256, Length 230.1, Breadth 30.2, Depth 17.8, Built Middlesboro England 1864, Registered Seattle, ON 141364, NHP 1,200, Master F M White, Owner Seattle Steamship Company

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed by F M White November 25, 1899 at Puget Sound

 

LAUREL ANN (1951)     The 9 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Laurel Ann burned October 18, 1951 at Ice House.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 46 50 N 152 21 30 W   Chart 16580

Comment: I have charted this wreck at Icehouse Point on Woody Island near Kodiak.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 30.6, Breadth 9.2, Depth 4.8, Built 1945 at Ketchikan, Horsepower 110, SL WA9027, Owner W E Eastham, Registered Ketchikan, ON 247845

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1951) Pg 302, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 957

 

LAUREN ROSE (1999)     The 33 foot aluminum gillnet fishing vessel Lauren Rose was consumed by fire and lost May 28, 1999 on the Copper River Flats.  The only person aboard made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 25 N 145 W   Chart 16013

Comment: This vessel may have burned April 28th.  WG

Additional Information: ON 959236

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LAURIE (1965)     The 12 ton 29 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Laurie was consumed by fire August 15, 1965 at Naknek.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 43 40 N 157 00 45 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 9 Net, Length 29.7, Breadth 11, Depth 4.9, Built 1961 at Bainbridge Island WA, Horsepower 165, SL WR9331, Owner Arctic Maid Fisheries, Registered Seattle, ON 285587

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 375, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1170

 

LAURIE ANN (1964)     The gas screw Laurie Ann burned August 10, 1964 at Cordova.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 33 N 145 45 W   Chart 16700

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LAVELTA LYNN (1984)     The fishing vessel Lavelta Lynn sank August 20, 1984 four miles off of Black Bay southwest of Seward.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 31 N 150 13 W   Chart 16680

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LAWRENCE (1938)     The 370 ton wooden barge Lawrence foundered 15 miles SE of Cape Fairweather Thursday September 22, 1938.  The barge was under tow by the oil screw McCray.  They had departed Cordova September 9th bound for Ketchikan.  The barge had two crewmen and was loaded with 20 tons of cargo consisting of dredging equipment worth $20,000.  C. Dell, master of the McCray reported the following:

“Moderate gale.”  “Left Cordova under tow of Am. Ol. S. McCray.  Weather bound at anchor for several days.  Crossing Gulf of Alaska deck of Barge split wide open, seams of vessel opened up, and vessel foundered.  Crew of barge taken aboard towboat.”  “Coast Guard Vessel Cyane attempted to sink hull of vessel after barge foundered because deemed menace to navigation.  When last seen was drifting toward beach.”

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 48 30 N 137 56 45 W   Chart 16760

Additional Information: Tonnage 370 Gross 325 Net, Built 1913, Registered Seattle, ON 165479, Master Mike Bergman of Seattle, Owner Puget Sound Bridge and Dredging Co of Seattle, Vessel Value $5,000, Insurance unknown

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed at Juneau September 29, 1938 by C Dell

 

LAWRENCE P (1954)     The 22 ton 42 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Lawrence P foundered August 27, 1954, 65 miles west of Yakutat.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 33 N 139 44 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: Tonnage 22 Gross 15 Net, Length 42, Breadth 13, Depth 5.6, Built 1917 at Hydaburg, Horsepower 40, Owner J Barrington, Registered Ketchikan, ON 215505

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) Pg 287, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 744

 

LAZARETTE (1972)     The crab fishing vessel Lazarette flooded in rough weather and sank November 1, 1972 in Peril Strait north of Sitka.  Two crewmembers were lost with the vessel.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 30 N 135 13 W   Chart 17320

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LCT-71 (1943)     The Navy landing craft LCT-71 foundered and sank in heavy weather September 9, 1943 in the Gulf of Alaska south of Kodiak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Source : BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LCT-319 (1943)     The Navy landing craft LCT-319 ran aground in a storm and sank August 27, 1943 in Kiska Harbor.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   51 58 N 177 34 E   Chart 16012

Source : BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LCT-366 (1943)     The Navy landing craft LCT-366 foundered and sank in heavy weather September 9, 1943 in the Gulf of Alaska south of Kodiak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Source : BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LEADER (1955)     The 50 ton 65 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Leader foundered July 21, 1955 in the Bering Sea.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   Unknown

Additional Information: Tonnage 50 Gross 17 Net, Length 65.3, Breadth 18, Depth 6.6, Built 1918 at Oakland CA, Horsepower 110, SL WA7059, Owner Wards Cove Packing Company, Registered Juneau, ON 216128

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) Pg 300, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 802

 

LEADING LADY (1964)     The 57 ton 57 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Leading Lady was reported lost in the Good Friday earthquake of March 27, 1964 at Kodiak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Comment: This vessel was salvaged and sinks again in 1972.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 57 Gross 38 Net, Length 57.8, Breadth 17.1, Depth 7.8, Built 1947 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 115, SL WA7060, Owner John Katelnikoff Jr., Registered Juneau, ON 251872

Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 362

 

LEADING LADY (1972)     The 57 ton 57 foot wooden oil screw crab fishing vessel Leading Lady struck an unknown object and sank June 26, 1972 off of the northeast shore of Montague Island.  The three crewmembers made it to shore in a life raft.  The Leading Lady sank quickly taking 20,000 pounds of tanner crab with her.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 10 N 147 15 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: Tonnage 57 Gross 38 Net, Length 57.8, Breadth 17.1, Depth 7.8, Built 1947 at Seattle WA, ON 251872

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 376, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1974) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1636, 3. Seattle Daily Times (June 28, 1972) “Crew escapes as crab boat sinks off Alaska” Pg 99

 

LEAH (1906)     The 477 ton 139 foot wooden stern wheel steamer Leah struck a sunken rock and sunk at Quail Island in the Yukon River September 10, 1906.  The Leah was in service as an inland passenger vessel and had 199 persons aboard at the time of the casualty.  The following is from the wreck report:

“While proceeding down the Yukon River, 40 miles below Kaltag, the steamer struck a sunken rock or snag, and sunk.  This accident occurred just as the long Arctic winter was commencing and the vessel could not possibly be raised or removed from that position for at least 8 months, being filled with mud and ice bound during that period.  The owners, therefore, regarded her as a total loss as soon as informed of the accident.  There was no loss of life.”

The Leah was valued at $35,000 at the time of the wreck.  She was built in 1898 at St Michael and listed the same as her home port.

Mapping and Location: Central Alaska

Additional Information: Tonnage 477 Gross 295 Net, Length 138.7, Breadth 31, Depth 6.3, IHP 400

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report

 

LEANNE (1962)     The 12 ton 29 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Leanne was consumed by fire August 1, 1962 at Sand Point.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 20 15 N 160 30 W   Chart 16553

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 9 Net, Length 29.8, Breadth 11, Depth 4.7, Built 1962 at Eagledale WA, Horsepower 130, SL WT9304, Owner Peter Pan Seafood, Registered Seattle, ON 288002

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 376, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1170

 

LEE WANG ZIN (1979)     30 Taiwanese crewmembers perished when the 741 foot Japanese ore ship Lee Wang Zin struck a reef and capsized December 25, 1979 in Dixon Entrance.  The vessel later drifted ashore at Kendrick Bay on Prince of Wales Island.  The U S Coast Guard attempted to drag the vessel to deep water and scuttle her, but the tow line broke nine miles south of Forrester Island and the vessel plunged to the bottom in 1,000 feet of water.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 48 N 133 31 W   Chart 16016

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LEGASEA (1998)     The 51 foot herring seiner Legasea broke her boom, rolled over and sank January 3, 1998 in the Eastern Channel near Sitka.  The vessel had a large catch of herring in her nets that sank and caused the disaster.  All five crewmen were able to escape alive.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 01 N 135 20 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: ON 964898

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LEGEND (1989)     The 42 foot fiberglass fishing vessel Legend was found capsized April 30, 1989 in Lower Cook Inlet.  There were no survivors.  Lost were Richard Wiard, Doug Cundiff, Dave Garner and Mike Barney, all from Homer.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 54 30 N 153 07 W   Chart 16013

Additional Information: ON 533286, Built 1971

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LELA MAY (1989)     The fishing vessel Lela May sank June 18, 1989 off of Chilkat Island.  All four crewmembers made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   59 02 N 135 16 W   Chart 17300

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LENA (1912)     Two crewmen were lost December 7, 1912 when the launch Lena was lost between Galena and Jack Bays off of Grassy Island.  The captain was rescued.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 55 20 N 147 37 W   Chart 16707

Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

LENA (1958)     The 22 ton 44 foot wooden scow Lena foundered December 15, 1958 off of Yakutat.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 33 N 139 44 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: Tonnage 22 Gross and Net, Length 44.5, Breadth 16.3, Depth 3.9, Built 1919 at Brinnon WA, Owner Bellingham Canning Company, Registered Juneau, ON 167630

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) Pg 302, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 802

 

LENA F (1957)     The 6 ton 29 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Lena F was consumed by fire November 26, 1957 at Wrangell.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 28 N 132 22 40 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: Tonnage 6 Gross 5 Net, Length 29.1, Breadth 8.8, Depth 3.3, Built 1929 at Bellingham WA, Horsepower 58, Owner Carl T Messinger, Registered Wrangell, ON 232086

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) Pg 302, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 802

 

LENA MAY (1989)     The 40 foot fishing vessel Lena May flooded and was lost in heavy seas October 18, 1989 off of Glacier Point.  All three crewmembers were rescued by another vessel.

Mapping and Location: Alaska Unknown

Comment: Many Glacier Points.  WG

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LEO (1892)     The 155 ton schooner Leo struck a rock and sank in Port Houghton Bay November 27, 1892.  The machinery aboard the Leo, which was salvaged, was from the old Portland steamer Wildwood.  The Leo was eventually taken to the cove on Japonski Island in Sitka Harbor and moored for the final time.  The vessel for a time served as a quarantine station and later as a jail.  The hulk of the Leo remained until WWII construction on Japonski Island covered the remaining exposed ribs of her hull.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 135 22 W   Chart 17327

Additional Information: Owner Sitka Trading Company, Master Captain Whitford, Value $14,000

Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1961) Pg 360

 

LEOTA (1920)     The 36 ton steamer Leota was crushed by the ice of spring breakup May 25, 1920 and broken up.  The vessel was laid up for the winter near Fairbanks on the bank of the river.  The Leota was valued at $1,500 with no insurance.

Mapping and Location: Central Alaska

Additional Information: Tonnage 36 Gross 24 Net, Built 1898, Registered St Michael, ON 141541, Master A J Livingston of Chena, Owners Horton & Nesars of Ft Yukon, Last Port Fairbanks

Source: U S C G Report of Casualty filed by Andrew Livingston November 18, 1921 in Juneau

 

LESCHI (1979)     The fish processing vessel Leschi came to rest in shallow water December 30, 1979 in Shotgun Cove near Whittier, Prince William Sound.  The vessel was a retired side wheel steamer that had been used as a ferry in Washington State.  The Leschi is now popular dive site.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 48 05 N 148 32 30 W   Chart 16700

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LESLIE D (1900)     The 285 ton 112 foot barkentine Leslie D stranded on an unknown shoal and was lost north of Cape Corwin at 11 a.m. Saturday June 23, 1900.  The vessel departed Seattle May 8th bound for Nome with 31 persons aboard including her master, 5 seamen, 1 steward, 1 engineer, 2 carpenters, and 20 passengers.  Included in the passengers was the owner of the Leslie D, Englishman and himself a captain C Jorgensen and four “females”.  The Leslie D was laden with 300 tons of general cargo including lumber, coal and hardware worth $15,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by her master, A Malmiros:

“Moderate wind, daylight.”  “About 18(?) north of Cape Corven, Nunivak Island…Stranding.”  “Slow speed and continual soundings.”  “11 of the crew arrived at St Michael July 7th.  14 are left on the island, 11 men and 3 women.  6 men left Nunivak Island in a boat bound for Nome.”

All persons aboard found safety, but the Leslie D, valued at $8,000 and all of her cargo became a total loss.  Revenue Cutter reports show the Leslie D on a reef of boulders about ¾ of a mile off Nunivak Island near Etolin Harbor.  The same accounting mentions that the Ragnhild took claim to the wreck to attempt salvage of some of the cargo.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   59 55 N 165 35 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 285, Length 112, Breadth 22, Depth 14, Built 1862 Searsport ME, Owner C Jorgensen of San Francisco, Vessel Insurance $1,000, Cargo Insurance unknown

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report by Malmiros July 7, 1900, 2. Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914 Microcopy 641 Roll 8

 

LESNOY (1904)     The 8 ton wooden schooner Lesnoy wrecked at Wosnesenski Island  in the Shumagin Islands at 10:30 p.m. December 27, 1904.  The vessel had departed Pirate Cove December 25, 1904 bound for Pauloff Bay with 2 aboard.  John E Jackson of Pauloff Bay was the master and owner of the vessel and recounted the following in the wreck report:

“Total wreck…NW. end Wossnessiuski Island (Shumagin Island) Alaska…Stranding…NW Gale, being also iced up…Hurricane, dark…Impossible to have been avoided.”  “Would have foundered at sea if had not drifted ashore.”

Mapping and Location  : South Central Alaska   55 11 N 161 22 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 7 Net, Length 35, Breadth 9.8, Depth 3.8, Built 1892 Karluk, Registered Kodiak, ON 141254, Vessel Value $700, Insurance none

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed July 1, 1907

 

LESTER (1920)     The stern wheel steamer Lester was lost at Fairbanks May 21, 1920.

Mapping and Location: Central Alaska

Comment: Leota reported lost same place a few days later.  WG

Source: The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 313

 

LETHA R THOMAS (1900)     The 37 foot wooden steamer Letha R Thomas foundered in rough seas 2.25 miles off of Nome at 6:50 p.m. Saturday September 22, 1900.  The conditions at the time were 95 mile an hour winds, rough seas, dark night and stormy weather.  The Letha R Thomas was “struck by heavy sea and swamped.”  The crew of three was rescued by the steamer Aloha.  The vessel was valued at $5,000 with only ballast aboard and had no insurance.  She was “engaged in towing off Nome.”

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska 64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Net, Length 37, Breadth 10, Depth 5, Built 1900 (New) San Francisco, Registration San Francisco, ON 141646, Master F Supp, Owner Kimball S S Co of San Francisco

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed by President of Kimball Steamship May 22, 1901

 

LETS GO (1991)     The 71 foot trawler Let’s Go flooded and sank September 14, 1991 southwest of Sitka off of Cape Ommaney.  All five crewmembers were rescued from a life raft.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 10 N 134 40 20 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: ON 609344

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LETTIE (1902)      The schooner Lettie was lost at Port Moller April 21, 1902.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 59 30 N 160 34 30 W   Chart 16363

Source: The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 84

 

LETTIE (1919)     The 27 ton wooden schooner Lettie stranded and was lost at 12:15 a.m. Monday August 4, 1919 near Samalga Island.  The vessel departed Atka with A C Goss of Unalaska, owner and master and three other crewmen aboard bound for Unalaska via Unimak.  They were carrying 4 tons of general merchandise and salt codfish worth $600.  The following statements are from the casualty report made by Goss:

“Dense fog and strong tides.  Very light air, moonlight but thick.”  “Careful deck watch.  Master on deck from 8:00  p.m. 3rd, and at wheel when grounded.”  “STRANDED…Samalga Reef S.W. end Samalga Is.”  “Tide falling, brisk breeze sprang up on floodtide.  Heavy sea set in.  Abandoned ship at 4:10 a.m.”

The Lettie was valued at $4,500 and her complete loss was reported as $5,100 with cargo.  The vessel had no insurance but the cargo had an open policy for $600.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 47 N 169 12 W   Chart 16500

Additional Information: Tonnage 27 Net and Gross, Age 10 years, Registered Unalaska, ON 206409

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty at Unalaska August 20, 1919 by Goss

LETTIE (1924)     The 33 ton gas screw Lettie stranded and was lost near Wainwright Inlet at 1:00 p.m. Tuesday September 9, 1924.  The Lettie departed Herschel Island in the Yukon Territory August 25, 1924 with three crewmen bound for Point Barrow.  Her cargo at the time of the disaster was valued at $5,800 and consisted of three tons of furs and general merchandise.  The following are statements from the casualty report her master, James R Crawford:

“Strong northerly breeze, with some swell on the bar; daylight.”  “Stranding…One-half mile N.E. of the mouth of Wainwright Inlet, Alaska, and one-half mile off shore.”  “Got out of the channel and went aground and unable to get vessel off.”  “The master had never entered the channel and he secured Mr. Allen in to pilot the vessel in as he has resided there for many years and has acted as pilot for vessels entering this channel on various occasions.”  “Got out an anchor and tried to pull vessel off, but could not move her.”

Captain Crawford was assisted by A J Allen and five Eskimos in the attempt to free the vessel.  The Lettie, valued at $5,000 became a total loss.  The report states that only $400 worth of the cargo was lost.

Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   70 36 N 160 W   Chart 16003

Additional Information: Tonnage 33 Gross 31 Net, Built 1888, Registered Unalaska, ON 141132, Master James R Crawford of San Francisco, Owner H Liebes and Co of San Francisco, Vessel Insurance $5,000, Cargo Insurance none

Source: U S C G Report of Casualty filed at Nome October 4, 1924 by Crawford

 

LEW-AL (1959)     The 17 ton 36 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Lew-Al stranded and was lost December 16, 1959 in lower Cook Inlet.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 40 N 152 20 W   Chart 16640

Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 10 Net, Length 36.3, Breadth 12.3, Depth 4.9, Built 1947 at Astoria OR, Horsepower 165, SL WC5085, Owner Edwin T Grabowski, Registered Juneau, ON 254927

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 310, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1961) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 861

 

LEWIS MCDONALD (1919)     The 9 ton gas screw Lewis McDonald foundered while at anchor in Red Bay at 11:55 p.m. March 2, 1919.  She had departed Petersburg February 15, 1919 bound for Red Bay on Prince of Wales Island with two aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by owner G D McDonald of Petersburg:

“Cove SW Red Bay, Alaska…High Wind…Dark – snowstorm…wind estimate 60 miles per hour.”  “Vessel at anchor – waves broke in cabin and vessel foundered.”

The Lewis McDonald was valued at $5,500 at the time of the foundering.  The two aboard made it to safety.  The vessel had no cargo and no insurance.  The casualty report lists the loss to the Lewis McDonald as $1,100.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 20 N 133 18 W   Chart 17381

Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 7 Net, Built 1913, Home Port Port Townsend, Registered Juneau, ON 211078, Master T J McBryde of Petersburg

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed at Juneau May 19, 1919

 

LEX (1972)     The fishing vessel Lex was consumed by fire March 8, 1972 near Alligator Island in the Shelikof Strait west of Shuyak Strait.  All four crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessel Rosemary.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 28 30 N 152 47 10 W   Chart 16580

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LIAHONA (1935)     The 40 ton oil screw Liahona stranded and foundered near Red Bluff Bay in Chatham Strait at 4:00 a.m. September 29, 1935.  The vessel departed Ketchikan September 28 bound for sea fisheries with 10 crewmen.  John Hanson, one third owner, was master of the vessel.  Hanson states the following in the casualty report:

“Heavy fog…Baranof Island, Chatham Strait near Red Bluff Bay, Alaska.”  “Dark night, foggy and calm.”  “Ordinary and usual care in navigation…Stranding.”  “Vessel struck in fog causing great leakage, attempted to beach vessel to save her, but vessel foundered.”

The Coast Guard vessel Cyane assisted in the rescue of the crewmen of the Liahona.  The vessel was valued at $20,000 with no cargo aboard.  The loss to the vessel is noted as $4,000 in the report.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 50 30 N 134 42 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: Tonnage 40 Net, Built 1929, Registered Seattle, ON 228492, Owners Dave Daneman 2/3 and John Hansen 1/3, Vessel Insurance estimated at $15,000

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed at Ketchikan October 12, 1935

 

LIBBY (1932)     The 8 ton wooden gas screw Libby broke loose from her moorings in a storm and foundered at 9 a.m. Sunday August 7, 1932 near Ekuk.  No one was aboard at the time.  F Swensson, General Superintendent for owners Libby, McNeill and Libby gave the following accounting in the casualty report:

“Vessel was placed at mooring in Nushagak River outside of Libby, McNeill & Libby Ekuk Cannery August 5, 1932.  A heavy southeast storm came up during the night and vessel broached to on the ebb tide and foundered.”  “On account of heavy wind and sea no assistance could be rendered.”

The Libby was valued at $4,000 with no cargo and was listed as a total loss.  She was insured for $2,000.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 49 N 158 33 30 W   Charts 16006&16322

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 5 Net, Age 21 years, Registered Seattle, ON 208464, Master P J Hansen of Seattle

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed in Seattle September 30, 1932

 

LIBBY 20 (1958)     The 16 ton 35 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Libby 20 burned July 9, 1958 at Bumble Bay, Kodiak Island.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 16 30 N 154 41 30 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 16 Gross 13 Net, Length 35.6, Breadth 12, Depth 4.5, Built 1948 at Anacortes WA, Horsepower 143, SL WC 2070, Owner Libby McNeil & Libby, Registered Ketchikan, ON 255292

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) Pg 304, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 802

 

LIBBY MCNEILL & LIBBY No 1 (1929)     The 11 ton wooden scow Libby, McNeill & Libby No 1 foundered and sank in Dixons Entrance at 2:15 a.m. Saturday September 7, 1929.  The vessel had just departed Kelp Island and was being towed by the tug North Star.  They were bound for George Inlet with no persons or cargo aboard the No 1. Upon entering Dixon Entrance they encountered strong winds and heavy northwesterly weather and the scow, valued at $1,600 was lost.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 52 10 N 131 15 15 W   Chart 17434

Additional Information: Tonnage 11, Built 1913, Registered Ketchikan and Seattle, ON 165419, Owners Libby, McNeil & Libby of Seattle, Master D W Branch of Seattle, Insurance none

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty September 12, 1929 by F Svensson, General Supt.

 

LIBBY MCNEILL & LIBBY No 2 (1935)     The 28 ton scow Libby McNeill & Libby No 2 was driven ashore and broke up at 2:00 a.m. Friday August 2, 1935.  The following are statements from the casualty report filed by F Swenson, General Superintendant for the owners:

“East Foreland, Cook Inlet…Stranding.”  “Heavy southwest gale…40 Southwest wind…Vessel was anchored.”  “Vessel was anchored at Salamato Beach, Cook Inlet, Alaska, awaiting to receive salmon from Salamato salmon trap when gale sprung up and vessel drifted to the beach at East Foreland, stranded and was pounded to pieces by the heavy seas.”

The No 2 was valued at $1,800 at the time of the tragedy and was fully insured.  She had Departed Kenai August 1, 1935 bound for Salamato.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 43 N 151 24 W   Chart 16660

Additional Information: Tonnage 28, Age 23 years, Registered Seattle, ON 164756, Owners Libby McNeil & Libby of Seattle

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty September 4, 1935 at Seattle

 

LIBBY MCNEILL & LIBBY No 9 (1932)     The 14 ton wooden scow Libby McNeill & Libby No 9 was washed ashore in a gale and lost at 6:00 a.m. August 3, 1932 on Salamato Beach in Cook Inlet.  The following are comments from the casualty report filed by F Swanson, General Superintendant for the Owners:

“Salamato Beach, Cook Inlet, Alaska…Stranding.”  “Heavy SW gale…40 Southwest gale heavy sea morning…Vessel was anchored…Mooring broke.”  “Vessel was anchored in vicinity of Salamato salmon fish trap when heavy S.W. gale struck vessel and broke the mooring causing the vessel to go on beach where it was pounded by heavy seas and resulted in total loss.”

The No 9 was valued at $924 at the time of the loss and had no insurance.  Her last port was Kenai with a destination of Salamato.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 37 15 N 151 20 30 W   Chart 16660

Comment: Salamatof Tanaina Indian Village now abandoned.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 14.12 Net, Age 20 years, Registered Seattle, ON 165168, Owner Libby McNeil & Libby of Seattle, Master D W Branch

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty October 25, 1932 filed at Seattle

 

LIBBY MCNEILL & LIBBY II NO 2 (1942)     The 65 ton 65 foot wooden scow Libby McNeill & Libby II No 2 foundered and was lost in Alaskan waters November 16, 1942.

Mapping and Location: Unknown Alaska

Additional Information: Tonnage 65 Gross and Net, Length 65, Breadth 22, Depth 5.3, Built 1933 at Seattle WA, Owner Libby McNeill & Libby, Registered Seattle WA, ON 171581

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1946) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 806, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1945) Pg 414

 

LIBBY MCNEILL & LIBBY III NO 3 (1942)     The 67 ton 65 foot wooden scow Libby McNeill & Libby III No 3 foundered and was lost in Alaskan waters November 16, 1942.

Mapping and Location: Unknown Alaska

Additional Information: Tonnage 67 Gross and Net, Length 64.7, Breadth 22, Depth 5.5, Built 1936 at Seattle WA, Owner Libby McNeill & Libby, Registered Seattle WA, ON 172303

            Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1946) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 806, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1945) Pg 414

 

LIBBY MCNEILL & LIBBY III NO 7 (1942)     The 68 ton 72 foot wooden scow Libby McNeill & Libby III No 7 foundered and was lost in Alaskan waters November 16, 1942.

Mapping and Location: Unknown Alaska

Additional Information: Tonnage 68 Gross and Net, Length 72, Breadth 24, Depth 4.5, Built 1939 at Seattle WA, Owner Libby McNeill & Libby, Registered Seattle WA, ON 174393

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1946) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 806, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1945) Pg 415

 

LIBBY MCNEILL & LIBBY IV NO 1 (1944)     The 49 ton 60 foot wooden scow Libby McNeill & Libby IV No 1 stranded and was lost July 21, 1944 at Dry Bay Bar.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 08 N 138 25 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: Tonnage 49 Gross and Net, Length 60, Breadth 18, Depth 4.6, Built 1940 at Seattle WA, Owner Libby McNeill & Libby, Registered Seattle, ON 174701

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1945) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 776, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1944) Pg 396

 

LIBBY MCNEILL & LIBBY V NO 6 (1944)     The 79 ton 71 foot wooden scow Libby McNeill & Libby V No 6 foundered in 1944.

Mapping and Location: Unknown

Additional Information: Tonnage 79 Gross and Net, Length 71, Breadth 24, Depth 5.3, Built 1936 at Seattle WA, Owner Libby McNeill & Libby, Registered Seattle WA, ON 172289

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1946) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 804, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1945) Pg 415

 

LIBBY MCNEILL & LIBBY VII NO 4 (1942)     The 67 ton 64 foot wooden scow Libby McNeill & Libby VII No 4 foundered and was lost in Alaskan waters November 16, 1942.

Mapping and Location: Unknown Alaska

Additional Information: Tonnage 67 Gross and Net, Length 64.6, Breadth 21.9, Depth 5.6, Built 1931 at Seattle WA, Owner Libby McNeill & Libby, Registered Seattle WA, ON 171258

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1946) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 806, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1945) Pg 415

 

LIBBY MCNEILL & LIBBY VII NO 5 (1940)     The 23 ton 46 foot scow Libby McNeill & Libby VII No 5 foundered August 7, 1940 about 125 miles from Cape Greig in the Bering Sea at 56 25 N 162 06 W.  No one was aboard the scow and no lives were lost.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska 56 25 N 162 06 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 23 Gross and Net, Length 46.7, Breadth 15.7, Depth 3.9, Built 1932 at Seattle WA, Owner Libby McNeill & Libby, Registered Seattle, ON 171478

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1941) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 512, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1939) Pg 380

 

LIBBY MCNEILL & LIBBY IX NO 16 (1950)     The 35 ton 60 foot wooden scow Libby McNeill & Libby IX No 16 was consumed by fire September 15, 1950 at George Inlet.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 20 N 131 30 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 35 Gross and Net, Length 59.9, Breadth 17.9, Depth 3.8, Built 1930 at Seattle WA, Owner Libby McNeill & Libby, Registered Seattle WA, ON 170564

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1951) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 939, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1950) Pg 312

 

LIBBY MCNEILL & LIBBY X NO 2 (1953)     The 34 ton 56 foot wooden scow Libby McNeill & Libby X No 2 foundered September 21, 1953 at Yakutat.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 33 N 139 44 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: Tonnage 34 Gross and Net, Length 56, Breadth 18, Depth 4, Built 1929 at Houghton WA, Owner Yakutat & Southern Railway, Registered Juneau, ON 170227

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) Pg 293, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 802

 

LIBBY NO 9 (1974)     The 60 foot fishing vessel Libby No 9 foundered July 23, 1974 in Veta Bay near Craig.  Five of the six crewmembers were rescued by another fishing vessel. Lost with the Libby No 9 was Clyde Miyasharo of Wahiawa, Hawaii.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 21 N 133 39 W   Chart 17400

Source: The Oregonian (July 25, 1974) “Fisherman dies as boat sinks” Pg 28

 

LIBBY NO 12 (2002)     The 43 foot dive boat Libby No 12 flooded and sank after striking a log May 19, 2002 approximately five miles west of Craig.  The sole occupant of the vessel issued a May-Day and was rescued by the Craig Harbormaster who was first on scene.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 28 30 N 133 09 W   Chart 17400

Additional Information: ON 261726

Source: U S C G Enforcement Report (May 19, 2002)

 

LIBERTY (1956)     The 16 ton 39 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Liberty foundered September 11, 1956 off of the Barrier Islands.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 48 N 132 25 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 16 Gross 13 Net, Length 39.5, Breadth 11.2, Depth 4.7, Built 1911 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 30, Owner Jessie Thompson, Registered Ketchikan, ON 208713

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 294, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 756

 

LIBERTY (1958)     The 66 ton 72 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Liberty was destroyed by a storm May 8, 1958 at Cape Ikolik on Kodiak Island.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 17 15 N 154 47 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 66 Gross 44 Net, Length 72.4, Breadth18.2, Depth 7.6, Built 1913 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 135, SL WA7135, Owner Nora Louise Erikson, Registered Seattle, ON 211597

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 310, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 824

 

LIBERTY (1989)     The 71 foot fishing tender Liberty sank February 15, 1989 approximately three nautical miles off of Cape Barnabas.  The vessel began taking on water in the lazarette and sank in less than 10 minutes.  The crew of four escaped to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   5309 N 152 53 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: ON 625721

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LIEF H (1965)     The fishing vessel Lief H grounded on a shoal and sank November 16, 1965 in Wrangell Narrows near Channel Light 32A.  Lost were owner Livingston Desmond and Newton Cooday.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 31 N 132 55 W   Chart 17360

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LILA (1906)     The sloop Lila was lost in a storm in Dolphin Island Bay in 1906 along with schooners Mary Gray and Olivia.  The vessel was valued at $2,000 at the time of the loss. The three vessels are mistakenly listed on Alaska shipwrecks lists since as early as 1914.  All three were in fact lost off the coast of Alabama in the hurricane that made landfall south of Mobile September 27, 1906.

Mapping and Location: Alabama – Error in Location

Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 128, 2. Washington Historical Quarterly (1916) “Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route” Pgs 21-37, 3. Historic Shipwrecks and Magnetic Anomalies of the Northern Gulf of Mexico (1989) Pg H-17

 

LILA KI (1968)     The gas screw Lila Ki burned August 13, 1968 at Twin Points in Stephens Passage.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 54 45 N 133 59 30 W   Chart 17300

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LILLIE (1907)     The schooner Lillie was wrecked at Unalaska March 30, 1907 and became a total loss.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 52 30 N 166 32 W   Chart 16528

Source: The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pgs 137&294

 

LILLIE (1915)     The 26 ton wooden scow Lillie broke away from her tug in a storm near Cape Darby and stranded at Rocky Point at 3:00 a.m. Saturday September 18, 1915.  The vessel had departed Dime City September 17 bound for Golovin with three crewmen and no cargo aboard.  The crew escaped to safety, but the Lillie, valued at $1,000 was believed to be a total loss.  She had no insurance.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 24 N 163 08 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 26, Age 14 years, Registered Nome, ON 141706, Master E H Pfaffle of Council City, Owner Wallace Porter of Golovin

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed October 7, 1915 by Pfaffle

 

LILLY (1928)     The 10 ton wooden gas screw Lilly caught fire and was lost in Badger Bay at 8:00 a.m. February 29, 1928.  The vessel departed Ketchikan February 23rd with two aboard bound for Boca De Quadra.  According to owner operator Charles F Wilson, Captain George Steele of the gas screw Palmer S loaned him a hammer and cold chisel so he could cut the anchor cable and tow the hull of the Lilly to shore.  The Lilly was valued at $6,500 before she burned.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 08 38 N 130 49 W   Chart 17434

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 8 Net, Built 1919, Registered Seattle, ON 218556

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty by Wilson at Ketchikan March 1, 1928

 

LILLY (1961)     The 18 ton 40 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Lilly was consumed by fire July 4, 1961 at Cordova.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 33 N 145 45 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: Tonnage 18 Gross 12 Net, Length 40.1, Breadth 12, Depth 5.4, Built 1921 at Richmond Beach WA, Horsepower 70, SL WE6946, Owner New England Fish Company, Registered Ketchikan, ON 221163

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) Pg 319, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 904

 

LILY L (1904)     The schooner Lily L was wrecked at East Cape, Siberia September 1, 1904.  The vessel was carrying supplies to Cape Sedge when a severe storm arose on the night of September 1st and the Lily L was driven ashore.

Mapping and Location: Siberia

Sources: 1. Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914 (1966) Roll 10, 2. Nome Semi-Weekly Vol 4 No 99 (September 14, 1904)Lily L Wrecked”

 

LILY MARLENE (1993)     The 37 foot fishing vessel Lily Marlene was consumed by fire and lost August 30, 1993 in Chignik Bay.  All three crewmembers made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 18 N 158 24 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: ON 539824

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LIMIT (1937)     The 50 ton wooden purse seiner Limit disappeared with all hands during the night of September 28-29, 1937.  The following is a statement from the casualty report filed by the owners:

“The Diesel boat Limit with a crew of eight men aboard, disappeared during the night of September 28-29, 1937.  They had been fishing in vicinity of Larch Bay, on the southwesterly side of Baranof Island.  Late in the evening of September 28 they presumably started back toward the Company’s fishing reduction plant at Washington Bay.  So far as any definite information goes, they were never seen again.  A strong, northerly wind was blowing in Chatham Strait and the Limit undoubtedly met this after rounding Cape Ommaney.”

“Careful and persistent search has revealed nothing, except some floating articles such as three hatch covers, side light and screens, identified as belonging to the Limit.  The inevitable conclusion is that the boat sank with all hands so suddenly that the crew did not even have time to cut loose or untie the skiff they carried on the stern.”

Lost in the disaster were Olaf Storfold, Gust Edwardsen, Carl H Carlson, S Birkeland, Ole Saterhaug, John Hansen, Oscar Torheim and Chris Solheim.  The Limit was valued at $9,000 and had an unknown amount of freshly caught herring aboard.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 43 N 134 23 20 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: Tonnage 50 Gross 34 Net, Age 10 years, Registered Seattle, ON 226780, Master Olof Storfold of Seattle, Owners Storfold & Grondahl Packing Co of Seattle, Last Port Washington Bay September 28, 1937, Vessel Insurance $8,000, Cargo Insurance none, Conditions strong northeast wind and dark night

Source: U S C G Casualty Report filed by John W Storfold, President, Storfold & Grondahl Packing on October 14, 1937 in Seattle

 

Web Lin-J 1975

LIN J (1999)     The 96 foot crab fishing vessel Lin J was lost with all hands March 18, 1999 approximately eight miles off of Saint Paul Island in the Bering Sea.  The vessel iced up, capsized and sank in 40 knot winds, ice fog and heavy icing conditions.  Lost were skipper Blake Kinnear (50), Jason Conlon (24), Mark Shane Hill (45), John McKerley (39) and Aaron Miller-Moylan, all from Kodiak.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   57 10 N 170 15 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: ON 538018

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 3. U S Coast Guard Press Release #42-99 (March 18, 1999) “Coast Guard responding to capsized vessel near St. Paul”

 

LINA K (1924)     The 10 ton gas screw Lina K was consumed by fire while out of commission at Aiaktalik Island at 9:00 p.m. November 26, 1924.  No one was aboard at the time of the casualty.  The vessel was owned and operated by Matrona Kaguyak of Aiaktalik and valued at $3,000.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 42 N 154 03 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 7 Net, Age 14 years, Registered Seward, ON 207692, Insurance none

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty December 30, 1924 at Kodiak

 

LINCOLN (1896)     The two masted schooner Lincoln departed Seattle March 7, 1896 with a party of miners bound for Cook Inlet and was never seen again.  A severe storm was reported in the Gulf of Alaska the first week of April by the vessels Bertha and William J Bryant which almost succumbed to the hurricane force weather.  It is presumed that the Lincoln was overcome by the same storm.  There were as many as 37 persons aboard bound for the gold fields of Alaska.  The schooner departed Seattle with the following persons aboard: William Staples, of Seattle who left a wife and five children; J H Goddard, wife and two children, Seattle; C C Ward, wife and one child, River Park; Edson England, single of Seattle; Adolph Anderson, wife and one child, Seattle; Charles Lind, wife and two children, Seattle; Vincent Gallion, single, Newcastle; O B Johnson, single, Seattle; E C Boyles, single, Seattle; A Halvorsen, single, Seattle; Frank Mitchell, single, Seattle; M Cunningham, single, Sunnydale; E R Dunham, single, Sunnydale; C R Harder, single, Seattle; Mr. Kuenzler, single, Seattle; the wife of the cook, Ole Bee, and six children, all of Seattle.  The crew lost with the Lincoln were captain Helmer Newgard, mate John Newgard, crewmen Mathias Olsen and John Olsen and cook Ole Bee.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska Unknown

Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg7, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 3. Seattle Post (May 22, 1897) “Albert Halverson, A Passenger On The Lost Lincoln” Front Page

 

LINCOLN ROCK (1932)     The 9 ton wooden gas screw Lincoln Rock caught fire and was destroyed while at anchor in Wrangell Harbor at 9:00 a.m. Saturday August 20, 1932.  The five crewmen escaped the blaze and got ashore, but the Lincoln Rock, valued at $1,650, became a total loss.  The vessel had no cargo and no insurance.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 28 N 133 23 W   Charts 16382 & 16384

Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 8 Net, Built at Lake Bay 1915, Registered Wrangell, ON 213805, Master John McCullough of Wrangell, Owner Wrangell Packing Corp..

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty August 24, 1932 by W T Hale, Secretary for Owners

 

LINDA (1956)     The 30 foot troller Linda swamped and sank July 30, 1956.  A message in a bottle that was found a year later in the Gulf of Alaska off of Yakutat was the only testimony to the disaster.  Lost was 16 year old Orville Rude who was taking his father’s vessel Linda from Elfin Cove to fish in North Inian Pass.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 17 N 136 22 W   Chart 17300

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LINDA E (1995)     The 45 foot wooden fishing vessel Linda E struck a submerged object believed to be a log April 29, 1995 off of Point Howard, nine nautical miles northwest of Cape Decision.  All four crewmembers donned survival suits and abandoned ship.  They were rescued by the fishing vessel Connie Marie.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 04 10 N 134 13 45 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: ON 253179

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LINDA’S DRAW (1988)     The 47 foot longline fishing vessel Linda’s Draw capsized and sank in a storm April 11, 1988 in Icy Bay.  The crew was rescued by another vessel that filmed the entire event.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 55 N 141 33 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: Tonnage 35 Gross 24 Net, Length 47.4, Breadth 15.3, Depth 6.7, Built 1981, SL WRA5621, ON D642951

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 3. U S C G Maritime Information Exchange “Linda’s Draw”

 

LINEA L (1909)     The 13 ton 37 foot wooden schooner Linea L foundered on the beach at Portage Bay at 7:00 p.m. October 9, 1909.  A strong NE gale was given as the cause of the casualty by master and owner Nels Peterson of Kodiak.  The Linea L had left Kodiak August 6th bound for “Arkerprin Bay” with 3 crewmen on board.  The crew made it to safety and assistance was rendered by the natives at Portage Bay.  The Linea L was a total loss and had a value of $1,500.  There was no cargo and no insurance.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska 57 30 N 156 02 W   Chart 16570 & 16013

Comment: Arkerprin Bay destination probably Agripina Bay just to the SW.  May be the wreck marked on Chart 16013 in Portage Bay on west side beach. WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Net, Built 1907 Kodiak, Length 36.6, Breadth 12.3, Depth 4.0, Registered Kodiak, ON 203934

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report of November 20, 1909 by Nels Peterson

 

LINNET (1929)     The diesel fishing vessel Linnet was lost in Chatham Strait September 28, 1929.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 134 32 W   Chart 17320

Source: The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 403

 

LISA DENISE (1993)     The 31 foot fishing vessel Lisa Denise was destroyed by fire and sank September 7, 1993 at Naked Island in Prince William Sound.  All three crewmembers made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 40 N 147 25 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: ON 609461

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LISA JO (1997)     The 82 foot fishing vessel Lisa Jo grounded, rolled over and sank February 19, 1997 in Akun Bay, Akun Island.  The operator fell asleep precipitating the disaster.  There was only one person aboard and no loss of life.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   54 15 N 165 30 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: ON 511692

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LISTER (1922)     The 21 ton wooden gas screw Lister stranded and was lost at 3:00 a.m. Friday November 17, 1922.  The vessel departed Umnak Island November 16 with four crewmen aboard bound for Unalaska.  According to part owner and master of the Lister, F H Larsen of Unalaska, an incorrect compass put the vessel off course in the dark of night.  The vessel stranded about 10 miles south of “Cape Makushin” on Unalaska Island.  The crew escaped to safety, but the Lister, valued at $4,000 was estimated to be a total loss.  She had no cargo save ballast and no insurance.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 45 30 N 167 01 20 W   Chart 16500

Comment: Probably Makushin Point.  There is a wreck market on Chart 16500 outside of Skan Bay at about the right distance and direction from Makushin Point.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 21 Gross 14 Net, Age 18 years, Registered Unalaska, ON 201174, Owner Henry Swanson of Unalaska

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty December 20, 1922 by Larsen

 

LITHGOW (1924)     The 370 ton river barge Lithgow sprung a leak and filled with water 100 miles off the Yukon River during a strong southerly wind at 2:00 a.m. August 3, 1924.  The barge was being towed by the vessel Meteor and had left St Michael July 30, 1924 bound for Bethel with two crewmen aboard.  The Meteor was able to retrieve the two crewmen and tow the submerged lower hull back to St Michael.  The vessel’s house was washed overboard.  The Lithgow was owned by Waechter Brothers of Seattle and worth $18,000 at the time of the loss.  The reported monetary loss to the Lithgow was also $18,000 of which $15,000 was insured.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   62 32 N 166 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 370, Age 13 Years, Registration St Michael, ON 164599

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty November 14, 1924 by O A Waechter at Seattle

 

LITTLE ANN (1990)     The 90 foot longline halibut fishing vessel Little Ann foundered May 1, 1990 on Portlock Bank 60 miles east of Kodiak.  The Little Ann sank bow first.  All eight persons aboard were rescued by the fishing vessel Sandra Su.  Two of those rescued did not have survival suits and suffered from hypothermia.  The Little Ann’s EPIRB did not work.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: ON 640429

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LITTLE BEAR (1989)     The 90 foot trawler Little Bear flooded and sank March 28, 1989 approximately 25 to 30 miles off of Cape Chiniak near Kodiak.  Her four crewmembers were rescued from a life raft.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 37 N 152 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: ON 585059

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LITTLE GLORY (1937)     The 50 ton wooden gas screw Little Glory ran aground in the dark and foundered in False Pass at 2:30 a.m. August 17, 1937.  The vessel departed Naknek August 14th at 6:00 a.m. bound for King Cove.  There were nine crewmen aboard including master E R Simpson of Seattle and no cargo.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

“Heavy southwest wind, dark night.”  “False Pass, St Catherine’s Cove, Alaska…foundering.”  “Darkness, ran aground…Had no opportunity to salvage because of the pounding of the sea.  P E Marris Co,’s boat Gas Screw Bobby (assisted) but was unable to accomplish anything towards saving the vessel because of her breaking up.”  “I was unable to file a report until reaching Bellingham.”

The Little Glory had a reported value of $5,000 which was a total loss.  She was insured for $4194.13.  All nine crewmen survived.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska 55 01 N 163 30 W   Chart 16535

Additional Information: Tonnage 50 Gross 40 Net, Built 1912, Registered Seattle, ON 209959, Owner Pacific American Fisheries of Bellingham Washington,

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty September 7, 1937 by Simpson at Bellingham

 

LITTLE JOE (1968)     The diesel screw Little Joe was consumed by fire January 18, 1968 at Seal Bay.

Mapping and Location: Alaska   Unknown

Comment: Multiple Seal Bays.  WG

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LIZZIE COLBY (1907)     The 150 ton schooner Lizzie Colby stranded and wrecked June 29, 1907 in Anadyr Bay.  Her value at the time of the loss was $25,000 including cargo.

Mapping and Location: Unknown Alaska or Siberia

Comment: Some reports have this loss in the Gulf of Alaska

Additional Information: Tonnage 150, Built 1882, Crew 10, ON 140580

Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 137, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 3. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 4. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1908) Pg 380

 

LIZZIE S SORENSON (1900)     The 83 ton 84 foot wooden schooner Lizzie S Sorenson ran up on the reef at Killisnoo Monday March 12, 1900.  The vessel departed Seattle and was “fishing off Alaska” with a crew of 15.  Captain Frank Forward of Seattle was at the helm when “wind and rip tides” sent the vessel onto the rocks.  According to the wreck report filed by owner John P Fay of Seattle, the Lizzie S Sorenson was worth $6,000 and her cargo of fish, salt and supplies for fishing worth $2,000.  Fay further states the damage to the vessel was $6,000 and her cargo $2,000.  The vessel was insured for $2,500 and her outfit and cargo for $1,500.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 28 N 134 34 W   Chart 17320

Comment: Vessel refloated and sold, repowered and sinks again May 10, 1919 Southeast Alaska

Additional Information: Tonnage 83, Length 84.2, Breadth 20, Depth 8, Built 1898 Ballard Washington, Registered Seattle, ON 141523

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report January 24, 1901 by John P Fay

 

LIZZIE S SORENSON (1910)     The 76 ton 84 foot wooden gas screw Lizzie S Sorenson was struck by a whale and foundered at 8 p.m. May 10, 1910 in Iphigenia Bay.  The vessel departed Tyee and was cruising for whales with a crew of seven.  The following is an accounting found in the wreck report:

“8 miles SW of Cape Addington (Iphigenia Bay, Alaska).”  “Vessel was engaged in whaling and had harpooned a whale, which in its endeavor to get away, turned and stove a hole in her, on the starboard side.”  “Tried to plug the hole, but without success.  Pumps worked, but would not keep her free.  Gasoline tanks emptied, hoping they would keep her afloat.”  “No assistance rendered.  Vessel’s crew landed in ship’s boat and picked up May 12th by the tug Fearless.”

The Lizzie S Sorenson was valued at $25,000 and became a total loss with no insurance.  A wreck report was filed by William Walker, manager for Alaska for The Tyee Company of San Francisco.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 26 15 N 133 24 15 W   Chart 17400

Comment: Same vessel lost March 12, 1900 at Killisnoo.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 76.1 Gross, Length 84.2, Breadth 20, Depth 8, Built 1898 Ballard Washington, Registered San Francisco, ON 141523, Master A Selness of Seattle, Owners Tyee Co. of San Francisco

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report May 18, 1910

 

LIZZIE WILLIAMS (1889)     The 790 ton 159 foot wooden bark Lizzie Williams struck a shoal and was lost on Tugidak Island at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday April 22, 1889.  The vessel departed San Francisco March 28, 1889 bound for Kodiak Island.  She was carrying 82 passengers, 14 crewmen and a 1,100 ton cannery outfit and supplies worth $57,000.  75 of the passengers were Chinese cannery workers.  The steamers Al-Ki and Elsie aided in the rescue of passengers and crew, all who survived.  The Lizzie Williams, worth $16,000 and her valuable cargo were total losses.  Conditions at the time were a five mile an hour wind, moderate weather, a heavy sea and daylight.  Some of the cargo was recovered.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 30 N 154 40 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 790, Length 159.4, Breadth 33.5, Depth 20.2, Built 1868 Portland ME, Registered San Francisco, ON 15519, Master T G Cushman of San Francisco, Owner Kodiak Packing Co of San Francisco, Vessel Insurance $14,000, Cargo Insurance $56, 195

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed at San Francisco by Cushman July 11, 1889

 

LLOYD (1982)     The 60 foot halibut fishing vessel Lloyd flooded and foundered June 9, 1982 approximately 25 miles south of Seward.  All five crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessels Gjoa and Marathon.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 06 30 N 149 26 30 W   Chart 16680

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LOCKS (1964)     The 43 ton 58 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Locks collided with the vessel Fern and was lost September 13, 1964 at Unalaska.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 52 30 N 166 32 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: Tonnage 43 Gross 29 Net, Length 58.7, Breadth 15.3, Depth 7.1, Built 1917 at Tacoma WA, Former Name Lion, Horsepower 190, SL WA7275, Owner Donald T Cook, Registered Seattle, ON 214731

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 391, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1170

 

LOIS (1924)     The 21 ton gas screw Lois was destroyed by fire in Hoonah Harbor at 9:00 p.m. Wednesday February 20, 1924.  The vessel was at anchor with no one aboard prior to the tragedy.  The following are statements made in the casualty report by George J Beck, master of the vessel:

“Pitt Island, Hoonah Harbor, Alaska.”  “Driven ashore by heavy ice floe coming from head of bay, at 9 o’clock master entered vessel with lantern; explosion and fire followed; vessel total loss; master escaped with burns about head.  Apparently leaky gasoline tank allowing oil to be ignited by lantern.”  “Great assistance rendered by natives after the fire, in raising the hull. Vessels documents destroyed.”

The Lois was valued at $12,000 with no cargo.  The amount of insurance was not known at the time the casualty report was filed.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 07 N 135 27 45 W   Chart 17302

Additional Information: Tonnage 21 Gross 14 Net, Built 1911, Registered Juneau, ON 209196, Master George J Beck of Hoonah, Owner Presbyterian Church of U S A, Cargo none

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty March 3, 1920 at Juneau

 

LOIS M (1970)     The oil screw Lois M stranded and was lost August 7, 1970 near Point Couverden.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 11 25 N 135 03 10 W   Chart 17300

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LOLETA (1880)     The 119 ton schooner Loleta stranded on Saint Lawrence Island September 4, 1880 and was lost.  The vessel had departed Honolulu with 16 crewmen aboard and was expected to finalize her journey in San Francisco.  At the time of the disaster, the Loleta had a “light cargo of about 100 tons” of whale oil, whale bone, ivory and fox skins valued at $10,000.  The vessel was worth $8,000.  The crew managed to reach safety, but the Loleta and her cargo were total losses.  “Fog and current” were reported to be the cause of the casualty.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   63 30 N 170 30 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 119, Built 1871 Seattle, Registered San Francisco, ON 15788, Master Benjamin Dexter, Owners Benjamin Dexter and William H Dimond of San Francisco, Vessel Insurance $8,000, Cargo Insurance $8,000

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report April 20, 1881 by W H Dimond in San Francisco

 

LOMELA (1953)     The 42 ton 51 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Lomela was consumed by fire September 7, 1953, 19 miles southeast of Kodiak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 42 Gross 33 Net, Length 51.6, Breadth 16.5, Depth 6.5, Built 1943 at Portland OR, Crew 3, Horsepower 150, SL WA7292, Owner Florence Nelleton, Registered Aberdeen WA, ON 244010

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 320, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 749

 

LOMEN COMMERCIAL CO NO 1 (1944)     The 43 ton 50 foot wooden scow Lomen Commercial Co No 1 stranded and was lost October 1944 at Cape Darby.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 19 N 162 47 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 43 Gross and Net, Length 50, Breadth 22, Depth 4.7, Built 1939 at Seattle WA, Owner Lomen Commercial Company, Registered Juneau, ON 175499

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1946) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 806, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1945) Pg 417

 

LOMEN COMMERCIAL CO NO 3 (1951)     The 45 ton 50 foot wooden scow Lomen Commercial Company No 3 foundered June 23, 1951 near Hooper Bay  in the Bering Sea.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   61 31 55 N 166 05 30 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 45 Gross and Net, Length 50, Breadth 22, Depth 5, Built 1932 at Nome, Owner Gaasland Company Inc., Registered Juneau, ON 171608

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 319, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 824

 

LOMEN COMMERCIAL CO NO 4 (1951)     The 43 ton 50 foot wooden scow Lomen Commercial Company No 3 foundered June 23, 1951 near Hooper Bay  in the Bering Sea.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   61 31 55 N 166 05 30 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 43 Gross and Net, Length 50, Breadth 22, Depth 4.7, Built 1941 at Nome, Owner Gaasland Company Inc., Registered Juneau, ON 175420

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 319, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 824

 

LOMEN COMMERCIAL CO NO 5 (1951)     The 45 ton 50 foot wooden scow Lomen Commercial Company No 3 foundered June 23, 1951 near Hooper Bay  in the Bering Sea.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   61 31 55 N 166 05 30 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 45 Gross and Net, Length 50, Breadth 22, Depth 5, Built 1931 at Seattle WA, Owner Gaasland Company Inc., Registered Juneau, ON 171298

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 319, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 824

 

LOMEN COMMERCIAL CO NO 8 (1951)     The 37 ton 50 foot wooden scow Lomen Commercial Company No 3 foundered June 23, 1951 near Hooper Bay  in the Bering Sea.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   61 31 55 N 166 05 30 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 37 Gross and Net, Length 50, Breadth 20, Depth 4.5, Built 1933 at Seattle WA, Owner Gaasland Company Inc., Registered Juneau, ON 171596

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 319, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 824

 

LOMEN COMMERCIAL CO NO 9 (1951)     The 46 ton 47 foot wooden scow Lomen Commercial Co No 9 stranded and was lost August 7, 1951 when the vessel broke away from her moorings and drifted onto the rocks near Tin City and Cape Prince of Wales.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   65 33 N 167 51 W   Chart 16204

Additional Information: Tonnage 46 Gross and Net, Length 47, Breadth 21, Depth 5, Built 1927 at Golovin, Owner Gaasland Company, Registered Juneau, ON 171608

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1951) Pg 317, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 957

 

LOMEN COMMERCIAL CO NO 15 (1951)     The 37 ton 61 foot wooden scow Lomen Commercial Company No 3 foundered June 23, 1951 near Hooper Bay  in the Bering Sea.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   61 31 55 N 166 05 30 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 37 Gross and Net, Length 61.4, Breadth 18, Depth 4, Built 1931 at Anacortes WA, Owner Gaasland Company Inc., Registered Juneau, ON 171257

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 319, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 824

 

LONGLINER (1983)     The crab fishing vessel Longliner flooded and sank April 28, 1983 seven miles northwest of Cape Ideluk in the Bering Sea.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 08 30 N 173 31 45 W   Chart 16480

Comment: Probably Cape Idalug on Amlia Island.  WG

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LOOKOUT (1886)     The 67 ton 80 foot wooden schooner Lookout stranded and was lost after going ashore on Sanak Island in a thick fog at 11:00 p.m. Thursday June 3, 1886.  There was a watch on deck of the Lookout with a moderate breeze and thick fog when the tragedy occurred.  The vessel had departed San Francisco May 1, 1886 on a hunting voyage to the North Pacific with 15 crewmen aboard.  The crew made it to safety, but the Lookout, valued at $9,000 was a total loss.  She had no cargo aboard.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 25 N 162 40 W   Chart 16520

Comment: There is a shipwreck marked on the chart on the rocks just south of Sanak Is. as well as a Lookout Point on Caton Island just to the east.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 66.71, Length 80.1, Breadth 18.5, Depth 8.3, Built 1884 San Francisco, Registered San Francisco, ON 140731, Master Peter Faggney, Owners Peter Faggney and Jno. W Dollard of San Francisco, Vessel Insurance $4,500

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report August 12, 1886 at San Francisco by Dollard

 

LOOMIS (1953)     The 15 ton 45 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Loomis burned March 3, 1953 in Jamestown Bay, three miles south of Sitka.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 02 40 N 135 17 30 W   Chart 17326

Additional Information: Tonnage 15 Gross 10 Net, Length 45.8, Breadth 13.6, Depth 4, Built 1919 at Kake, Horsepower 140, Owner Charles Clark, Registered Sitka, ON 217992

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 320, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1961) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 862

 

LOON (1992)     The 120 foot fishing vessel Loon struck a submerged rock near Naked Island in Prince William Sound August 28, 1992.  Several hours later, in Nuka Bay, the vessel capsized and sank in 600 feet of water.  The two crewmembers aboard were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter and were suffering from severe hypothermia.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 19 N 150 33 W   Chart 16013

Additional Information: ON 255475

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LOOSE GOOSE TOO (1997)     The 26 foot cabin cruiser Loose Goose Too disappeared with two persons aboard October 26, 1997 in Kachemak Bay.  The vessel was travelling between Homer Boat Harbor and Sadie Cove.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 30 30 N 151 28 W   Chart 16640

Source: Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LORA LEE (1986)     The 32 foot fishing vessel Lora Lee capsized and sank May 30, 1986 approximately 10 miles south of Sequel Point, southwest of Cape Chiniak near Kodiak.  All three crewmembers were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 33 40 N 152 12 30 W   Chart 16593

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LORA LEE (1987)     The fishing vessel Lora Lee sank near Kodiak October 1, 1987.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LORA MAE (1992)     The 42 foot fishing vessel Lora Mae burned to the waterline and sank June 18, 1992 in Chignik Bay.  All four crewmembers were rescued.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 22 N 158 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: ON 677991

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LORAINE (1988)     The 45 foot fishing vessel Loraine was swept onto the rocks and destroyed September 8, 1988 near Yakutat.  The two crewmembers waded to the beach and were picked up by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 33 N 139 44 W   Chart 16016

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LORAL (1964)     The 26 ton 48 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Loral was reported lost in the Good Friday earthquake of 1964 at Kodiak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 26 Gross 20 Net, Length 48.4, Breadth 12.5, Depth 4.7, Built 1943 at Seattle WA, Former Names GS-1 (U S Dept. of Interior) and CG 50067 (U S C G), Horsepower 80, SL WL9624, Owner Neal Day, Registered Wrangell, ON 277425

Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 378

 

LORETTA C (1998)     The 36 foot halibut longline fishing vessel Loretta C was consumed by fire from an oil stove March 27, 1998 in Petersburg Harbor.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 48 10 N 132 58 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: ON 626868

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LORRAINE (1930)     The 9 ton 36 foot gas screw Lorraine foundered in Saginaw Bay on the north coast of Kuiu Island February 18, 1930.  The vessel was valued at $1,200 at the time of the tragedy.  No one was aboard and no lives were lost.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 55 N 134 16 W   Chart 17368

Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 36, Breadth 9.9, Depth 4.0, Built 1911 at Olympia WA, Horsepower 40, Registered Petersburg, ON 208801, Owner Port Walter Herring and Packing Company

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1931) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 940, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1930) Pgs 400-1, 3. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

LORRINDA G (1978)     The fishing vessel Lorrinda G sank in the Bering Sea October 23, 1978.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   Unknown

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LORVON (1998)     The 50 foot longline halibut fishing vessel Lorvon experienced a structural failure of the bow in heavy seas, flooded and sank May 16, 1998 on the northeast side of Umnak Island two miles east of Cape Tanak.  All three crewmembers abandoned ship to a life raft and were rescued by the fishing vessel Heritage.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 33 50 N 168 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: ON 246318, Year Built 1944

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LOS ANGELES (1881)     The vessel Los Angeles went down in Peril Strait in 1881

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 30 N 135 13 W   Chart 17320

Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

LOTTA TALBOT (1906)     The 342 ton 146 foot wooden stern wheel river steamer Lotta Talbot stranded at Fairbanks May 22, 1906 and became a total loss.  The 5 crewmen aboard reached safety but the Lotta Talbot, valued at $60,000 with cargo became a total loss.

Mapping and Location: Central Alaska

Additional Information: Tonnage 342 Gross 216 Net, Length 145.7, Breadth 24.8, Depth 4.2, Built 1898 Seattle, Service Inland Passenger, Registered Seattle, ON 141551

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report

 

LOTTIE M (1964)     The diesel screw Lottie M was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Cordova.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 33 N 145 45 W   Chart 16700

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LOU ANN (1983)     The tug Lou Ann sank April 7, 1983 with the loss of her five crewmembers approximately 145 miles southeast of Cordova.  The Lou Ann was towing the barge Sherry Lee which was later found beached.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 33 N 145 45 W   Chart 17013

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LOU-ANN-MARIE (1996)     The 32 foot fishing vessel Lou-Ann-Marie burned and sank August 9, 1996 approximately 120 nautical miles northwest of Dutch Harbor.  All three crewmembers were rescued.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 54 N 166 31 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: ON 685380

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LOUIS B (1969)     The gas screw Louis B was consumed by fire May 10, 1969 at Nushagak in Bristol Bay.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 57 N 158 29 W   Chart 16011

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LOUIS G (1981)     The seiner Louis G capsized and sank August 4, 1981 off of Cape Bartolome.  All five crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessel Delight.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 14 N 133 37 W   Chart 17400

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LOUIS WALSH (1902)     The 1433 ton ship Louis Walsh broke loose from her moorings in a gale and wrecked near Dutch Harbor in 1902.  The ship was washed ashore on the Dutch Harbor spit where she sat high and dry.  The hull was stripped and eventually broke up.  The Louis Walsh was built in Bath, Maine in 1861.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 54 N 166 31 W   Chart 16529

Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 94, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

LOUISA (1883)     The 304 ton whaling bark Louisa was lost near Herald Island September 22, 1883.  The vessel had struck ice in a gale off Point Hope.

Mapping and Location: Siberia

Comment: Herald Island is to the west of Point Hope in Siberia

Sources: 1. Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1868-1888, 2. Northern Mariner (April 2006) “Nineteenth Century Commercial Shipping Losses” J R Bockstoce Pg 65

 

LOUISA (1913)     The 5 ton wooden schooner Louisa drug anchor in a SE gale and stranded on the beach at Chinik in Golovin Bay at 11 a.m. Sunday October 5, 1913.  The following are statements taken from the wreck report filed at Nome by her owner and master Katongen, a Native from Golovin:

“SE Gale weather clear. Stranding on beach at Chinik, Alaska.”  “Put lines on vessel and tried to hold her so the waves would not strike her amidships, but were helpless on account of large sea.”  “The storm was so severe that it was impossible to render any assistance.”

Katongen was assisted by his crew and many Natives from the area.  The crew of three escaped to safety, but the Louisa, value at $1,000 was a total loss.  She had no cargo aboard at the time.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 33 N 163 02 W   Chart 16200

Comment: Chinik was an early name for Golovin Village.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 5 Gross and Net, Built 1910 at Golovin, Registered Nome, ON 209263, Vessel Insurance none, Cargo ballast

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed at Nome January 3, 1914

 

LOUISA DOWNS (1868)     The 11 ton schooner Louisa Downs drifted into Dry Bay November 22, 1868 went ashore and wrecked.  Her masts had been cut away in a gale to save the vessel.  The Louisa Downs had departed Sitka October 13, 1868 bound for Hoonah, other villages of Icy Strait, Cross Sound and the Gulf of Alaska on a hunting and trading expedition.  She had three crewmen and a cargo of trade goods and furs.  After the wreck, the crew of the Louisa Downs found canoes at a deserted Native village in Dry Bay.  They loaded their furs and trade goods in them and made their way west to another Native village, arriving on December 7, 1868.  There the local Natives confiscated their possessions but took care of the three through the winter.  In the spring they were transported to Cross Sound, arriving in Sitka June 23, 1869.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 08 N 138 25 W   Chart 16016

Sources: 1. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1961) Pg 170, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

LOUISE (1902)     The little schooner Louise wrecked on the beach at Nome in October of 1902.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

Source:  The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 84

 

LOUISE (1910)     No one knows the fate of the two passengers and two crewmen aboard the 8 ton gas screw Louise.  The vessel departed Anadyr, Siberia November 1, 1910 bound for Nome.  The wreck of the Louise was found November 4th one mile NE of Cape Prince of Wales crushed by ice with no one aboard.  Lost were the master of the vessel, C B Owen, as well as Clement LaBord, John W Kelley and F Cramer.  The vessel was valued at $1,500 and was a total loss with no cargo and no insurance.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   65 36 N 168 05 W   Chart 16003

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 6 Net, Length 34, Breadth 10.3, Depth 3, Built 1901 at Nome, Service Freight, HP 14, Registered Nome, ON 201233, Master C B Owen of Nome, Owner E T McIntyre of Nome

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report Nome June 14, 1911 by Ira M Rank acting agent

 

LOUISE (1977)     The 10 ton 28 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Louise stranded and was lost October 12, 1977 in Bertha Bay.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 48 N 136 21 W   Chart 17321

Comment: The vessel Lula J is lost in the same bay two days later.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 9 Net, Length 28.4, Breadth 10.3, Depth 4.7, Built 1955 at Tacoma WA, Former Name Jayne L, ON 269870

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 396, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1978) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2118

 

LOUISE (1991)     The 86 foot fishing vessel Louise sank in rough weather near Dutch Harbor November 7, 1991.  Four crewmembers were rescued and one was lost.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 54 N 166 31 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: CG035337

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LOUISE II (1971)     The seiner Louise II ran up on the rocks and broke up in rough weather November 17, 1971 on Clam Island between Klawock and Craig.  All three crewmembers were rescued.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 58 48 N 133 15 30 W   Chart 17405

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LOUISE J KENNY (1898)     The 97 foot trading schooner Louise J Kenny drug anchor and stranded on the beach near Point Hope on August 19, 1898.  The nine aboard made it to safety, but the Louise J Kenny became a total loss.  The vessel had departed Seattle April 4, 1898 and stopped at Unalaska, departing there June 22nd.  She was carrying 120 tons of lumber, machinery and general merchandise valued at $7,000.  The following are the events of August 19, 1898 as described by L Larsen, master of the Louise J Kenny:

“South side of Point Hope in Arctic Ocean, Alaska.”  “Gale; southwest wind.  Impossible to get under way on account of hight wind and proximity to breakers.  Dragged anchor and drifted on beach.  Force of wind 8.  5 a.m. daylight.”  “Tried to make sail evening of 18th in so doing lost one anchor, snapping the chain suddenly.  Vessel going towards beach and before other anchor took hold vessel was in .. fathoms of water.  Wind veering to SSW so we had no chance to clear beach on either tack.  Held on until 4 a.m. when began to drag.  People on beach took line and helped crew to land.”  “When wind subsided vessel was high and dry on the beach, but full of water.  Impossible to get her off or save anything.  Had to abandon everything.”

The Louise J Kenny was valued at $10,000 and along with her cargo listed as total losses.  Insurance on the vessel was $5,000 and her cargo $4,000.

Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska 68 21 N 166 47 W   Chart 16003

Comment: Some cargo salvaged.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 155 Net, Length 96.8, Breadth 25.4, Depth 11.2, Built 1889 Essex MA, Registered Seattle, ON 140984, Owner Seattle Hardware

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report August 25, 1898 by Larsen, 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 41

 

LOUISIANA (1865)     On July 9, 1865 the 297 ton whaling ship Louisiana stranded on a shoal entering Kotzebue Sound while fleeing the rampage of the confederate privateer Shenandoah.  The vessel ran aground between the south side of Choris Peninsula and Chamisso Island.  According to local Natives, the crew salvaged the cargo of whale oil and burned the vessel July 13th.  The wreck could be seen on shore for the next ten years.  The Louisiana left New Bedford MA April 25, 1864 and was valued at $20,000 with cargo at the time of the loss.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   66 13 N 161 50 W   Chart 16005

Sources: 1. Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

LOUISIANA (1939)     The 33 ton gas screw fishing vessel Louisiana stranded and was lost at the head of Pavlof Bay at 3:00 p.m. Wednesday July 19, 1939.  The vessel struck a reef at the head of Pavlof Bay as they were leaving for King Cove.  Conditions were a gentle easterly breeze and fog.  The five aboard made it to safety, but the Louisiana was a total loss.  The gas screw Umala tried to pull the Louisiana off of the reef but was unable.  Several attempts were made to float the vessel but weather and tide conditions did not permit salvage operations.  Axel Samuelson, owner and master of the Louisiana wrote the vessel off as a total loss.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska 55 20 N 161 38 W   Chart 16551

Additional Information: Tonnage 33, Age 24 years, Registered Ketchikan, ON 213146, Vessel Value $2,000, Cargo none, Vessel Insurance none

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty February 3, 1940 at Ketchikan by Samuelson

 

LOVAC (1987)     The 32 foot fishing vessel Lovac was missing and presumed lost March 16, 1987 while fishing for black cod out of Kodiak.  Presumed lost were James Shutter and possibly another crewmember.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: ADF&G No. 9566

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LOYAL (1954)     The 11 ton 37 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Loyal was consumed by fire May 15, 1954 at Kimshan Cove.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 41 20 N 136 07 W   Chart 17322

Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 9 Net, Length 36.9, Breadth 9, Depth 4.4, Built 1912 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 130, Owner Hans F Irrgang, Registered Seattle, ON 218968

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) Pg 304, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 744

 

LOYAL (1956)     The 23 ton 43 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Loyal was consumed by fire April 20, 1956 in Simpson Bay, Prince William Sound.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 37 30 N 145 55 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: Tonnage 23 Gross 18 Net, Length 43.4, Breadth 13.2, Depth 5.6, Built 1915 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 140, SL WA7360, Owner Charles Jerry Cochran, Registered Juneau, ON 213362

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 324, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 824

 

LU (1935)     The 14 ton 38 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Lu foundered in Stephen’s Passage January 13, 1935.  The 9 crewmen aboard made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 13 N 133 39 W   Chart 17300

Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 9 Net, Length 38.3, Breadth 10.7, Depth 4.4, Built 1924 at Juneau, Horsepower 40, Owner Mrs L P Dawes, Registered Juneau, ON 224156

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1935) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1029, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1934) Pgs 426-7

 

LUCILE (1908)     The full rigged 1,402 ton 200 foot wooden ship Lucile broke a pin in a mooring swivel and drifted onto the sand spit at the entrance to the Ugashik River at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday August 19, 1908.  The vessel was in port about to sail for San Francisco when the disaster occurred.  There were 70 crew and 80 Japanese cannery laborers aboard.  The Lucile was laden with 1557 tons of canned and salt salmon valued at $160,000.  The vessel was valued at $20,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed in San Francisco:

“Sand spit entrance of Ugashik River.  Moorings carried away; drifted ashore.”  “Pin in mooring swivel broke.  Strong wind, sea smooth at time of swivel breaking.”  “Set sails. S.S. Lehem came to assistance, and towed on ship for about 4 hours.  But wind increased to a gale, and tide running 6’ per hour with same direction of wind caused ship to go higher up on sand flat.”  “As the tide was rising, nothing could be done, the rise and fall of the tide being about 18 feet at mouth of river where vessel lies.”

The Lucile and her cargo were reported as total losses.  The crew and passengers survived.  Insurance on the vessel was $2,500 and her cargo $100,000.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 30 N 157 37 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 1402 Gross 1297 Net, Built 1874 Freeport ME, Length 200, Breadth 40, Depth 23.9, Registration San Francisco, ON 140031, Master J P McInnis of San Francisco, Owner Frank B Peterson of San Francisco

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report September 11, 1911 by Owners

 

LUCKY (1917)     The 8 ton 33 foot gas screw fishing vessel Lucky foundered August 6, 1917 near Cape Fox.  The three persons aboard made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 46 10 N 130 50 45 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 6 Net, Length 33.6, Breadth 10.2, Depth 3.1, IHP 16, Built 1908 at Seattle WA, Registered Ketchikan, ON 213932

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1918) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 441, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Pg 267

 

LUCKY BOY (1955)     The 10 ton 32 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Lucky Boy stranded and was lost July 22, 1955 on the beach at the northeast end of Kalgin Island.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 28 N 151 55 W   Chart 16660

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 7 Net, Length 32.8, Breadth 8.8, Depth 3, Built 1927 at Seattle, Horsepower 140, Owner Alfred R Waterbury, Registered Seattle, ON 252801

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 307, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 757

 

LUCKY DEBONAIR (1974)     The crab fishing vessel Lucky Debonair was believed to have been destroyed by a storm March 5, 1974.  The 50 foot vessel was last seen near Marmot Island north of Kodiak on March 3, 1974. The vessel was traveling between Kodiak and Cordova with four crewmembers on board when she disappeared. Owner operator Chick Nims, his wife Esther Nims, Mike Pablic and Rick Woit, all of Kodiak, were lost. One body was discovered June 2nd clad in a wet suit bearing the name Lucky Debonair floating in Cape Chiniak Lagoon on Afognak Island.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 13 N 151 50 W   Chart 16580

Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. Fairbanks Daily News Miner (March 14, 1974) “Planes fail to find boat” Pg 2, 3. Fairbanks Daily News Miner (June 4, 1974) “Little hope for crewmen” Pg 2

 

LUCKY LOGGER (1996)     The 26 foot bowpicker Lucky Logger flooded and sank October 28, 1996 at the entrance to Day Harbor near Cape Resurrection.  The only person on board was plucked from the Lucky Logger by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 57 N 149 10 W   Chart 16680

Additional Information: ON 614216

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LUCKY PIERRE (1995)     The fishing vessel Lucky Pierre flooded from the stern, capsized and sank May 8, 1995 south of Kodiak near Narrow Cape in Ugak Bay.  Both persons on board were rescued by the fishing vessel Progress.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 25 30 N 152 20 W   Chart 16580

Source: Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LUCKY STAR (1964)     The 44 ton 49 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Lucky Star was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Kodiak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 44 Gross 17 Net, Length 49.6, Breadth 16, Depth 8.4, Built 1951 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 115, SL WD8006, Owner Arthur O Rorvick, Registered Seattle, ON 262527

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 371, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1004

 

LUCRETIA (1889)    The 350 ton wooden whaling bark Lucretia stranded on an unknown reef 7 miles west of Herald Island at 12:20 p.m. Wednesday September 4, 1889.  The vessel departed San Francisco December 6, 1888 on a whaling voyage with 44 crewmen.  At the time of the disaster they had accumulated 100 tons of whale oil and ivory valued at $12,000.  The bark Abram Barker picked up the crew and got up full steam.  They backed three hours without being able to get the Lucretia off of the reef.  The Lucretia was written off as a total loss with a value of $20,000.  Her cargo was also lost.  The vessel was insured for $14,000.  The cargo had no insurance.

Mapping and Location: Siberia

Additional Information: Tonnage 350, Age 12 years, Registered New Bedford MA, ON 140233, Master Joseph Whiteside of New Bedford, Owner William Lewis of New Bedford

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report November 5, 1889 at San Francisco by Whitehead

 

LUELLA (1869)     The schooner Luella was driven ashore during a gale and lost in May 10, 1869.  The vessel departed Sitka March 28 got caught in a gale and capsized.  She was driven ashore and completely wrecked in the Barren Islands.  The vessel was owned by Costello and Malowinski of Victoria.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 57 N 152 15 W   Chart 16606

Sources: 1. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1961) Pg 180, 2. BOEMRE Shipwreck Database (2011)

 

LUELLA (1910)     The 8 ton gas screw Luella was driven ashore by a gale and ice and lost at 3 a.m. Friday September 2, 1910.  The vessel and her three crewmen left Nome August 28, 1910 for the Siberian Coast carrying $1,500 worth of general merchandise weighing 10 tons.  They were driven ashore at North Head, Siberia, Saint Lawrence Bay.  The cargo and engine were salvaged, but the Luella, worth $1,200 was a total loss with no insurance.  Assistance was given by the Natives of Siberia.

Mapping and Location: Siberia

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 6 Net, Built 1904 at Nome, Length 33.4, Breadth 11, Depth 2.9, Registered Nome, ON 201291, Master M Gottschalk of Nome, Owner Ira Rank of Nome

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report September 27, 1910 by Gottschalk at Nome

 

LUELLA (1910)     The 115 ton 90 foot sternwheel steamer Luella was lost September of 1910 on the Tanana River near Chena.

Mapping and Location: Central Alaska

Additional Information: Tonnage 115 Gross 88 Net, Length 90, Breadth 17, Depth 3, Built 1898 at Stockton CA, Registered Nome, ON 141540

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1922) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 451, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1910) Pg 238, 3. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 180

 

LUELLA (1920)     The sternwheel steamer Luella was lost September of 1920 at Chena.

Mapping and Location: Central Alaska

Source: The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 313

 

LULA II (1968)     The gas screw Lula II burned August 3, 1968 at the Alitak Cannery at Alitak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 56 40 N 154 10 W   Chart 16580

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LULA J (1977)     The 11 ton 36 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Lula J October 14, 1977 in Bertha Bay.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 48 N 136 21 W   Chart 17321

Comment: The vessel Louise was lost in the same bay two days before.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Length 36.2, Breadth 9.3, Depth 4.2, Built 1918 at LaConner WA, ON 216138

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 400, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1978) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2118

 

LUMBERJACK (1966)     The 4,924 ton 272 foot steel barge Lumberjack stranded and was lost October 18, 1966 on Jorkins Point, Swindle Island in Milbank Sound.

Mapping and Location: British Columbia

Additional Information: Tonnage 4,924 Gross and Net, Length 272.1, Breadth 68.1, Depth 18.7, Built 1959 at Alameda CA, Service tanker, Registered Eureka CA, ON 280028

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 401, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1170

 

LUMMI BAY (1938)     The 43 ton wooden oil screw Lummi Bay foundered three miles north of Tree Point Light at 9:00 p.m. Friday August 19, 1938.  Her six crewmen escaped to safety, but the vessel, worth $15,000 was a total loss.  She was also carrying 15,000 salmon worth $900, also lost.  The following is an accounting by H D Stackpole, master of the Lummi Bay:

“Wind strong SW.  Sea Heavy. Night Dark.”  “1/4 mile north of “the reef”.  3 miles north of Tree Point Light, Southeast Alaska.”  “Vessel leaking”  “Believe damage was caused to vessel’s hull by pounding against fish trap while brailing.  Probably opened seams.  Attempted to beach vessel immediately after noticing that she was leaking.”  “Trap watchman took crew ashore in trap skiff in answer to distress signals.”

The Lummi Bay was insured for $8,000.  Her last port was Hidden Inlet that day.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 48 15 N 130 55 45 W   Chart 17434

Additional Information: Tonnage 43 Gross 29 Net, Age 21 years, Registered Ketchikan, ON 215290, Master H D Stackpole of Seattle, Owner Nakat Packing Corporation of Seattle

Source: U S C G Report of Casualty August 22, 1938 at Ketchikan by Stackpole

 

LUNA (1932)     The 19 ton gas screw Luna was consumed by fire at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday March 30, 1932 at Osten Island.  The two aboard made it to safety but the Luna, valued at $4,000 was a total loss.  The following are comments taken from the casualty report by W H Roessel, owner and master of the Luna:

“Osten Island, Carroll Inlet…explosion of gas.”  “Calm and clear, light breeze.”  “Vessel completely burned, caused by explosion of gas after lighting galley stove.  Impossible to extinguish flames on account of danger of further explosions; vessel burned to water’s edge and beached on north end of Osten Island.”

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 24 45 N 131 19 28 W   Chart 17428

Additional Information: Tonnage 19 Gross 13 Net, Age 20 years, Registered Ketchikan, ON 209816, Last  Port Ketchikan March 27, 1932, Destination Carroll Inlet

Source: U S C G Report of Casualty April 4, 1932 by Roessel at Ketchikan

 

LYDIA MAYFLOWER (1900)     The schooner Lydia Mayflower was wrecked and went to pieces on the rocks off of Cape Prince of Wales September of 1900 along with the schooner Victoria.  Both shipwrecked vessels crews were picked up by the schooner Alice.

Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   68 21 N 166 47 W   16005

Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 63, 2. The San Francisco Call (October 24, 1900) “Picks Up Two Shipwrecked Crews on the Bleak Shores of the Arctic”

 

LYNDA (1971)     The fishing vessel Lynda ran aground and broke up November 5, 1971 near Cape Mordvinof on the northwest coast of Unimak Island.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 56 45 N 164 26 W   Chart 16011

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LYNDA K (1971)     The fishing vessel Lynda K was lost at sea April 15, 1971 between Homer and Seward.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   Unknown

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LYNN D (1956)     The 10 ton wooden gas screw Lynn D foundered 15 miles off of Cape Saint Elias on May 29, 1956.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 54 N 144 36 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross, Built 1955, ON 271381

Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Subject to Removal” Pg 581

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *