Alaska Shipwrecks (M)

ABBREVIATIONS:  AluminumALBritish ColumbiaBCCentralCFiberglassFRPFishing VesselFVIndicated Horse PowerIHPLongliner-LLMotor VesselMVNorthNOfficial NumberONRevenue Cutter ServiceRCSSchoonerSchSignal LettersSLSouth CentralSCSoutheastSESouthwestSWSteel oil screwSOSSteam ShipSSUnknownUUnited States ArmyUSAUnited States Coast GuardUSCGUnited States NavyUSNWestcentralWCWood gas screwWGSWood oil screwWOS

M&M (1983)     The 50 foot wooden fishing vessel M&M struck a log and capsized October 26, 1983 near Wrangell.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 28 N 132 22 40 W   Chart 17360

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

M M MORRILL (1903)     The 43 ton sealing schooner M M Morill  foundered June 30, 1903 along with the schooner James G Swan along the coast of Alaska.  The vessel was built in Seattle in 1894.  The crew is reported to have survived.

Mapping and Location: Unknown

Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 94, 2. BOEMRE Shipwreck Database (2011)

 

M P E 110 (1968)     The diesel screw M P E 110 foundered April 12, 1968 off of Cook Inlet.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 05 N 152 30 W   Chart 16013

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

M S P CO NO 1 (1931)     The 20 ton 36 foot scow M S P Co No 1 foundered in Alaska in about 1931.

Mapping and Location: Alaska Unknown

Comment: Vessel not reported lost until 1941.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 20 Gross and Net, Length 36, Breadth 17.7, Depth 3.9, Built 1913 at Seattle WA, Owner Midnight Sun Packing Company of Washington, Registered Seattle, ON 165212

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1941) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 512, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1939) Pg 383

 

M T B S INC V (1955)     The 45 ton 50 foot wooden freight barge M T B S Inc V stranded and was lost July 15, 1955 at Unalakleet.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   63 52 25 N 160 47 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 45 Gross and Net, Length 50, Breadth 22, Depth 5, Built 1931 at Seattle, Owner Northern Commercial Company, Registered Juneau, ON 171297

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) Pg 310, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 744

 

MABEL (1885)     The 188 ton 100 foot wooden bark Mabel went ashore in a heavy gale at Wainright Inlet at 3 p.m. Monday August 10, 1885.  The George and Susan drug anchor and collided with the Mabel causing her to drag as well.  The vessel departed Saipan, Caroline Island February 10, 1885 bound for whaling in the Arctic with 35 crewmen aboard.  She had 100 tons of whale oil and whaling gear worth $6,000 stowed in her holds.  The U S Revenue Cutter Thomas Corwin attempted to get a hawser to the Mabel but her anchor cable parted and the vessel and her cargo were lost.  The Mabel was valued at $12,000.  The crews of the Mabel and the George and Susan were rescued by the Thomas Corwin.

Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   70 36 N 160 W   Chart 16003

Comment: Some reports have this wreck between Pt Belcher and Pt Franklin.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 188.09, Length 100.2, Breadth 25.1, Depth 10, Built 1877 Bath ME, Registered New Bedford MA, ON 91013, Master Thomas J McLane of Falmouth MA, Owner William Lewis of New Bedford, Insurance unknown

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report October 19, 1885 by McLane, 2. Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1886-1888 (1966)

 

MABEL A (1920)     The 32 ton gas screw fishing vessel Mabel A stranded and was lost at 7:00 a.m. Monday December 13, 1920 near “Noise Island”.  The vessel departed Ketchikan with three crewmen aboard bound for deep sea fisheries and had accumulated 2.5 tons of fish worth $700.  The engine of the Mabel A broke down during a “50 mile gale” allowing the vessel to wash onto an exposed part of “Noise Island”.  The gas screw Todd II stood by and got a line aboard, but that parted.  The Mabel A was reported to have broken up within two hours.  She was valued at $8,000.  The crew made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 30 N 133 40 W   Chart 17400

Comment: Noise Island probably Noyes Island.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 32, Age 8 years, Registered Seattle, ON 209932, Master A Jensen of Paulsbo WA, Owner H C Hansen of Ballard WA, Vessel Insurance $4,000, Cargo insurance none

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty December 29, 1920 at Seattle by Jensen

 

MABEL M (1965)     The 10 ton 32 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mabel M foundered in November of 1965 at Grave Island, Hoonah.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 06 35 N 135 27 15 W   Chart 17300

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 8 Net, Length 31.9, Breadth 10.6, Depth 2.8, Built 1932 at Petersburg, Horsepower 110, SL WE4819, Owner George Martin Jr., Registered Sitka, ON 232087

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 416, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1170

 

MABLE LANE (1898)     The river steamer Mable Lane was lost in the Bering Sea July 17, 1898.  She had departed Dutch Harbor bound for St Michael under tow of the vessel South Portland.  The Mabel Lane’s tow line parted in a gale and she filled and sank.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska Unknown

Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MACE (1956)     The 10 ton 36 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mace burned May 18, 1956 at Castle Flats.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 38 30 N 133 15 30 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 9 Net, Length 35.9, Breadth 10.1, Depth 3.9, Built 1943 at Bay City MI, Former Names CG-33025 (U S C G) and PRB-C-15996 (U S N), Horsepower 143, SL WF3735, Ove U Foss, Registered Seattle, ON265288

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 317, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 757

 

MACRAY (1938)     The 86 ton wooden tug Macray was blown ashore in a storm and lost at 9:00 p.m. Sunday October 16, 1938.  The vessel departed Cordova at 4:30 P.M. October 13th bound for Petersburg with six crewmen aboard towing a scow.  The following are statements from the casualty report made my Clyde Dell, master of the Macray:

“While laying in Controller Bay holding a scow on 600’ of towline with the Macray anchored in 8 fathoms of water with a 400 lb. anchor and 60 fathoms of chain.  This anchor was backed up by a 800 lb. anchor on 200’ of 7/8 inch wire rope fast to cargo winch on forecastle head.  At approx. 8:00 P.M. Oct. 16th, 135 Meridian time, a hurricane struck of approx. 90 mi. per hour.  The engine was immediately started full ahead.  The wind was of such force that glass was blown out of windows and heavy seas were rolling over forecastle head and bulwarks.  Fifteen min. later the scow was cut adrift with ship still going full speed ahead and the auxiliary pumps were running to keep hull pumped out due to water coming in thru broken out windows above engine room and thru hatch which had covers ripped off by terrific force.  The ship was forced backward onto S.E. end of Kanak Island at approx. 9:00 P.M., 135 meridian time.  The hull and superstructure were badly pounded and broken up by the force of the seas.  At approx. 10:30 P.M. Oct. 17th the wind had died  down to approx. 60 mile gale and at approx. 2:00 A.M the one remaining life boat was launched at low water and the crew of six men got thru the surf to the S.E. end of Kanak Island.”  “Crew taken off beach at 10:00 A.M. Oct. 18, 1938 by USCG Cutter Morris.”

The Macray was valued at $25,000 at the time of the loss and had no cargo or insurance.  Nothing is mentioned in the wreck report about the scow that was cut loose or whether it was carrying any cargo.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 08 N 144 21 W   Chart 16723

Additional Information: Tonnage 86 Gross 49 Net, Age 16 years, Registered Seattle, ON 222149, Master Clyde Dell of Sedro-Wooley WA, Owner Puget Sound Bridge and Dredging Co of Seattle

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty October 20, 1938 at Cordova

 

MAFCO 8 (1951)     The 7 ton 28 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mafco 8 foundered June 14, 1951 in the Gulf of Alaska at 50 56 N 139 55 W.

Mapping and Location: Alaska Unknown

Comment: These coordinates would put the loss out well west of Queen Charlotte Sound in the very southern Gulf of Alaska.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 5 Net, Length 28.5, Breadth 10.1, Depth 3.6, Built 1951 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 95, Owner Malaspina Fisheries Company, Registered Seattle, ON 261780

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 332, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 745

 

MAFCO 9 (1951)     The 7 ton 28 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mafco 9 foundered June 14, 1951 in the Gulf of Alaska at 50 56 N 139 55 W.

Mapping and Location: Alaska Unknown

Comment: These coordinates would put the loss out well west of Queen Charlotte Sound in the very southern Gulf of Alaska.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 5 Net, Length 28.5, Breadth 10.1, Depth 3.6, Built 1951 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 95, Owner Malaspina Fisheries Company, Registered Seattle, ON 261781

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 332, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 745

 

MAGGIE (1953)     The 12 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Maggie burned May 26, 1953 near Anchor Point in Cook Inlet.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 46 45 N 151 49 50 W   Chart 16640

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 10 Net, Length 30.3, Breadth 10.3, Depth 5, Built 1942 at Seattle WA, Former Name C-6030 (U S N), Horsepower 282, SL WB9922, Owner Seldovia Bay Packing Company, Registered Juneau, ON 257205

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 332, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 749

 

MAGI (1987)     The 30 foot fishing vessel Magi sank July 2, 1987 at Naked Island.

Mapping and Location: Southern Alaska   Unknown

Comment: Multiple Naked Islands.  WG

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MAGIC MINNOW (1997)     The 32 foot crab fishing vessel Magic Minnow was lost from an explosion and engine room fire February 18, 1997 in Gastineau Channel.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 16 N 134 20 W   Chart 17300

Additional Information: ON AK3591K

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MAGNET (1980)     The 36 foot vessel Magnet sank September 20, 1980 in the Spiridon Bay area.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 40 N 153 52 W   Chart 16580

Source: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak)

 

MAGNHEL (1920)     The 9 ton single masted gas screw fishing vessel Maghnel broke a shaft and stranded at Cora Point on Coronation Island at 10 a.m. Friday March 5, 1920.  The vessel was pushed ashore by heavy NE weather.  They had departed Ketchikan the day before with a crew of three to work along the fishing bank of Coronation Island.  The master of the Magnhel, A Lindset of Seattle, made the following statements in his casualty report:

“N.E. wind…Put out 2 anchors and rode 24 hours, when same dragged our cables parted, and vessel was washed ashore.  Crew went ashore after vessel was anchored.”  “On March 7, Ga.s. My Fancy passing was signaled and took master and crew to Shakan.”  “All ships papers were lost including manifest of vessel cleared for deep sea on March 4, 1920 from Ketchikan.”

The Magnhel was valued at $4,000 and became a total loss with no insurance.  She was owned by her master, A Lindset and his partner L Skogsaas.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 54 10 N 134 47 15 W   Chart 17400

Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Built 1917, Registered Tacoma, ON 215118

Source: USCG Report of Casualty March 14, 1920 at Wrangell by Lindset

 

MAGNUM (2007)     The 56 foot salmon seiner Magnum foundered June 23, 2007 near Cape Igvak on the Alaska Peninsula.  The crew of four family members abandoned ship to a life raft and were picked up by the vessel Sea Storm three days later about 17 miles west of Halibut Bay in the Shelikof Strait.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 26 N 156 01 W   Chart 16580

Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak), 2. U S C G News Release (June 23, 2007) “Crew of Overdue Fishing Boat Found Safe in Liferaft”

 

MAHINA HOU (1950)     The 162 ton 103 foot steel oil screw fishing vessel Mahina Hou stranded and was lost August 24, 1950 in the first cliff west of Cape Suckling.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 59 30 N 143 53 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: Tonnage 162 Gross 94 Net, Length 103.6, Breadth 32.9, Depth 5.6, Built 1944 at North Tonawanda NY, Former Name LCT 6-1450 (U S N), Crew 7, Horsepower 675, Owner Alaska Allied Industries, Registered Juneau, ON 249515

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 333, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 745

 

MAHALO (1992)     The 83 foot crab fishing vessel Mahalo sank January 18, 1992 near Saint Paul Island in the Bering Sea.  The vessel had become disabled and was under tow when the disaster occurred.  All four crewmembers were rescued by the vessel Sea Producer.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   56 35 N 169 35 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: ON 598642

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MAIA D (1994)     The 34 foot salmon troller Maia D got line in her screw, flooded and sank May 16, 1994 in Stevenson Entrance.  Both crewmembers were rescued by the U S Coast Guard.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 47 N 152 24 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: CG045062

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MAINE (1949)     The 29 ton 45 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Maine foundered August 23, 1949 in Lisianski Strait.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 50 N 136 27 W   Chart 17300

Additional Information: Tonnage 29 Gross 19 Net, Length 45.4, Breadth 14, Depth 6.3, Built 1915 at Tacoma WA, Crew 7, Horsepower 143, Owner Robert Austin, Registered Juneau, ON 213139

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 334, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 739

 

MAJESTIC (1956)     The 104 ton 74 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Majestic stranded and was lost August 12, 1956, 12 miles out of Puale Bay in the Shelikof Strait.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 41 N 155 29 W   Chart 16013

Additional Information: Tonnage 104 Gross 49 Net, Length 74.1, Breadth 19.6, Depth 8.7, Built 1934 at Los Angeles CA, Horsepower 180, SL WA7542, Owner John B Jorgensen, Registered Seattle, ON 233572

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 320, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 757

 

MAJESTIC (1992)     The 70 foot halibut long line fishing vessel Majestic capsized and sank September 22, 1992 approximately 70 nautical miles south of Saint Paul Island.  All five crewmembers were rescued.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   57 10 N 170 15 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: ON 223177

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MAJOR (1976)     The 50 ton 54 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Major foundered August 12, 1976 off of Kodiak Island.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 50 Gross 42 Net, Length 54.8, Breadth 16.4, Depth 7.7, Built 1947 at Seattle WA, Former Name Irene G, ON 254026

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Irene G” Pg 308, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1978) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2118

 

MAKAKA (1990)     The 152 foot steel fish tender Makaka stranded and was lost August 3, 1990 on Fernando Reef.  There was no loss of life.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 29 30 N 133 15 50 W   Chart 17400

Comment: Fern Reef off of San Fernando Island.  WG

Additional Information: ON 255042

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MAKANI KANALIO (1996)     The 39 foot fishing vessel Makani Kanalio caught fire and sank December 14, 1996 at Unalaska.  The only person aboard made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 52 30 N 166 32 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: ON 943552

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MAKO (1958)     The 9 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mako was consumed by fire May 31, 1958 at the mouth of the Kasilof River.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 23 15 N 151 17 45 W   Chart 16660

Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 7 Net, Length 30, Breadth 10.5, Depth 3.9, Built 1944 at Seldovia, Horsepower 110, Owner Glenn A Phillips, Registered Juneau, ON 265276

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) Pg 333, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 802

 

MALINA (1961)     The 165 ton 82 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Malina stranded and was lost June 14, 1961 near the Black Hills In Bristol Bay.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 41 N 162 05 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: Tonnage 165 Gross 134 Net, Length 82, Breadth 26.6, Depth 8.7, Built 1943 at Seattle WA, Former Names BSP-1909 (U S A) and PB-119 (U S A), Horsepower 230, SL WA7565, Owner San Juan Fishing & Packing Company, Registered Seattle, ON 250952

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) Pg 350, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 904

 

MALLARD (1921)     The halibut boat Mallard was wrecked in a storm October 27, 1921 on False Island in Clarence Strait.  The Mallard was attempting to assist the halibut boat Alta who had stranded.  There was no loss of life.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   Unknown

Source: The Juneau Empire (November 2, 1921) Pg 6

 

MALROE (1919)     The 12 ton wooden schooner Malroe was destroyed by fire near Nome on Monday August 25, 1919.  The vessel was out of commission and hauled out on the bank of the Snake River about a half mile from the mouth.  The cause of the fire was unknown.  The Malroe was valued at $400 and had no insurance.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16206

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 10 Net, Built 1905, Registered Nome, ON 202250, Owner and Master W E Wagner of Nome

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty August 28, 1919 by Wagner at Nome

 

MAMOOK (1917)     The 17 ton 42 foot gas screw Mamook burned at Eagle Reef August 6, 1917.  The two persons aboard made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 27 40 N 134 49 15 W   Chart 17300

Comment: Formerly the gas screw Merrill

Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 12 Net, Length 42, Breadth 11, Depth 6, Service freight, IHP 40, Built 1911 at Seattle WA, Registered Seattle, ON 208648

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1918) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 441, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Pg 270

 

MANANA II (1969)     The charter vessel Manana II struck a deadhead and sank May 1, 1969 near Sitka.  All seven on board escaped to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 135 20 W   Chart 17320

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MANHATTAN (1917)     The 291 ton steel hulled halibut steamer Mahhattan struck an uncharted rock off Lituya Bay and was lost at 2:00 a.m. Thursday November 15, 1917.  The Manhattan departed Vancouver, B.C. October 29, 1917 on a fishing venture with 34 crewmen aboard.  The vessel came across the stranded and abandoned wreck of the Al-Ki on Novewmber 1st near Point Augusta.  The crew looted the vessel, taking whatever they could find of value.  They then proceeded to the halibut fishing grounds of the Gulf of Alaska.  By the time of the disaster, they had caught 80,000 lbs. of fresh fish worth $12,000.  While heading to Cape Spencer with their newly caught load of halibut, John Kolseth of Vancouver, master of the Manhattan, lost his bearings in a gale and thick snowstorm and stranded the Manhattan off Lituya Bay.  The crew abandoned ship in dories but were unable to land because of an enraged brown bear that pursued them through the surf.  Thirty hours after the stranding they spotted the Mariposa passing and managed to attract their attention by burning an oilskin coat.  They were rescued and taken to Juneau where they were promptly arrested for looting the Al-ki.  The Mariposa had been the vessel that had rescued the crew of the Al-ki as well as those of the Manhattan.  When the crew of the Mariposa heard that the crew of the Manhattan had looted the Al-Ki they radioed ahead to the authorities.  Charges against the crew of the Manhattan were soon dropped as all of the evidence had gone down with the Manhattan somewhere near Lituya Bay.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 36 45 N 137 39 30 W   Chart 16760

Comment: The Mariposa sank several days later, November 18, 1917, near Point Baker.  Trappers reported finding the boiler of the Manhattan on the beach at Lituya Bay in 1932 but it was soon buried by moving sands.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 291 Gross 134 Net, Age 12 years, Registered Portland ME, ON 202845, Owner New England Fish Co of Boston, Vessel Value $100,000 (Book Value $50,000), Vessel Insurance none, Cargo Insurance none

Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty January 9, 1918 at Portland ME by Benjamin Thompson, clerk for New England Fish, 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 294, 3. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MANZANITA (1975)     The 78 ton 76 foot wooden oil screw Manzanita foundered April 17, 1975 near Cordova in the Gulf of Alaska.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 33 N 145 45 W   Chart 16013

Additional Information: Tonnage 78 Gross 53 Net, Length 76.5, Breadth 18.5, Depth 8.2, Built 1899 at Seattle WA, Former Names North Star and Queen City, ON 130814

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 837, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1976) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1870

 

MAPELE (1943)     The 3,545 ton steam screw freighter Mapele grounded and was lost January 15, 1943 at Cape Devine in the Shumagin Islands.  One crewmember and one Armed Guard were lost in the surf during rescue.  48 others were taken aboard the USS Discoverer.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 22 45 N 160 09 W   Chart 16540

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MAR DEL LABRADOR (1984)     The Spanish trawler Mar del Labrador sank November 2, 1984 approximately 25 miles southwest of Kodiak.  All thirty crewmembers were picked up by the fishing vessel Dona Genoveva.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MAR DEL ORO (1976)   The 156 ton 80 foot steel oil screw shrimper Mar del Oro foundered in the Shelikof Strait October 14, 1976.  The vessel sank within minutes.  The 6 person crew escaped to a life raft and all were hoisted to a Coast Guard helicopter two hours later.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 30 N 155 W   Char 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 156 Gross 108 Net, Length 79.9, Breadth 24.1, Depth 11.3, Built 1969 at Mobile AL, Horsepower 565, SL WY6521, Registered Tacoma WA, ON 520258

Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List, 2. Seattle Daily Times (October 14, 1976) “Six rescued off Kodiak Island” Pg 34, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1976) Pg 744

 

MAR DEL PLATA (1977)     The 156 ton 80 foot steel oil screw shrimp fishing vessel Mar del Plata grounded and foundered May 19, 1977 in the Shelikof Strait.  Crewmen were rescued by the fishing vessel Heidi J.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 30 N 155 W   Char 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 156 Gross 108 Net, Length 79.9, Breadth 24.1, Depth 11.3, Built 1969 at Mobile AL, Horsepower 565, SL WYZ5733, ON 519919

Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1976) Pg 744, 3. BOEM Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MARATHON (1925)     The 25 ton gas screw Marathon drug anchor and stranded in Kodiak at 11 a.m. November 17, 1925.  The vessel was moored in the harbor until a 45 mile an hour SW gale forced her onto the beach “about 500 feet west of Erskine’s Dock”.  The two aboard the Marathon attempted to get an anchor out but were too late.  The Ga. S. Pronto also attempted to render assistance but the Marathon had drifted onto the reef.  The engine of the Marathon was salvaged but the hull was damaged beyond repair.  The Marathon was valued at $2,500 and had no insurance.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 25 Gross 17 Net, Age 15 years, Registered Seward, ON 209474, Master Charles Gilbert of Ouzinkie, Owner John E Gilchrist of South Bend OR

Source: U S C G Report of Casualty February 18, 1926 by J E King, Agent at Kodiak

 

MARCELLA (1972)     The 14 ton 39 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Marcella foundered June 25, 1972 at Stephens Island.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   Unknown

Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 9 Net, Length 39.8, Breadth 10.9, Depth 4.2, Built 1943 at New Bedford MA, Former Name J-513 (U S A), ON 247226

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 424, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1978) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2118

 

MARCONIA (1962)     The 115 ton 74 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Marconia struck a reef and sank in Unga Strait on March 25, 1962.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 25 N 160 30 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: Tonnage 115 Gross 59 Net, Length 74.5, Breadth 20.4, Depth 9.9, Built 1937 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 200, SL WA7627, Owner Arthur Edwards, Registered Seattle, ON 236158

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) Pg 382, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 931

 

MARDI SUE LYNN (1990)     The 35 foot aluminum crab fishing vessel Mardi Sue Lynn caught fire and burned to the waterline April 25, 1990 off of Cape Chiniak.  All three crewmembers abandoned the vessel in a Zodiac.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   Unknown

Comment: Unknown which Cape Chiniak.  WG

Additional Information: ON 591428

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MARENGO (1876)     The 478 ton wooden whaling ship Marengo was caught in the ice abandoned in the Arctic NE of Point Barrow Sept 12, 1876.  The Marengo was out of New Bedford, Massachusetts and valued at $40,000 at the time of the disaster.

Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   71 23 29 N 156 28 30 W   Chart 16003

Sources: 1. Northern Mariner (April 2006) Pg 63 “19th Century Commercial Shipping Losses” by J R Bockstoce , 2. U S Commission of Fish and Fisheries : The Fishery Industries of the United States Section 5 Volume II “Destruction of the Arctic Whaling Fleet, 1876” Pgs 83-84

 

MARGARET (1874)     The U S transport schooner Margaret was driven ashore in a heavy snowstorm near the village of Kake March 2, 1874.  The vessel departed Sitka February 16, 1874 with captain Harrison at the helm bound for the San Juan Islands of Washington.  All three crewmen found safety, but the Margaret was lost and her cargo pillaged by Natives.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 58 30 N 133 56 30 W   Chart 17368

Sources: 1. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1961) Pg 222, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MARGARET (1921)     An explosion and fire destroyed the 55 ton gas screw Margaret at the oil dock at Katalla at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday July 6, 1921.  The three crewmen aboard all suffered burns but survived the disaster.  The Margaret was being filled with “distillate oil” at the time, having loaded seven tons or $500 worth.  The crew had loaded oil many times before and could find to cause for the explosion.  About a dozen company men helped fight the blaze, but the Margaret became a total loss.  She was valued at $42,385 and had $25,000 worth of insurance.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 12 N 144 31 W   Chart 16723

Additional Information: Tonnage 55 Gross 37 Net, Built 1920, Registration Ketchikan, ON 220614, Master B H Durkee of Katalla, Owner Bering River Coal Co of Seattle

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty August 22, 1921 by Durkee at Juneau

 

MARGARET (1937)     An explosion and fire destroyed the 9 ton wooden gas screw Margaret at the General Petroleum Dock at Ketchikan at 10:30 a.m. July 11, 1937.  The five crewmen escaped to safety, but the Margaret, valued at $4,000 was a total loss.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

“Calm, cloudy…smooth”  “Had filled starboard tank with 130 gallons of gas and had shifted to port tank and was about to take gas in that tank when an explosion occurred in port tank.  The explosion shattered port tank and caused gas to run out into bilge.  The engine room and pilot house caught afire immediately.  Attempted to put out fire, but fire could not be controlled.  Vessel was moved from oil dock and beached on Pennock Is. where she sank in about 10 or 15 ft. of water – with about 4 or 5 ft. of her mast visible above lower water.”  “Casualty occurred suddenly without warning – impossible to take measures to avoid it.”

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska 55 20 30 N 131 38 45 W   Chart 17428

Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Net, Age 13 years, Registered Ketchikan, ON 224608, Master Charles Ryan of Metlakatla, Owner Amanda Ryan of Metlakatla

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty July 12, 1937 by Charles Ryan

 

MARGARET A (1976)     The 108 ton oil screw Margaret A foundered November 22, 1976 at Frederick Sound by Turnabout Island.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 07 30 N 133 58 40 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: Tonnage 108 Gross, Built 1965, ON 501928

Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1978) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2118

 

MARGARET J (1957)     The 28 ton 49 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Margaret J stranded and was lost September 24, 1957 at Sunny Cove, Chomly (Cholmondeley) Sound.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 15 N 132 15 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 28 Gross 19 Net, Length 49, Breadth 13.5, Depth 6.2, Built 1927 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 85, Owner J A Johnson, Registered Seattle, ON 226740

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) Pg 329, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 778

 

MARGARET N (1996)     The 30 foot fishing vessel Margaret N sank October 2, 1996 at Hydaburg.  Both persons aboard made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 12 20 N 132 49 28 W   Chart 17400

Additional Information: ON 230176

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MARGE (1987)     The 36 foot fishing vessel Marge sank July 29, 1987 at Grand Island southeast of Ketchikan.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 58 15 N 132 51 45 W   Chart 17400

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MARGERY (1905)     The 10 ton 35 foot wooden schooner Margery was washed ashore in a westerly gale on the east side of Sanborn Harbor at 3 a.m. November 7, 1905.  The vessel departed Sand Point the day before bound for Sanborn Harbor with two aboard.  They had two anchors with 30 and 45 fathoms of chain out, but the chains parted in the heavy westerly gale.  Both crewmen survived, but the Margery, valued at $400 was a total loss and had no insurance.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska 55 10 N 160 04 W   Chart 16553

Comment: There is a notation on the Wreck Report under the signature of Potter that says Eagle Harbor, Nagai Island which is one bay over from Sanborn Harbor.  This vessel is listed as Marjory or Marjorie in other wreck lists.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 10, Length 35, Breadth 11, Depth 3.7, Built 1889 in Seattle, Registered Unalaska, ON 92309, Master and Owner John Potter of Sand Point, Cargo ballast

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report July 27, 1907 by Potter at Unalaska

 

MARGIE ANN (1963)     The 12 ton 33 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Margie Ann burned July 14, 1963 at Fresh Water Bay near Tenakee.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 51 N 134 59 W   Chart 17300

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 8 Net, Length 33.1, Breadth 10.7, Depth 4.8, Built 1935 at Wrangell, Horsepower 33, Owner Larry Jackson, Registered Wrangell, ON 234231

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) Pg 396, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 965

 

MARGUERITE (1936)     The 19 ton gas screw Marguerite exploded and caught fire at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday July 8, 1936 while docked at Snug Harbor.  The three crewmen escaped but the Marguerite was cut adrift and sank.  She was valued at $2,000 and was a total loss with no insurance.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 15 N 147 43 W   Chart 16701

Comments : I put this wreck on Knight Island but it could be a different Snug Harbor.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 19 Gross 13 Net, Built 1915, Registered Seward, ON 213371, Master E J Fribrock of Seattle, Owner Snug Harbor Packing Company of Seattle

Source: U S C G Report of Casualty July 29, 1936 by Fribrock at Seward

 

MARGUERITE (1964)     A vessel named Marguerite owned by Neal Day was reported lost at Kodiak in the Good Friday earthquake of March 27, 1964.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Source: Unofficial Wreck List

 

MARI JANA (1985)     The fishing vessel Mari Jana took a wave over the stern, flooded and sank July 26, 1985 six miles off of the mouth of the Kenai River in Cook Inlet.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 33 N 151 16 W   Chart 16660

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MARIA (1965)     The 8 ton 28 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Maria was consumed by fire August 25, 1965 at Naknek.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 43 40 N 157 00 45 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 7 Net, Length 28.7, Breadth 10.3, Depth 4, Built 1960 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 165, SL WM8329, Owner Pierre Mercurio, Registered Juneau, ON 281273

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 427, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1171

 

MARIAN M (1948)     The 34 ton 49 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Marian M collided with a dead mine at Salisbury Sound, 60 miles west of Sitka and was lost August 4, 1948.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 22 N 135 50 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: Tonnage 34 Gross 23 Net, Length 49.2, Breadth 16, Depth 6.9, Built 1941 at Potlatch WA, Horsepower 100, Owner Barry C Moxley, Registered Aberdeen WA, ON 242077

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1948) Pg 314, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1949) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 910

 

MARIE (1919)     The 43 ton 63 foot gas screw fishing vessel Marie burned September 25, 1919 at Sister Island.  The 6 crewmen aboard made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 52 15 N 131 17 15 W   Chart 17434

Comment: Could be a different Sister Island than the one I charted.  WG

Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 312, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1921) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 455, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Pg 272

 

MARIE (1941)     The 10 ton 34 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Marie straned and was lost near Kake February 4, 1941.  The one person aboard survived the disaster.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 58 30 N 133 56 30 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 8 Net, Length 34.1, Breadth 11.6, Depth 4, Built 1918 at Juneau, Horsepower 18, Owner Willie Grant, Registered Juneau, ON 216436

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1942) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 511, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1941) Pg 208

 

MARIE JO (1942)     The 28 ton 44 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Marie Jo foundered August 11, 1942 in Mill Bay.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 49 30 N 152 20 30 W   Chart 16595

Additional Information: Tonnage 28 Gross 19 Net, Length 44.8, Breadth 12.5, Depth 7.2, Built 1940 at Aberdeen WA, Horsepower 110 (Brake), Owner Martinas van der Zweth, Registered Aberdeen WA, ON 239851

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1943) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 755, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1942) Pg 366

 

MARIE MAE (1989)     The 32 foot aluminum salmon fishing vessel Marie Mae rolled quickly, capsized and was lost July 5, 1989 three nautical miles off of Ninilchik in Cook Inlet.  The two crewmembers narrowly escaped to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 03 N 151 40 W   Chart 16640

Additional Information: ON 593366

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MARIE N (1964)     The 10 ton 38 foot wooden oil screw pleasure vessel Marie N stranded and was lost (tidal wave) March 27, 1964 at Kodiak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information:  Tonnage 10 Gross 8 Net, Length 38, Breadth 10.7, Depth 4, Built 1925 at Seattle WA, Former Name Speedboat No. 8 (F & W L S), Horsepower 65, SL WL2316, Owner Harry Gottschalk, Registered Juneau, ON 264761

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) Pg 399, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1004

 

MARIECHEN (1906)     The 2521 ton 290 foot steel German steam ship Mariechen struck a rock I a snowstorm January 25, 1906 in False Bay, Chatham Straits.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

“Disabled Dec. 25, 1905, deadlight in coal bunker sprung open, adrift until Jan. 25, 1906.”  “Unable to see on account of snow storm and lack of steam.”  “Struck rock in snowstorm.”  “No charts of this coast, compass frozen up”

The Mariechen departed Seattle December 19, 1905 bound for Vladivostock, East Siberia.  She had a crew of 50 and a cargo of 5,000 tons of general merchandise worth $100,000.  The vessel herself was worth $250,000.  At the time the wreck report was filed by Rudolph Heldt, master of the Mariechen, the damage to the vessel and cargo had not been ascertained.  Later reports have the vessel salvaged and towed back to Seattle.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 58 N 134 55 W   Chart 17300

Comment: Though the Mariechen may have been salvaged, there may be other evidence of this wreck on site.  That is why it is included in this compilation.”  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 2521, Length 289.6, Breadth 44.3, Depth 25.2, Built 1885 at Liverpool, England, Registered Hamburg Germany, ON 2521, Master Rudolph Heldt of Kiel Germany, Owner M Jabsen of Hamburg, Insurance unknown at the time of report

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report February 1, 1906, 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pgs 125&135

 

MARIETTA J (1970)     The oil screw Marietta J foundered and was lost August 29, 1970 three miles west of Cape Strait in Frederick Sound.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 59 55 N 133 05 30 W   Chart 17360

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MARINA (1903)     The 5 ton 30 foot wooden sloop Marina struck a rock and was lost at 7:00 p.m. February 4, 1903.  Owner of the Marina, James Gordon and five passengers had departed Killisnoo and were bound for Hoonah when the disaster occurred.  They were loaded with $250 worth of camp supplies and potatoes.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

“Wind strong, dark.”  “Stranded on a reef.”  “Probably Fisheries Point. (Chatham Strait) Alaska.”  “The vessel struck a rock; all goods were moved ashore.  Men went on board to wait for tide to rise.  Only one was seen again who spoke only a few words and died.”

Lost were owner James Gordon, Grant Kadotk and Jim Teenduo.  The wreck report was signed by William M Carle, Minister of Gospel.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 47 30 N 134 42 35 W   Chart 17320

Comment: Fishery Point is on the route that the vessel was taking.  Some wreck reports spell the vessel Mariana.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 5, Length 30, Breadth 8.5, Depth 3.0, Built 1891 at Tacoma WA, Registered Juneau, ON 92344, Insurance unknown

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report March 6, 1903 at Juneau

 

MARINE MAID (1988)     The 32 foot gillnet fishing vessel Marine Maid sank July 4, 1988 off of Ninilchik.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 03 N 151 40 W   Chart 16640

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MARINE VIEW (1989)     The 82 foot fishing vessel Marine View grounded and sank during a herring opening March 21, 1989 in Kah Shakes Cove.  All three crewmembers were able to walk to shore.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 02 40 N 130 59 15 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: ON 243366

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MARION (1906)     The 235 ton 123 foot wooden cod fishing schooner Marion foundered at Sanak at 8:40 p.m. April 11, 1906.  The vessel departed San Francisco March 18, 1906 with 8 crewman bound for Sanak.  The vessel was carrying 200 tons of food and fishing supplies worth $5,000.  The following are from the wreck report filed in San Francisco by A G Ames, Manager Owner:

“Sanak, Alaska.”  “Fresh breeze NE, swell, 8:40 p.m., snow squall.”  “Mistaken position.” “Let go both anchors”  “Foundering.”  “Total loss.”

The report lists the vessel and cargo as total losses.  The Marion was valued at $8,000 and insured for $6,000.  Her cargo was insured for $4,400.  The crew survived the disaster.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 29 54 N 162 48 40 W   Chart 16547

Additional Information: Tonnage 235 Gross 223 Net, Length 123, Breadth 31.8, Depth 10.3, Built 1882 San Francisco, Registered San Francisco, ON 91487, Master F W Haus of San Francisco, Owner Alaska Codfish Co of San Francisco

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report June 8, 1906 at San Francisco

 

MARION (1952)     The 14 ton 49 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Marion burned May 11, 1952 about three miles west of the mouth of the Kaliakh River.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 05 40 N 142 48 30 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 10 Net, Length 49.5, Breadth 11.4, Depth 3.7, Built 1905 at Astoria OR, Horsepower 100, Owner Eugene H LaMonde, Registered Seattle, ON 202121

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) Pg 389, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 931

 

MARION A (1978)     The 42 foot steel crab fishing vessel Marion A rolled over an sank in foul weather in Geese Channel off of Aiaktalik Island October 2, 1978.  Crewmen Jerry Allain (28) and Delno Oldham (25) were lost with the Marion A.  Both were from Kodiak. A third crewman, Gerald C. Bourgeois (29) of Covington, Louisiana was rescued 11 days later by the vessel Moonsong. The Marion A listed to port and capsized at 10:30 in the morning a half mile from Aiaktalik Island on October 2nd. It happened so quickly a radio distress call could not be made. With the help of skipper Allain, Bourgeois was able to wrestle into a survival suit while in the water. The two attempted to make shore but Allain succumbed to the cold before they reached the beach. Bourgeois got to shore after a long struggle and put together a makeshift shelter of driftwood. He stayed in the survival suit the entire 11 days until rescued, living on beach grass, wild celery and mussels. No one in the fleet knew that the Marion A had been lost. On Friday the 13th crewman Buddy Walton from the fishing vessel Moonsong happened to be looking through binoculars as the vessel passed the beach where Bourgeois was shipwrecked. He noticed the orange of the survival suit and passed the glasses to skipper Ole Harder who identified the orange object as having waving arms. Realizing he was about to be rescued, Bourgeois could not wait for a skiff to be launched and swam out to the Moonsong.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 45 N 153 53 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 27 Gross 18 Net, Length 39, Breadth 13.5, Depth 8, Built 1965 at Freeland WA, ON 299131, SL WV8323

Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak), 2. Seattle Times (November 19, 1978) “Fisherman survived frigid sea, 11 days on island” Pg C3

 

MARIPOSA (1917)     The 3,158 ton 314 foot Alaska Steamship Company steamer Mariposa struck a reef near Point Baker and was lost November 18, 1917.  The vessel was carrying 25,000 cases of salmon and 1,200 tons of copper ore as well as 265 passengers.  She had departed Anchorage and recently stopped at Shakan to load canned salmon.  It was shortly after her departure at 3:00 a.m. from Shakan that the Mariposa ran up on the reef.  The passengers were quickly evacuated.  Among the passengers aboard the Mariposa were shipwrecked crewmen from the Al-Ki, which was lost November 1st southwest of Juneau and shipwrecked crewmen from the Manhattan, which was lost November 15th in the Gulf of Alaska.  There were tensions between the two shipwrecked crews as the Manhattan crew had looted the wreck site of the Al-Ki before the Manhattan sank two weeks later.  Tourists were getting their money’s worth of adventure that the Alaska Steamship Company brochures promised.  They were seeing the wonder of Alaska, getting to mingle with two different shipwrecked Alaskan crews and finally becoming ship wreck victims themselves.  Six hours and 38 minutes after the stranding of the Mariposa, the vessel slid off into the deep carrying the valuable cargos with her.  The crew and passengers were taken aboard the Curacao, Ravalli and Jefferson and transported to safety.  The reef where the disaster occurred has been renamed Mariposa Reef.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 22 45 N 133 42 W   Chart 17378

Additional Information: Tonnage 3,158 Gross 1,939 Net, Length 314, Breadth 41, Depth 17.3, IHP 3,500, Built 1883 at Philadelphia PA, Registered Port Townsend WA, SL KBGT, ON 91554

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1918) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 439, 2. Alaska Steam Alaska Geographic Quarterly Vol 11 No 4 (1984) Pg 64, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Pg 143

 

MARJO (1996)     A 48 foot vessel named Marjo was consumed by fire June 4, 1996 in Salisbury Sound.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 22 N 135 50 W   Chart 17320

Source: Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MARJORY (1905) See MARGERY (1905)

 

MARJORIE H (1971)     The 40 ton 50 foot wooden oil screw halibut fishing vessel Marjorie H foundered May 20, 1971 off of the Kenai Peninsula 80 miles west of Resurrection Bay.  The vessel was reported to have struck a deadhead.  The five crewmen spent two days in a life raft before they were picked up by another fishing vessel.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 48 N 149 30 W   Chart 16013

Additional Information: Tonnage 40 Gross 27 Net, Length 50, Breadth 15.3, Depth 7, Built 1947 at Everett WA, Former Name Janette, ON 249527

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 433, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1974) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1636, 3. Seattle Daily Times (May 27, 1971) “5 Rescued after 2 days in life raft” Pg 34

 

MARJORIE M (1929)     The 14 ton 40 foot gas screw fishing vessel Marjorie M was consumed by fire at Haines in 1929.  No one was aboard and no lives were lost at the time of the disaster.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   59 14 10 N 135 26 15 W   Chart 17300

Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 10 Net, Length 40, Breadth 11.8, Depth 3.8, Built 1928 at Hoonah, IHP 20, Registered Juneau, ON 223967, Owner Marion McKinley of Hoonah

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1931) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 940, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1930) Pgs 414-5

 

MARK CHRISTOPHER (1997)     The 49 foot salmon seiner Mark Christopher grounded and sank June 23, 1997 approximately 20 nautical miles east of Sitka.  All five crewmembers made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 135 20 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: ON 296804

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MARK F (1974)     The logging barge Mark F foundered September 3, 1974 near Whittier.  The vessel became disabled in high winds and her cargo of logs broke loose causing the Mark F to founder.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 46 30 N 148 41 W   Chart 16700

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MARMOT (1931)     A fire of unknown origin destroyed the 44 ton wooden halibut fishing ketch Marmot at 9:00 p.m. Wednesday August 12, 1931.  The vessel with her crew of 7 was fishing for halibut 10 miles east of Two Headed Island near Kodiak Island when the tragedy occurred.  The following are statements taken from the casualty report filed by master and half owner Arne Larson of Ketchikan:

“Brisk westerly wind, dark, cloudy.”  “Fire”  “On discovery of fire, engineer went into engine room and discharged 2 ½ gallon “Foamite” extinguisher, but was driven back by smoke and flames.”  “After engineer was driven from engine room, all doors, companionways and ventilators were closed and sealed in the hope that the flames would be smothered.  Two dories were launched and stood by until flames burst thru the deck.  As vessel was apparently doomed, crew in the two dories started for land.  Harry Venema had been ailing for some time before the fire but had stated that it was not necessary to see a doctor.  Apparently the stress of the fire and the exposure to the dory was too much for him.  He died in the dory on the morning of August 13th, 1931.”

The Marmot was valued at $18,000 at the time of the disaster.  Her cargo of 30,000 lbs. of freshly caught halibut was valued at $2,000.  Both the vessel and her cargo were total losses.  The Marmot was insured for $16,000 and her cargo insured for $2,000.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 54 N 153 35 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 44 Gross 30 Net, Age 6 years, Registered Ketchikan, ON 225318, Owners Arne Larson and C Hansen of Ketchikan, Last Port Ketchikan August 1, 1931

Source: U S C G Report of Casualty August 17, 1931 at Seward

 

MARMOT CAPE (1964)     The vessel Marmot Cape, out of Port Bailey and owned by Herman Von Scheele, was reported missing in the Good Friday earthquake of March 27, 1964.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 56 N 153 02 W   Chart 16594

Source: Unofficial Wreck List

 

MARMOT CAPE (1977)     The 27 ton 40 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Marmot Cape foundered October 15, 1977 in Astrolabe Bay 14 miles west of Cape Spencer. While headed south from Alaska to Columbia Ward in Seattle, the vessel sought shelter in Astrolabe Bay with two persons on board. Seas were running at 30 to 35 feet and winds gusting to 70 knots. The anchor line soon snapped and the two men attempted to jog around the bay in the high winds. The vessel eventually capsized and sank. Crewman Paul Stratton (27) donned a survival suit but skipper Bill Wood did not. Stratton was able to reach a nearby beach where he was rescued three days later. Bill Wood was lost along with the Marmot Cape. Stratton paced the beach in search of food and his ship mate. When the rescue helicopter picked him up days later it was observed that bear tracks were interlaced with Stratton’s tracks up and down the beach*.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 22 30 N 136 54 30 W   Chart 17300

Additional Information: Tonnage 27 Gross 19 Net, Length 39.9, Breadth 14, Depth 7, Built 1960 at Seattle WA, ON 283812

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 435, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1978) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2118, 3. The Oregonian (October 22, 1977) “Hunt Dropped for Oregonian” Pg A20, 4. *Personal Interview WG, 5. Seattle Times “December 27, 1977) “Suit staved off death in icy sea” Pg A15

 

MARSHA ANN (1968)     The oil screw Marsha Ann was lost September 27, 1968 off of Adak Island.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   51 45 N 176 45 W   Chart 16012

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MARTEN (1975)     The 188 ton 82 foot wooden oil screw crab fishing vessel Marten struck a rock pinnacle, rolled over and foundered at 10:15 p.m. February 20, 1975 off of Spruce Cape, four miles north of the Kodiak Harbor.  Captain Jeff Alexander (21) of Seattle was the only survivor of the disaster.  Lost with the Marten were Jim Rich (21) of Seattle, Mike Rowe from England and Deere Alioski of Yugoslavia.  Jeff Alexander was able to survive clinging to a cliff overnight in a snow storm.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 49 15 N 152 20 W   Chart 16594

Additional Information: Tonnage 188 Gross 155 Net, Length 82.2, Breadth 26.6, Depth 8.7, Built 1943 at Seattle WA, Former Name BSP-1914 (U S A), ON 250970

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 436, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1978) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2118, 3. Seattle Daily Times (February 24, 1975) “Seattle man lone survivor of sinking near Kodiak” Pg 40

 

MARTHA (1924)     The 23 ton wooden schooner Martha broke an anchor fluke in a heavy northwesterly storm and washed ashore on a reef on the E S E entrance to Catons Harbor at 6:00 a.m. April 27, 1924.  The Martha had been towed to Catons Harbor and anchored by the schooner Louise.  No one was able to get to the Martha in the northwesterly blizzard and snow storm before she washed up on the reef and was broken up by the seas.  The Martha had 17 ½ tons of fish salt worth $112.75 aboard, which were lost along with the vessel which was valued at $1,000 at the time of the tragedy.  Neither the Martha nor her cargo was insured.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 24 N 162 32 W   Chart 16547

Additional Information: Tonnage 23.3 Gross 14.71 Net, Age 19 years, Registered San Francisco, ON 204220, Owner Union Fish Co of San Francisco, Last Port towed from Pauloff Harbor

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty November 3, 1924 by G Schmidt, Agent

 

MARTHA (1938)     The 11 ton wooden gas screw fishing vessel Martha foundered in Chilkat Inlet at 12:30 p.m. August 3, 1938.  Master George Kasko of Haines and one deck hand were aboard when the disaster occurred.  Their cargo was 36,000 pounds of fresh salmon.  The following are quotes from the casualty report:

“Chilkat Inlet, 3 miles south of Letnikof Cove.”  “Force of wind strong; weather bad with heavy sea running; daylight.”  “Foundered…unable to stand strain of heavy seas.”  “Boat foundered suddenly; crew unable to take any measures to avoid casualty.”

The Martha was valued at $2,000 and her cargo $1,500.  Vessel and cargo were listed as total losses with no insurance.  The two crewmen made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   59 10 40 N 135 24 10 W   Chart

Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Built 1915, Registered Juneau, ON 213823, Owner Haines Packing Co of Seattle, Last Port Letnikof Cove, Destination Chilkoot Inlet

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty May 25, 1939 at Juneau by E M Brennan of Harris Packing Company

 

MARTHA (1939)     The 30 ton 60 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Martha stranded and was lost at Walrus Island near Nelson Lagoon at 10:00 a.m. Thursday October 19, 1939.  The vessel departed Unalaska October 14th bound for Bristol Bay with four crewmen aboard.  The rudder was carried away in a storm causing the stranding.  The four crewmen managed to escape but the Martha was a total loss.  The vessel was valued at $7,500 of which $6,000 was insured.  There was no cargo.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 01 40 N 160 50 W   Chart 16363

Comment: The Merchant Vessels of 1941 Vessels Reported Lost Pg 510  say this vessel was wrecked at Deer Island near Nelson Lagoon.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 30 Gross 16 Net, Length 60.3, Breadth 14, Depth 4.7, Built 1917 at Eureka CA, Horsepower 65 (Brake), Registered Cordova, ON 215539, Master Donald Pickard of Unalaska, Owner F Schroder of San Francisco

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1941) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 510, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1939) Pg 214, 3. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty December 12, 1939 by Schroder at Unalaska

 

MARTHA (1951)     The 40 ton 60 foot wooden oil screw Martha burned August 16, 1951 at Nelson Lagoon.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 N 161 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 40 Gross 32 Net, Length 60.3, Breadth 14, Depth 4.7, Built 1917 at Eureka CA, Service freight, Horsepower 165, SL WA 7854, Owner Charles Franz, Registered Juneau, ON 215539

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 354, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 825

 

MARTHA A (1949)     The 128 ton 107 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Martha A stranded and was lost near Mary Island on April 26, 1949.

Mapping and Location:  Alaska Unknown

Comment: There are multiple Mary Islands; further research is warranted.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 128 Gross 79 Net, Length 107.7, Breadth 18.2, Depth 9.3, Built 1943 at Ipswich MA, Crew 8, Horsepower 2,400, Owner Harold S Anderson, Registered Seattle WA, ON 256088

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1949) Pg 338, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1950) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 926

 

MARTHA W TUFT (1907)     The 173 ton 105 foot wooden schooner Martha W Tuft stranded and was lost at the Katalla River during the night of October 5, 1907.  A strong storm washed the vessel up onto the sand spit at the mouth of the river.  The crew of seven was rescued from the rigging.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 12 N 144 31 W   Chart 16723

Additional Information: Tonnage 173 Gross 164 Net, Length 105, Breadth 29.8, Depth 8.6, Built 1876 at Eureka California, Registered Seattle, ON 90924, Vessel Value with cargo $14,000

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report, 2. The San Francisco Call (October 15, 1907) Pg 11

 

MARTHA WILKES (1910)     The 67 ton 80 foot schooner Martha Wilkes stranded and was lost at Cape Bering, Siberia the evening of Saturday August 13, 1910.  The vessel departed Anadyr, Siberia August 11th bound for Nome.  There were three crewmen aboard and 1,000 lbs. of furs and skins valued at $600.  The cause of the disaster is attributed to foggy weather, a strong SE wind and heavy seas.  Natives rescued the crew of the Martha Wilkes on August 14, 1910.  The vessel and her cargo were total losses with no insurance.  The Martha W Wilkes was valued at $5,000 at the time of the tragedy.

Mapping and Location: Siberia

Additional Information: Tonnage 67, Length 80, Breadth 17, Depth 6.5, Built 1898 Seattle, Master C B Owen of St Michael, Owner Owen & Johnson of St Michael

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report September 21, 1910 by C B Owen at Nome

 

MARTIE (1996)     The 43 foot salmon seiner Martie sank August 2, 1996 at Evans Island in Prince William Sound.  All five persons aboard made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 03 N 148 04 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: ON 249005

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MARTIN D (1974)     The 147 ton 80 foot steel oil screw tug Martin D foundered February 15, 1974 at the entrance to Wrangell Narrows in Sumner Strait.  Three of her four crewmembers were lost.  The barge the vessel was towing was caught by the wind and blown ahead of the tug causing her to capsize and sink.  Lost were captain Jack MacKinnon, Jack Sanders (42) and Al Kite (51).  Mike MacIntyre (22) was the only survivor.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 31 N 132 55 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: Tonnage 147 Gross 98 Net, Length 80.2, Breadth 23.2, Depth 9.1, Built 1945, Service tug, Former Name ST-890 (U S A), ON 283372

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 436, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1979) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2243

 

MARTINDALE (1969)     The diesel screw Martindale stranded and was lost March 8, 1969 in Surf Bay on the southwest coast of Akun Island.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   54 10 N 165 37 W   Chart 16520

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MARTY N (1983)     The fishing vessel Marty N caught fire while under way and was abandoned January 1, 1983 west of Glacier Island.  The crew was rescued by the caretaker at the Fairmont Cannery who had heard the Mayday broadcast.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 53 N 147 11 W   Chart 16700

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MARVA ANNE (1999)     The 58 foot steel longline halibut fishing vessel Marva Anne flooded and sank October 21, 1999 two and a half miles west of Security Bay in Stephens Passage.  Both crewmembers donned survival suits and abandoned ship to a life raft.  They were rescued by the fishing vessel Celtic Air.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 53 N 134 21 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: ON 580460

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MARY (1871)     The 373 ton wooden whaling ship Mary was abandoned in the ice around Point Belcher September 14, 1871.  Her estimated value at the time of the disaster was $57,000.  The home port for the Mary was Edgarton, Massachusetts.  Most of the Arctic whaling fleet was lost with the Mary and in total 1,219 sailors had to be rescued.  The survivors of the Mary and more than 30 other shipwrecked whaling vessels reached Honolulu on seven remaining whaling ships on October 24, 1871.

Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   70 47 40 N 159 39 02 W   Chart 16003

Sources: 1. Harper’s Weekly (December 2, 1871) “Destruction of the Arctic Whaling Fleet”, 2. Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914 Microcopy 641

 

MARY (1885)     The 18 ton 48 foot wooden sloop Mary drifted ashore and was wrecked at 8 a.m. Sunday November 22, 1885 on Admiralty Island.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by Charles Green of Juneau, owner and master of the Mary:

“North point of Admiralty Island, Alaska…Stranded.”  “Had three anchors out…Dragged anchors and drifted ashore…Strong gale and heavy sea.”  “Total wreck”

The crew of three made it to safety, but the Mary, valued at $100 was lost.  There was neither cargo nor insurance.  The Mary had sailed from Juneau November 19th bound for Admiralty Island.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska 58 24 45 N 134 57 15 W   Chart 17300

Comment: I charted this wreck at Pt Retreat, the northernmost point on Admiralty Island.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 18.26, Length 48.4, Breadth 14.3, Depth 4.6, Built 1884 at Wrangell, Registered Wrangell, ON 91744

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report November 20, 1886 at Juneau by Charles Green

.

MARY (1926)     The 10 ton wooden gas screw Mary collided with the gas screw Virginia E in Tongass Narrows at 3:00 a.m. Monday September 27, 1926.  She had departed Saxman that day bound for Chomly with four aboard.  The following are excerpts taken from the casualty report filed by Peter McKay, master of the Mary:

“No wind; clear and calm; moonlight, slight haze.”  “In Tongass Narrows near Channel Is. Light…Collision Ga. S. Virginia E of Ketchikan.”  “Captain of Mary was unable to determine which side to pass Virginia E on.”  “I heard Virginia E blow one whistle but considered I was too close to pass on starboard so answered with two whistles and swung to port.  Both vessels were advancing too rapidly to avoid collision and I hit the Virginia E on the port side.  The bow of the Mary was badly smashed and she began to sink immediately.  The Virginia E put a rope under the Mary to keep her afloat and towed her ashore and then took my crew of three besides myself aboard and brought us to Saxman, Alaska.”

The Mary was a total loss and had no insurance.  She was valued at $2,000 and with no cargo aboard.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 23 45 N 131 45 45 W   Chart 17428

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 8 Net, Built 1913, Registered Ketchikan, ON 211056, Master Peter McKay of Ketchikan, Owner Charles T Johnson of Ketchikan

Source: U S C G  Report of Casualty September 27, 1926 at Ketchikan

 

MARY AND IDA (1904)     The 110 foot wooden cod fishing schooner Mary and Ida drug anchor, stranded and was lost at Unga Island at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday February 23, 1904.  The vessel was anchored just off the codfish station at Unga Island when the disaster occurred.  A violent hurricane force storm with 90 mile an hour NW winds and rough seas stranded the Mary and Ida.  She was carrying 78,000 fish or 200 tons of salted codfish valued at $12,000.  The Mary and Ida was valued at $7,000 and became a total loss along with her cargo.  The crew of 8 was helped to safety by the employees of the codfish station and all survived.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 11 N 160 30 10 W   Chart 16553

Comment: H W McCurdy (Pg 94) has this vessel lost in the Bering Sea February 28, 1904. WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 174 Net, Built 1882 at San Francisco, Length 110.2, Breadth 29.4, Depth 9.7, Registered San Francisco, ON 91524, Master M Ipsen of San Francisco, Owner Pacific Marine Supply Co of San Francisco, Last Port Sand Point February 8, 1904, Destination San Francisco, Vessel Insurance $7,000, Cargo Insurance $10,000

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report March 30, 1904 by Ipsen

 

MARY AND SUSAN (1888)     The 327 ton 115 foot wooden whaling bark Mary and Susan was lost on the reef four miles south of Point Barrow during a storm on August 3, 1888.  The vessel departed San Francisco March 9, 1888 with a crew of 31 bound for the Arctic.  At the time of the loss, the Mary and Susan was carrying $12,000 worth of “whaling supplies”.  The vessel was valued at $8,000 and became a total loss along with her cargo.  Four other whalers were caught in a lee shore and wrecked along with the Mary and Susan in the same ferocious gale; the Fleetwing, Young Phoenix, Jane Grey and the Ion.  The shipwrecked crewmembers were taken aboard the revenue cutter Bear and transported to San Francisco.

Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   71 23 20 N 156 28 30 W   Chart 16003

Additional Information: Tonnage 327, Length 114.7, Breadth 29, Depth 16.8, Built 1857 New Bedford MA, Registered New Bedford, ON 17556, Master L C Owen of Vinyard Haven, Owner J H Bartlett & Sons of New Bedford, Insurance $20,000

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report by owners at New Bedford December 13, 1888, 2. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1895) Pg 361

 

MARY ANN (1905)     The 96 ton 88 foot wooden cod fishing schooner Mary Ann stranded and was lost at Unga at 11:45 a.m. Monday November 13, 1905.  She had sailed from Seattle September 19, 1905 on a fishing trip to the North Pacific with ten crewmen aboard.  At the time of the disaster she was carrying 85 tons of salt and salt codfish worth $3,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by John Russel, master and owner of the Mary Ann:

“In the outer harbor of Unga, Alaska…Hurricane from the NE…In day time, heavy sea and strong undertow.  Barometer 27.85, lowest in history of Alaska.”  “Had 2 anchors out, 35 fathoms chain on 515# anchor, 8 fathoms chain and 70 fathoms hawser on 613# anchor.  7 fathoms water where anchored.”  “Port anchor broke shank 6 in. from crown of anchor; then began to drift and left go third anchor with 65 fathoms chain.  But wind increasing and vessel diving badly and dragging all the time, and 11:48 a.m. struck her stern on a rock.  The next sea she struck under her cabin, and the next 4 feet forward of the main mast, and that broke her back.  She began to fill with water, so let go cables and let her drive up on the shore.  2:40 p.m. we got on shore ourselves.”  “Total loss”

The crew all survived the disaster, but the Mary Ann, valued at $5,000 and her cargo were lost.  The vessel was insured for $2,500 and her cargo for $2,000.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 11 N 160 30 10 W   Chart 16553

Additional Information: Tonnage 96.18 Net, Length 88.3, Breadth 19.8, Depth 9.8, Built 1852 Philadelphia PA, Registered Seattle, ON 17438, Owner and Master John Fussel of Ballard WA

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report April 2, 1906 by John Fussel

 

MARY ANN (1955)     The 7 ton 29 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mary Ann was consumed by fire June 8, 1955 in Kendrick Bay on Prince of Wales Island.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 51 15 N 131 58 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 5 Net, Length 29.4, Breadth 8.7, Depth 3.6, Built 1928 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 16, Owner James J Fitzgerald, Registered Ketchikan, ON 233209

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) Pg 332, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 744

 

MARY ANNE (1986)     The 34 foot fishing vessel Mary Anne was lost September 10, 1986 between Karluk and the Red River Lagoon.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 34 10 N 154 27 30 W   Chart 16580

Source: Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak)

 

MARY ANNE (1992)     The 29 foot fishing vessel Mary Ann was consumed by fire and sank October 14, 1992 near Mitrofania Island.  The Mary Anne and the New Star were being towed by the fishing vessel Silver Bullit when the Silver Bullit struck a rock.  The vessels were rafted together while repairs were being made, but caught fire and all three vessels were lost.  There was no loss of life.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 53 N 158 50 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: ON 600078

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MARY C FISHER (1931)     The 12 ton two masted vessel Mary C Fisher foundered and sank in a storm in the Shelikof Strait at 12:10 p.m. Friday August 28, 1931.  Owner and master Cliff Sumerlin of Cordova and two others had departed Kodiak the evening of August 24th.  They were bound for Dutch Harbor and Unalaska.  They were carrying a ton of coal and six tons of grocery supplies, fishing gear and gasoline valued at $900.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

“3 miles E Cape Kubugukli Shelikof Strait Pnei. Alaska.”  “Wind 60 mile gale sweeping mist and rain.  High tide, heavy broken cross seas running, midday.”  “S.E. storm that swung sharply to So. West causing heavy cross seas that swept deck, damaged vessel, and filled it.”  “Took every measure possible to save vessel until last minute of hope.”  “Foundered and sank.”  “Two seamen, Names George Tapper and Olaf Hansen and myself worked along coast in open skiff for 7 days to reach Kanatak.  Our eats were pilot bread and coffee only.  Made report of foundered vessel to Captain Anderson on S.S. Starr

The Mary C Fisher was valued at $5,500 at the time of the tragedy.  There was no insurance on the vessel or her cargo.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 53 50 N  155 03 35 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 8 Net, Age 4 years 3 months, Registered Juneau, ON 226258, Vessel and Cargo loss total

Source: U S C G Report of Casualty March 4, 1932 at Cordova by Sumerlin

 

MARY ELLEN (1890)     The 77 ton Canadian schooner Mary Ellen was wrecked on a reef at Sand Point July 23, 1890.  The wreck was sold for $150.  The purchaser raised the Mary Ellen and sold her at a big advance to Jacobson of Victoria.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 20 15 N 160 30 W   Chart 16553

Sources: 1. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1895) Pg 435, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MARY ELLEN (1942)     The 18 ton 39 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mary Ellen burned July 30, 1942 at Hinchinbrook Island.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 23 N 146 28 W   Chart 16013

Additional Information: Tonnage 18 Gross 15 Net, Length 39.6, Breadth 14.2, Depth 4.6, Built 1903 at Whatcom WA, Horsepower 25, Owner Edward E Haltness, Registered Cordova, ON 200435

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1943) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 756, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1942) Pg 211

 

MARY ELLEN (1943)     The 15 ton 39 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mary Ellen burned August 7, 1943 at Icy Point.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska Unknown

Additional Information: Tonnage 15 Gross 10 Net, Length 38.9, Breadth 13.2, Depth 5.3, Built 1928 at Houghton WA, Horsepower 25, Crew 2, Owner Arthur Anderson, Registered Ketchikan, ON 227770

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1944) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 755, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1943) Pg 217

 

MARY G (1933)     The 31 ton 51 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mary G  foundered in 1933 southwest of the Alaska Peninsula near the Shumagin Islands.  There was no one aboard at the time of the disaster.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 10 N 160 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: Tonnage 31 Gross 21 Net, Length 51.4, Breadth 14.2, Depth 6.4, Built 1915 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 40, Owner Northern Fisheries of Washington, Registered Tacoma WA, ON 213372

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1941) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 511, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1939) Pg 216, 3. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 425

 

MARY G II (1931)     The 34 ton gas screw Mary G II caught fire and was lost on the NE coast of Prince of Wales Island at 10:30 a.m. November 24, 1931.  The vessel departed Ketchikan November 17th, 1931 with two aboard bound for the fishing grounds outside of Prince of Wales Island.  Master and owner of the Mary G II, Otto Bindpage, listed the following information in his casualty report:

“Near Coffman Island at entrance to Lake Bay, Prince of Wales Island.”  “Raining and sky overcast light SW wind.”  “Caught fire from carbureter back firing.”  “Endeavored to put out fire with extinguishers.”  “Fire occurring in engine room got beyond control, master and crew were forced to take to skiff.”  “Total loss”

Both Bindpage and his crewman escaped the disaster, but the Mary G II, valued at $10,600, was a total loss.  She was insured for $9,000.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 01 45 N 132 50 30 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: Tonnage : 34 Gross 23 Net, Built 1919, Registered Ketchikan, ON 218151, Cargo none

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty November 27, 1931 at Ketchikan

 

MARY GRAY (1906)     The schooner Mary Gray was lost in a storm in Dolphin Island Bay in 1906 along with the sloop Lila and schooner Olivia. The three vessels are mistakenly listed on Alaska shipwrecks lists since as early as 1914.  All three were in fact lost off the coast of Alabama in the hurricane that made landfall south of Mobile September 27, 1906.

Mapping and Location: Unknown – Error in Location

Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 128 & Pg 269, 2. Washington Historical Quarterly (1916) “Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route” Pgs 21-37, 3. Historic Shipwrecks and Magnetic Anomalies of the Northern Gulf of Mexico (1989) Pg H-17

 

MARY H THOMAS (1894)     The 94 ton trading schooner Mary H Thomas was lost in the Bering Sea in 1894.  She was valued at $8,500 at the time of the disaster.

Mapping and Location: Unknown

Sources: 1. Washington Historical Quarterly (1916) “Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route” Pg 32, 2. The Northern Mariner (April 2006) “19th Century Commercial Shipping Losses” Pg 66

 

MARY HELEN (1999)     The 50 foot fiberglass codfish trawler Mary Helen was consumed by a stateroom fire and lost February 22, 1999 approximately 15 nautical miles southwest of King Cove.  Both crewmembers made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 03 20 N 162 19 W   Chart 16540

Additional Information: ON 991700

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MARY J (1933)     The 9 ton 36 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mary J foundered near Sitka September 23, 1933.  The one person aboard made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 135 20 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 36, Breadth 11, Depth 3, Built 1922 at Sitka, Horsepower 12, Owner Peter C Nelson, Registered Sitka, ON 222617

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1938) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 512, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1933) Pgs 434-5

 

MARY JANE (1980)     The crab fishing vessel Mary Jane ran aground at Unalga Pass November 26, 1980.  The crew abandoned ship in survival suits and swam to the beach.  They were rescued the following day by the fishing vessel Advancer.  Early efforts to salvage the Mary Jane were thwarted by bad weather.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 58 N 166 14 W   Chart 16011

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MARY L (1932)     The 8 ton wooden gas screw Mary L broke up on the beach near Wrangell at 10 p.m. Wednesday February 14, 1932.  The vessel was at anchor in the harbor with no one aboard before the tragedy.  The following are statements from the accident report made by master and owner Manuel Loftus of Wrangell:

“Strong wind, rough sea, dark.”  “Anchor failed to hold.”  “Stranded on beach within ½ mile of Wrangell, Alaska.”  “No one on board and vessel was ashore and breaking up before the owner knew anything about it.”  “The anchor failed to hold and the vessel was driven on the beach and broken up by the waves.”

The Mary L was valued at $800 with no cargo and no insurance.  The accident report is dated February 20, 1934.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 28 N 132 22 40 W   Chart 17384

Comment: The Casualty Report says February 14, 1932 and the Merchant Vessels of the U S (1934) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1007 says February 14, 1934.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 6 Net, Built 1911, Registered Wrangell, ON 232145

Source: U S C G Report of Casualty February 20, 1934 by Loftus at Wrangell

 

MARY L (1964)     The 8 ton 31 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mary L was reported lost at Kodiak in the Good Friday earthquake of March 27, 1964.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 5 Net, Length 31.3, Breadth 9.3, Depth 4.2, Built 1961 at Larsen Bay, Horsepower 83, SL WR3846, Owner Peter Larionoff, Registered Juneau, ON 284927

Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 425

 

MARY L (1989)     The 38 foot fiberglass fishing vessel Mary L flooded her lazarette and sank October 25, 1989 in Chiniak Bay near Kodiak.  Both crewmembers were rescued.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 42 N 152 20 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: ON 944045

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MARY LEE (1927)     The 11 ton wooden gas screw Mary Lee was lost at the entrance to Shoup Bay the evening of November 9, 1927.  The vessel departed Valdez bound for Shoup Bay, only a few miles distant, and never reached her destination.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

“The Mary Lee left Valdez at about 4 o’clock in the evening of November 9, 1927 with Harry Balgrave as a passenger and with supplies for the Lealey-Daivs mine at Shoup Bay.  Nothing further was heard from them until Monday, the 14th, when Robert Schraeder, one of the men employed at the mine came to town to learn why the supplies had not been sent down.  The U.S. Marshal wired Gov. Parks for authority to send out a search party and upon receiving such authority a boat was sent out.  Later on another party found the boat and the body of Harry Balgrave.  Efforts to raise the boat had to be abandoned owing to a severe storm.  After the storm subsided it was found that the boat had entirely disappeared evidently having slipped off into deep water.”  “Calm moonlight”  “Ran onto rock; slipped off into deep water at high tide.”  “Inside entrance to Shoup Bay.”  “Total Loss”

Lost with the Mary Lee were her master Al de Hart and passenger Harry Balgrave.  The Mary Lee was valued at $2,000 and was carrying camp supplies.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   61 07 15 N 146 35 30 W   Chart 16707

Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Built 1914, Registered Juneau, ON 212040, Owner and master Al de Hart of Latouche, Cargo value unknown, Insurance unknown

Source: U S C G Report of Casualty January 12, 1928 by C J Todd, admin. of estate of Al de Hart

 

MARY LOU (1967)     The diesel screw Mary Lou foundered August 20, 1967 at Little Roller Bay on the west coast of Noyes Island.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 31 N 133 46 W   Chart 17400

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MARY LOU (1984)     The 86 foot trawl fishing vessel Mary Lou was struck by a large wave, rolled over and sank January 22, 1984 off of Cape Decision.  The vessel was coming from Seattle on her way to Kodiak.  Two crewmembers were lost and three rescued.  Lost were skipper and part owner Tom Hansen (33) of Seattle and Fred Blanchard (25) of Portland.  Survivors were Tracy Bain (26) of Seattle, Mike York (23) of Moses Lake and David Thomas (41) of Seattle.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 00 10 N 134 08 W   Chart 17320

Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. Seattle Times (January 24, 1984) “Rescue at Sea: Survivors relive brush with death” Pgs A1&A5, 3. Oregonian (January 25, 1984) “Despite odds 3 crew members survive ordeal at sea” Pg C3

 

MARY LOU (1991)     The 66 foot fishing vessel Mary Lou grounded, was refloated, tied to a buoy in the channel and then sank July 16, 1991 near Dillingham.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 02 30 N 158 27 30 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: ON 226391

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MARY LOUISE (1937)     The 19 ton wooden gas screw Mary Louise was destroyed by a fire at 11:00 a.m. Wednesday May 26th, 1937 in Hidden Inlet.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

“Hidden Inlet, Alaska…Moderate wind, showers…Boat caught fire from burning buildings.”  “Gasoline, diesel fuel and fuel storage tanks caught fire.  Burning fuel oils flowed from storage tanks under buildings and boat destroying all.”  “Boat caught fire from burning buildings.”  “Destroyed by fire which destroyed cannery building and warehouses.”  “The Mary Louise was standing on a cradle on the beach close by the buildings, low tide, cradle dry.  Vessel had been berthed there all Winter, no captain or master assigned.  Completely destroyed by fire which originated in and around fuel tanks.”  “Complete loss.”

The Mary Louise was valued at $5,000 and hadn’t been assigned a master.  She had last sailed out of Ketchikan August of 1936.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 57 N 130 21 W   Chart 17437

Comment: Probably the abandoned cannery at Gwent Cove.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 19 Gross 15 Net, Built 1929, Registered Ketchikan, ON 228803, Owner Nakat Packing Corp. at Hidden Inlet, Insurance unknown

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty June 15, 1937 at Ketchikan by L F Ryan, Superintendent for Hidden Inlet Cannery

 

MARY MAY (1992)     The 41 foot longline halibut fishing vessel Mary May sank without a trace September 11, 1992 near Biorka Island.  Both crewmembers were lost.  The body of one was later recovered in Sitka Bay on Kruzof Island.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 51 N 135 32 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: ON 510791

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MARY MITCHELL (1851)     The 354 ton whaling ship Mary Mitchell was stove in by ice and lost in the Bering Sea 30 miles northwest of King Island on July 1, 1851.  Captain Sayer had brought the vessel up from San Francisco for whaling in the Arctic.  She was valued at $22,000 with cargo.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska 64 58 N 168 05 W   Chart 16006

Sources:  1. Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route (1916) Pg 31, 2. The Northern Mariner (April 2006) “19th Century Commercial Shipping Losses” Pg 57

 

MARY PAT (1953)     The 10 ton 27 foot wooden gas screw Mary Pat burned June 26, 1953 in Bristol Bay.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 N 162 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 8 Net, Length 27.7, Breadth 9.8, Depth 4.6, Built 1944 at Seattle WA, Service freight, Horsepower 143, SL WA7970, Owner Nakat Packing Corp., Registered Ketchikan, ON 245706

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 356, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 749

 

MARY R (1951)     The 13 ton 33 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Mary R burned May 17, 1951 in Veta Bay.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 21 N 133 39 W   Chart 17400

Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 8 Net, Length 33.4, Breadth 10.8, Depth 5.4, Built 1929 at Gig Harbor WA, Horsepower 20, Owner Ed Wick, Registered Seattle, ON 229156

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1951) Pg 352, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 956

 

MARY-RUBY (1964)     The 119 ton 78 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Mary-Ruby was reported lost in the Good Friday earthquake of March 27, 1964 at Kodiak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 119 Gross 59 Net, Length 78.2, Breadth 23.9, Depth 9.1, Built 1943 at San Francisco CA, Former Name Fleetwood, Horsepower 270, WA5003, Owner Russell Sharp, Registered Juneau, ON 244142

Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 427

 

MARY SACHS (1917)     The 30 ton 60 foot twin screw schooner Mary Sachs became frozen in the ice at Collinson Point near the Alaska Canada Border while owned by the Stefansson  Arctic Expedition in late 1913.  She never returned south but spent the next several winters hauled up on the beach and used as a camp shelter.  She ended up wrecked and scavenged in 1917 on Banks Island near Cape Kellett. Remnants of the vessels engine and other large metal parts are still evident.  Several local landmarks bear the name of the Mary Sachs including Mary Sachs Harbour and Mary Sachs Creek.

Mapping and Location: Northwest Territories, Canada

Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 230, 2. The Story of the Canadian Arctic Expedition 1913-1918 by David Gray (2003) Canadian Museum of Civilization

 

MARY WOOD (1894)     The schooner Mary Wood stranded and was lost near Kodiak January 18, 1894.  The vessel was valued at $800 with cargo at the time of the disaster.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Source:  Washington Historical Quarterly “Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route” (1916) Pg 35

 

MARY-JO (1960)     The 10 ton 39 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mary-Jo burned June 14, 1960 at Kalinin Bay on Kruzof Island.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 20 N 135 47 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 6 Net, Length 39, Breadth 11.5, Depth 3, Built 1943 at Bremerton WA, Horsepower 130, SL WL9438, Owner Alvin W Green, Registered Tacoma WA, ON 274520

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) Pg 368, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 904

 

MARYLAND (1928)     The 29 ton wooden gas screw Maryland stranded and was lost near Ocean Cape at 8:45 p.m. December 15, 1928. The crew of four departed Cordova December 11th bound for Seattle.  The vessel had three tons or $125 worth of gasoline listed as its only cargo.  The following are statements taken from the casualty report filed by Carl Johnson, master of the Maryland:

“5 ½ miles east of Ocean light Cape.”  “Easterly and south easterly gales, very dark.”  “Snow storm and very dark and weak light, could not get bearing.”  “Stranded.”  “Could do nothing…No assistance rendered as it was all we could do to save ourselves.”  “Total loss.”

The Maryland was valued at $4,000 and became a total loss with no insurance.  The crew made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 32 30 N 139 51 30 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: Tonnage 29 Gross 20 Net, Built 1918, Registered Tacoma WA, ON 209980, Master Carl Johnson of Tacoma, Owner Joseph Johnson of Tacoma

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty January 2, 1929 at Juneau by Carl Johnson

 

MARYLEE (1964)     The 11 ton 29 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Marylee was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Kodiak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Length 29.3, Breadth 10.6, Depth 4.3, Built 1948 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 110, SL WD3772, Owner E E Erwin, Registered Juneau, ON 254733

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 428, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1004

 

MASSACHUSETTS (1871)     The 351 ton wooden ship Massachusetts was lost at Scammon’s Lagoon north of Cape Romanzoff February 6, 1871.  The vessel’s home port was San Francisco and she was in service in the whaling trade.  Her value at the time of the loss was $45,000 with cargo.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   61 55 N 165 50 W   Chart 16240

Comment: Scammon Bay and Cape Romanzof. WG

Source: Alaska Packers Association Record (1982 Microfilms)

 

MASSACHUSETTS (1871)     The 356 ton wooden whaling bark Massachusetts was abandoned in the ice around Point Belcher September 14, 1871.  The vessel’s home port was New Bedford, Massachusetts.  Her value at the time of the disaster was $46,000.  Later reports claim the Massachusetts drifted around Point Barrow and was later pillaged by the natives.

Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   71 17 30 N 156 47 15 W   Chart 16003

Sources: 1. Alaska Packers Association Record (1982 Microfilms), 2. Harpers

Weekly (December 2, 1871) “Destruction of the Arctic Whaling Fleet”

 

MASSACRE BAY (1993)     The 86 foot crab fishing vessel Massacre Bay grounded and sank during a northwesterly storm January 16, 1993 in Alitak Bay.  Matt Corriere (23) of Kodiak was the sole survivor of the crew of four.  Lost were skipper Jock Bevis (42), Tom Salisbury (48) and William Corbin (45), all from Kodiak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 50 N 154 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: ON 583865

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MASTER CARL (1976)     The 131 ton 72 foot steel crabber Master Carl overturned and sank in high seas and 90 knot winds on April 26, 1976 approximately 6 miles southeast of Cape Suckling near Kayak Island.  Her four crewmen managed to escape to a life raft, but two perished when the small craft capsized in the surf near shore.  Lost were Tom Miller of Cordova and Tom Davidson of Westport.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska 59 59 30 N 143 53 W   Chart 16013

Additional Information: Tonnage 131 Gross 89 Net, Length 72.7, Breadth 22.4, Depth 11.6, Built 1968 at Mobile AL, Horsepower 365, SL WY2934, Owner Francis L Miller, Registered Aberdeen WA, ON 512768

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1974) Pg 686, 2. BOEMRE Wreck List (2011) “4/26/1976”, 3. Unofficial Wreck List

 

MATINEE (1898)     The 37 ton schooner Matinee was lost in the Aleutian Island with all hands in 1898.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska Unknown

Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MATTIE J (1962)     The 14 ton 32 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mattie J foundered October 1, 1962 off of the cannery dock at Chilkat.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 11 N 144 12 W   Chart 16723

Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 12 Net, Length 32.6, Breadth 11.6, Depth 4.6, Built 1924 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 110, Owner Pete Howard, Registered Juneau, ON 224323

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) Pg 402, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 931

 

MAUDE (1900)     The 161 ton wooden red barge Maude broke up on the beach near St. Michael at 8:00 a.m. Saturday October 20, 1900.  She was employed lightering coal in St. Michael Bay, having departed St. Michael October 19th with three crew and 65 tons of coal in sacks worth $1,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed at St. Michael:

“Very stormy and high sea.”  “About three miles east of Lamont Point”  “Heavy seas compelled the cutting her adrift from the coal ship.”

From a copy of St. Michael station Log:

Canarvin cut the red barge adrift early in the morning with 878 sacks of coal aboard.  It was very rough when we discovered that the barge had been cut adrift.  In the mean time the S S Roanoke was flying her ensign and the Govt. transport Seward put for Egg Island.  The N A T Co chartered the A E Co tug Meteor and started for the Roanoke at 10 a.m.  Rough seas, however prevented her from reaching the Roanoke, and they returned.  They were within a mile of the barge Maude, but could only see her Pilot house.  She is floating towards the mainland.  At 11 a.m. the Roanoke started for Egg Island for protection against the seas.  Sunday, Oct 21, our red barge is visible on the beach of the mainland.  The Govt. is responsible for her in accordance with the agreement we made with them.  Monday Oct. 22, the red barge is asunder on the mainland.  She is broken in 3 pieces.”

The red barge Maude was valued at $5,000 at the time of the loss.  The crew made it to safety but the barge and coal were lost with no insurance.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   63 27 N 162 W   Chart 16240

Additional Information: Tonnage 161, Built 1898 St. Michael, Registered St. Michael, ON 51310, Master Henry Jackson, Owner Pat Galvin of Seattle, Service Lightering in St. Michael Bay

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report at St. Michael by J E Hanson, Agent

 

MAUREEN GREER (1971)     The crab fishing vessel Maureen Greer foundered and sank February 28, 1971 at the entrance to Uganik Bay on Kodiak Island.  All three crewmembers escaped injury.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 50 N 153 32 W   Chart 16580

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MAURELLE (1997)     The 36 foot salmon troller Maurelle was lost in an explosion and fire July 4, 1997 approximately 20 nautical miles northwest of Cape Spencer.  All three crewmembers were rescued.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 12 45 N 136 39 30 W   Chart 17300

Comment: Some reports have this wreck listed as the fishing vessel Moral (ON 263900). WG

Additional Information: ON 944697

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MAWEEMA (1928)     The 453 ton cod schooner Maweema stranded and was lost on Tolstoi Point, St George Island in the Bering Sea at 3 a.m. Sunday August 19, 1928.  She had a crew of 31 and 500 tons of salt cod fish aboard worth $35,000 when the disaster occurred.  The following are statements made in the casualty report by Robert Firth, master of the Maweema:

“Wind light…Heavy sea…heavy fog.”  “On north side of St. George Isl.  about 5 mi. from village.”  “Stranding.”  “Dense fog & light winds.”  “Total wreck…Total loss.”  “Crew left wreck in ship’s boats.”

The Maweema was valued at $11,000 at the time of the disaster.  The entire crew survived.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   56 35 40 N 169 28 W   Chart 16381

Additional Information: Tonnage 453 Gross 392 Net, Built 1895, Registered San Francisco, ON 92684, Master Robert Firth of San Francisco, Owner Alaska Codfish Company of San Francisco, Last Port San Francisco March 29, 1928, Insurance unknown

Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty August 22, 1928 by Firth at Unalaska, 2. Seattle Daily Times (August 28, 1928) Pg 31

 

MAX (1958)     The 8 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Max was consumed by fire August 8, 1958 approximately 6 miles from Port San Juan.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 03 N 148 04 W   Charts 16700, 16702

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 5 Net, Length 30.5, Breadth 9.5, Depth 3.7, Built 1922 at Cordova, Horsepower 110, Owner Kenneth L Scoggin, Registered Juneau, ON 239478

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 364, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 825

 

MAX (1980)     The 95 foot trawler Max capsized March 15, 1980 off of Green Island in Prince William Sound.  The captain of the vessel managed to beach her on Green Island.  The crew of five was picked up by a U S Coast Guard helicopter.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 15 N 147 28 30 W   Chart 16700

Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MAX (1991)     The 91 foot longline fishing vessel Max capsized and sank May 14, 1991 near Hinchinbrook Entrance, Prince William Sound.  All four crewmen were rescued.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 20 N 146 50 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: ON 585066

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MAXIE (1940)     The 13 ton 35 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Maxie foundered August 12, 1940 on the west side of Bronson Bay.  No one was aboard at the time of the casualty.

Mapping and Location: Unknown Alaska

Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 8 Net, Length 35.8, Breadth 10.9, Depth 5.3, Built 1930 at Seattle WA, Owner Erling C Haakonson, Registered Ketchikan, ON 229910

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1942) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 511, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1941) Pg 215

 

MAXINE (1942)     The 7 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Maxine was consumed by fire July 25, 1942 at Hydaburg.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 12 20 N 132 49 28 W   Chart 17400

Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 5 Net, Length 30.4, Breadth 8.8, Depth 4.4, Built 1928 at Metlakatla, Horsepower 30, Owner Victor Haldane

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1944) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 755, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1943) Pg 219

 

MAXINE (1965)     The gas screw Maxine burned September 2, 1965 at Copper River Flats, southeast of Cordova.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 25 N 145 W   Chart 16013

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MAXINE M (1958)     The 31 ton 44 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Maxine M foundered September 24, 1958 off of Dall Head near Gravina Island.  Five of the vessel’s six crewmembers were lost.  The sixth crewman, Howard Williams, son of the owner of the Maxine M was found alive atop a floating seine table in Clarence Strait.  He was picked up along with his deceased father by the fishing vessel Homer.  Lost in the disaster were owner James Williams (65), Alfred Dundas, Billy Dundas, Fred Fawcett and Henry Brendible.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 08 N 131 45 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 31 Gross 22 Net, Length 44.6, Breadth 14.4, Depth 6.2, Built 1942 at Saxman, Horsepower 165, SL WA8011, Owner James H Williams, Registered Ketchikan, ON242625

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 364, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 825

 

MAY (1919)     The 11 ton wooden gas screw May was forced ashore and lost on Prince of Wales Island at 6 p.m. Saturday December 20, 1919.  The vessel had departed Ketchikan December 7th with only owner and master John Leedy aboard.  He was expecting to return to Ketchikan.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

“Strong wind…heavy sea…dark night.”  “Lost wheel close shore”  “Wind and tide forced boat in”  “Prince of Wales Island, 2 miles south of Narrow Point.”  “put out anchor was on shore wind.”  “Broken plank and battered by high seas…considered not worth repairs.”

John Leedy survived the tragedy, but the May, valued at $3,000 was abandoned.  The accident reports that the vessel had no insurance and was a $1,600 loss.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 47 30 N 132 28 30 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Built 1913 at Ketchikan, Registered Juneau, ON 211493, Master and Owner John Leedy of Ketchikan

Source: U S C G Report of Casualty February 3, 1920 at Wrangell by Leedy

 

MAY (1992)     The tug May capsized and sank November 22, 1992 in 50 fathoms of water at the mouth of Farragut Bay in Frederick Sound.  Only one crewmember survived out of the four on board.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 06 N 133 14 W   Chart 17360

Source: Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MAYFLOWER (1900)     The sloop Mayflower was lost at Hooper Bay in August of 1900 with all hands.  The following is an excerpt from the U S Revenue Cutter Service report of the disaster:

“On July 9, 1900 the sloop Mayflower left Nome, AK bound for the mouth of the Kuskokwim River… Captain W S Allen and 6 others…report reached me…vessel had been wrecked on Nelson Island…some time during August…all hands had been drowned in an attempt to make the shore.  It was also reported that the natives in that neighborhood had stripped them of all their clothing and what money and valuables they had in their possession.  It is supposed that the party had in their possession between $3,000 and $5,000 in cash when leaving Nome, but whether they had this money on their persons at the time the vessel was wrecked is impossible to say…Captain Geo. H Whitney in the summer of 1901 learned from a trader living on Cape Vancouver, Nelson Island, that a sloop had been wrecked in Hooper Bay some time during August of the summer before and that the entire crew of seven had been drowned.  He claimed that the natives had a large sum of money, supposed to have been taken from their bodies.”

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   61 31 55 N 166 05 30 W   Chart 16006

Source: Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1915 (1966) Roll 9 Microcopy 641

 

MAYFLOWER (1905)     According to a U S Customs Wreck Report filed November 12, 1905, the 14 ton 35 foot wooden schooner Mayflower was stranded and lost at “Chignik Bay, Kalsinsia Reef” at 9 p.m. Saturday November 4, 1905.  The vessel departed Kodiak November 1st with three aboard bound for “Kaguyak” with a cargo of 5 tons of general merchandise worth $1,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

“High wind and rain, sea rough, very dark, lost bearings and struck reef.”  “Trying to get in Bay to get anchored.”  “Stranding”  “Lat. 56-30 Long 158-30 West of the Semendi Islands.”  “Most of cargo was brought ashore but badly damaged by water.  Some of the gear saved, schooner abandoned.”

The Mayflower was valued at $325 and became a total loss.  There is conflicting information on this wreck report making it possible for the Mayflower to have been lost in Chignik Bay on the mainland or in Chiniak Bay near Kodiak.  Kalsin Reef in Chiniak Bay looks more logical.  To further confuse the issue, the American Vessels Reported Lost During 1906 list has the same vessel lost October 24, 1905 at Solomon (near Nome).  It is subsequently posted in H W McCurdy at the Solomon location.

Mapping and Location: Alaska Unknown

Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 8 Net, Built 1891 at Tacoma WA, Length 34.6, Breadth 12.4, Depth 4.4, Registered Port Townsend, ON 92305, Master and Owner William Paul Panoloff of Kodiak, Insurance none

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report November 12, 1905 by Panoloff, 2. Merchant Vessels of the United States (1906) Pg 384, 3. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 115

 

MAYO (1947)     The 23 ton 43 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mayo foundered August 20, 1947 one mile off Ninilchik Light.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 03 N 151 40 W   Chart 16640

Additional Information: Tonnage 23 Gross 16 Net, Length 42.9, Breadth 12.3, Depth 6.2, Built 1920 at Olympia WA, Horsepower 70, Owner Everd Jones, Registered Juneau, ON 220219

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1948) Pg 331, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1949) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 911

 

MCKINLEY (1928)     The 56 ton diesel screw McKinley foundered near Cape Decision at 2:00 a.m. Saturday March 5, 1928.  The vessel departed Ketchikan February 11, 1928 with 10 crewmen aboard bound for “Sea Fisheries.”  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

“Spanish Reef Island, opposite Cape Decision.”  “Fog and tidal currents setting vessel off its course.”  “Struck reef and foundered.”  “TOTAL LOSS”

The crew all made it to safety, but the vessel and her cargo were a total loss.  The McKinley was loaded with 54,000 lbs. of fish valued at $3,500.  The vessel was valued at $28,000.  Insurance on the vessel was $20,000 but there was none on the cargo of fish.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 57 N 134 07 W   Chart 17402

Additional Information: Tonnage 56 Gross 38 Net, Built 1927, Registered Ketchikan, ON 226236, Master and part owner Barney Hanson of Ketchikan, Owners B Hanson and O Knutson

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty at Ketchikan by Hanson

 

MEDINA (1967)     The diesel screw Medina foundered February 6, 1967 a quarter mile off of Spruce Cape northeast of Kodiak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 49 15 N 152 20 W   Chart 16594

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MELDON (1967)     The 42 ton 53 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Meldon stranded and was lost June 23, 1967 on the south shore of Long Island.

Mapping and Location: Alaska Unknown

Comment: There are at least a dozen Long Islands; more research is warranted.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 42 Gross 17 Net, Length 53, Breadth 15.1, Depth 7, Built 1940 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 170, SL WA8055, Registered Astoria OR, ON 239575

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 450, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1171

 

MELISSA K (1989)     The 24 foot herring fishing vessel Melissa K grounded in heavy weather and broke up on the rocks March 30, 1989 on Survey Point, Annette Island.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 00 45 N 131 29 15 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: ON AK1281K

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MELISSA RAE (1995)     The 50 foot fiberglass cod trawler Melissa Rae iced up, rolled over and sank March 17, 1995 about 45 miles from King Cove near Cold Bay.  The vessel was returning from a two day fishing trip near Sanak.  All four persons aboard made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 59 N 162 28 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: ON 647038

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MELODY (1964)     The 9 ton 31 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Melody was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Seward.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 06 30 N 149 26 30 W   Chart 16680

Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 31, Breadth 11.5, Depth 3.5, Built 1961 at Seward, Horsepower 100, SL WR8175, Owner Chignik Fisheries Company, Registered Juneau, ON 285050

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 434, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1004

 

MELODY (1989)     The fishing vessel Melody capsized and was lost May 11, 1989 near Homer.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 38 40 N 151 33 W   Chart 16640

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MELODY (1992)     The 42 foot longline fishing vessel Melody developed rudder problems, washed up on a ledge and sank May 23, 1992 northwest of Baker Island.  Both persons aboard made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 22 N 133 36 W   Chart 17400

Additional Information: ON 248046

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MEMORIES (1963)     The 13 ton 35 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Memories was consumed by fire September 21, 1963 at Cordova.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 33 N 145 45 W   Chart 16013

Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 8 Net, Length 35.2, Breadth 10.1, Depth 5.2, Built 1938 at Cordova, Horsepower 121, SL WA8071, Owner Robert Glud, Registered Juneau, ON 238024

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 434, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1004

 

MEMORIES (1997)     The 49 foot shrimp pot fishing vessel Memories grounded and sank October 28, 1997 in Wrangell Narrows.  The operator fell asleep at the wheel causing the disaster.  Both persons on board made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 31 N 132 55 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: ON 234750

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MENLO (1971)     According to the List of Merchant Vessels of the U S (1974), the 23 ton 47 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Menlo was lost during June of 1971 after a collision with an unknown object 45 miles southeast of Juneau.  Newspaper articles from the period report the vessel as lost April 24, 1971 “near Portlock Bank”, “off of the south end of the Kenai Peninsula” and “near Seldovia”.  Three people were lost with the Menlo including Jack Cremin, his son and Hal Painter.  The Cremens were living in Anchorage but all three of those on board were from Port Orchard, Washington.  The vessel departed Seattle April 14, 1971 bound for the Gulf of Alaska.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 25 N 150 15 W   Chart 16013

Additional Information: Tonnage 23 Gross 15 Net, Length 47.4, Breadth 13.8, Depth 5.6, Built 1915 at Everett WA, ON 213160

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 451, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1974) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1636, 3. Seattle Daily Times (April 29, 1971) “Fishing-vessel search suspended” Pg C 2, 4. Anchorage Daily News (April 30, 1971) “Search ends for missing vessel” Pg 2

 

MENOQUET (19??)     The 197 ton 106 foot wooden electric oil screw tug Menoquet foundered sometime before 1979 at Katlian Bay.  Originally a Navy Tug doing service in WWII in the Pacific, she was stricken from the Navy List in May of 1959.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 09 N 135 23 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: Tonnage 197 Gross 134 Net, Length 106, Breadth 26.4, Depth 12.7, Built 1944 at San Francisco CA, Former Name YTB-256 (U S N), Service tug, ON281433

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 451, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1979) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2243, 3. Wikipedia “USS Menoquet (YTB-256)”

 

MERCER N0 1 (1943)     The barge Mercer No 1 broke loose from the gas boat Highway and was lost March 5, 1943 at Lena Point.  Wreckage of the Highway was found near Ralston Island.  All 6 or 7 crewmembers were lost in the disaster.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 23 45 N 134 46 45 W   Chart 17300

Source : BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MERCURY (1879)     The 311 ton wooden whaling bark Mercury was frozen in the ice and abandoned near Herald Island, Siberia October 24, 1879.  The vessel sailed out of San Francisco with a crew of 37 and the Captain’s Wife.  The following are excerpts from the Wreck Report filed at New Bedford, Mass in 1880:

“Arctic Ocean.  Frozen in ice in mid-ocean and abandoned.”  “No sea; fair weather, no wind.”  “Bk Helen Mar rescued entire crew.  Disaster unavoidable; caught in the pommage ice and frozen in; captain, officers and crew all landed at San Francisco.”

The Mercury was listed with a value of “$16,000 & bal. of outfits”.  Her cargo of oil and whalebone were listed with a value of $40,000.  Both the Mercury and her cargo were total losses.

Mapping and Location: Siberia

Additional Information: Tonnage 311, Age 57 Years, Registered New Bedford MA, ON 17558, Master Stephen Hickmott, Vessel Insurance $14,000, Cargo Insurance none, Agents Wm. Phillips & Son, New Bedford

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed at New Bedford by Agents Wm. Phillips & Son

 

MERCURY (1898)     The 1050 ton 193 foot wooden ship Mercury stranded in Skagway Harbor at 2 a.m. April 11, 1898.  The vessel had sailed out of Seattle, Washington March 27, 1898 with a crew of 40.  She was carrying 1,500 tons of general merchandise worth $20,000.  The Mercury drug anchor in a 60 mile an hour gale that was “blowing too hard”.  The Mercury was listed with of value $8,000 with $4,000 worth of damage as a result of the stranding.  The report also lists $10,000 worth of cargo lost.  There was no insurance on the Mercury.  The vessel was eventually refloated and put back in service as a barge.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   59 27 30 N 135 18 45 W   Chart 17317

Additional Information: Tonnage 1050.29, Length 193, Breadth 39, Depth 22.2, Built 1851 at NY NY, Registered Seattle, ON 16948, Master Frank Anderson of Seattle, Owner E E Caine (M.O.) of Seattle, Last Port Seattle March 27, 1898, Destination Skagway

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report July 14, 1898 at Puget Sound by Frank Anderson

 

MERCURY (1900)     The 1050 ton 193 foot wooden ship Mercury sprung a leak and was beached on Unimak Island at 12 noon August 12, 1900.  The vessel departed Nome August 3rd with seven crewmen and no cargo aboard.  They were bound for Seattle.  The crew escaped to safety, but the Mercury was a total loss.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 45 N 165 W   Chart 16520

Additional Information: Tonnage 1050, Length 193, Breadth 39, Depth 22.2, Built 1851 at NY NY, Registered Seattle, ON 16948, Master Frank Anderson of San Francisco, Owner Pacific Clipper Line of Seattle

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report September 8, 1900 at Puget Sound by Anderson

 

MERCURY (1958)     The 73 ton 72 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Mercury burned June 26, 1958 at Seldovia.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 26 15 N 151 42 30 W   Chart 16640

Additional Information: Tonnage 73 Gross 50 Net, Length 72, Breadth 17.2, Depth 9.1, Built 1912 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 125, SL WA8081, Owner Curtis F Kirkendall, Registered Juneau, ON 209681

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) Pg 377, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 904

 

MERCURY (2001)     The 60 foot tug Mercury flooded and was abandoned September 5, 2001 approximately 26 miles southwest of the Ugashik River in Bristol Bay.  The two crewmen aboard were rescued by U S C G Helicopter and taken to King Salmon.  The Mercury had been towing a crane barge when heavy seas began flooding the tug.  The barge was cut loose and tug abandoned.  Salvage efforts for both vessels were under consideration.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 30 45 N 157 23 45 W   Chart 16006

Source: U S C G News Release (September 5, 2001) “Coast Guard rescues two men from sinking tug”

 

MERCY BEE (1981)     The fishing vessel Mercy Bee capsized in heavy surf January 1, 1981 in Squaw Bay.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   60 49 15 N 147 50 30 W   Chart 16705

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MERIDIAN (2002)     The 52 foot fishing vessel Meridian flooded her engine room and sank January 18, 2002 approximately 14 miles north of Kodiak in Marmot Bay.  All three crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessel Carlsen Point.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 N 152 06 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: ON 283545

Source: U S C G News Release (January 18, 2002) “Three safe after fishing boat sinks near Kodiak”

 

MERIT (1998)     The 32 foot salmon gillnet fishing vessel Merit was consumed by fire and lost May 28, 1998 near Port Nellie Juan in Prince William Sound. Both crewmembers made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 33 N 148 09 45 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: ON 681405

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MERKA (1961)     The 8 ton 34 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Merka was destroyed by fire August 23, 1961 at Controller Bay.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 05 N 144 15 W   Charts 16016, 16723

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 6 Net, Length 34, Breadth 9.7, Depth 4.4, Horsepower 85, Owner Stephen Pytel, Registered Juneau, ON 229759

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) Pg 408, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 931

 

MERMAID (1899)     The 273 ton whaling bark Mermaid was lost in a storm at Dutch Harbor October 28, 1899 along with one crewman.  The Mermaid had sailed out of San Francisco March 28, 1899 for whaling in the North Pacific.  She had the whale bone from two bowhead whales as cargo.  The cargo was saved, but the Mermaid, valued at $29,000, was a total loss.  The vessel was condemned and later rebuilt for the Nome trade.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 54 N 166 31 W   Chart 16528

Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 52, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MERMAID (1913)     The launch Mermaid was lost in Valdez Narrows January 24, 1913 with two aboard.  Charles Rua, owner of the mine at Rua Bay on Knight Island was lost.  Charles Lindquist was rescued by Natives in a bidarka.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   61 03 15 N 146 40 30 W   Chart 16707

Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. BOEMRE Shipwreck Lists (2011) Pg 111

 

MERMAID (1964)     The 24 ton 41 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Mermaid burned May 23, 1964 at Kodiak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Char 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 24 Gross 18 Net, Length 41.3, Breadth 13.5, Depth 6, Built 1943 at West Mystic CT, Former Name C-8316 (U S N), Horsepower 120, SL WP7766, Owner Charles Reft, Registered Juneau, ON280556

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 435, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1004

 

MEROM (1900)     The 1,158 ton 179 foot wooden bark Merom stranded and was lost in the Karluk Harbor at 3 p.m. Saturday October 6, 1900.  The vessel departed San Francisco August 29, 1900 bound for Karluk with 16 crewmen.  One crewman, 34 year old William Booke from Germany was lost in the stranding.  The Merom had 500 tons of cargo including 12,574 cases of canned salmon worth $50,000 on board at the time of the disaster.  The Merom, valued at $14,000, and her cargo were listed as total losses.  The vessel was owned by Alaska Packers Association of San Francisco and had no insurance.  A Peterson, master of the Merom, attributed the losses to a “severe storm”.  Conditions at the time were listed as a strong gale, clear weather and high seas.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 34 10 N 154 27 30 W   Chart 16598

Additional Information: Tonnage 1158 Net, Length 179.2, Breadth 37.6, Depth 23.9, Built 1870 at Phippsburg ME, Registered San Francisco, ON 90070, Master A Peterson of Oakland

Comment: This may be the same master A Peterson of Oakland that is lost with the bark Hadn Brown in 1912 on Montague Island

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report November 7, 1900 by Peterson in San Francisco.

 

MERRIE COLLEEN (1993)     The 58 foot salmon seiner Merrie Colleen burned to the waterline and sank September 11, 1993 near Nichols Island.  All four crewmembers abandoned ship to a 10 foot skiff and were picked up by the 22 foot research boat Cape Henry.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 10 N 132 59 W   Chart 17400

Additional Information: ON 261504

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

METEOR (1907)     The launch Meteor was lost on Kayak Island July of 1907

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 56 N 144 23 W   Chart 16723

Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

METEOR (1953)     The 8 ton 28 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Meteor was consumed by fire November 7, 1953 off of Rocky Point on Montague Island in Prince William Sound.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 21 30 N 147 03 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 6 Net, Length 28.4, Breadth 9.5, Depth 4.2, Built 1940 at Valdez, Horsepower 45, Owner Lyle Swanson, Registered Juneau, ON 239842

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 365, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 749

 

METEOR (1963)     The 83 ton 75 foot wooden oil screw Meteor stranded and was lost August 1, 1963 at Coal Harbor, Zacher (Zachary) Bay, Unga Island.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 22 N 160 38 W   Chart 16553

Additional Information: Tonnage 83 Gross 50 Net, Length 75.5, Breadth 17.7, Depth 7.1, Built 1900 at San Francisco CA, Horsepower 220, Service Freight, Owner Gulf Navigation & Towing Ltd., Registered Juneau, ON 93031

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) Pg 422, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 965

 

METEOR (1978)     The 30 foot fishing vessel Meteor burned and sank in Whale Pass July 1, 1978.  The same vessel hit a snag and tore a hole in her bottom a week earlier near Long Island.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 56 N 152 50 W   Chart 16594

Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak)

 

MEXICAN (1851)     The 226 ton whaling ship Mexican was lost in the Arctic in 1851.  She departed New Bedford May 31, 1848 bound for whaling in the Arctic.  She was valued at $22,000 with her cargo of whale oil and bone at the time of the disaster.

Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska Unknown

Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route Andrews (1916) Pg 31

 

MEXICO (1897)     The 1,797 ton 275 foot steam powered wooden schooner Mexico struck a rock and foundered in Dixon Entrance at 4:20 a.m. Thursday August 5, 1897.  The vessel departed Sitka at 4:52 a.m. with 70 passengers and 71 crewmen bound for Victoria and ports on Puget Sound.  She was also carrying three tons of general merchandise of unknown value.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed at Willamette:

“Weather smooth, partly foggy.”  “Struck a rock in Dixons Entrance, Alaska, supposed to be West Devil Rock.  Sunk in 85 fathoms of water in two hours.”  “Got everybody in boats with hand baggage, and landed at Metlakahtla.  From there brought to Puget Sound by str. City of Topeka.”  “Total loss”

The Mexico was valued at $100,000 at the time of the disaster.  All passengers and crew made it to safety but the vessel and her cargo were lost.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 40 N 131 36 W (West Devil Rock) Chart 17434

Comment: The 1883 Coast Pilot for Alaska puts West Devil Rock at 54 41.5 N 131 27.5 W which is substantially East and slightly North of its actual location.  The wreck site is very near the border between Alaska and British Columbia.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 1797 Gross 1340 Net, Length 275, Breadth 26, Depth 20.7, Built 1882 San Francisco, NHP 1,500, Registered Portland OR, ON 91411, Master H C Thomas of San Francisco, Owner Oregon Improvement Co of Portland OR, Vessel Insurance $35,000

Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report August 26, 1897 by Goodall Perkins & Co General Agents, 2. Pacific Coast Pilot Alaska Part I (1883) ADDENDA and ERRATA – “Dangers in Dixon Entrance and Vicinity” Pg 277

 

MIA DAWN (1984)     The seiner Mia Dawn grounded and sank in bad weather February 25, 1984 at Tolstoi Point, Unga Island.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 22 N 161 30 W   Chart 16551

Comment: Bearings are for Cape Tolstoi not far from Unga Island.  WG

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MIAMI (1906)     The 82 ton 72 foot wooden steam tug Miami stranded on a sand bar and was lost at 2:55 a.m. Sunday June 10, 1906 near Kvichak.  The vessel left Tacoma Washington in April of 1904 with seven crewmen bound for Bristol Bay.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by the master of the Miami, John A Horgen of Seattle:

“Thick fog, calm, smooth.”  “On Sand Bar 14 miles above mouth of Kvichak River, Alaska…Stranded.”  “Grounded on Sand Bar, sprung a leak.”  “Pumps started, bailed with buckets.”

The Miami was valued at $10,000 at the time of the loss.  The damage to the vessel was reported as $10,000.  She was not carrying cargo.  The crew made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   61 20 N 161 28 W   Chart 16323

Additional Information: Tonnage 81.77 Gross 52.7 Net, Length 71.6, Breadth 18.5, Depth 6.9, Service fish, Built 1898 Tillamook OR, Registered Tacoma WA, ON 92845, Owner Union Packing Co of Tacoma, Insurance unknown

Comment: Some reports put the value of the loss of the Miami at $25,000.  WG

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report September 11, 1906 by Horgen at Puget Sound

 

MICHAEL J (1955)     The 9 ton 28 foot gas water jet fishing vessel Michael J was destroyed by a storm August 6, 1955 off of the southwestern coast of Alaska.

Mapping and Location: Alaska Unknown

Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 7 Net, Length 28.7, Breadth 10.2, Depth 3.9, Built 1953 at Friday Harbor WA, Horsepower 130, Owner John C Jackson, Registered Bellingham WA, ON 269947

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 454, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1171

 

MICHAEL LEE (1980)     The 93 foot fishing vessel Michael Lee foundered and sank June 14, 1980 near Clarks Point in Nushagak Bay.  Four of the five crewmembers on board were rescued by the Soviet processing ship Soyuz V.  Cory Kaldestad (62) of Seattle, skipper of the Michael Lee, was lost.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 50 30 N 158 33 W   Chart 16006

Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. The Seattle Times (June 16, 1980) “Four U S fishermen rescued by Soviet vessel” Pg C 1

 

MICHELLINDA (1983)     The fishing vessel Michellinda burned and became a total loss August 28, 1983 outside of Whittier.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 46 30 N 148 41 W   Chart 16700

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MICHIGAN (1909)     The 450 ton barge Michigan foundered in the Tanana River March 12, 1909.  She was valued at $18,000 with cargo at the time of the disaster.

Mapping and Location: Central Alaska

Additional Information: Tonnage 450, Built 1898, ON 51303

Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 165, 2. Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route (1916) Pg 33, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1910) Vessels Reported Lost Pg 410

 

MICHO (1959)     The 21 ton 34 foot wooden oil screw Micho was consumed by fire August 21, 1959 at Smeaton Bay.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 19 N 130 54 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 21 Gross 14 Net, Length 34.4, Breadth 12.5, Depth5.3, Built 1956 at Ketchikan, Service freight, Horsepower 100, SL WH2872, Owner Tom C Wonk, Registered Ketchikan, ON 271694

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 371, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 825

 

MIDAS (1898)     The British bark Midas was lost with all hands in 1898 in the North Pacific.  She departed Nagasaki, Japan some time near February 14, 1898 bound for the west coast of the United States and was never seen again.  The bark Willscott and the Puritan were caught in a terrific storm following the same route from the Orient at the same time.  The Willscott was dismasted and put into port in distress at San Francisco.  The normal time at sea from the Orient to West coast ports was 24 to 36 days.  The San Francisco Call reported her still missing on April 19, 1898, 65 days after the Midas left Nagasaki.

Mapping and Location: Unknown

Sources: 1. The San Francisco Call (April 19, 1898) “Where is the Bark Midas?” Pg 20, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MIDGET (1950)     The 12 ton 33 foot wooden gas screw purse seiner Midget disappeared in the Gulf of Alaska May 10, 1950 on a trip from Cordova to Seattle with three persons aboard.  A Japanese mine found washed ashore in the area lead to speculation that the vessel may have struck a mine and been lost.  Lost with the Midget were owner John Erickson and brothers Ralph and Albert Peterson.

Mapping and Location: Alaska Unknown

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 8 Net, Length 33.3, Breadth 11.4, Depth 4.8, Built 1945 at Port Madison WA, Crew 1, Horsepower 130, Owner John Erickson, Registered Seattle WA, ON 247587

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1951) Pg 363, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 957, 3. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MIDNIGHT SUN (1989)     The 38 foot wooden salmon fishing vessel Midnight Sun sank due to overloading and insecure hatches July 22, 1989 in Cook Inlet.  All four crewmembers made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 05 N 152 30 W   Chart 16013

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MIDNIGHT SUN (2011)     The 68 foot fishing vessel Midnight Sun stranded and was lost February 10, 2011 at Cape Paramanof on the west side of Afognak Island.  All five crewmembers were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 18 20 N 153 03 30 W   Chart 16580

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. Kodiak Daily Mirror (February 14, 2011) “Midnight rescue for grounded Midnight Sun

 

MIKI MIKI (1989)     The 126 foot wooden fishing vessel Miki Miki flooded and was abandoned January 6, 1989 ten miles off of the Kenai Peninsula.  The vessel was being transported from the Cook Inlet to Seward when she started taking on water and the crew was forced to abandon ship.  All four crewmembers were hoisted to a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.  The vessel was last seen drifting to the northwest as was presumed sunk.

Mapping and Location:  South Central Alaska   Unknown

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MIKIE (1955)     The 7 ton 28 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mikie was consumed by fire September 16, 1955 in Fortuna Strait near Chichagof Island.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 25 N 135 53 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 5 Net, Length 27.9, Breadth 9.2, Depth 4.6, Built 1932 at Marysville WA, Horsepower 95, Owner Jack W Huff, Registered Sitka, ON 261801

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) Pg 346, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 904

 

MIKKIDURA (1927)     The 10 ton wooden auxiliary schooner Mikkidura caught fire at 4:30 a.m. Wednesday July 27, 1927 in Barlow Cove.  The vessel departed Juneau July 26th bound for Lincoln Island via Barlow Cove with two aboard.  Pyrene and seawater were used to attempt to extinguish the blaze.  It was a clear night with calm seas and the Mikkidura had been at anchor all night.  The two aboard escaped to safety, but the vessel became a total loss.  The Mikkidura was valued at $7,000 and had no cargo at the time of the disaster.  The cause of the fire was unknown.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 24 N 134 55 W   Chart 17316

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 8 Net, Built 1909, Registered Seattle, ON 225878, Master and owner J R Crawford of Juneau, Vessel Insurance $5,000

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty July 29, 1927 by J K Crawford at Juneau

 

MILDRED (1954)     The 12 ton 50 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Mildred burned February 12, 1954, one and one half miles northeast of East Point on Woronkofski Island.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 23 N 132 24 20 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 11 Net, Length 50, Breadth 12.6, Depth 3.6, Built 1912 at Petersburg, Horsepower 165, Owner Mike Lynch Jr., Registered Wrangell, ON 210116

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) Pg 347, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 744

 

MILDRED II (1928)     An engine backfire caused a blaze that destroyed the 45 ton wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mildred II at 7:30 a.m. April 30, 1928 near Turn Point Light.  The vessel departed Ketchikan April 16, 1928 bound for sea fisheries with 6 crewmen aboard.  They had 5,000 lbs of fresh halibut aboard worth $700 when the disaster occurred.  The following are statements from the casualty report:

“near Turn Point Light, Alaska”  “Easterly wind, rainy”  “Engine back fired…Fire”  “Assistance rendered by Cannery tender Harolda.  Vessel appeared on the scene but could do nothing on account of the gallons of gas being aboard burning vessel which made it dangerous to get too close.”  “TOTAL LOSS”

The Mildred II, worth $10,000 and her cargo of halibut were lost.  The crew made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 59 05 N 132 58 50 W   Chart 17375

Comment: There are several Turn Point Lights in Southeast Alaska.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 43 Gross 31 Net, Built 1920, Registered Seattle, ON 220046, Master C Svendsen of Seattle, Owner Martin Johnson of Seattle, Insurance unknown

Source: U S C G Report of Casualty May 2, 1928 by Svendsen at Ketchikan

 

MILDRED ROBINSON (1931)     The gas boat Mildred Robinson was lost at Madeline Point in 1931.

Mapping and Location: Alaska Unknown

Source:  The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 413

 

MILLER’S BAY (1976)     The 34 foot salmon troller Miller’s Bay went missing with a family of three on board July 25, 1976 off of Noyes Island 150 miles south of Juneau.  Lost were Robert West (31), his wife Judy (30) and their 14 year old daughter Brenda.  The Wests were salmon fishing at the time of the disaster.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 30 N 133 40 W   Chart 17400

Sources: 1. The Oregonian (July 29, 1976) “Oregonians still missing off Alaska” Pg C 1, 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MILLIE M (1974)     The 27 foot vessel Millie M burned and sank July 16, 1974 near Kodiak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Source: Unofficial Wreck List

 

MILLIE S (1964)     The 21 ton 43 foot wooden oil screw passenger vessel Millie S was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Seward.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 06 30 N 149 26 30 W   Chart 16680

Additional Information: Tonnage 21 Gross 15 Net, Length 43, Breadth 13, Depth 4.5, Built 1942 at Mystic CT, Former Name C-7594 (U S N), Horsepower 450, SL WP5710, Owner Chris Sorenson, Registered Juneau, ON 283140

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 440, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1004

 

MILLVILLE (1924)     A fire of unknown origin destroyed the 22 ton wooden gas screw Millville December 18, 1924.  The vessel was laid up for winter at Pybus Bay when the disaster occurred.  There was no one aboard and no cargo.  The Millville was valued at $2,000 and had $2,000 worth of insurance.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 16 N 134 05 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: Tonnage 22 Gross 18 Net, Built 1915, Registered Ketchikan / Seatttle, ON 213011, Owner Alaska Pac. Fisheries of Seattle

Source: U S C G Report of Casualty May 11, 1925 by J M Gelbert, Agt. Alaska Consol. Canneries for Alaska Pac. Fisheries

 

MINERVA (1871)     The 337 ton wooden whaling bark Minerva was abandoned in the ice around Point Belcher September 14, 1871.  The vessel was out of New Bedford and valued at $50,000 with cargo at the time of the disaster.  “The Minerva drifted around to the entrance of Wainright Inlet.  The following spring the hull was in as good condition as when abandoned.  The bark Florence went up to the wrecked whalers during 1872, and from the wreck of the Minerva secured 250 barrels sperm oil, 1200 barrels whale oil and 15,000 lbs. whale bone, which were brought to San Francisco.”  Some accounts report the Minerva salvaged in 1872.

Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   70 36 N 160 W   Chart 16005

Sources: 1. Alaska Packers Association Records (1982 Microfilms), 2. Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914 (1966) Microcopy 641

 

MINERVA (1898)     The barge Minerva was lost at the mouth of the Kuskokwim River June 28, 1898.  She had departed Seattle May 31, 1898 being towed by the steamer Jessie along with a second unnamed steel barge.  There three vessels were lost in the turbulent waters outside the Kuskokwim River.   Also lost were the crews and miners from the Columbia Exploration Company that were aboard; a total of 18 souls.  One person, a trader called Ling, lived to tell the tale.  He brought word of the wreck to Saint Michael.  Many believed the surviving miners and crew were massacred by Indians who looted the wrecks.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   60 N 162 20 W   Chart 16006

Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 42, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MINNEAPOLIS (1927)     The single masted 20 ton wooden gas screw Minneapolis foundered in a storm in Cook Inlet at 3:00 a.m. Sunday October 16, 1927.  The vessel departed Seldovia October 12, 1927 bound for Halibut Cove with 6 crewmen aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by the master of the Minneapolis, Arne Vegen of Seldovia:

“Halibut Cove, Alaska”  “Storm and bad weather, due to gale blowing from the NW down Cooks Inlet, Alaska.”  “Gale from the NW; NW storm, heavy sea, 3 a.m. snow storm and dark.  Every precaution taken to save ship and attempt made to beach vessel.  This was a failure as ship sunk before we could beach her.”  “TOTAL LOSS”

The crew of the Minneapolis had 12 tons or 200 bbls. of herring aboard and a seine on deck when the disaster occurred.  They all managed to get to safety, but the vessel and her cargo were lost.  The value of the Minneapolis was $2,500 and her cargo $5,000.  There was no insurance.

Mapping and Location:  South Central Alaska   59 37 N 151 14 W   Chart 16640

Additional Information: Tonnage 20 Gross 13 Net, Built 1909, Registered Tacoma WA, ON 206833, Owner Peter Carlson of Tacoma WA

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty January 10, 1928 at Seldovia by Vegen

 

MINNIE (1900)     The two masted 50 ton Canadian schooner Minnie was lost at Ugamak Island July 26, 1900.  The vessel was driven onto a reef in a dense fog.  The crewmen escaped to safety in lifeboats and were later rescued by the steamer Alliance and schooner Walter L Rich.  The Minnie became a total loss.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   54 12 30 N 164 50 W   Chart 16531

Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 64, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MINNIE (1926)     The 8 ton 34 foot gas screw fishing vessel Minnie burned June 20, 1926 in Excursion Inlet.  The one person aboard at the time of the casualty made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 25 N 135 26 W   Chart 17300

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 7 Net, Length 34.7, Breadth 11.2, Depth 4, Built 1912 at Excursion Inlet, Horsepower 16, Owner John Williams of Hoonah, Registered Juneau, ON 210266

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 886, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1926) Pgs 434-5

 

MINNIE (1935)     An engine room fire destroyed the 11 ton gas screw fishing vessel Minnie at 6:15 p.m. Wednesday December 18, 1935 at Clover Island.  The Minnie and her crew of two departed Ketchikan December 17th for the “crab and clam fishing grounds”.  Master and owner Earl K Goodwin of Ketchikan made the following statements in his casualty report:

“Clover Pass and Clover Island”  “Wind blowing in sharp gusts, sea smooth in Pass.  Dark and thick, going at half speed trying to get bearings.”  “When in pilot house with my deckhand I heard engine miss and turned to look down companionway leading from pilot house to engine room and was met with a burst of flame.  Impossible to get at fire extinguishers which were hanging in this companionway.  We got skiff overboard and pulled away some 100 yards fearing explosion of tanks.  Boat burned for several hours drifting onto Clover Island.”  “Total loss.”

The Minnie was valued at $4,500 at the time of the tragedy.  She had no cargo aboard.  Her insurance was in the amount of $3,111.11.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 29 N 131 48 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Net, Age 25 years, Registered Ketchikan, ON 208079

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty December 21, 1935 by Goodwin at Ketchikan

 

MINNIE K (1964)     The 10 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Minnie K foundered June 12, 1964 at Meyers Chuck.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 44 30 N 132 15 15 W   Chart 17423

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 gross 8 Net, Length 30.8, Breadth 9.2, Depth 4.4, Built 1916 at Wrangell, Horsepower 90, SL WL2132, Owner Cecil Griner, Registered Seattle, ON 214000

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 441, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1004

 

MINNIE S (1964)     The 17 ton 38 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Minnie S foundered July 12, 1964 northwest of Green Island in Prince William Sound.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 15 N 147 28 30 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 11 Net, Length 38.4, Breadth 11.4, Depth 5.6, Built 1936 at Cosmopolis WA, Horsepower 165, SL WJ9841, Owner Allen D Sprague, Registered Juneau, ON 235127

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 441, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1004

 

MINOTAUR (1993)     The 32 foot longline fishing vessel Minotaur flooded and sank September 9, 1993 near the entrance to Prince William Sound.  Both crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessel Dr Jack.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 45 N 147 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: ON 589351

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MINTO (1921)     The stern wheel river steamer Minto was lost on the Yukon River in 1921.

Mapping and Location: Central Alaska

Source:  The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 329

 

MIRA (1973)     The 10 ton 32 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mira stranded and was lost August 19, 1973 in Frederick Sound near Cape Strait.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 59 55 N 133 05 30 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 7 Net, Length 32.6, Breadth 10, Depth 5.4, Built 1921 at Seattle, ON 221877

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 458, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1974) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1636

 

MIRANDA ROSE (1995)     The 42 foot fiberglass salmon seiner Miranda Rose collided with the fishing vessel Primus and sank July 27, 1995 west of Rocky Point in the Shelikof Strait.  All four crewmembers made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57  39 45 N 154 13 50 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: ON 607370

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MISCHIEF (1943)     The 9 ton 34 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mischief was consumed by fire June 1, 1943 at Ketchikan.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 20 30 N 131 38 45 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 8 Net, Length 34.8, Breadth 9.9, Depth 3.9, Built 1924 at Stanwood WA, Horsepower 15, Owner M E Wilson, Registered Ketchikan, ON 223722

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1946) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 806, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1945) Pg 257

 

MISERABLE SKUNK (1982)     The 19 foot cabin cruiser Miserable Skunk capsized while pulling a crab pot July 3, 1982 five miles east of Homer in Kachemak Bay.  Two people were lost in the disaster.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 38 40 N 151 33 W   Chart 11640

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MISS ALASKA (1974)     The 197 ton oil screw Miss Alaska foundered June 23, 1974 off of Kodiak Island.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 197 Gross, Built 1973, ON 549940

Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1979) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2243

 

MISS ANNGEL (1992)     The 65 foot trawler Miss Anngel sank October 14, 1992 approximately 70 miles southwest of Kodiak Island.  The vessel took a series of waves that flooded and sank her.  Her three crewmembers were rescued.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 29 48 N 153 45 30 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: ON 607807

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MISS ARCTIC (1964)     The 31 ton 44 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Miss Arctic was reported lost at Kodiak in the Good Friday earthquake of March 27, 1964.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 31 Gross 21 Net, Length 44.1, Breadth 14.2, Depth 8, Built 1945 at Anacortes WA, Horsepower 160, SL WA8254, Owner McAlister Equipment Leasing Company, Registered Juneau, ON 248146

Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 443

 

MISTRESS (1999)     The 42 foot fiberglass crab fishing vessel Mistress capsized and sank in bad weather November 3, 1999 in the vicinity of Cape Fanshaw near Petersburg.  All three crewmembers were lost including captain James Odegard (47), his daughter Renee Odegard (22) and son Eric Odegard (25).

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 11 N 133 33 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: ON 561341

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MISS AURORA (1976)     The 22 ton oil screw Miss Aurora foundered September 27, 1976 one and a half miles off of Point Lull at the entrance to Kelp Bay, Chatham Strait.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 18 N 134 48 45 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: Tonnage 22 Gross, Built 1972, ON 539093

Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1978) Pg 2119

 

MISS BELLE (1978)     The double ended fishing vessel Miss Belle was hit broadside by a huge wave, capsized and sank May 2, 1978 on the west side of Cape Suckling.  The double ender had blown her engine and drifted for three days with two crewmembers on board.  The fishing vessel Pacific Sea found the Miss Belle and was towing her to safety when the disaster occurred.  Both crewmembers were rescued by the Pacific Sea.  The Fish and Wildlife Patrol Vessel Enforcer brought the two men back to Cordova.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 59 30 N 143 53 W   Chart 16013

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MISS BRENDA (1982)     The 38 foot fishing vessel Miss Brenda sank December 7, 1982 in Duck Bay on Afognak Island.   The eight persons aboard were picked up by the fishing vessel Ruff & Reddy.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 06 N 152 28 W   Chart 16580

Source: Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak)

 

MISS D (1946)     The 23 ton 50 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Miss D was consumed by fire at Anchorage June 28, 1946.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   61 13 05 N 149 53 30 W   Chart 16660

Additional Information: Tonnage 23 Gross 16 Net, Length 49.9, Breadth 12.9, Depth 4.7, Built 1917 at Norfolk VA, Former Name 3902 (U S N), Horsepower 45, Owner W R Gilbert Co. Inc., Registered Juneau. ON 228059

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1946) Pg 323, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1947) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 824

 

MISS EVERETT (2003)     The 34 foot troller Miss Everett sank due to unknown causes July 8, 2003 near Kruzof Island approximately 10 miles north of Sitka.  The only person aboard, Ted Hahler, was lost with the Miss Everett.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 10 N 135 40 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: ON 221075

Sources: 1. U S C G News Release (July 8, 2003) “Coast Guard locates boat wreckage near Sitka”, 2. Anchorage Daily News (July 19, 2003) “False Alarms”

 

MISS IN SOO (1988)     The 85 foot fishing vessel Miss In Soo disappeared and was presumed sunk November 30, 1988.  The vessel was abandoned by her crew of four approximately three miles south southwest of Narrow Cape.  The crew was picked up by the fishing vessel Kristine Alaska.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 25 30 N 152 20 W   Chart 16580

Source: Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak)

 

MISS LACE (1951)     The 14 ton 35 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Miss Lace burned October 14, 1951 off of Steamer Point, Clarence Strait.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 13 N 132 42 40 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 9 Net, Length 35.7, Breadth 10.7, Depth 6, Built 1942 at Algonac MI, Former Name C-6061 (U S N), Horsepower 320, SL WC4638, Owner George Shapley, Registered Seattle, ON 257977

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 374, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 745

 

MISS MARI (1997)     The 28 foot longline fishing vessel Miss Mari flooded from the stern and foundered July 20, 1997 southwest of Elrington Island in Prince William Sound.  The only person on board was rescued by the fishing vessel Coho II.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 N 148 03 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: ON AK9718C

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MISS MARIA (2001)     The 49 foot longline cod fishing vessel Miss Maria grounded, sank and was abandoned January 19, 2001 in Makushin Bay.  The sea valve aboard the vessel began leaking and the crew grounded her to prevent further sinking.  All four crewmen abandoned ship to a life raft and were hoisted off of the beach by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.  Fuel was removed from the vessel and salvage arrangements were in process.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 44 N 167 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: ON 627897

Sources: 1. U S C G News Release (January 19, 2001) “Coast Guard saves fishermen from sinking boat”, 2. ADEC Situation Report (January 23, 2001) “F/V Miss Marie

 

MISS POZZOLANA (1970)     The oil screw Miss Pozzolana stranded and was lost August 18, 1970 at Dry Harbor.

Mapping and Location: Alaska Unknown

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MISS UNIVERSE (1987)     The 85 foot fishing vessel Miss Universe was lost June 16, 1987 on a trip from Chignik Lagoon to Alitak Bay.  A Coast Guard search spotted her submerged pilothouse in the Semidi Islands and two days later her beached raft.  There were no survivors.  Lost with the Miss Universe were Howard Broadway of Kodiak, Karen Spector of Madison WI and Leonard Gridley.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 10 N 156 47 W   Chart 16013

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MISSION (1927)     The 13 ton wooden gas screw Mission was destroyed by fire at midnight August 14, 1927 at Burnet Cannery.  The vessel and her crew of four departed Petersburg May 17, 1927 bound for Burnet Cannery.  The following is an accounting taken from the casualty report filed by Billy Hooper, master of the Mission:

“two miles south of Burnet Cannery”  “Calm moonlit night.”  “Hand lantern falling ignited gasoline in bilge.  Pyrene fire extinguishers unavailing.”  “Used Pyrene fire extinguisher unavailingly to extinguish flames.  Took to dingy when efforts were useless.”  “When boat was about 15 feet from vessel, Mission blew up and wreck sunk in 22 fathoms of water.”

The Mission was valued at $2,000 and reported as a total loss.  It was unknown at the time of the report whether there was any insurance.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 04 N 132 29 W   Chart 17382

Comment: There is a Cannery Point at the west entrance to Burnett Inlet with the ruins of a cannery; probably the location of this wreck.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 8 Net, Built in 1910 at Sacramento, Registered Wrangell, ON 207771, Master William Hooper of Wrangell, Owner Wm. Tamaree of Wrangell

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty August 18, 1927 at Wrangell by Hooper

 

MIST (1894)     The 18 ton 50 foot wooden schooner Mist parted her anchor chains and was lost in a storm at 7:00 p.m. Friday October 12, 1894 at Sitka.  The crew of three survived and made it to safety, but the Mist drifted ashore and went to pieces.  High seas, high winds and a dark stormy night were reported at the time.  The Mist was valued at $600 and had no cargo and no insurance.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 135 20 W   Chart 17327

Additional Information: Tonnage 17.87 Net, Length 50, Breadth 12, Depth 3.5, Built 1865 at Oak Point WA, Registered Port Townsend WA, ON 17962, Master and Owner Wm H Smith of Sitka, Last Port Sitka October 11, 1899, Destination Hot Springs AK

Comment: The wreck report mentions the Mist departed Sitka the day before the tragedy so it may be possible that the wreck occurred in Hot Springs Bay southeast of Sitka near Goddard.  WG

Source: U S Customs wreck report October 15, 1894 by Smith at Sitka

 

MIST (1961)     The 17 ton 39 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mist foundered August 4, 1961 at Mount Edgecumbe Dock, Sitka.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 135 20 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 11 Net, Length 39.6, Breadth 12.3, Depth 5.6, Built 1929 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 143, SL WF4447, Owner Ernest Hillman, Registered Sitka, ON 228786

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) Pg 439, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 965

 

MIST (1963)     The 20 ton 41 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Mist foundered March 15, 1963 off of Spruce Island near Kodiak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 55 N 152 25 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 20 Gross 13 Net, Length 41.8, Breadth 11.7, Depth 5.9, Built Douglas, Horsepower 120, SL WA8315, Owner W B Cuthbert, Registered Juneau, ON 251551

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) Pg 439, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 965

 

MISTY (1981)     The 86 foot trawler Misty caught fire and sank September 7, 1981 in Marmot Bay while dragging for scallops.  The five crewmen aboard were picked up by the fishing vessel Trailblazer.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 N 152 06 W   Chart 16580

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MITCHELL (1930)     The 14 ton wooden gas screw Mitchell stranded and was lost on “Fanny Island Reef” at 11 a.m. Friday August 22, 1930.  Master J M Adamson was the only one aboard.  He had departed Juneau August 21st bound for “Speal River”.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

“Fanny Island reef…stranded…fog.”  “Calm sea heavy fog.”  “Running slow at about 5 miles an hour.”  “In attempting to raise the boat the gas line broke and in some manner the boat got on fire and burned up.”  “total loss”

The Mitchell was valued at $2,000 and had no insurance.  Adamson made it to safety and filed an accident report in Juneau soon after.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 02 45 N 133 47 10 W   Chart 17313

Comment: Fannie Island…Speel River.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 10 Net, Built 1902, Registered Juneau, ON 93286, Owner Robert E Coughlin of Juneau

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty August 29, 1930 by Adamson at Juneau

 

MITKOF (2004)     The 75 foot fish tender Mitkof struck a rock and sank at 1:57 a.m. August 5, 2004 approximately 10 miles north of Petersburg.  The disaster was attributed to the operator falling asleep at the wheel.  The vessel was carrying 160,000 pounds of fish.  All four crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessel Angjenl.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 48 10 N 132 58 W   Chart 17360

Source: U S C G News Release (August 6, 2004) “Fisherman rescues skipper, three teens”

 

MIZPAH (1910)     The 64 ton 70 foot gas powered schooner Mizpah caught fire and burned after an explosion aboard May 25, 1910 at Kvichak.  The schooner had been converted to gas power in 1902.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 58 N 156 56 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 64 Gross 41 Net, Length 70, Breadth 22.9, Depth 7, Service freight, Crew 6, Built 1898 at Prosper OR, Registered San Francisco, ON 92843

Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 180, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1910) Pg 251, 4. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1911) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 413

 

MOCKINGBIRD (1899)     The vessel Mockingbird was lost at Dyea Harbor December of 1899.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   59 29 35 N 135 21 45 W   Chart 17317

Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MOJO (1975)     The 26 foot vessel Mojo sank August 10, 1975 in Ugak Bay.  All on board were picked up by the fishing vessel Mariner.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 25 N 152 35 W   Chart 16580

Source: Unofficial Wreck List

 

MOJO (1988)     The 28 foot fishing vessel Mojo sank when her anchor line tangled July 25, 1988 in Cameron Bay south of Sitka.  Jim Trow (62), owner and operator of the Mojo was lost after being pulled from the water by the fishing vessel Sefora.  Two crewmembers were rescued from the water by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 43 N 135 16 30 W   Chart 16326

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MONO (1898)     The 88 ton British steamer Mono was washed up on the rocks in Clarence Strait July 23, 1898.  She had been under tow by the vessel Fastnet along with the British steamer Stikine Chief, also in tow.  As the Fastnet made a turn down Snow Passage to escape freshening southeasterly weather, the towline to the Mono parted and the vessel was set adrift.  While the Fastnet was towing the Stikine Chief to safety on the northwest side of Bushy Island, the Mono drifted NW.  The crew aboard the Mono attempted to set anchors to slow the drifting vessel but the Mono blew up onto the rocks on the SE end of Bushy Island.  The tide was very high so the Mono was carried over the reefs and high onto the rocks at the south end of the Island.  Much of the cargo was salvaged when the tide receded but the Mono was a total loss.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 16 N 132 59 W   Chart 17382

Comment: The Stikine Chief was lost in the Gulf of Alaska a week later near Yakutat

Source:  U S Customs Wreck Report filed at Wrangell and accompanying letter from P F Armstrong, Master

 

MONONGAHELA (1853)     The 497 ton whaling ship Monongahela was lost with all hands some time in 1853 in the Aleutian Islands.  The Monongahela had sailed out of New Bedford MA October 1, 1850 on a whaling voyage with Captain Jason Seabury at the helm.  She was valued at $35,000 with cargo at the time of the disaster.  The following are excerpts from the January 1855 Sailer’s Magazine:

“Would that I could make as favorable report respecting the whale ship Monongahala, Capt. Seabury.  This vessel was missing last year.  No definite information could be obtained respecting her fate.  Although it was supposed she was lost, about the time that she attempted to leave the Arctic Ocean.  She was seen during a severe gale, but subsequently nothing was heard from her, until as report says, a cask of her sails and some of her spars have been picked up at sea…Capt. Percival reports that…About 100 miles south of Seguam, one of the chain of Fox Islands, fell in with two casks of oil.  One of which he secured.  It was a ground or second tier cask, bunged off, and had evidently come out of some ship, and not washed overboard.  The head was marked with marking-irons S.C. and with white paint iron hoops.  It had kelp grown on it and had apparently been in the water a long time.  Also quite a number of pieces of ship’s plank floating about that bore every appearance of a wrecked vessel, from the manner in which they had broken off.  It is Capt. P.’s opinion that they belonged to the Monongahela, the missing ship.  He says there was a current report among the ships, from a French whaler, that last season, when beating out the 72nd passage in a gale of wind, he saw a ship off the lee quarter, which he knew to be the Monongahela; that with great difficulty he fetched by, and he thought the ship astern must have gone on.  In addition to the above evidence that the Monongahela was lost, as supposed, on one of the Fox Islands, it is known that the Pocahontas picked up a cask of sails, marked Monongahela, and Capt. Jaggar, of the Emerald, now in port, picked up a cask of flags, supposed to belong to the same ship.  Both these casks were picked up in the vicinity of the island on which the Monongahela is supposed to have been wrecked.  Ed. Polynesian…There is a strong presumption that all on board must have perished.  It is sad to reflect upon the probable fact that a whale-ship’s company of thirty and more souls, all gone down together, and not one surviving to tell the tale of sorrow.”

An interesting point to note is the tale that is attached to the Monongahela, although not related to her disappearance.  The first of it was published in newspapers in New York and London in March of 1852.   January 18, 1852 the Monongahela is reported to have encountered a “sea serpent” more than 100 feet long while becalmed near the equator.  The crew managed to kill and behead the monster.  The head was said to be 10 feet long and contain 94 curved teeth.  Captain Seabury of the Monongahela had the head stowed aboard in a pine box.  He wrote a detailed report of the incident and sent it ahead to New Bedford with another whaling vessel that was loaded with whale oil and bone and ready to return to port.  The Monongahela then continued on to whaling in the Arctic.  She never made port, and none of her crew survived.  The story of the sea serpent survives to this day as a possible hoax or unexplained mystery.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska 52 19 N 172 30 W   Chart 16480

Comment: I have mapped this wreck at Seguam Island as it was mentioned in the 1855 Sailor’s Magazine article.  WG

Sources: 1. Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route (January 1916) Pg 31, 2. Sailor’s Magazine and Naval Journal Volume 27 No 5 (January 1855) Pg 133

 

MONROE (1931)     The 34 ton wooden oil screw Monroe drug anchor, stranded and was lost at 2 a.m. March 21, 1931 at the south end of Wingham Island.  The Monroe departed Seward February 24, 1931 with two aboard bound for Juneau.  She had a cargo of salt, barrels and tierces weighing 20 tons, worth $1,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by O P Brown of Seattle WA, master of the Monroe:

“Reef at S E Point of Wingam Is.”  “75 mile wind, dark, snowing and sleeting.”  “Dragging of anchors in heavy gale”  “Stranding”  “Started engine, wheel turned about two minutes when the vessel struck and then went dead.”  “Two men clung to wreckage to daylight then went ashore to Fox Island camp.”  “Total loss”

The crew survived the disaster, but the Monroe, valued at $10,000 was a total loss as was her cargo.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 59 45 N 144 22 10 W   Chart 16723

Additional Information: Tonnage 34 Gross 28 Net, Built 1894, Registered Juneau, ON 157393, Owner M B Dahl of Tacoma WA, Vessel Insurance unknown, Cargo Insurance $1,000

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty April 21, 1931 at Cordova

 

MONSTER (1992)     The 32 foot fishing vessel Monster was consumed by fire and sank June 23, 1992 at the mouth of the Egegik River.  All crewmembers made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 13 N 157 22 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: ON 614781

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MONTANA (1885)     The 628 ton wooden bark Montana stranded and was lost on the “New Shagak” River at 11 a.m. Thursday June 11, 1885.  The vessel departed San Francisco April 27, 1885 with 23 crewmen and 73 passengers bound for the “New Shagak” River.  She was carrying a 500 ton cargo of “General Merchandise” valued at $30,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by John Stenberg, master of the Montana:

“New Shagak River, Alaska; 58.59 N, 159 West…Stranded.”  “Error of Pilot”  “Gentle breeze; misty weather…no sea.”  “The vessel was in charge of an Esquimaux pilot who was unable to explain the channel, the consequence being that the vessel went ashore and became a total loss.”

The wreck report goes on to report that there was no loss of life.  The Montana was valued at $12,000 and was a total loss.  It was not known at the time how much of the cargo was lost.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 02 30 N 158 27 30 W   Chart 16322

Comment: I have charted this wreck at Dillingham on the Nushagak River as the longitude and latitude on the wreck report would put it inland, southwest of there.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 628 Gross 596 Net, Built 1864, Registered San Francisco, ON 17316, Master John Stenberg of San Francisco, Owner Chas. Nutsen of San Francisco

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report November 2, 1885 at San Francisco

 

MONTANA (1914)     The 65 ton wooden gas halibut schooner Montana caught fire and was lost at 1:00 p.m. Monday April 27, 1911 near Redoubt Bay.  The vessel departed Ketchikan April 8, 1914 with a crew of 15 on a fishing cruise.  At the time of the disaster, they had stowed 8,900 lbs. of halibut and 376 lbs. of bait worth a total of $4,000.  The following are excerpts from the Wreck Report filed by Michael Scott of Seattle, master of the Montana:

“8 ¼ mi. SSE from Sitka Sound on small Island front Redoubt Bay…on reef…gentle breeze.”  “Vessel floated off reef without damage.  At anchor when fire occurred.  Engines… tried to extinguish fire.  Fire caused by backfire of engines.”  “Towed to beach by gas boats Star and Niagara.”  “Complete loss.”

The Montana was valued at $16,000 at the time of the disaster and was a total loss including cargo.  The crew all made it to safety.  There was a total of $14,000 worth of insurance.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 55 30 N 135 22 W   Chart 17326

Additional Information: Tonnage 65 Gross 33 Net, Age 3 years, Registered Seattle, ON 208427, Owners W H Butt, E Cunningham and H Lee

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report April 30, 1914 by M Scott

 

MONTCLAIR (1925)     The 23 ton gas screw Montclair stranded in a storm off the south shore of Etolin Island at 6 p.m. Tuesday December 8, 1925.  The vessel departed Ketchikan November 23, 1925 with a crew of three bound for Onslow Island.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

“South shore Etolin Is. nr. Double Is.”  “Storm”  “Stranded”  “80 mile gale, rough sea, dark.”  “Montclair was lying at anchor on the leeward side of Mable Is. storm came up about 12 M increased in fierceness until midnight, at 6 p.m. she began to drag anchor, another was thrown out but to no avail.  The vessel now rests on the beach in a cove on the south shore of Etolin Island, about halfway between Mable and Double Is the engines and other machinery have been salvaged, it is not yet fully decided whether the hull is worth repairing or not.”

The Montclair was valued at $5,000 and was reported a total loss with no insurance.  The crew made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 52 30 N 132 22 W   Charts 17360 and 17423

Additional Information: Tonnage 23, Age 17 years, Registered Seattle, ON 205622, Master Lewis A Stockley of Myers Chuck, Owner Fur Farms Finance Co of Seattle 42/50th

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty March 3, 1926 at Myers Chuck by Stockley

 

MONTCLAIR (1972)     The 7 ton 28 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Montclair was consumed by fire July 20, 1972 at Kvichak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 58 N 156 56 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 6 Net, Length 28.6, Breadth 10.1, Depth 3.8, Built 1953 at Fletcher Bay WA, Former Name E P C 21, ON 265100

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “E P C 21” Pg 197, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1974) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1636

 

MONTICELLO (1871)     The 356 ton wooden whaling bark Monticello was abandoned in the ice near Wainwright Inlet September 13, 1871.  She hailed out of New London, Connecticut and was valued at $45,000 with cargo at the time of the disaster.

Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   70 36 N 160 W   Chart 16005

Sources: 1. Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route Andrews (1916) Pg 31, 2. The Northern Mariner (2006) “19th Century Commercial Shipping Losses” Pg 62

 

MONTREAL MARU (1943)     The 6,577 ton Japanese cargo vessel Montreal Maru was sunk by 3 Mitchell Bombers January 6, 1943 near Kiska Island.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   51 58 30 N 177 30 E   Chart 16012

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MOON (1964)     The 8 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Moon was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Seward.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 06 30 N 149 26 30 W   Chart 16680

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 7 Net, Length 30, breadth 11, Depth 3.3, Built LaConner WA, Horsepower 141, SL WD6320, Owner Earl Heatherington, Registered Juneau, ON 259580

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 459, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1005

 

MOON SONG (1985)     The 50 foot seiner Moon Song sank April 27, 1985 off of Cape Chiniak near Kodiak.  All six persons aboard were rescued.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 37 N 152 10 W   Chart 16580

Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MOONLIGHT (1898)     The 71 ton schooner Moonlight ran aground on a small island 20 miles from the Kobuk River Mouth and was lost July 2, 1898.  It was reported that the captain refused to use Indian Guides as Pilots.  There were 42 passengers aboard bound for Kotzbue Sound from Seattle.  “Crew and prospectors built a small boat from lumber on board and continued prospecting.”  Much of the cargo of prospecting outfits, provisions and lumber was salvaged.

Mapping and Location:  Westcentral Alaska   66 45 N 163 W   Chart 16005

Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MORENGEN (1922)     The 25 ton gas screw fishing vessel Morengen was lost with all hands November of 1922 between Cape Spencer and Yakutat.  The vessel departed Sitka October 19, 1922 bound for the Yakutat fishing banks with 6 crewmen aboard.  The Morengen had about 9 tons of ice and bait aboard when she left port.  She was last seen by the gas boat Caroline steering eastward of Yakutat.  Lost with the Morengen were master Hans Walderhaug of Petersburg, Jack Refenes, Carl Hagan, Charley Peterson, Olaf Vallum and one other.  No wreckage was found.  The Morengen was valued at $6,000 and had no insurance.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 33 N 139 44 W   Chart 16016

Comment: This same storm claimed the Valorous, Convention and Washington.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 25 Gross 17 Net, Built 1914, Registered Juneau, ON 212011, Owners Hans Walderhaug, Fred Sorensen of Seattle and L Peterson of Sitka

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty February 24, 1923 by S T Peterson ½ owner

 

MORIAH (1995)     The 68 foot steel longline fishing vessel Moriah struck a submerged rock and sank August 23, 1995 off of Segula Island in the Aleutian Islands.  All seven crewmembers made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 01 N 178 07 E   Chart 16012

Additional Information: ON 556529

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MORNING STAR (1989)     The 42 foot fishing vessel Morning Star capsized and sank January 14, 1989 in Uyak Bay.  Owner, Francisco (Frank) Beeman (50) of Kodiak, was lost.  The second crewman, Joe Talien survived.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 48 N 154 04 W   Chart 16580

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MORNING STAR (1992)   The 34 foot salmon seiner Morning Star ran up on the rocks and sank February 23, 1992 at Seldovia Point.  Ricky Maerz (37) from Homer was lost.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 28 15 N 151 42 W   Chart 16640

Additional Information: ON 503856

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MORZHOVOI (1955)     The 81 ton 80 foot wooden oil screw Morzhovoi burned June 10, 1955 in Funter Bay, Clarence Strait.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 14 15 N 134 55 W   Chart 17300

Additional Information: Tonnage 81 Gross 63 Net, Length 80.2, Breadth 18.9, Depth 7.6, Built 1917 at Seattle WA, Service freight, Horsepower 165, SL WB4935, Owner P E Harris Company, Registered Juneau, ON 214789

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 364, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 757

 

MOUNT MCKINLEY (1942)     The 4,861 ton 360 foot steam ship Mount McKinley stranded and was lost off of Scotch Cap beach March 11, 1942.  She had been following a zigzag course during a submarine alert when the disaster occurred.  All passengers and crew were removed before the vessel broke up in spring storms.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 24 15 N  164 47 30 W   Chart 16011

Additional Information: Tonnage 4,861 Gross 2,851 Net, Length 360.2, Breadth 51.6, Depth 22.8, Built 1918 at Philadelphia PA, Service passenger, Crew 83, Horsepower 3,400, Owner Alaska Steamship Company, SL KJEU, Registered New York, ON 216215

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1943) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 756, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1942) Pg 45, 3. Alaska Steam (1984) Pg 93

 

MOUNT MCKINLEY (1965)     The 39 ton 60 foot wooden barge Mount McKinley foundered in May of 1965 off of Seldovia.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 26 15 N 151 42 30 W   Chart 16640

Additional Information: Tonnage 39 Gross and Net, Length 60, Breadth 22, Depth 3.5, Built 1938 at Seattle WA, Owner Odin Jensen & Sons, Registered Ketchikan, ON 173933

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 479, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1172

 

MOUNT WOLLASTON (1879)     The 325 ton wooden bark Mount Wollaston was lost at Herald Island off the Siberian Coast October 10, 1879 with all hands.  She hailed out of New Bedford, Massachusetts and was valued at $32,000 at the time of the disaster.  This vessel had been caught in the ice and abandoned during the whaling season of 1876 but was salvaged in 1877 and put back into the whaling trade.  Her cargo when lost was reported to be 300 barrels of whale oil and 4,500 lbs. of whale bone valued at $18,000.

Mapping and Location: Siberia

Sources: 1. Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914 Microcopy 641 (1966), 2. APA Records Microfilm (1982), 3. The Northern Mariner (2006) “19th Century Commercial Shipping Losses” Pg 64

 

MR GEORGE (1973)     The 13 ton oil screw Mr. George stranded and was lost July 20, 1973 at Cook Inlet.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 05 N 152 30 W   Chart 16013

Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross, Built 1971, ON 538121

Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1974) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1636

 

MRS (2005)     The 48 foot diesel powered  vessel MRS capsized while making a turn and sank October 14, 2005 near Grindall Island in Clarence Strait.  The vessel was pot fishing for shrimp on a calm clear day.  All three crewmembers were rescued from the water by the Good Samaritan Vessel Lady May.  Two crewmembers survived the disaster and hypothermia, but the master of the MRS, Ryan Miller was lost.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 26 35 N 132 07 30 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 26 Gross 20 Net, Length 38, Breadth 14.5, Depth 6, Built 1950 at Wrangell, SL WD6706, ON 260616

Sources: 1, U S C G News Release (October  14, 2005) “Coast Guard, Good Samaritans rescue crew of fishing vessel MRS”, 2. Juneau Empire (October 24, 2005) “A heavy turnout in Wrangell for fisherman who drowned”

 

Web Ms.Aries

MS ARIES (1990)     The 42 foot salmon seiner Ms Aries sank in September of 1990 on a trip from Chignik to Kodiak.  All persons aboard were rescued.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   Unknown

Source: Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak)

 

MS B HAVEN (1982)     The fishing vessel Ms B Haven sank January 1, 1982 in Prince of Wales Passage.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 05 N 148 05 W   Chart 16700

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

MS FORTUNE (1996)     The 38 foot fishing vessel MS Fortune was consumed by fire and lost July 16, 1996 at Cape Seniavin in the Bering Sea.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 24 N 160 09 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: ON 912141

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MS TRACIE (2000)     The 50 foot wooden salmon fishing vessel Ms Tracie flooded from a faulty shaft packing, sprung a plank and sank August 16, 2000 off of Cedar Point, Metlakatla.  All six crewmembers abandoned the vessel to a skiff and were rescued by the fishing vessel Island Dancer.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 05 50 N 131 36 25 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: ON 260528

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MULE (1964)     The 31 ton 52 foot steel oil screw fishing vessel Mule was destroyed by a storm April 4, 1964 near Cape Spencer.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 12 45 N 136 39 30 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: Tonnage 31 Gross 21 Net, Length 51.9, Breadth 13.8, Depth 4.7, Built 1945 at Emeryville CA, Former Name LCM-6-C-48815 (U S N), Horsepower 330, SL WL2676, Owner Western Marine Construction Inc., Registered Seattle, ON 276472

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 462, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1005

 

MUNROE (1969)     The 30 ton 46 foot wooden oil screw Munroe collided with an iceberg and was lost August 29, 1969 in Stephens Passage.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 13 N 133 39 W   Chart 17300

Additional Information: Tonnage 30 Gross 20 Net, Length 46.9, Breadth 13.7, Depth 6.3, Built 1942 at Seattle WA, ON 241885

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 480, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1979) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2243

 

MURRE (1958)     The 7 ton 29 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Murre burned December 30, 1958 at Cordova.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 33 N 145 45 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 6 Net, Length 29.6, Breadth 9.4, Depth 3.5, Built 1925 at Cordova, Horsepower 40, Owner Charles C Sherman, Registered Juneau, ON 262714

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 390, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 825

 

MUSHER (1941)     The 6 ton 28 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Musher was consumed by fire July 13, 1941 in Sitka Sound.  The two persons aboard made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska 57 N 135 30 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: Tonnage 6 Gross 5 Net, Length 28.2, Breadth 8.7, Depth 3.4, Built 1927 at Ketchikan, Horsepower 16, Owner Charles McKewan, Registered Sitka, ON 232311

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1942) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 511, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1941) Pg 225

 

MUTUAL (1992)     The 85 foot longline fishing vessel Mutual was consumed by fire and sank July 25, 1992 approximately 40 nautical miles southeast of Seward.  Both persons aboard were rescued.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 06 30 N 149 26 20 W   Chart 16680

Additional Information: ON 219947

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MYRA (1948)     The 10 ton 39 foot wooden oil screw Myra burned in August of 1948 in the harbor at Whittier.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 46 30 N 148 41 W   Chart 16013

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 gross 7 Net, Length 39.6, Breadth 10.5, Depth 4.2, Built 1942 at Benton Harbor MI, Service freight, Former Name C-23 (U S N), Horsepower 75, Owner Dan H Moller, Registered Sitka, ON 254589

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1950) Pg 377, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1951) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 939

 

MYRA JEAN (2003)     The 42 foot Pollack trawler Myra Jean struck a rock, capsized and sank February 18, 2003 at the head of Wells Bay, Prince William Sound.  The vessel was engaged in pot fishing for shrimp.  Both crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessel Anna Lee.  Pollution mitigation was undertaken and salvage was under consideration.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 53 30 N 147 28 30 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: ON 602792

Sources: 1. A D E C Situation Report (February 20, 2003) “F/V Myra Jean sinking”, 2. Anchorage Daily News (February 19, 2003) “Fishing vessel sinks near Valdez, two person crew picked up by boat”

 

MYRNA (1937)     The 11 ton 34 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Myrna was destroyed by fire at Wrangell September 29, 1937.  The three persons aboard made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 28 N 132 22 40 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Length 34.4, Breadth 10.3, Depth 3.5, Built 1936 at Petersburg, Horsepower 70, Owner Loren Johnson of Petersburg, Registered Petersburg, ON 235582

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1938) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 512, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1937) Pg 239

 

MYRTLE (1870)     The schooner Myrtle was wrecked in the Aleutians late in 1870.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska Unknown

Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MYRTLE (1932)   The 9 ton wooden gas screw Myrtle stranded and was lost a mile south of East Foreland at 11:30 a.m. August 6, 1932.  E Sandvik, master and owner, was the only one aboard at the time of the disaster.  He had departed Swanson Creek in Cook Inlet and was bound for Kenai and Seldovia.  The cargo aboard the Myrtle was 2 ½ tons of canned salmon valued at $500.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

“1 mile south of East Foreland, Alaska.”  “From gentle breeze of S.W. at 9 a.m. increasing to storm in the afternoon.”  “Stranding occurred about 1 hr. and 15 min. before low water at which time wind had increased to strong breeze with moderate ground swell.  Ebb current somewhat offset ground swell for a distance of approximately 4 miles south of East Foreland.  Flood current set ground swell in to beach with full force of wind and current.”  “Rowed out kedge anchor with 40 fms of line.  No other boat near by at time of stranding.”  “Libby McNeill & Libby cannery tenders Indiana and Flyer offered assistance but came too late and could not be accepted.”  “Total loss of hull”

The Myrtle had a value of $3,000 at the time of the loss.  Much of the cargo was salvaged.  There was no insurance.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 43 N 151 24 W   Chart 16662

Comment: The 1933 Merchant Vessels of the U S dates this wreck September 20, 1932.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 7 Net, Age 5 years, Registered Seward, ON 227866,Master and owner E Sandvik of Seldovia

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty September 12, 1932 by Sandvik

 

MYRTLE D (1997)     The 33 foot salmon troller Myrtle D grounded and was lost August 24, 1997 at Elfin Cove.  The operator sleeping at the wheel was blamed for the disaster.  There was no loss of life.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 11 40 N 136 20 35 W   Chart 17300

Additional Information: ON 230884

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

MYRTLE H (1926)     The 23 ton wooden gas screw Myrtle H foundered near Hinchinbrook Island at 10:30 p.m. Saturday July 23, 1926.  The vessel departed Cordova bound for Cape Hinchinbrook Lighthouse with two aboard and was on a return trip when the disaster occurred.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

“2 miles from Boswell Bay on Hinchinbrook Island”  “Foundering”  “Strong breeze with heavy swell”  “First we had engine trouble, the engine stopping; boat drifting on bar, and dropped anchor to keep from going aground; at this time boat was in shallow water; Heavy ground swell lifted boat and it settled down on the anchor; the fluke of the anchor going thru the hull about amidships; boat filled up with water and Henderson and deckhand took to skiff; rowed ashore; took another went out and stood by; tried to drag Myrtle H up on beach but did not have power enough; owing to strong tied vessel dragged anchor approximately half mile seawards; boat then in breakers where she was battered to pieces and totally destroyed.  Was returning from Cape Hinchinbrook Lighthouse when accident happenend.”

The Myrtle H was valued at $6,000 at the time of the disaster.  The crew made it to safety but the vessel was a total loss.  There was no cargo aboard

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 24 N 146 08 W   Chart 16709

Additional Information: Tonnage 23 Gross 21 Net, Age 9 years, Registered Juneau, ON 215923, Master R B Eisner of Cordova, Owner O W Henderson of Cordova, Vessel Insurance $4,000

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty July 24, 1926 at Cordova by O W Henderson

 

MYSTIC LADY (1994)     The 40 foot fishing vessel Mystic Lady burned to the waterline September 9, 1994 in Kitoi Bay near Kodiak.  The fire originated from a stove.  No one was aboard at the time of the blaze.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 11 30 N 152 21 W   Chart 16594

Additional Information: ON 578731

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Alaska), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

4 Responses to Alaska Shipwrecks (M)

  1. i troyer says:

    i would like info re: a cannery ship(LST) AKA SR9 shipwreck in/or near Yakuat AK
    summer 1952

    • captaingood says:

      The 158 foot steel cannery tender S.R.9 (Official Number 257612) ran aground and became stranded July 6, 1952 at the mouth of the Kaliakh River about 10 miles from Cape Yakataga. There were 11 persons aboard who were forced to take refuge on the beach. The U S Coast Guard dropped supplies from aircraft until a crew from the Coast Guard Cutter Kimball attempted to reach the survivors in a small vessel days later. That boat capsized in the rough surf and her five crewmembers swam to the beach to join the 11 persons who were already marooned there. Six of the S.R.9 crewmembers and the five coast guard men hiked to Cape Yakataga where a Coast Guard plane picked them up. The remaining five persons stayed at the site if the stranding to await underwriters. The salvage tug Salvage Chief was dispatched to the scene August 29, 1952 to attempt to re-float the S.R.9. I cannot find evidence that the re-float was successful. The Princess Kathleen sank the following week with 425 passengers and crew rescued.

  2. Dave Henderson says:

    I believe the “False Island” referred to regarding the incidents involving the vessels “Mallard” and “Alta” on October 27,1921 is on the southern end of Cleveland Peninsula immediately west of Pen Cove and approx. 1.5 miles east of Niblack Point. This island is only an island at high tide. Interestingly, while Pen Cove is labeled on the chart (17426) and the island is not, on topographic maps of the same area False Island is labeled but the cove is not. I charted the coordinates at 55°32’17.68″N, 132° 5’10.65″W. Also, as a boater living in the area for most of my life, I was already aware of the name of this location. Hope this helps.

    PS: Your website is absolutely fascinating and a wealth of information.

    • captaingood says:

      Thank you very much Dave, both for the information and feedback. I will edit my posts and books to include an update on the location of this wreck. I usually use the Dictionary of Alaska Place Names by Donald J. Orth for coordinates, but sometimes there are no references to names of less significant features.

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