Alaska Shipwrecks (O)

               ABBREVIATIONS:  AluminumALBritish ColumbiaBCCentralCFiberglassFRPFishing VesselFVIndicated Horse PowerIHPLongliner-LLMotor VesselMVNorthNOfficial NumberONRevenue Cutter ServiceRCSSchoonerSchSignal LettersSLSouth CentralSCSoutheastSESouthwestSWSteel oil screwSOSSteam ShipSSUnknownUUnited States ArmyUSAUnited States Coast GuardUSCGUnited States NavyUSNWestcentralWCWood gas screwWGSWood oil screwWOS

O M ARNOLD (1939)     The 74 ton wooden oil screw O M Arnold foundered during a storm in Chatham Strait at 11:20 a.m. Friday August 18, 1939.  The vessel departed Chatham August 17th bound for Noyes Island with 8 crewmen aboard.  George Lee, master of the O M Arnold, Andre Lee and Ernest Kruse were lost in the disaster.  The vessel foundered a half mile off Timbered Islets loaded with 60 tons of fresh salmon worth $1,800.  Only five of the crewmen made it to safety.  The O M Arnold was valued at $20,000.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 41 45 N 133 48 W   Chart 17400

                Additional Information: Tonnage 74 Gross, Age 12 years, Registered Seattle, ON 226486, Master George Lee of Seattle, Owner New England Fish Co of Portland OR, Vessel Insurance $20,000, Cargo Insurance none

                Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty August 23, 1939 at Seattle by NEFCO of Oregon

OAKLAND (1901)     The 534 ton 151 foot wooden bark Oakland stranded and was lost at 10:30 a.m. Monday July 15, 1901 near Port Clarence.  She had departed Everett, Washington June 8, 1901 bound for Teller, Alaska with 12 crewmen aboard.  The Oakland was carrying a cargo of 900 tons of lumber and shingles valued at $8,000.  The vessel was valued at $15,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by her master, P Peterson of San Francisco:

                “Reef about 10 miles from entrance to Port Clarence, Alaska”  “Fog and currents”  “Wind light breeze from southwest”  “Stranding”  “Vessel filled immediately and sank to her deck, crew abandoned and I went ashore for help, ship and cargo was afterward sold at public auction”  “Practically total loss”

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   65 15 N 166 30 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 534 Gross 483 Net, Length 150.8, Breadth 34.5, Depth 13.2, Age 36 years, Registered Port Townsend WA, ON 19142, Owner James Bell and A O Nelson, Insurance unknown

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report July 23, 1901 at Teller by Peterson

OAKLAND (1912)     The 146 ton 103 foot wooden gas steamer Oakland stranded and was lost at the entrance to Dry Bay just before noon October 23, 1912.  The vessel had just departed Dry Bay bound for Seattle with eleven crewmen aboard.  She was carrying a 125 ton cargo of canned salmon and supplies as well as a deck load of empty oil drums.  The Saint Elias Packing Company was operating the vessel having contracted to purchase it from the Alaska Steamship Company.  The wreck report attributes the disaster to a moderate gale and heavy snowstorm.  No lives were lost, but the Oakland, valued at $20,000 and her cargo, worth $9,475 were total losses.  The vessel was insured for $15,000 and her cargo for $9475.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   59 08 N 138 25 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: Tonnage 146 Gross 117 Net, Built 1905 at Marshfield OR, Length 103, Breadth 24., Depth 7.8, Registered Port Townsend WA, ON 202085, Master R A Leonard of Vancouver

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report June 13, 1913 at Puget Sound by R R Piesom, Supt.

OAKLAND (1939)     The 18 ton wooden gas screw Oakland foundered near Cape Chacon at 6 p.m. April 29, 1939.  The vessel had departed Hydaburg with five crewmen aboard bound for Ketchikan.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report of Willis Bell, master of the Oakland:

                “500 feet S E Cape Chacon, Alaska”  “Strong breeze, drizzle, heavy sea, twilight”  “heavy seas and tide rips caused bottom planks to spring”  “Used pumps and cans for bailing”  “Foundering”  “Vessel drifted around Cape Chacon and managed to get skiff overboard and all made shore in skiff.  Built fire on beach and one member of crew proceeded along shore to McLeans Arm for help.  Ga. S. Reliance picked up rest of crew May 1.  USCG Alert went to McLeans Arm and brought other member of crew to Ketchikan the morning of May 2, 1939.”  “Total loss”

                The Oakland was valued at $3,500 and had no insurance.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 41 30 N 132 00 50 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: Tonnage 18 Gross 14 Net, Built 1927, Registered Ketchikan, ON 226853, Master Willis Bell of Hydaburg, Owner Peter Bell of Hydaburg

                Source: U S C G Report of Casualty May 2, 1939 at Ketchikan

OAXACA (1998)     The 36 foot crab fishing vessel Oaxaca grounded and was lost February 15, 1998 in Glacier Bay.  Both crewmembers made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 22 N 136 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: ON AK7053C

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

OBAN (2005)     The 41 foot seiner Oban grounded and was lost March 23, 2005 on the southwest corner of Duke Island approximately 10 miles south of Annette Island.  Both persons on board abandoned ship to a Metlakatla Fire Department skiff that transferred them to the Good Samaritan Vessel Skip Jack.  They were transported to Ketchikan where they began efforts to mitigate pollution and possibly salvage the Oban.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 55 N 131 20 W   Chart 17420

                Source: A D E C Situation Report (March 24, 2005) “F/V Oban”

 

OBORO (1942)     The 378 foot 1,950 ton Japanese supply destroyer Oboro was sunk by an attack of six U S B-26 Marauders October 17, 1942 ten miles north of Pillar Rock off of Kiska Island.  Only 17 crewmembers of probable compliment of 219 survived.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 07 20 N 177 22 E   Charts 16012, 16441

                Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. Wikipedia.org (2013)” Japanese destroyer Oboro (1930)”

 

OCEAN BEAUTY (1977)     The 44 foot oil screw fishing vessel Ocean Beauty sank May 6, 1977 south of Marmot Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 13 N 151 50 W   Chart 16580

                Source: Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak)

 

OCEAN BEAUTY (1996)     The 30 foot fishing vessel Ocean Beauty grounded and was lost August 25, 1996 at Port Moller.  Both crewmembers found their way to safety.  There was not expected to be salvaged.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 59 30 N 160 34 30 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: ON 600074

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

OCEAN BOUNTY (1985)     The 90 foot crab fishing vessel Ocean Bounty flooded her engine room and sank March 21, 1985 approximately 110 miles south of Cape Saint Elias.  Winds were at 65 knots and seas 35 feet when the disaster occurred.  The three persons aboard were rescued by a U S Coast Guard helicopter.  The same vessel had lost a crewmember overboard two weeks earlier.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 54 N 144 36 W   Chart 16013

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

OCEAN CAPE (1979)     The 80 foot crab fishing vessel Ocean Cape foundered January 1, 1979 approximately 22 miles out of Cape Fairweather.  The vessel was on her way to Yakutat with a load of snow crab.  The four survivors were picked up from their life raft by the Crowley Maritime Tug Stalwart after drifting four days.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 48 30 N 137 56 45 W   Chart 16016

                Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. Seattle Daily Times (January 6, 1979) Pg 1

 

OCEAN CASTLE (1971)     The Seattle fishing vessel Ocean Castle foundered February 22, 1971 near the Barren Islands after a collision with the tanker Hawaiian Standard.  The four crewmen aboard the Ocean Castle were picked up by the tanker and then transferred to the Coast Guard Cutter Storis.  Surviving to tell the story were Michael Johnson, Ron Cooper, Gary Mayhew and David Hunt.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 57 N 152 15 W   Chart 16580

                Source: The Seattle Times (February 23, 1971) “Seattle boat sinks after collision” Pg B 6

 

OCEAN CHALLENGER (2006)     The 50 foot fishing vessel Ocean Challenger capsized in severe weather October 19, 2006 approximately 60 miles south of Sand Point.  Three of her four crewmembers were lost including captain David “Cowboy” Hafflequist (51) of Hoonah, Steve Esparza (26) of Kodiak and Walter Foster (26) of Westport WA.  Kevin Ferrell (28) of Lynchburg VA was the sole survivor.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska 55 20 15 N 160 30 W   Chart 16540

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. U S C G News Release (October 19, 2006) “Coast Guard aircraft resume search for missing crewmember”

 

OCEAN CLIPPER (1987)     The 90 foot fishing vessel Ocean Clipper was blown ashore and wrecked in a gale March 21, 1987 on the south side of Saint Paul Island.  The six crewmen aboard escaped to a life raft, floated to a nearby reef and walked ashore.  They were picked off of the beach by the U S Coast Guard Cutter Midget and transported to Saint Paul for treatment for mild hypothermia.  The hulk of the vessel was demolished and removed in 2010.  Evidence of this wreck may still be on site and of interest.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   57 10 N 170 15 W   Chart 16011

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

OCEAN DYNASTY (1988)     The 124 foot trawler Ocean Dynasty sank November 20, 1988 in the Bering Sea.  All seven crewmembers were rescued by the processor Golden Alaska.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   Unknown

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

OCEAN GRACE (1983)     The 120 foot crab fishing vessel Ocean Grace capsized and sank August 14, 1983 approximately 22 miles northwest of Dutch Harbor in the Bering Sea.  Only one of the five on board survived.  Lost were skipper Harold Pedersen (46) of Edmonds, Randy R Ficks (27) of Seattle, Annette Fletcher (24) of Port Townsend and Jim P Converse (28) of Engadine, Michigan.  Survivor Jeff Anderson (30) of Everett, Washington was thrown clear of the Ocean Grace when a large wave struck and overturned her.  He managed to find and board the life raft and was picked up more than 24 hours later by a Panamanian ship.  Anderson was then transferred to the fishing vessel Miss Blue and transported to Dutch Harbor.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 54 N 166 31 W   Chart 16011

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 3. Seattle Times (August 16, 1983) “Four crew members feared lost after Seattle boat sinks” Pg B 2, 4. Seattle Times (August 18, 1983) “Survivor of capsizing credits skipper” Pg C-1

 

OCEAN HOME (1990)     The 46 foot fiberglass longline fishing vessel Ocean Home was consumed by fire from an oil stove May 1, 1990 at Cape Spencer.  All four crewmembers abandoned ship to a skiff and were rescued by the U S Coast Guard Cutter Naushon.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 12 45 N 136 39 30 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: ON 617885

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

OCEAN HOPE I (1998)     The 92 foot cod trawler Ocean Hope I capsized and was lost October 29, 1998 off of Cape Karluk in the Shelikof Strait.  All four crewmembers were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska 57 35 10 N 154 30 50 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: ON 652395

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

OCEAN HOPE II (1989)     The 108 foot long line halibut fishing vessel Ocean Hope II disappeared with all hands March 3, 1989 in heavy weather in the Shelikof Strait.  The vessel was last heard from the night of March 2nd and was seeking shelter in Portage Bay.  Only a life ring was found days later.  Lost were skipper Jack White (33) of Kodiak, Dennis Frye (26), Dan Tullar (26) of Kodiak and Michael Wheeler (27) of Anacortes WA.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 34 05 N 156 02 15 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: ON 652396

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

OCEAN PACIFIC (1989)     The 166 foot steel salmon processor Ocean Pacific capsized and sank in 22 fathoms of water August 12, 1989 at her mooring in Tongass Narrows.  There was no loss of life.  Lost with the vessel were 200,000 pounds of processed and frozen pink salmon and 120,000 pounds of pink salmon in refrigerated seawater.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 22 N 131 43 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: ON 587265

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

OCEAN PRIDE (1979)     The fishing vessel Ocean Pride sank November 24, 1979 in the Bering Sea.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   Unknown

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

OCEAN QUEEN (1964)     The 13 ton 39 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Ocean Queen was reported lost at Kodiak in the Good Friday earthquake of March 27, 1964.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 8 Net, Length 39.5, Breadth 11.2, Depth 4.1, Built 1943 at New Bedford MA, Former Name J-503 (U S A), Horsepower 140, SL WJ2176, Owner Arthur C Nelson, Registered Juneau, ON 273901

                Sources: 1.Unofficial Wreck List, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 498

 

OCEAN SPRAY (1994)     The 81 foot trawler Ocean Spray flooded and sank September 30, 1994 off of Unimak Island in the Bering Sea.  Her four crewmembers were rescued from a life raft by U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 39 42 N 163 56 48 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: ON 517100

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Alaska), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

OCEAN SUNRISE (2001)     The 42 foot shrimp fishing vessel Ocean Sunrise sank after taking on water in high seas October 28, 2001 in Cholmondeley Sound, 19 miles west of Ketchikan.  Robert Hanscomb and his wife Terisa were on board when the disaster occurred.  Terisa was rescued from the water by the fishing vessel Nina Fay but Robert was lost.  The U S Coast Guard and fishing vessel Rio Grande also responded to the Ocean Sunrise May-Day but were unable to revive Mr. Hanscomb after retrieving him from the water.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 17 N 132 04 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: ON 541029

                Source: U S C G News Release (October 28, 2001) “Coast Guard, Good Samaritan save woman, skipper parishes”

 

OCEANIC (1926)     The 11 ton wooden gas screw Oceanic broke loose from her moorings at Metlakatla and stranded in Sylvan (Sylburn) Harbor during the night of December 15, 1926.  There was no one aboard at the time.  The wind was high and from the southeast when the disaster occurred.  The Oceanic was valued at $2,000 and became a total loss.  There was no insurance.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 12 N 131 36 W   Chart 17434

                Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Built 1909, Registered Ketchikan, ON 206584, Master Everett C Hudson of Metlakatla, Owner John Hudson of Metlakatla

                Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty March 24, 1930 by John Hudson at Ketchikan

OCEANIC (1996)     The 48 foot shrimp fishing vessel Oceanic flooded and sank December 12, 1996 approximately 23 nautical miles southwest of Craig.  Two of the three crewmembers were rescued, one was lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 28 30 N 133 09 W   Chart 17400

                Additional Information: ON 229334

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

OCEANUS (1989)     The 52 foot wooden longline fishing vessel Oceanus sank in heavy weather during a halibut opening May 14, 1989 at the entrance to Aialik Bay.  All five crewmembers were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 40 N 149 34 W   Chart 16680

                Additional Information: ON 225279

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

ODIAK (1907)     The gas launch Odiak was wrecked at Bear Cape in Prince William Sound in 1907.  The vessel was valued at $3,000 with cargo at the time of the loss.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 12 N 146 43 W   Chart 16700

                Sources: 1. Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route (1916) “List of Wrecks in Alaskan Waters from Records of Customs Office, Juneau” Pg 33, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

ODIN (1958)     The 19 ton 39 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Odin burned March 2, 1958 at Petersburg.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 48 10 N 132 58 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 19 Gross 13 Net, Length 39.5, Breadth 12.1, Depth 4.6, Built 1914 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 140, SL WH8112, Owner Louis G Severson, Registered Wrangell, ON 212838

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) Pg 293, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 802

 

ODUNA (1965)     The 7,252 ton 422 foot steel steam ship Oduna stranded and was lost November 26, 1965 at Cape Pankof.  The vessel stranded in heavy seas on the east side of Unimak Island.  The radar aboard the Oduna was inoperative and strong currents drug her onto the rocks.  The Chief Mate was at the helm when the disaster occurred and was blamed for the stranding.  The crew was removed by breeches buoy and helicopter to the Cutter Storis and tug Adeline Foss.  Initially her cargo was thought to be lost, but several men organized a salvage effort and were able to save much of what was onboard, including 200,000 pounds of frozen crab in refrigerated container vans.  The Oduna was owned by the Alaska Steamship Company.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 40 N 163 04 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 7,252 Gross, 4,452 Net, Length 422.8, Breadth 57, Depth34.8, Built 1945 at South Portland ME, Former Names Francis A Retka, Liberty Bell, I R Lashins, and Southport, Service freight, Horsepower 2,500, SL KIOI, Owner Alaska Steamship Company, Registered Seattle, ON 247159

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 518, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1172, 3. Alaska Steam (1984) Pg 135

 

ODUNO (1939)     The gas powered salmon fishing vessel Oduno is reported as having been lost off Noyes Island while engaged in fishing in 1939.  All 12 crewmen were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 41 45 N 133 48 W   Chart 17400

                Comment: There are similarities between this wreck and the O M Arnold (1939).  WG

                Source:  1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 475, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

OHIO (1888)     The 195 ton 93 foot wooden bark Ohio was driven ashore and lost near Point Hope at 9 p.m. October 3, 1888.  Only eight of the 33 crewmen survived.  They were rescued eight months later.  The vessel departed San Francisco November of 1887 for the Arctic Ocean.  Her cargo at the time of the disaster was 50 tons of provisions, bone and oil worth $11,000.  The Ohio was valued at $10,000.  Both the vessel and her cargo were lost.  The wreck was attributed to a thick snowstorm and heavy gale.

                Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   68 20 20 N 166 50 40 W   Chart 16005

                Comment: I have charted this wreck at Pt Hope as the wreck report states. The Revenue Cutter Service records 1868-88 mention it near Cape Lisburne to the north.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 195, Length 92.6, Breadth 24, Depth 14.9, Built 1830 at Baltimore MD, Registered New Bedford MA, ON 18980, Master George E Allen of New Bedford, Owner Gilbert Allen of New Bedford, Vessel Insurance $14,000

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report August 13, 1889 by Gilbert Allen

OHIO (1889)     The 364 ton 111 foot wooden whaling bark Ohio stranded and was lost at 2:30 a.m. May 22, 1889 at Nunivak Island.  The vessel departed Honolulu, Hawaii March 6, 1889 on a whaling trip with 35 crewmen aboard.  At the time of the disaster her only cargo was a $10,000 outfit of whaling supplies.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “Nonnivak Island, Alaska”  “Strong breeze, dark night, foggy”  “First stove in ice, afterwards stranded.”  “Unmanageable after being stove in, and blown ashore.”  “Total loss”

                The Ohio and her cargo were a total loss but the entire crew made it to safety.  They were taken from Nunivak Island by the bark Ocean.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   60 N 166 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 363.8, Length 110.9, Breadth 28.4, Depth 18.6, Built 1833 at Rochester MA, Registered New Bedford MA, ON 18987, Master Elihu G Gifford of New Bedford, Owner Frederick Swift of New Bedford, Insurance $28,000

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report September 16, 1889 by Frederick Swift at New Bedford

OHIO (1898)     The schooner Ohio went adrift from Port Simpson, British Columbia in December of 1898.  A strong gale hit and set the vessel adrift from her place of anchorage.  The Ohio drifted and eventually ran aground on a reef off of a small uninhabited island near the south end of Revillagigedo Channel.  The crew lived on seaweed and mussels for a week before they were found by Natives.  They later returned to Port Simpson.  The vessel was a total loss.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 48 N 131 06 W   Chart 17434

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

OHIO (1909)     The 3488 ton 343 foot iron steamship Ohio struck a reef in Finlayson Channel, British Columbia and sank at 1:00 a.m. Thursday August 26, 1909.  The vessel was on her way to Prince William Sound from Seattle, having departed August 24, 1909.  There were 188 passengers and 88 crewmen aboard.  Four persons were lost; Albert Anderson the Quartermaster, George E Eccles the Wireless Operator, F J Stephen the Purser, and Dock A Hayes a soldier.  The three crewmen from the Ohio had stayed back to help the seasick soldier and were lost with him.  The damaged Ohio almost made it to Carter Bay, but incoming water reached the boilers and they exploded, sinking the vessel quickly.  She was carrying 1,100 tons of general merchandise worth $115,793.  The passengers who didn’t jump overboard and swim for it were landed on the beach in ships boats.  From there they were transported by the fishing boat Kingfisher to the steamers Humbolt and Rupert City.  The wreck report states that there were high southeast winds and rain on a very dark night when the accident happened.  The Ohio was valued at $200,000 at the time of the disaster.

                Mapping and Location: British Columbia

                Additional Information: Tonnage 3488 Gross, Length 343, Breadth 43, Depth 24.9, Service – Passenger, IHP 2,000, Built 1873 Philadelphia PA, Registered Port Townsend WA, ON 19376, Master J Johnson of Seattle, Owner Alaska Steamship Company of Seattle, Vessel Insurance $175,000

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report August 30, 1909 at Puget Sound by Frank E Burns, Manager Alaska SS Company, 2. Alaska Steam (1984) Pg 43

OLAF (1924)     The 21 ton wooden salmon fishing vessel Olaf foundered in Cook Inlet at 9:15 p.m. Saturday July 12, 1924.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Five miles N. Kenai River”  “Wind southwest 20 miles; daylight; rough sea”  “Vessel turned with the wind”  “Vessel sprung a leak”  “The vessel foundered on Cooks Inlet laden with fresh salmon bound from fish trap to the Kenai Cannery at appr. Lat. 60.37 N Long 151.23 W.  Vessel suddenly filled with water.”

                The three crewmen aboard made it to safety, but the Olaf, valued at $2,800, was a total loss.  Her cargo of salmon was also lost.  She was carrying approximately 35,000 pounds of fresh salmon worth $803.07.  There was no insurance on the Olaf or her cargo.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 37 N 151 23 W   Chart 16662

                Additional Information: Tonnage 21 Gross 14 Net, Built 1912, Registered Seattle, ON 210039, Master J A Rasmussen of Seattle, Owner Libby McNeill & Libby of Seattle, Last Port Salamato Trap July 12th, Destination Kenai

                Source: U S C G Report of Casualty August 26, 1924 at Seattle by C H Bowen of LM&L

OLE II (1947)     The 8 ton 32 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Ole II burned in Union Bay August 8, 1947.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 46 N 132 13 W   Chart 17400

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 5 Net, Length 31.9, Breadth 8.9, Depth 4.2, Built 1919 at Cape Edwards, Crew 8, Horsepower 20, Owner Nakat Packing Corp., Registered Ketchikan, ON 225378

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1947) Pg 378, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1948 “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 862

 

OLGA (1908)     The 20 ton 47 foot wooden schooner Olga stranded and was lost in Prince William Sound at 5:00 a.m. September 18, 1908.  The vessel had been moored to the wrecked steamer Saratoga with no one aboard.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “Second point from Point Freemantle”  “Stormy, southeast wind, and heavy sea running”  “Vessel was under charter by wrecking crew trying to salve steamer Saratoga, when she parted her moorings and went adrift”  “Carried away her moorings alongside steamer Saratoga, and drifted to point where schooner stranded”  “Carelessness of parties in charge.  Report made that no measure was taken to avoid casualty”

                The steamer Saratoga was wrecked March 20, 1908 at Busby Island, just northwest of Bligh Island in the Valdez Arm of Prince William Sound.  The Olga was valued at $500 at the time of the tragedy and had no insurance.  She had been leased by a salvage company for salvaging the steamer Saratoga.  The strong southeasterly wind blew the Olga across Valdez Arm to the west side above Point Freemantle.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 57 N 146 58 W   Charts 16700, 16707

                Comment: The 2,820 ton Saratoga wrecked near Bligh Reef where the Exxon Valdez ran aground in 1989.    See Saratoga (1908).  This is also the reef where the 2827 ton Olympia wrecked in 1910.  See Olympia (1910).  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 19.9 Net, Built 1883 at Kodiak, Length 47, Breadth 14.8, Depth 5, Registered Valdez, ON 155084, Master and Owner Charles Swanson of Allamar

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report October 19, 1908 by Charles Swanson

OLGA (1909)     The 43 ton 64 foot wooden gas screw schooner Olga was severely damaged in a storm at Nome the night of October 24, 1909.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by William Mogg, master and owner of the Olga:

                “Sand spit at Nome”  “Easterly gale, high sea, dark night”  “Lying on beach at Nome”  “High wind and heavy sea breaking over her while lying on beach”  “Tried to haul her up higher on beach.  All tackle carried away”  “Capt. Bain, with a crew of men tried to haul her up on beach”

                The Olga was valued at $5,000 with no cargo.  The damage reported was $3,000.  There was no one aboard and no cargo.  There was also no insurance.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 43 Net, Built 1890 Benicia CA, Length 63.5, Breadth 20, Depth 7, Service Whaling, Registered San Francisco, ON 155176, Master and owner William Mogg of San Francisco

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report October 26, 1909 at Nome by Mogg

OLGA (1923)     The 76 ton gas schooner Olga stranded on a sand bar southeast from shore opposite the mouth of Safety Lagoon at 4:00 p.m. Thursday May 16, 1923.  The channel buoys had been shifted from their original positions.  The vessel was later crushed by ice and completely wrecked by a gale during the spring breakup.  The Olga was valued at $10,000 and had no insurance.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 29 N 164 45 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 76 Gross 60 Net, Built Misato Japan, Registered Alaska, ON 208171, Master and Owner Alexander Allan of Seattle, Last Port Nome September 3, 1922, Destination Port Safety

                Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty June 25, 1923 at Nome by Alexander Allan

OLGA (1927)     The 8 ton wooden gas screw Olga stranded and was lost in Lynn Canal at 7:00 p.m. July 19, 1927.  The vessel departed Juneau that day with three crewmen aboard to fish for halibut.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report;

                “N.W. end Hump Isld, Lynn Canal”  “good weather, daylight”  “Broken steering gear”  “Stranding”  “Strong tide running and engine failed allowing vessel to drift on beach.  Six lines put ashore and stern anchor failed to hold vessel upright and she tilled on the following tide”  “Vessel pounded badly after stranding in exposed position”

                The Olga was valued at $3,000 and reported as a total loss.  There was fishing gear and personal effects aboard worth $700, some of which were salvaged.  The vessel was insured for $2,000.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 27 30 N 134 59 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 6 Net, Built 1913, Registered Juneau, ON 211093, Master and Owner O C Oberg of Juneau

                Source: U S C G Report of Casualty July 23, 1927 at Juneau by Oberg

OLGA N (1949)     The 11 ton wooden gas screw Olga N foundered in the Gulf of Alaska May 8, 1949.

                Mapping and Location:  Alaska Unknown

                Comment: This vessel sank early in the year she was built.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross, Built 1949, ON 257308

                Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1950) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 927

 

OLIVE (1922)     The 50 ton scow Olive was crushed by ice and lost May 15, 1922 in the Iditarod River.  The vessel departed Eagle with six crewmen aboard bound for Iditarod.  The crew made it to safety but the Olive, valued at $1,000 was a total loss.

                Mapping and Location: Central Alaska

                Additional Information: Tonnage 50 Gross 50 Net, Age 17 years, Registered Eagle, ON 162384, Master and Owner George Mutchler of Flat, Insurance none

                Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty March 12, 1923 at Juneau by Mutchler

OLIVE (1924)     The 59 ton wooden auxiliary schooner Olive stranded in Portage Bay at 1:00 p.m. July 18, 1924.  There were four crewmen aboard.  The vessel departed Kodiak for Kanatak July 15, 1924.  She had discharged her cargo before the casualty occurred.  The following are excerpts from the report filed by the master and owner of the Olive:

                “North east corner Portage Bay”  “Heavy weather, carrying away of ground tackle”  “About 80 mile gale, thick weather and heavy sea”  “Blew ashore”  “When gale came up both anchors were put down and 65 fm chain given.  Both anchors carried away on parting cable whereupon steamed ahead seeking shelter but unable to make steerage account severity of gale.  Lost control and vessel stranded”

                The Olive, valued at $15,000 was reported a total loss.  The crewmen all survived and the Olive was subsequently salvaged.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 34 05 N 156 02 15 W   Chart 16013

                Comment: The Olive casualty of 1924 is included in this compilation even though the vessel was salvaged.  Evidence of the loss may still be on site (ground tackle etc.) and of interest.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 59 Gross 51 Net, Built 1921, Registered Seattle, ON 221334, Master and Owner Axel Olsen of Matanuska, Vessel Insurance $6,000

                Source: U S C G Report of Casualty August 4, 1924 by Axel Olsen

OLIVE (1932)     The 59 ton wooden gas powered schooner Olive caught fire at winter quarters at midnight June 17, 1932 and was a total loss.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “N. E. wind about 35 m.p.h.; dark with heavy clouds and rain”  “Caught fire while being beached in the lagoon between Near Island and Crooked Island (near Kodiak, Alaska), apparently from a backfire from the engine”  “The vessel was being turned on the beach at high tide for the purpose of painting.  One side had been painted and it was necessary to turn her to get at the other side.  There was apparently an accumulation of gas in the bilge which exploded when the back-fire occurred.  A heavy explosion immediately followed a back-fire from the running engine, enveloping the vessel in flames, making the possibility of extinguishing out of the question.  Immediately the vessel was a roaring furnace that made it impossible to attempt to fight fire aboard, as the master and one man were forced to abandon her.  The fuel tanks exploded shortly after the crew had left”  “A boat and crew came from Kodiak to assist but arrived too late to help”  “Total loss”

                The two crewmen aboard were able to make it to safety but the Olive, valued at $15,000 was a total loss.  She was insured for $10,000.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 N 152 24 W   Chart 16595

                Comment: Same vessel as wrecked at Kanatak in 1924.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 59 Gross 51 Net, Built 1921, Registered Seward, ON 221334, Master and Owner J A Johnson of Kodiak, Last Port at Winter Quarters since September 1931

                Source: U S C G Report of Casualty June 25, 1932 by J A Johnson at Seward

OLIVER CROCKER (1871)     The 305 ton wooden whaling bark Oliver Crocker was abandoned in the ice around Point Belcher September 14, 1871.  Home Port for the vessel was New Bedford, Massachusetts.  She was valued at $48,000 at the time of the disaster.

                Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   70 47 40 N 159 39 02 W   Chart 16003

                Source: Harper’s Weekly (December 2, 1871) “Destruction of the Arctic Whaling Fleet”

 

OLIVIA (1906)     The schooner Olivia was lost in a storm in Dolphin Island Bay in 1906 along with the schooner Mary Gray and sloop Lila.  The three vessels are mistakenly listed on Alaska shipwrecks lists since as early as 1914.  All three were in fact lost off the coast of Alabama in the hurricane that made landfall south of Mobile September 27, 1906.

                Mapping and Location: Unknown – Error in Location

                Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 128, 2. Washington Historical Quarterly (1916) “Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route” Pgs 21-37, 3. Historic Shipwrecks and Magnetic Anomalies of the Northern Gulf of Mexico (1989) Pg H-17

 

OLIVIA H (1941)     The 51 ton 58 foot wooden oil screw Olivia H foundered at Dayville December 17, 1941.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 05 N 146 21 W   Chart 16708

                Comment: Dayville more commonly referred to as Fort Liscum.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 51 Gross 34 Net, Length 58.7, Breadth 15.4, Depth 7.5, Built 1925 at Everett WA, Service freight, Crew 5, Horsepower 75 (Brake), Owner Carl Rubinstein, Registered Seattle, ON 224816

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1945) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 777, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1944) Pg 258

 

OLIVUS (2000)     The 35 foot wooden salmon troller Olivus flooded and sank in a dense fog at 11 p.m.  August 28, 2000 near Helm Bay, northwest of Ketchikan.  Only one of the two crewmembers survived.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 36 N 131 55 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: ON 241441, Built 1942, Former name Clara B

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

OLYMPIA (1910)     The 2,827 ton 335 foot iron steam ship Olympia stranded and was lost in Prince William Sound at 11:50 p.m. Saturday December 10, 1910.  The vessel departed Cordova at 6:32 p.m. that evening bound for Valdez.  She had 56 passengers and 60 crewmen aboard.  She was also carrying a 350 ton cargo of coal and general merchandise valued at $2,000.  Most of the Olympia’s cargo had been discharged at Cordova, with the remainder stowed in her bow.  This “bow heavy” condition made steerage difficult, and coupled with the 50 mile northerly gale, contributed to her demise.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by her owners;

                “Northerly gale; partly cloudy”  “Struck reef off west shore Bligh Island, Prince William Sound, Alaska”  “Stranded”  “In dangerous locality when struck by strong gale; attempted to turn around and ran on reef”  “Distress signal sent out by wireless picked up by naval station at Cordova and tugs dispatched from Valdez and Fort Liscum.  Took off passengers and crew.”  “Total Loss”

                The Olympia was built in Glasgow, Scotland in 1883 as the Dunbar Castle.  She was purchased by the Alaska Steamship Company in 1904 and renamed Olympia.  At the time of the disaster she was valued at $165,000.  The Olympia and her cargo were both total losses.  She was insured for $157,000. Her bottom was badly torn and salvage was not attempted.  She sat visible and upright on the rocks as a local landmark until February of 1922.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   50 30 N 146 52 30 W   Chart 16708

                Additional Information: Tonnage 2,827 Gross 1,730 Net, Length 335, Breadth 38.2, Depth 19.5, NHP 2,000, Built 1883, Registered Port Townsend WA, ON 155339, Master Jim Daniels of Seattle, Owner Alaska Steamship Company of Seattle

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report January 13, 1911 at Seattle by R R Pierson, Supt.  Alaska Steamship Company, 2. Alaska Steam (1984) Pgs 46&49

OLYMPIC (1936)     The 12 ton wooden gas screw Olympic drug anchor and washed ashore in Sitka Harbor at 10:00 a.m. Thursday October 15, 1936.  There was a strong northerly wind and not much sea.  George Hobson, master and owner of the Olympic, said in his casualty report:

                ‘Got to vessel too late to do anything, went on rocks and part of side gone when we arrived.”  “Total loss”

                The Olympic was valued at $500 and had no insurance.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 15 N 135 21 W   Chart 17327

                Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 8 Net, Age 19 years, Registered Sitka, ON 216480

                Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty June 22, 1937 at Sitka by Hobson

OLYMPIC (1989)     The 80 foot crab fishing vessel Olympic sank January 10, 1989 in the Bering Sea 80 nautical miles north of Dutch Harbor.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 54 N 166 31 W   Chart 16011

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

OMA BELLE (1964)     The 11 ton 34 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Oma Belle was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Cordova.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 33 N 145 45 W   Chart 16640

                Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 8 Net, Length 34.4, Breadth 8.9, Depth 4.8, Built 1932 at Portland OR, Horsepower 60, SL WG7728, Owner Ralph E Renner, Registered Juneau, ON 240151

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 520, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1172

 

OMANEY (1929)     The halibut schooner Omaney stranded and was lost on Sitkinak Island in the Trinity Islands in April of 1930.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 07 N 153 14 W   Chart 16580

                Source: Juneau Empire (April 22, 1930) Pg 7

 

OMILAK CHIEF (1917)     The 65 ton 70 foot stern wheel steamer Omilak Chief was crushed by the ice at Fish River May 15, 1917.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 35 N 163 21 W   Chart 16006

                Comment: The Fish River is 45 miles long flowing from above the village of Omilak at 65 02 N 162 41 W down to Golovin Lagoon.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 65 Gross 57 Net, Built 1906 at Chinik, Home Port Nome, ON 205772, Length 70, Breadth 15, Depth 2.2

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the United States (1918) “Lost Motor Vessels” Pg 441, 2. Dictionary of Alaska Place Names (1967) “Omilak” Pg 724

ON TIME (1920)     The 27 ton 56 foot gas screw freight vessel On Time stranded and was lost in 1920 in Cook Inlet.  The loss was not reported until 1928.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 05 N 152 30 W   Chart 16013

                Additional Information: Tonnage 27 Gross 18 Net, Length 56.1, Breadth 13.5, Depth 5, IHP 30, Built 1917 at Seattle WA, Registered Cordova, ON 215008

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 886, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1920) Pg 300

 

ONIEDA (1890)     The 1,074 ton 179 foot wooden ship Onieda stranded and was lost near Sanak at 9:00 p.m. Saturday April 26, 1890.  77 Chinamen perished in the disaster.  The vessel departed San Francisco with 28 crewmen and 127 passengers bound for Thin Point.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by F P Anderson, master of the Onieda:

                “Light wind, foggy, rough sea, dark and foggy”  “Uncertain currents, foggy weather”  “Hamings Rock 10 miles SW of Sanak Alaska”  “Stranding”  “No sail set, vessel hove to, waiting fair weather”  “Total loss”

                The vessel was carrying 550 tons of merchandise and provisions worth $50,000.  The Onieda, valued at $15,000 and her cargo were total losses.  The vessel was insured for $42,000 and her cargo for $15,000.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 28 20 N 162 55 40 N   Chart 16520

                Comment: I have charted this wreck at Onieda Rock (SSE of Hennig Rock) named so by Ferdinand Wesdahl, commander of the USC&GS steamer McArthur, who did surveys of the area in 1901

                Additional Information: Tonnage 1130 Gross 1074.26 Net, Length 179, Breadth 36.5, Depth 23, Built 1856 Searsport ME, Registered San Francisco, ON 18864, Owner Lea Cross of San Francisco

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report June 3, 1890 at San Francisco

ONTARIO (1866)     The 489 ton bark Ontario was abandoned in the Chukchi Sea after a collision with the Helen Mar September 27, 1866.  The Ontario departed New Bedford, Massachusetts July 2, 1863 on a whaling voyage to the Arctic.  She was carrying 1050 barrels of whale oil at the time of the disaster.  The vessel was abandoned at 70 25 N and drifted through the Bering Strait during the winter.  She washed up on shore nine miles north of Mys Chaplina (Indian Point), Chukotka, Russia, northwest of Saint Lawrence Island.

                Mapping and Location: Russia

                Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. The Northern Mariner (2006) “Nineteenth Century Commercial Shipping Losses” Pg 60

ONWARD (1876)     The 339 ton wooden bark Onward was abandoned in the ice northeast of Point Barrow September 12, 1876.  The vessel was in the whaling trade out of New Bedford, Massachusetts captained by Ezra B  Lapham.  She was carrying 1,400 barrels of whale oil and 14,000 lbs. of whale bone worth $67,000 at the time of the disaster.  The Onward was valued at $40,000.

                Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   71 23 29 N 156 28 30 W   Chart 16003

                Sources: 1. Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914 (1966) Microcopy 641, 2. The Northern Mariner (2006) “Nineteenth Century Commercial Shipping Losses” Pg 63, 3. U S Commission of Fish and Fisheries: The Fishery Industries of the United States Sec 5 Vol II (1876) “Destruction of the Arctic Whaling Fleet” Pgs 79-83

ONWARD (1916)     The 13 ton 42 foot gas screw towing vessel Onward foundered in September of 1916 at Sheep Creek.  No one was aboard at the time of the loss.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 27 N 144 50 W   Chart 16700

                Comment: There are dozens of Sheep Creeks, so I charted this wreck at the one closest to the vessels home port.  It could just as easily have been the Village of Sheep Creek (Thane), several miles SE of Juneau.  Further research is warranted. WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 9 Net, Length 42.6, Breadth 9, Depth 2.7, Built 1907 at Ketchikan, Registered Cordova, ON 203871

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1918) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 441, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Pg 287

ONWARD HO (1916)     The 323 ton 143 foot halibut steam trawler Onward Ho was lost off of Cape Fairweather January 18, 1916 with all hands.  The vessel had departed Vancouver, British Columbia January 6, 1916 with 34 crewmen aboard.  The Onward Ho was on her way to the fishing grounds near Cape Spencer when she was caught in a gale.  She was sighted by the schooner Alaska and steamer Manhattan carrying a load of ice on deck and in her rigging.  She was never seen again.  It is presumed the Onward Ho became top heavy, rolled over and sank. Lost were Captain Fred Fredericksen, Mate H Hughes, Pilot Sid Ulstein, Chief Engineer Thomas Shiminin, Fireman Matthew Walker, Cook Jens Bendicksen Aas, and the following fishermen: P Andersen, H Aune, P Beck, B Benson, R Brandal, C Bravak, D Brown, E Edmunsen, O Hessen, J Knudsen, K Knudsen, H Larvik, O Longfelt, George Mackie, J March, O Olson, J S Petersen, H Rudd, B Schjie, S Simonsen, W Snow, M Stronstad, S Swanson, H Ulstein and H Westvik.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 48 30 N 137 56 45 W   Chart 16760

                Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. Maritimequest.com (2010) “Daily Event for January 18”

OPTY (1988)     The 139 foot fishing vessel Opty was driven ashore by high winds and heavy seas and lost December 3, 1988 on the northwest point of Alcan Harbor on the northwest shore of Shemya Island.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 43 45 N 174 04 30 E   Chart 16012

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

ORANIUS (1964)     The 18 ton 37 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Oranius was reported missing out of Kodiak in the Good Friday earthquake of March 27, 1964.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 18 Gross 12 Net, Length 37.3, Breadth 10.8, Depth 6.5, Built 1952 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 142, SL WH5788, Owner Albert (Googen) Peterson, Registered Juneau, ON 263803

                Sources: 1.Unofficial Wreck List, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 503

 

ORCA (1897)     The 628 ton three masted steam whaling bark Orca was crushed by ice and lost at the Sea Horse Islands off Point Franklin September 21, 1897.  The crew was rescued by the Belvedere and later walked 100 miles to Point Barrow to overwinter.  The Orca had departed San Francisco March 30, 1897 for whaling in the Arctic.  She was valued at $100,000 with cargo at the time of her loss.  The cargo of whale oil, bone and supplies was salvaged.

                Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   70 53 N 158 42 W   Chart 16003

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

ORCAS (1999)     The 65 foot wooden derelict fishing vessel Orcas flooded and sank October 31, 1999 in Thompson Harbor, Sitka.  No one was aboard at the time of the sinking.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 135 20 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: ON 251386

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

OREGON (1906)     The 283 foot 2,335 ton iron steamship Oregon stranded and was lost off Cape Hinchinbrook at 11:10 p.m. Thursday September 13, 1906.  The vessel departed Catella that day bound for Orca.  There were 53 passengers and 68 crewmembers aboard, with H E Soule of Seattle as master.  The Oregon was burdened with a 790 ton cargo of general merchandise valued at $25,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “3 miles NE X N X N ¾ N of Cape Hinchinbrook, Alaska (Long. 147degrees)”  “Current and thick weather”  “Moderate wind, dark, overcast and rain squalls, dark night”  “Stranding”  “U S S Columbine picked up 5 boat loads of passengers and crew and proceeded wreck and took off balance of crew, also all letter mail and express, registered mail, also all baggage.  Sea running too high to further communicate with wreck.”  “Total loss ($175,000)”

                The survivors were transported to Valdez by the lighthouse tender Columbine.  The Oregon, valued at $150,000 and was a total loss along with her cargo.  The master was exonerated from all blame.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 14 N 146 39 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: Tonnage 2,335 Gross 1,642 Net, Length 283, Breadth 37.4, Depth 23.4, Built 1878 at Chester PA, IHP 1,700, Registered Port Townsend WA, ON 19485, Owner Northwestern Steamship Co of Nevada, Vessel and Cargo Insurance unknown

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report September 15, 1906 at Valdez by H E Soule

OREGON CITY (1922)     The 23 ton wooden power sloop Oregon City was destroyed by fire at 2:00 p.m. Friday November 10, 1922 at Warm Springs Bay.  The vessel departed Evans Bay November 3rd bound for Tacoma, Washington with seven crewmen aboard.  She had four tons of herring aboard worth $500.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Warm Springs Bay, Alaska”  “Day light, good weather”  “Backfire of engine”  “Flames too far advanced to prevent catching of oil tanks.  Crew taken on board Monitor.”  “Total loss”

                The Oregon City, valued at $6,000, was a total loss along with her cargo.  The crew made it to safety aboard the gas boat Monitor.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 05 N 134 47 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: Tonnage 23 Gross 17 Net, Age 9 years, Registered Seattle, ON 211365, Master A B Andrewson of Gig Harbor WA, Owner Nick Begnolinevich of Gig Harbor WA, Vessel Insurance $6,000, Cargo Insurance $465

                Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty November 23, 1922 at Seattle by Begnolinevich

OREGON DAWN (1980)     The 98 foot crab fishing vessel Oregon Dawn rolled over on her starboard side and sank February 17, 1980 approximately 2.5 miles south of Cape Tolstoi near Pavlof Bay.  Winds were said to be NNW gusting to 75-80 miles an hour.  There were 65 crab pots aboard at the time of the disaster.  All five crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessel Patience.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 22 20 N 161 28 W   Chart 16011

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

OREGON WOLF (1954)     The 48 ton 58 foot wooden oil screw Oregon Wolf foundered September 25, 1954 about three miles east of Turnabout Island in Frederick Sound.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 07 30 N 133 58 40 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 48 Gross 32 Net, Length 58.6, Breadth 15.3, Depth 7.3, Built 1917 at Tacoma WA, Service freight, Crew 6, Horsepower 75, Owner O L Grimes, Registered Juneau, ON 214910

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 426, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 740

 

OREGONIAN (1931)     The 45 ton wooden gas screw fishing vessel Oregonian foundered in Kvichak Bay at 5:00 a.m. Sunday July 12, 1931.  The vessel had departed Ketchikan April 7, 1931 bound for Dillingham with a crew of four.  The Oregonian had 39 tons of fresh red salmon aboard, worth $1,500 at the time of the disaster.  The following are statements from the casualty report:

                “Ten miles west Middle Bluff Light in Kvichak Bay, Alaska”  “Southwest wind about 40 miles, heavy sea running, morning dawn”  “…believed to have sprung open, in very heavy weather”  “Vessel began filling with water and all hands manning pumps until no longer chance to save vessel”  “(assistance rendered by) gas boat Pigeon, our vessel”

                The crew of the Oregonian made it to safety, but the vessel and her cargo were lost.  The Oregonian was valued at $7,000 and was insured for $6,000.  Her cargo was not insured.  The Oregonian was owned by Associated Fishermen of Alaska

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska 58 24 20 N 157 31 15 W   Chart 16523

                Additional Information: Tonnage 45.02 Gross 30 Net, Built 1917, Registered Ketchikan, ON 215,000, Master Martin Olsen of Seattle

                Source: U S C G Report of Casualty August 27, 1931 by Att. Bradford, President, Associated Fishermen of Alaska

OREL (1792) (1799)     See Severovostochni Orel (Northern Eagle)

ORIOLE (1871)     The 280 ton wooden whaling bark Oriole was crushed by ice and abandoned near Zaliv Lavrentia (St Lawrence Bay), Chukotka, Russia  September of 1871.  The vessel was towed to Bukhta Provideniya (Plover Bay) and abandoned.  The Oriole sailed out of New Bedford, Massachusetts.

                Mapping and Location: Russia

                Source: The Northern Mariner (2006) “Nineteenth Century Commercial Shipping Losses” Pg 62

ORIOLE (1901)     The 6 ton 34 foot wooden steamer Oriole was carried out by ice and lost at 10 a.m. November 9, 1901 in Kotzebue Sound.  The crew of three departed Teller October 28, 1901 bound for Keewalik, Kotzebue Sound.  Harry Storey of Nome, master of the Oriole gave the following particulars in the wreck report:

                “Calm wind, sea and weather, daylight”  “10 miles West Cape Espenberg entrance Kotzebue Sound, Alaska”  “Carried out by ice”  “Run vessel into beach and made all lines fast on dead men to hold vessel”  “Assistance rendered by crew of barge Reception and Nome City, which I had in tow.”  “Total loss”  “No cargo”

                The Oriole was valued at $2,000 and became a total loss.  The crew survived the tragedy.  There was no insurance

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   66 33 N 163 36 W   Chart 16005

                Additional Information: Tonnage 6, Length 33.7, Breadth 9.2, Depth 3.5, Built 1894 at New Whatcom WA, Registered Seattle, ON 155260, Master Harry Storey of Nome,  Owner J J Barton, William Seliner, Richard Lewis and William Robertson of Nome

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report July 16, 1902 at Nome

ORION (1960)     The 23 ton 43 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Orion disappeared October 8, 1960 on a voyage from Hydaburg to Ketchikan.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 12 20 N 132 49 28 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: Tonnage 23 Gross 18 Net, Length 42.9, Breadth 12.4, Depth 5, Built 1926 at Metlakatla, Horsepower 45, SL WB7614, Owner Floyd Frank, Registered Ketchikan, ON 225986

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) Pg 434, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 904

 

ORIZABA (1900)     The 967 ton 205 foot iron schooner Orizaba stranded and was lost near St Michael at 3:45 p.m. Monday September 17, 1900.  The Orizaba departed St Michael that day bound for Safety Harbor with 8 passengers and 46 crewmen aboard.  The vessel was engaged in laying cable for the United States government and was carrying 285 tons of submarine cable worth $95,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “2 ½ miles off Rocky Point, St. Michael, Alaska”  “Clear, smooth daylight”  “Stranded on a ledge”  “Ledge not charted”  “Alaska Commercial Co. lightered cargo”  “Total loss”

                All passengers and crew made it to safety, but the Orizaba, valued at $75,000 was a total loss.  The cargo was salvaged.  The reef where the tragedy occurred now bears the name Orizaba.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   63 31 10 N 162 01 50 W   Chart 16006

                Comment: The Wreck Report for this vessel has the information for the wrong Orizaba at the bottom of the page.  That Orizaba became the Northwestern and was much larger.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 967 Gross 742 Net, Length 205, Breadth 34, Depth 16.4, NHP 540, Built 1883 at Wilmington DE, Registered New York, ON 14416, Master C Randall of San Francisco, Owner Pacific Coast Company of New York, Vessel Insurance unknown, SL KBHT

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report September 29, 1900 at St Michael by C Randall, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1900) Pg 282

OSAMEKIN (1945)     The 100 foot 325 ton Navy tug Osamekin (YTB-191) sank in the Gulf of Alaska south of Kodiak Island December 4, 1945.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 20 N 153 22 W   Chart 16013

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

OSO (1936)     The 8 ton wooden gas screw Oso sank off Lituya Bay at 8:00 a.m. Saturday July 18th, 1936.  The vessel departed Sitka June 28th with two crewmen aboard bound for salmon trolling.  They had 10,000 pounds of fresh King Salmon in the hold when the disaster occurred.  The following are statements taken from the casualty report filed by Peder Liadal, master of the OSO:

                “No wind, smooth, long slow waves, foggy but calm”  “Vessel foundered off Lituya Bay,
Alaska, south about a half mile off Harbor Point, Alaska”  “Unforeseen tide rip flooded vessel, filling small trolling hatch in after part of cock pit, water rushed forward killed ignition and engine stopped, vessel went down by the stern and sank in about twenty minutes”  “Unable to do anything, as machine stopped vessel sank, with past the pilot house within a minutes time”  “Gas Screw Mine, whereof Nick Larsen, master and owner, picked us up about a half hour after disaster.  Brought us to Chichagof, Alaska”  “Total loss”

     The crewmen of the Oso made it to safety, but the vessel, worth $3,500 and her cargo, worth $800 were both total losses.  The master of the vessel knew of no insurance at the time the wreck report was filed.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 36 45 N 137 39 20 W   Chart 16760

                Comment: See Oso (1978).  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 5 Net, Age 5 years, Registered Ketchikan, ON 230761, Owner Alice E Schiller of Seattle

                Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty July 23, 1936 at Sitka by Peder Liadal

OSO (1978)     The troller Oso drug anchor in a winter storm, struck a rock and sank December 30, 1978 off of the west coast of Chichagof Island near White Sulfur Springs.  “Oso” Pete Liadol was the only one aboard and made it to shore in a skiff.  He took shelter in a cabin and lived on clams until rescued five weeks later by the fishing vessel Midnight Charger.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 48 25 N 136 20 45 W   Chart 17321

                Comment: Appears to be same boat and person as Oso (1936). WG

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

OSPREY (1936)     The 12 ton 41 foot wooden gas screw power seiner Osprey was lost in San Alberto Bay between Prince of Wales Island and San Fernando Island August 27, 1936 after a collision with the gas boat Leba.  The Osprey had departed Klawok that day bound for Point San Francisco on Noyes Island with 5 crewmen and one boy aboard.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by George S James:

“Moonlight few stars out calm, it was a dark night”  “Course of Osprey W by N”  “Collision Leba Craig, Alaska”  “Pilot was confused did not understand signals as he did not answer Osprey’s whistle”  “Gave two whistles then see they are heading for us.  We turned for the shore”  “No assistance was rendered, we had a small life boat in which we rowed over to the Leba”  “Arthur and Kimbert Demmert were badly burned, and had to be sent to the Ketchikan Hospital.  The other boy nine years old had his nose broken he also had to go to Ketchikan for medical treatment.  The side lights head lights range lights were all lit where are lit by a storage battery.  There were two sets of storage batteries on the boat.  The engine that was on the boat was a 40 HP Frisco Standard”

  The crew all survived the disaster, but the Osprey, valued at $10,000, sank and was a total loss.  There was no insurance.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 28 N 133 14 W   Chart 17405

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 11, Net, Length 41, Breadth 12, Depth 4, Built 1918 at Shakan, Owner George Demmert of Klawock, Registered Wrangell, ON 216595

Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty September 3, 1936 by George S James, 2.  Merchant Vessels of the United States 1935 & 1936

OSPREY (1970)     The oil screw Osprey foundered October 17, 1970 in Bluefox Bay, Afognak Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 26 N 152 41 W   Chart 16580

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

OTTER (1889)   The 74 ton 81 foot schooner Otter was lost with all hands in the North Pacific in March of 1889.  The Otter Departed San Francisco March 2, 1889 bound for the Shumagin Islands with 23 crewmen aboard and never was heard from again.  Two other vessels, the schooner James A Hamilton and the schooner Annie also disappeared on the same route at the same time.  Lost from the Otter were Captain – G W Littlejohn, First Mate – Joseph Wilson, Boatswain – Charles Swanson, Hunters – John P Sidwell, W C Peterson, Ernest Fisher and Herman Rode, Seamen – Joseph Richards, William Neven, W Eitel, Henry Edwards, Frank Sawyer, Frank Mulhi, John Johnson, F G Sutton, John Herman, Heinriech Kellinen, John Brown, Martin Anderson, Hans Knudtsen and J E Burnett, Cabinboy – C L Wolf, and Cook Gotlieb Elsen.  The Otter was valued at $10,000 at the time of the disaster.

                Mapping and Location: Unknown Alaska

            Additional Information: Tonnage 73.75, Length 81, Breadth 24.6, Depth 7.6, Built 1881 at San Francisco, Registered Sitka, ON 155024, Master G W Littlejohn, Owner H Liebes

                Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. Daily Alta California (July 25, 1889) “Probable Loss of Three Schooners Which Left Last March” Pg 2 Col 1, 3. Merchant Sailing Vessels of the United States (1888) Pg 210

OUNIMAK (1887)     The 35 ton 62 foot wooden schooner Ounimak was lost with all hands off Sanak Island the night of Wednesday March 30, 1887.  The vessel departed “Belkoffsky”(Belkofski) that day bound for “Pauloff Harbor, Saanak Island” (Pavlof Harbor, Sanak) with six crewmen aboard.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “Between Bellkoffsky and Pauloff Harbor, Alaska”  “Capsized probably”  “Heavy gale, not sufficient cargo”  “Dark stormy night with snow”  “Vessel left Bellkoffsky in a strong wind, contrary to advice of all on shore.  Was probably capsized during the night, as she was found bottom up on a reef off Pauloff Harbor the next morning with no one near her.  Crew no doubt drowned.”

                Lost from the Ounimak were her captain, Thomas Trondson, and crewmen Henry Traiton, August Olsen, Otto Osborn, Mathew Hermanson and Stein Nelson.  The vessel and her cargo were total losses.  The Ounimak was valued at $4,000 and her 6 ton cargo of groceries, provisions and furs at $600.  There was no insurance.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 27 40 N 162 41 30 W   Chart 16547

                Additional Information: Tonnage 34.67 Gross 32.94 Net, Length 61.5, Breadth 19.5, Depth 6.0, Built 1884 at San Francisco, Registered San Francisco, ON 155091, Master Thomas Trondson of San Francisco, Owner The McCollam Fishing & Trading Co of San Francisco

                Source: U S Custom Wreck Report May 23, 1887 at San Francisco by Gasheira, Manager MCCollam Fishing & Trading Company

OUTLINE (1920)     The vessel Outline was lost in 1920 in Cook Inlet.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 05 N 152 30 W

                Source: The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 313

 

OWL (1930)     The 14 ton wooden gas screw fishing vessel Owl was lost in Wide Bay at 7:00 p.m. Monday September 15, 1930.  The vessel departed Kukak Bay September 12 on her way to the fishing banks with three crewmen aboard.  The following are statements from the casualty report:

                “Wide Bay, Alaska”  “Approximately 30 mile wind.  Weather fair, with heavy south east swell, casualty happened at evening twilight”  “Foundered on reef…Due to clutch on engine breaking”  “Put two anchors out, working to keep vessel off of reef, tried to repair clutch”  “After grounding, engineer did all possible to repair clutch with aid of deckhand, when discovered the repairs could not be made in time or at sea, all of the crew turned to keeping the vessel off the reef”  “total loss”

                The crew escaped to safety, but the Owl, valued at $3,000 and her ten ton cargo of fish, valued at $315 were both lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 22 N 156 11 W   Chart 16568

                Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 10 Net, Age 20 Years, Registered Seward, ON 207151, Master Tom Parker of Anchorage, Owner Hemrich Packing Company of Seattle WA, Insurance unknown

                Source: U S C G Report of Casualty September 18, 1930 at Seward by Tom Parker

5 Responses to Alaska Shipwrecks (O)

  1. Sandra Argenius says:

    I see a discrepancy in the description about the Ocean Grace. Can I send you the information in an email? I will also try to get it verified.

    • captaingood says:

      Thanks Sandra. I looked at my resources and found that I had used the August 16, 1983 article from the Seattle Times for information. They posted a second article on August 18, 1983 with the names spelled a little different and I presume more correct. I will update my entries shortly. Let me know what you think. Thanks again and smooth sailing.

  2. Capt. Chris Gundersen says:

    OCEAN HOPE II (1989) My vessel (Ocean Mariner) and the F/V Aloma, were anchored up at Castle Cape when the Ocean Hope II passed by. It was in on our Profish JV group, so I knew the Captain and the boat. I had purchased a Weatherfax the year before, and noted that they had 80knt plus winds coming down the strait. I relayed the info to Jack, suggested he come in and anchor up with us till the weather passed. He indicated, that they wanted him back in Kodiak sooner to start fishing. We left on the 5th, went south side of Kodiak, beautiful weather. Found out the vessel was lost when we reached Kodiak.
    I knew Mickey Wheeler, from fishing out of Anacortes. Taken from my log book 1989.

    • captaingood says:

      Thanks for the input Capt. Gunderson. I was living in Kodiak and looking for a PWS Herring job when the Ocean Hope II went missing. It was shortly after that when the Exxon Valdez fetched up hard aground on Bligh Reef. I had just got an Inspected Masters License and was all of a sudden in high demand. I had heard from someone at the harbor masters that those guys had intended to lay up in Portage Bay. As you probably know Portage and Puale are two of the worst blow holes if the weather goes northerly and sweeps down off of Becharof Lake. The freezing spray can be unbelievable. The Russians called Puale Bay “Cold Bay” for that very reason.

      • Capt. Chris Gundersen says:

        Ya, after Kodiak, almost headed to Prince William Sound looking for a market. The Aloma and I, had made a codfish delivery to Peter Pan, King Cove, then got knocked out by their regular vessels. I would have been on point for cleanup duty. People I talked to said they made real good money( not sayin’ the spill was any good). But headed back to Washington to fish on the coast.
        In Anacortes, ran into Mickey Wheelers family, and told them what I knew of the events, it was a sad reunion.

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