Alaska Shipwrecks (S)

ABBREVIATIONS:  AluminumALBritish ColumbiaBCCentralCFiberglassFRPFishing VesselFVIndicated Horse PowerIHPLongliner-LLMotor VesselMVNorthNOfficial NumberONRevenue Cutter ServiceRCSSchoonerSchSignal LettersSLSouth CentralSCSoutheastSESouthwestSWSteel oil screwSOSSteam ShipSSUnknownUUnited States ArmyUSAUnited States Coast GuardUSCGUnited States NavyUSNWestcentralWCWood gas screwWGSWood oil screwWOS

S #2 (1918)     The 54 ton wooden barge S #2 was lost between Kodiak and Chignik March 1, 1918.  The vessel was under tow when she iced down, the tow line parted and she foundered.  She was carrying 11,000 pounds, 10 drums of distillates, valued at $275.  The S #2 had a value of $5,000.  There was no insurance on the vessel or her cargo.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   Unknown

                Additional Information: Tonnage 54 Gross and Net, Built 1918 at Seattle WA, Registered Seattle, ON 167153, Master H Knudsen, Owner Sockeye Salmon Co of Seattle, Last Port Seattle February 14, 1914, Destination Morzhovia Bay, Alaska

                Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty March 17, 1919 at Seattle by N B Doue for Frank W Doue Co, Agent

S B P CO NO 12 (1965)     The 38 ton 49 foot steel barge S B P Co No 12 was consumed by fire August 22, 1965 at Kenai.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 33 N 151 16 W   Chart 16660

                Additional Information: Tonnage 38 Gross and Net, Length 49, Breadth 14, Depth 5.5, Built 1943 at New Orleans LA, Owner C W C Fisheries, Registered Juneau, ON 259697

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 600, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1174

 

S & C (1921)     The 8 ton 34 foot gas screw S & C was destroyed by ice in the spring break up on the Taku River April 20, 1921.  The vessel was hauled out on shore for winter and unoccupied.  The S & C had a value of $2,000 and no insurance.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 25 30 N 133 59 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 6 Net, Length 34.3, Breadth 10.2, Depth 2.2, Built 1919 a Bellingham WA, Service Freight, IHP 20, Registered Seattle, ON 217842, Master James M Cramer of Douglas, Owner C Nottley of Seattle, Last Port Juneau December of 1920, Destination Taku River

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty April 25, 1921 at Juneau by Cramer, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1920) Pg317

S C 25 (1942)     The 300 ton 167 foot Japanese sub-chaser S C 25 was sunk by the U S submarine Grunion (SS-216) July 15, 1942 west of Sredni Point at the  Kiska Harbor entrance.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 02 48 N 177 38 35 E   Chart 16012

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

S C 27 (1942)     The 300 ton 167 foot Japanese sub-chaser S C 27 was sunk by the U S submarine Grunion (SS-216) July 15, 1942 west of Sredni Point at the  Kiska Harbor entrance.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 02 48 N 177 38 35 E   Chart 16012

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

S & E #3 (1926)     The 25 ton wooden scow S & E #3 was lost in Johnstone Strait at 5:25 p.m. Monday June 14, 1926.  She was under tow and carrying a deck load of 24 ton cargo of anchors, cables, wire netting and rails valued at $3,000.  The scow departed Seattle June 12th bound for Hidden Inlet.  The following are remarks from the casualty report filed by master C P Haugen:

                “Brisk northwest wind, sea choppy”  “Scow believed to have sprung sudden leak”  “South end of Hanson Isl. In Johnstone Strait, Alaska”  “Scow turned turtle”  “Tug towing scow altered course immediately and headed for shore”  “Scow was pumped dry and thoroughly inspected about five hours before disaster.  Four attempts were made to right scow after she turned turtle but strong ebb tide prevented this.  The tug was forced to let go about fifty feet from shore in order to avoid going ashore.  The tug worked from the time of the accident, 5:25 p.m. to 9:50 p.m. attempting to save the scow”  “Total Loss”

                The S & E #3 was valued at $600 and was a total loss along with her cargo.  The cargo was insured for $3,000.  The vessel had no insurance. There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: British Columbia

                Comment: Casualty Report mistakenly puts Johnstone Strait in Alaska.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 25 Gross and Net, Built 1919, Registered Seattle, ON 167640, Master C P Haugen of Seattle, Owner Dixon Entrance Fisheries of Yakutat

                Source: U S C G Report of Casualty at Ketchikan June 19, 1926

S-E (1960)     The 7 ton 28 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel S-E burned February 24, 1960 at Port Ashton.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 03 30 N 148 03 W   Chart 16702

                Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 6 Net, Length 28.5, Breadth 9.4, Depth 3.9, Built 1942 at Bellingham WA, Horsepower 95, SL WG2163, Owner Carl A Mills, Registered Sitka, ON 241642

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) Pg 499, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1961) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 862

 

S J NO 5 (1964)     The gas screw S J No 5 foundered August 11, 1964 four miles off of Harvester Island in Uyak Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 39 N 154 W   Chart 16580

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

S J NO 7 (1964)     The 9 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel S J No 7 was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Kodiak.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 30, Breadth 11, Depth 3.9, Built 1944 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 105, SL WK5625, Owner San Juan Fishing & Packing Company, Registered Ketchikan, ON 245686

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 582, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1005

S J NO 8 (1974)     The 32 foot oil screw S J No 8 burned February 19, 1974 and sank March 3, 1974 in Afognak Strait.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 59 N 152 48 W   Chart 16580

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List, 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

S J NO 9 (1966)     The 12 ton 31 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel S J No 9 was destroyed by a storm October 15, 1966 off of Aiaktalik Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 42 N 154 03 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 10 Net, Length 31.1, Breadth 11.5, Depth 4.4, Built 1949 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 141, SL WC3078, Owner San Juan Fishing & Packing Company, Registered Juneau, ON 257777

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 604, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1174

 

S P #3 (1917)     The 31 ton scow S P #3 stranded and was lost on Key Reef in Clarence Strait October 28, 1917.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 09 35 N 132 49 45 W   Chart 17382

                Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1918) “Loss of American Vessels” Pg 442

 

S R 22 (1962)     The 650 ton 110 foot steel barge S R 22 foundered October 12, 1962 near Chirikof Island in the Gulf of Alaska.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 50 N 155 37 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 650 Gross and Net, Length 110.3, Breadth 34, Depth 10.3, Built 1914 at Vallejo CA, Former Name YR-22 (U S N), Owner Ira Rothwell, Registered Juneau, ON 257613

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) Pg 564, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 966

 

S S F CO NO 5 (1952)     The 126 ton 70 foot wooden scow S S F Co No 5 foundered September 24, 1952 off of Narrow Point in Clarence Strait.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 47 30 N 132 28 30 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 126 Gross and Net, Length 70, Breadth 24, Depth 5, Built 1928 at Seattle WA, Owner Sebastian Stuart Fish Company, Registered Ketchikan, ON 170021

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 537, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 746

 

S S VIKING (1996)     The 55 foot hatchery vessel S S Viking struck a rock and sank February 3, 1996 at Montague Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   10 10 N 147 15 W   Chart 16700

                Source: Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SABLE (1991)     The 82 foot fish tender Sable burned to the waterline and sank July 17, 1991 in Bristol Bay.  All four crewmembers were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 N 162 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: ON 249618

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SACCO (1983)     The fishing vessel Sacco caught fire and burned September 5, 1983 while traveling between King Cove and False Pass.  The crewmembers abandoned ship in a skiff and were rescued by the fishing vessel Kodiak Queen.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 51 15 N 163 24 30 W   Chart 16011

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SACCO NO 3 (1953)     The 28 ton 55 foot wooden scow Sacco No 3 stranded and was lost August 11, 1953 two and a half miles southeast of Ocean Cape in the Gulf of Alaska.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 32 30 N 139 51 30 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: Tonnage 28 Gross and Net, Length 55.2, Breadth 16, Depth 3.6, Built 1927 at Seattle, Owner Whiz Fish Products Company, Registered Juneau, ON 169699

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 490, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 740

 

SACKETT’S HARBOR (1946)     See Saketts Harbor (1946)

 

SACRED HEART (1964)     The 14 ton 34 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Sacred Heart was destroyed in a fire January 25, 1964 at Alitak.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 56 40 N 154 10 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 12 Net, Length 34, Breadth 13.5, Depth 4.2, Built 1957 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 100, SL WJ5279, Owner Joe N Survan, Registered Bellingham WA, ON 274266

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 585, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1005

 

SADIE (1961)     The 10 ton 34 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sadie foundered January 1, 1961 at Tee Harbor, Juneau.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 24 35 N 134 45 30 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 7 Net, Length 34.8, Breadth 9.8, Depth 4.4, Built unknown, Horsepower 103, Owner Carl A Baker, Registered Juneau, ON 240549

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 607, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1174

 

SADIE F CALLER (1891)     The 413 ton 132 foot wooden schooner Sadie F Caller stranded and was lost near Chignik at 2 p.m. Saturday May 2, 1891.  The vessel departed San Francisco April 11, 1891 bound for Chignik Bay, Alaska.  She had 158 passengers and 10 officers and crew.  Her passengers were cannery workers.  Her 450 ton cargo was a salmon canning outfit valued at $50,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “Entrance of Chignik Bay Harbor”  “56 50 N Lat, 156 W Long”  “Stranded on bar, owing to change of channel”  “Strong breeze, clear weather, rough sea”  “Str. Polar Bear towed the vessel to beach about 2 hours after casualty”

                The Sadie F Caller had a value of $16,000 at the time of the disaster and was reported a total loss.  Loss to the cargo was reported at $40,000.  Insurance on the vessel was $9,000 and there was $45,000 of coverage on the cargo.  H W McCurdy mentions an effort to salvage cargo from the Sadie F Caller was attempted in 1913 in 60 feet of water.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 18 N 158 24 W   Chart 16566

                Comment: Latitude and Longitude given on wreck report wrong.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 413.81 Gross 393.25 Net, Length 131.9, Breadth 31.5, Depth 15.1, Built 1873 at Essex MA, SL JMDQ, Registered San Francisco, ON 115162, Master John C Young of San Francisco, Owner A B Peterson MO of San Francisco

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report October 5, 1891 by J C Young at San Francisco, 2. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pgs 229-30

SAGINAW II (1945)     The 92 ton 70 foot wooden scow Saginaw II foundered in 1945 between Slocum Arm and Khaz Bay.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 35 N 136 05 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: Tonnage 92 Gross and Net, Length 70.2, Breadth 24, Depth 3.9, Built 1920 at Seattle WA, Owner Val Zitz, Registered Sitka, ON 167823f

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1946) Pg 427, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1947) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 824

 

SAIDIE (1904)     The 276 ton 150 foot steel side wheel steamer Saidie struck a rock and was lost near York City at 3:25 p.m. Sunday September 4, 1904.  The vessel departed Cape York that day bound for Kotzebue Sound and way ports.  She had 16 passengers and 22 officers and crew on board.  The Saidie was also carrying 50 tons of general merchandise and coal valued at $25,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “3 ½ miles off York City”  “Clear and calm, sea smooth, light NE winds”  “Struck uncharted rock, settled in 6 feet of water.  Ship filled from forward bulkhead after part of engine room”  “Sent chief officer to Nome for assistance.  Gas sch. Augusta C took mails and part of passengers to Nome.  Tightened up bulkhead in engine room and endeavored to pump out engine room without success.  Sept. 5 all cargo that could be got at was put ashore.  Sept. 6 had to leave ship on account of SE gale and heavy surf.  Sept 7 seas going over ship continually.  W C Co’s tug Meteor arrived and left again for Teller on account of gale.  Sept. 9 str. Seddon arrived and left on 10th for Nome with passengers.  Divers put chains and wire under ship.  Barge placed on each side of wreck and endeavored to pull wreck off, but without success”

                The Saidie had a value of $70,000 and damages were reported at $75,000.  Her cargo loss was reported as $25,000.  The vessel was insured for $40,000 with no cargo coverage.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   65 30 N 167 41 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 276 Gross 145 Net, Length 150, Breadth 30, Depth 8, Built 1898 San Francisco, IHP 300, Registered San Francisco, ON 116831, Master P C Rickmerts of Seattle, Owner Northern Navigation Company of Camden NJ

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report January 7, 1905 by President of Northern Navigation at San Francisco, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1904) Pg 294

SAINT ALEXANDER (1799)     The Russian vessel Saint Alexander was lost between Alaska and Siberia in route to Okhotsk, in 1799.  The vessel, all hands and a cargo of furs were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska Unknown

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SAINT ANDREW (1934)     The 40 ton 54 foot wooden fishing vessel Saint Andrew stranded and was lost the night of October 9, 1934 in Unga Bay.  The vessel departed Mist Harbor on her way to Unga with eight on board.  Lost with the Saint Andrew were crewmen Ed. Heince, master Jalmar Hirvir and 3 of her 6 passengers.  The Saint Andrew was valued at $6,750 with damages estimated at $4,200.  She was insured for $4,200.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 11 N 160 30 10 W   Chart 16553

                Comment: Probably Delarof Harbor.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 40 Gross 27 Net, Length 54.3, Breadth 15.8, Depth 7, Built 1920 at Gig Harbor WA, Horsepower 50, Registered Ketchikan, ON 219841, Master J Hirvir of Mist Harbor, Owner Associated Fishermen of Alaska, Seattle

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty October 25, 1934 at Seattle by M Jaseplison, secretary for Associated Fishermen of Alaska, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1934) Pgs 542-3

SAINT ANNA (?)     The 26 ton 48 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Saint Anna collided with a rock and was lost in Johnson Cove near Lincoln Rock.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 05 55 N 132 41 20 W   Chart 17382

                Comment: This casualty is reported in 1964 with no date given.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 26 Gross 22 Net, Length 48, Breadth 14, Depth 5.7, Built 1912 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 121, Owner Chester C Grubb, Registered Ketchikan, ON 209820

 

SAINT ANTHONY (1911)     The 7 ton 31 foot wooden gas screw passenger vessel Saint Anthony stranded and burned near Metlakatla at 11:20 a.m. Sunday January 1, 1911.  The vessel Departed December 31, 1910 for Metlakatla with 7 passengers and 3 crewmen aboard.  There was no cargo.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by P E Timmons, master of the Saint Anthony:

                “Nichols Passage, Clarence Strait”  “Reef, about 2 mi. NW Metlakatla, Alaska”  “Strong SE wind, rough sea, dark”  “Thick snow, struck reef, gasoline exploded”  “Stranded and then burned from explosion”  “Sent boat to Metlakatla for assistance and Gas boat Eagle, Paul Mather, Master, came to rescue”  “4 hours 35 min. after vessel struck relief came”  “Total loss”

                The Saint Anthony had a value of $2,700 with no cargo.  She was a total loss with no insurance.  The passengers and crew were all rescued.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 07 45 N 131 34 30 W   Chart 17434

                Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 5 Net, Length 31, Breadth 9.3, Depth 3.3, IHP 12, Built 1908 at Seattle WA, Registered Ketchikan, ON 205275, Master P R Timmons of Ketchikan, Owner Miners & Merchants Bank of Ketchikan

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report January 2, 1911 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1910) Pg 285

 

SAINT ANTHONY (1967)     The 75 foot oil screw fishing vessel Saint Anthony was destroyed by a storm December 3, 1967 at Puale Bay.  Winds of 85 miles an hour and sub zero temperatures hindered any possible assistance.  The fishing vessel Ethel S, who reported the plight of the Saint Anthony to the U S Coast Guard, also went missing in the same storm.  Owner operator Harry Larson of Seattle, Henry Moller of Gig Harbor and a third crewmember named Charles were aboard the Saint Anthony when she was lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 41 N 155 29 W   Chart 16580

                Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. The Seattle Times (December 7, 1967) “Seattle vessel still missing off Alaska” Pg 49, 3. The Seattle Times (December 6, 1967) Pg 22

 

SAINT AUGUSTINE (1978)     The 42 foot vessel Saint Augustine stranded and sank in Danger Bay on Afognak Island September 27, 1978.  The two crewmen were picked up by the U S Coast Guard.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 06 N 152 55 W   Chart 16594

                Comment: Danger Bay more commonly known as Kazakof Bay. WG

                Source: Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak)

 

SAINT CHRISTOPHER (1960)     The 11 ton 29 foot wooden oil screw Saint Christopher stranded and was lost March 27, 1960 at Takaze (Takatz) Bay in Chatham Strait.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 09 N 134 50 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Length 29.3, Breadth 10.6, Depth 4.3, Built 1948 at Seattle, Horsepower 83, SL WB7368, Owner Richard Frank, Registered Juneau, ON 254734

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) Pg 503, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1961) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 862

 

SAINT DAVID (1917)     The 1,576 ton ore barge Saint David stranded and was lost near Yakutat October 31, 1917.  The Saint David had been under tow of the tug Commodore from Valdez bound to Anyok, but the Commodore became disabled.  The barge was in tow of a second tug, the Kern, when it broke free and stranded on Khantaak Island and was pounded to pieces by heavy seas.  The Saint David had a value of $40,000 with cargo, and was a total loss.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 36 N 139 46 W   Chart 16761

                Additional Information: Tonnage 1,576, Built 1877, ON 115568

                Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 294, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1918) Pg 437

SAINT FRANCIS (1917)     The 1,898 ton 231 foot wooden ship Saint Francis stranded and was lost on Unimak Island at 2:15 a.m. Monday May 14, 1917.  The vessel departed San Francisco April 21, 1917 bound for Kvichak, Bristol Bay with a crew of 17.  She was carrying a 1,500 ton cargo of general merchandise and cannery supplies valued at $150,000.  The following are comments taken from the casualty report filed by J A Rosengren, master of the Saint Francis:

                “At night and dark, fresh SW, dark and misty, moderate”  “1 mile south Middle Point, Unimak Island, Alaska”  “STRANDING”  “Missed tack, in veering vessel went ashore”  “Unable to do anything, dropped one anchor but too late to do anything”  “St. s. Norwood and St. s. Goliah stood by and rescued people from ship, and took all on board”  “Total loss”

                The Saint Francis had a value of $75,000 and was a total loss along with her cargo.  Both were insured for an unknown amount.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 29 N 164 54 30 W   Chart 16520

                Comment: Middle Point now called Sennett Point.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 1,898 Gross 1,757 Net, Length 231.4, Breadth 41.8, Depth 17.7, Built 1882 at Bath ME, Registered San Francisco, ON 115835, SL JWBF, Master J A Rosengren of Seattle, Owner Alaska Fisherman’s Packing Company of San Francisco

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty May 15, 1916 by J A Rosengren, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Pg 65

SAINT GEORGE (1876)     The 392 ton whaling ship Saint George was caught in the ice and abandoned northeast of Pt. Barrow September 12, 1876.  The vessel was out of New Bedford, Massachusetts and valued at $36,000.  Her cargo was 1,400 barrels of whale oil and 1,800 pounds of whale bone worth $43,000.

Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   71 23 29 N 156 28 30 W   Chart 16003

                Sources: 1. U S Commission of Fish and Fisheries: The Fishery Industries of the United States Sec 5 Vol II (1876) “Destruction of the Arctic Whaling Fleet”, 2. Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914

SAINT GEORGE (1881)     The 100.41 ton schooner Saint George wrecked on a rock near Kodiak on Wednesday April 27, 1881.  The vessel had departed Kodiak bound for English Bay and Nutchick with 3 passengers and 7 crewmen aboard.  She was carrying $9,000 worth of general merchandise as cargo.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by John Wessels, master of the Saint George:

                “Struck unknown sunken rock off Twin Rocks”  “Stove large hole in bottom, causing her to fill and be unmanageable”  “Schooner Pauline Collins towed her to Long Island”  “The rock apparently unknown by anyone seems to be very pointed rock over which we would have passed had it not been dead low tide”

                The Saint George had a value of $12,000.  Both the vessel and her cargo are listed as nearly total losses.   The Saint George was insured for $10,000 and her cargo for the same amount.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 50 05 N 152 18 45 W   Chart 16580

                Comment: Probably hit Hutchinson Reef near Hanin Rocks which used to be called the Twins, just north of Kodiak.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 100.41, Built 1878 at San Francisco CA, SL JTBM, Registered San Francisco, ON 15607, Master John Wessels of San Francisco, Owner Alaska Commercial Company of San Francisco

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report April 30, 1881 by Wessels at Kodiak

 

SAINT GEORGE (1992)     The 77 foot crab fishing vessel Saint George disappeared with all hands January 5, 1992 in the Bering Sea.  The vessel departed Dutch Harbor January 1, 1992 for the crab grounds and was never seen again.  An EPIRB and life raft were found but no sign of the Saint George or her crew.  Lost were skipper David Parkes of Blaine WA, Terry James of Blaine WA, Brian Schouten of Blaine WA, Kevin Clark of Ferndale WA, George Dahl and Bellingham WA and Shawn McWethy of Soldotna.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 56 N 164 48 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: ON 603711

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SAINT GEORGE II (1945)     The 26 ton 40 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Saint George II stranded and was lost at the Kasilof River in Cook Inlet August 24, 1945.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 23 15 N 151 17 45 W   Chart 16660

                Additional Information: Tonnage 26 Gross 18 Net, Length 40.5, Breadth 14.2, Depth 5.7, Built 1912 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 40, SL WDOA, Owner Arne Wick, Registered Juneau, ON 210843

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1946) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 806, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1945) Pg 305

 

SAINT JAMES (1899)     The river steamer Saint James capsized and was lost in the Yukon River August 26, 1899.  The vessel was valued at $8,000 with cargo.

                Mapping and Location: Central Alaska

                Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 52, 2. Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route (1916) Pg 35

SAINT KATHERINE (1917)     The 1,201 ton 202 foot wooden bark Saint Katherine “grounded and broke her back” at Ugashik May 14, 1917.  The vessel was raised late that summer and repaired.  Evidence of the wreck may still be on site and of interest.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska 57 30 45 N 157 23 45 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 1,201 Gross 1090 Net, Length 202.8, Breadth 39.3, Depth 19.1, Built 1890 at Bath ME, SL KHPV, Registered San Francisco, ON 116362

                Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pgs 293-4, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1918) Pg 58

SAINT LAWRENCE (1898)     The 41 ton 65 foot wooden fishing schooner Saint Lawrence stranded and was lost in Pybus Bay at 5:30 a.m. Wednesday December 28, 1898.  The vessel departed Juneau on a fishing voyage with seven crewmen aboard.  At the time of the disaster, the Saint Lawrence had on board 25,000 pounds of fish with a value of $500.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by S Calder, master of the Saint Lawrence:

                “Pybus Bay, SW from Brother Island (Frederick Sound)”  “Stranding, chain broke”  “Blinding snowstorm and heavy SE gale”  “??miles, heavy sea, dark”  “Schooners anchor chains broke”

                The crew of the Saint Lawrence was assisted by the schooner North and all survived.  The Saint Lawrence had a value of $3,500 and was a total loss as was her cargo of fish.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 18 N 133 50 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 41 Gross 39.15 Net, Length 64.6, Breadth 16.4, Depth 7, Built 1893 at Seattle WA, Registered Seattle, ON 116554, Master S Calder of Seattle, Owner unlisted, Insurance unlisted

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report January 19, 1899 by S Calder, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1898) Pg 166

SAINT LOUIS (1963)     The 18 ton 41 foot wooden oil screw Saint Louis was consumed by fire May 8, 1963 at Juneau.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 18 15 N 134 24 30 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 18 Gross 12 Net, Length 41.6, Breadth 12.6, Depth 4.7, Built 1911 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 80, Owner Edmund J Krauss, Registered Juneau, ON 208745

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) Pg 568, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 966

 

SAINT MARK (1971)     The 83 foot Seattle based wooden crab fishing vessel St. Mark disappeared with four crewmembers on board December 16, 1971 on a trip from Kodiak to Seward.  The vessel was last seen attempting to escape rough seas near Port William on Shuyak Island.  Missing with the St. Mark was skipper Mike Johnson, Dolly Jorgenson, Nels Brandle and Gabriel Balumotoff.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 29 20 N 152 35 W   Chart 16604

                Additional Information: Tonnage 139 Gross 72 Net, Length 79.6, Breadth 22.4, Depth 10, Built 1945 at Tacoma WA, SL WA6266, Horsepower 300, ON 247398

                Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. The Seattle Times (December 30, 1971) “Weather hinders search for boat” Pg D 4

 

SAINT MARTIN (1937)     Fire destroyed the 36 ton 55 foot wooden gas screw Saint Martin in Wrangell Narrows at 6:00 a.m. April 23, 1937.  The vessel departed Petersburg that day bound for Ketchikan with two persons on board and no cargo.  Her engine caught fire across from Scow Bay Cannery in Wrangell Narrows.  Weather at the time was calm, no wind and light snow falling.  According to the casualty report, there were fire extinguishers on board but no time to use them.  The Saint Martin was a total loss.  The persons on board made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 46 20 N 132 57 50 W   Chart 17375

Additional Information: Tonnage 36 Gross 24 Net, Length 55, Breadth 16.4, Depth 6.2, Horsepower 40, Built 1912 at Dockton WA, Registered Tacoma WA, ON 210673, Master and Owner Anton Mladineo of Tacoma, Vessel Insurance $2,000-$2,500

Sources: U S C G Report of Casualty April 23, 1937 at Petersburg by Mladineo, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1936) Pgs 352-3

SAINT MATTHEW (1994)     The 171 foot crab fishing vessel Saint Matthew capsized and was lost February 22, 1994 approximately 120 miles northwest of Saint Paul Island in the Bering Sea.  Seven crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessel Gulf Wind.  An eighth crewman, Tom Gardner (33) was lost.  The Saint Matthew was last seen partially submerged and adrift 110 miles west of Saint Paul Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   60 24 N 172 42 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: ON 293366

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Alaska), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SAINT MICHAEL #1 (1899)     The 228 ton wooden barge Saint Michael #1 broke loose from her mooring and stranded October 17, 1899 near Nome.  The vessel was used as a lighter on the Nome Roadstead with a crew of four.  At the time of the disaster, the barge had a deck load of 175 tons of general cargo.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “Mouth of Snake River, Nome City, Cape Nome, Alaska”  “Strong gale, wind south, heavy sea”  “Sea so rough could not do anything”  “Stranding”  “Broke mooring”

                The Saint Michael #1 had a value of $2,500 and her cargo $10,000.  Both were total losses.  Neither the vessel nor her cargo was insured.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 228, Built 1896 at St Michael, Registered Saint Michael, ON 57983, Master G Lee of Nome, Owner A C Co of St Michael

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report April 4, 1900 at St Michael by W Hastings, Agent for owners, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1899) Pg 362

SAINT MICHAEL #6 (1910)     The 240 ton barge Saint Michael #6 was “cut down by ice” and became a total loss in the Tanana River May 14, 1910.

                Mapping and Location: Central Alaska

                Additional Information: Tonnage 240, Built 1898, ON 58061

                Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1911) Pg 415

SAINT MICHAEL #8 (1899)     The 240 ton wooden barge Saint Michael #8 drug anchor, stranded and was lost west of St Michael at 4 a.m. Monday July 31, 1899.  The barge departed St Michael bound for Ft Gibbon in tow of the steamer Louise.  There were three crewmen on board the barge and 225 tons of government supplies valued at $6,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report;

                “About 6 miles west of St Michael” “Foundered and broke in two”  “Parted her lines from heavy seas”  “40 miles (wind), rough, daylight”  “Str. Louise towing the barge, was disabled by the breaking of machinery and anchored barge”  “Anchor line parted and barge broke in two by the heavy swells”  “Str. Louise crew got barge crew ashore”  “Str. Louise being disabled, drifted ashore and sank in 5 feet of water.  Was afterwards raised and is now in this harbor being repaired”

                The Saint Michael #8 had a value of $6,000 and became a total loss.  The disposition of the cargo was unknown at the time of the wreck report.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   63 29 N 162 02 W   Chart 16006

            Additional Information: Tonnage 240, Built 1898 at St Michael, Registered St Michael, ON 58052, Master S E Lancaster of St Michael, Owner Alaska Commercial Company of San Francisco

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report April 20, 1900 at St Michael by J E Hansen Supt. for owner, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1900) Pg372

SAINT MICHAEL #9 (1920)     The 366 ton wooden barge Saint Michael #9 sank at the dock in St Michael at 3:00 a.m. Wednesday July 21, 1920.  The barge had departed Tanana July 9, 1920 bound for St Michael and was loaded with 406 tons of fuel oil in tanks valued at $9,200.  An unusually heavy gale and heavy seas sank the Saint Michael #9 at the dock.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “St Michael, Alaska…dock”  “65 to 70 mile per hour, dark”  “Barge lay on south side of dock.  Tug Meteor lay on north side endeavored to pull barge out, wind too strong, could not move barge”  “Heavy sea, gale sprung up, heavy seas broke over barge, swamping her, could not rescue her”  “Total loss”

The Saint Michael #9 had a value of $14,426 which became a total loss with no insurance.  All cargo was salvaged.  There was no one aboard at the time of the casualty.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   63 29 N 162 02 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 366, Built 1898 at St Michael, Registered St Michael, ON 58053, Master none, Owner American Yukon Navigation Company

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty July 30, 1920 at St Michael by H P DePue, Agent for owners

SAINT PATRICK (1981)     10 crewmen were lost when the 138 foot steel diesel screw scallop fishing trawler Saint Patrick was abandoned November 30, 1981 five miles east of Marmot Island near Kodiak.  The vessel had been laboring in heavy weather when she took a wave that laid her over and prompted the captain to order all to abandon ship.  Only two of the 12 person crew survived.  Lost were skipper Cornelius Green (37) of Hampton VA, mate James Jobe (23) of Norfolk VA, engineer Wilson Pair (28) of Hampton VA, deck boss Clifford Steigal (32) of South Bend WA, cook Vanessa Sandin (23) of Kodiak, Randal Ryker (21) of Springfield OR, deckhand Tom Kauppinen (20) of Norfolk VA, deckhand Charles Parlett (24) of West Point VA, deckhand Ronald Newton (23) of Lexington NE and deckhand Gary Todd Stallings of Live Oak FL.  The vessel was found to be substantially lacking in lifesaving gear and crew experience.  Wallace R Thomas (23) of Saint Augustine FL and Robert Kidd (28) of Warwick RI were the only survivors.  The two suffered from severe frostbite and hypothermia when rescued from frozen beaches more than a day after the disaster.   The Saint Patrick was found damaged and adrift in outer Marmot Bay days later.  She was towed to Womans Bay and subsequently sank.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 43 N 152 31 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 458 Gross 240 Net, Length 138.2, Breadth 27.2, Depth 13.8, Built 1948 at Bath ME, Former Name Saint Patrick French, Horsepower 750, SL WO5233, ON 293243

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1978) Pg 1106, 4. The Greensboro Record (December 3, 1981) “Seven still missing from shipwreck” Pg C 14

 

SAINT PAUL (1884)     The 13.92 ton schooner Saint Paul was driven ashore and lost “Near Nikolaisosk settlement, Alas. 10 miles N of Belkopsky” on April 28, 1884.  The vessel departed Belkofski bound for Kodiak with two aboard.  A northeast gale caused the vessel to lose her anchors and be driven ashore.  The schooner’s papers were lost with the vessel.  There were two crewmen aboard who made it to safety.  The Saint Paul had a value of $1,800 and her cargo of provisions was worth $400.  Both the vessel and cargo were total losses.  There was no insurance.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 14 N 161 26 W   Chart 16549

                Comment: Nikolaief Settlement was in Dushkin Lagoon in Volcano Bay 11 miles NNE of Belkofski. WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 13.92, Age 7 years, Registered Kodiak, ON 115679, Master and owner Paul Pauloff of Kodiak

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report June 17, 1884 by Pauloff at Kodiak

SAINT PAUL (1907)     The 48 ton 63 foot wooden schooner Saint Paul was blown ashore and lost in the Semidi Islands at 5 p.m. October 6, 1907.  The vessel departed Kodiak September 22, 1907 bound for Chowiet Island with 9 crewmen aboard.  The vessel was carrying 30 tons of merchandise valued at $2,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by Andy Anderson, master of the Saint Paul:

                “ West side of Chowiet Island, Alas.”  “Heavy wind blowing, high seas”  “Anchor chains parted, blew ashore”  “Northwest gale, high seas running, getting dark, and cloudy”  “Both anchors down”  “Total loss”

                The Saint Paul had a value of $2,000 and was a total loss along with her cargo.  There were no lives lost in the disaster.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 02 N 156 42 W   Chart 16013 (Inset)

                Additional Information: Tonnage 48 Gross 46 Net, Length 63.5, Breadth 20, Depth 4, Built 1890 at Benicia CA, Registered Kodiak, ON 116316, Master Andy Anderson of Kodiak, Owner Alaska Commercial Company of San Francisco

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report November 13, 1907 at Unalaska

SAINT PAUL (1978)     The troller Saint Paul struck a rock and sank August 12, 1978 near Elfin Cove and George Island northwest of Juneau.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 12 N 136 23 W   Chart 17300

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SAINT PETER (1977)     The 81 ton 62 foot steel oil screw Saint Peter foundered March 9, 1977 in Orca Inlet.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 31 N 145 52 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: Tonnage 81 Gross 55 Net, Length 62,6, Breadth 21.2, Depth 8, Built 1958 at Costa Mesa CA, Former Name Packer,  ON 277400

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Packer” Pg 531, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1978) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2120

 

SAINT THERESE (1964)     The 14 ton 33 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Saint Therese was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 near Chenega in Prince William Sound.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 16 45 N 148 04 30 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 9 Net, length 33.1, Breadth 11.8, Depth 4.5, Built 1946 at Cordova, Horsepower 145, SL WE7625, Owner Eddie Viasoff, Registered Juneau, ON 252354

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 588, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1005

 

SAKETTS HARBOR (1946)     The 10,488 ton steel hulled electric screw steam tanker Saketts Harbor broke in two in a storm March 1, 1946 southeast of Attu.  The bow portion of the ship was eventually sunk with gunfire from the Navy frigate Orlando.  The stern section was rescued by the tug Sarsi near Adak.  It was eventually towed to Anchorage and used as a power plant.  After 9 years it was towed to Seattle.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   61 13 05 N 149 53 30 W   Chart 16660

                Additional Information: Tonnage 10,448 Gross and Net, Built 1923, ON 243882

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1948) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 861, 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

SALINTA (1979)     Three adults and seven children were lost from the 33 foot Canadian gillnet fishing vessel Salinta which was found washed ashore at Tree Point December 5, 1979.  The small old Canadian fishing vessel had departed Prince Rupert December 2nd on a day trip to Portland Inlet.  The heavily damaged vessel washed ashore 46 miles northwest of Prince Rupert.  There were no survivors.  Lost were Roy Mostad (44), his three children Tommy (13), Robert (9), and Tina (9), Judy Stevens (30) and her three children Lyle (7), Nadine (6), and Roselle (4), and Wendy Stevens (27) and her daughter Angie (4).

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 48 15 N 130 55 45 W   Chart 17420

                Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. The Seattle Times (December 11, 1979) “Hope lingers for 7 on boat” Pg F 8, 3. The Seattle Times (December 12, 1979) “Exposure caused death of 2 on gillnetter” Pg E 12

 

SALLY (1954)     The 10 ton 33 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sally was consumed by fire August 13, 1954 at Malina Bay near Kodiak.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 13 N 153 05 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 9 Net, Length 33.2, Breadth 10.5, Depth 3.6, Built 1948 at Seldovia, Horsepower 91, Owner Alaska Shell Fish Inc., Registered Juneau, ON 262912

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 493, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 826

 

SALLY B (1932)     The 18 ton 39 foot gas screw motor yacht Sally B was lost in “Caldera Bay” between 1:30 and 6:00 p.m. Wednesday October 5, 1932.  The vessel had departed Craig that day bound for “Caldera Bay” with three passengers and two crewmen aboard.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by J P Valentine, managing owner:

                “Caldera Bay, Alaska”   “Stranding and Fire”  “Clear day with NW wind”  “The boat had apparently dragged and grounded at high tide, turned over and caught fire”  “Total Loss”

                The Sally B had a value of $5,000 and was a total loss.  There was no cargo but the passengers and crew lost all of their personal effects.  There was no loss of life.  The vessel was insured for $4,000.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 23 N 133 10 W   Charts 17400, 17405

                Comment: There is no Caldera Bay, but there is a Calder Bay and a Port Caldera.  I charted the wreck at Port Caldera because it is closest to Craig.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 18 Gross 16 Net, Length 39.7, Breadth 11, Depth 4.9, Built 1927 at Seattle WA, Registered Ketchikan, ON 227034, Master and owner J P Valentine of Ketchikan

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty October 13, 1932, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1932) Pgs 870-1

SALLY J (1996)     The 45 foot fiberglass salmon seiner Sally J was consumed by fire and sank January 23, 1996 a mile from shore in Uganik Bay.  All four persons on board made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 50 N 153 32 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: ON 612645

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Alaska), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SALMO (1925)     Fire completely destroyed the 14 ton 36 foot fishing vessel Salmo near the Kasilof River at 5 p.m. Monday September28, 1925.  The vessel departed Kenai at 3:00 p.m. that day bound for Seldovia and way ports.  There were six passengers and three crewmen aboard.  The Salmo was also carrying 1 ½ tons of miscellaneous merchandise valued at $500.   The following are excerpts from the casualty report submitted by T O Perry, master and owner of the Salmo:

                “Mouth of Kasilof River, Alaska”  “Light wind off shore”  “Gasoline explosion and fire”  “Started in after cabin presumably from leak in gasoline feed pipe”  “Used two Pyrene fire extinguishers without effect”  “Watchman at cannery came with small boat to take everyone off”  “Vessel completely destroyed by fire”  “Total Loss”

                The Salmo had a value of $2,500 which was a total loss along with cargo.  There were no lives lost.  Neither the Salmo nor her cargo was insured.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 23 15 N 151 17 45 W   Chart 16660

                Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 9 Net, Length 36, Breadth 11.9, Depth 3.4, Built 1910 at Seattle WA, Registered Seward, ON 207531, Master and owner T O Perry of Seldovia

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty October 10, 1925 at Seward, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1925) Pgs 488-9

SALMO POINT (1990)     The 85 foot fishing vessel Salmo Point sank September 27, 1990 near Yakutat.  All three crewmembers donned survival suits and were hoisted to a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 33 N 139 44 W   Chart 16016

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SALMON MULE (1956)     The 40 ton 52 foot steel oil screw Salmon Mule foundered August 25, 1956 approximately 10 miles offshore from Ocean Cape in the Gulf of Alaska.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   59 32 30 N 139 51 30 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: Tonnage 40 Gross 27 Net, Length 51.9, Breadth 14, Depth 5.6, Built 1954 at Oakland CA, Former Name LCM-6-C-69840 (U S N), Horsepower 330, SL WF 6252, Owner Henry J Emard, Registered Juneau, ON 261690

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) Pg 469, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 779

 

SALMORA (1949)     The 63 foot fishing vessel Salmora was reported lost November 27, 1949 on a trip from Kodiak to Seattle.  The Salmora was seen at Cordova October 5, 1949.  Missing and presumed lost with the vessel were skipper Edward Warren, Virginia Lee Edwards and Clint Rowley.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 33 N 145 45 W   Chart 16700

                Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. Register-Republic (Rockford IL November 24, 1949) “No Trace of Fishing Boat Missing 17 Days” Pg 4

 

SALOME (1951)     The 14 ton 36 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Salome foundered September 13, 1951 at Tyee.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 02 30 N 134 32 30 W   Chart 17320

                Comment: This may be as a result of a collision with the gas screw Ruth (see Ruth 1951) near Red Bluff Bay earlier the same day.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 11 Net, Length 36.3, Breadth 10.7, Depth 5.4, Built 1928 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 110, SL WO2572, Owner Norman E Felsman, Registered Seattle, ON 227515

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1951) Pg 489, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 958

SALTY DOG (1964)     The 23 ton 44 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Salty Dog was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Valdez.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   61 07 N 146 16 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: Tonnage 23 Gross 15 Net, Length 44.1, Breadth 13.5, Depth 6.8, Built 1944 at Arverne NY, Former Names C-60202 (U S N) and Pat II, Horsepower 330, SL WC4887, Owner Walter R Farmer, Registered Juneau, ON 258375

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 590, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1005

 

SALU (1977)     The shrimp fishing vessel Salu swamped and sank in rough weather January 3, 1977 approximately 20 miles off of Cape Chiniak south of Kodiak.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 37 N 152 10 W   Chart 16580

                Source : BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SALVAI (2003)     The 36 foot salmon troller Salvai sprung a plank and sank February 19, 2003 on the north side of Kupreanof Island near Wrangell.  Both crewmembers abandoned ship to a skiff and made it to a nearby beach where they built a fire to keep warm.  They didn’t have time to issue May-Day but fortunately a U S Coast Guard Helicopter from Sitka spotted them the following morning and hoisted both to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 45 N 133 30 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: ON AK4079H

                Source: U S C G News Release (February 20, 2003) “Coast Guard rescues stranded fishermen”

 

SALVATOR (1935)     The 467 ton 160 foot four masted schooner Salvator stranded and was lost in Seldovia Bay in 1935.  The Salvator operated as a fishing and salmon packing vessel with 8 crewmen out of Seward and Seldovia.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 27 45 N 151 43 30 W   Chart 16645

                Additional Information: Tonnage 467 Gross 385 Net, Length 160, Breadth 36, Depth 11, Built 1890 at Eureka CA, SL KNXL, Owner Axel Anderson of Seldovia, Registered Seward, ON 116364

                Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1934) Pgs 656-7

SAM SU NO 7 (1967)     The South Korean fishing vessel Sam Su No 7 was lost with 15 crewmembers September 15, 1967 approximately 200 miles south of the Aleutian Islands 200 miles southwest of Adak.  Another catcher boat, the Sam Su No 8 was also lost with all hands.  The Sam Su No 301 reported the missing vessels to the U S Coast Guard but a search did not turn up any sign of the two vessels or the crews.  Heavy weather hampered search efforts.  A U S Navy aircraft spotted an empty life raft.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   51 45 N 176 45 W   Chart 16012

                Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. Seattle Daily Times (September 18, 1967) “Thirty South Korean fishermen feared dead” Pg 21

 

SAM SU NO 8 (1967)     The South Korean fishing vessel Sam Su No 8 was lost with 15 crewmembers September 15, 1967 approximately 200 miles south of the Aleutian Islands 200 miles southwest of Adak.  Another catcher boat, the Sam Su No 7 was also lost with all hands.  The Sam Su No 301 reported the missing vessels to the U S Coast Guard but a search did not turn up any sign of the two vessels or the crews.  Heavy weather hampered search efforts.  A U S Navy aircraft spotted an empty life raft.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   51 45 N 176 45 W   Chart 16012

                Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. Seattle Daily Times (September 18, 1967) “Thirty South Korean fishermen feared dead” Pg 21

 

SAMANTHA G (1984)     The 74 foot vessel Samantha G burned and sank September 2, 1984.

                Mapping and Location: Alaska Unknown

                Source: Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak)

 

SAMOA (1900)     The schooner Samoa was wrecked near Cape Rodney in the summer of 1900.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 39 N 165 24 W   Chart 16006

                Source: Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914 “Vessels Lost in the Bering Sea Summer 1900”

Fishing Vessel Samoke August 20, 2004 U S Coast Guard photo by Air Station Sitka

Fishing Vessel Samoke August 20, 2004
U S Coast Guard photo by Air Station Sitka

SAMOKE (2004)     The 45 foot fish tender Samoke was consumed by fire August 20, 2004 at Legma Island south of Sitka and west of Goddard.  The fire originated in a stove.  Both crewmembers abandoned ship to the beach and were picked up by the fishing vessel Allure and transported to Sitka.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 49 30 N 135 27 W   Chart 17320

                Source: U S C G News Release (August 23, 2004) “Coast Guard responds to vessel fire”

 

SAMSON (1923)     The 11 ton 33 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Samson caught fire and was lost at Cape Augustine, Dall Island at 9:00 a.m. Sunday August 19, 1923.  The vessel departed Sitka August 12th for sea fisheries with three crewmen on board.  The vessel had 10 tons of fish, ice, bait and gear aboard with a value of $1,000 when the fire began.  The cause of the blaze was unknown.  The Samson became a total loss along with all cargo.  No lives were lost.  The vessel was insured for $3,000 but the cargo was not covered.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 57 N 133 10 W   Chart 17400

                Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Length 33.4, Breadth 10.6, Depth 4.9, Built 1913 at Tacoma WA, IHP 20, Registered Ketchikan, ON 211168, Master and owner Isaac Posenvold of Ketchikan

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty August 21, 1923 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1923) Pg 272

SAMSON II (1965)     The oil screw Samson II was consumed by fire August 1, 1965 three and a half miles north of Sitka.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 135 20 W   Chart 17320

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SAN (1970)     The gas screw San was destroyed by a storm November 28, 1970 in Uganik Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 50 N 153 32 W   Chart 16580

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SAN JOSE (1896)     The 55 ton Canadian sealing schooner San Jose stranded and was lost near Unimak Pass September 22, 1896.  The following is a quote from the San Francisco Call of October 17, 1896:

                “October 16-A Port Townsend Special states that the sealing schooner San Jose, formerly of San Francisco but later flying the British Flag, was wrecked during a heavy gale on September 22 on the rocky beach off Akum Cove, Alaska.  The crew and 600 skins were saved, being taken off the next day by the steamer Dora.  In order to prevent her hulk from becoming a dangerous derelict Captain Colmaster set fire to the vessel before leaving it”

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   54 15 N 165 30 W   Chart 16011

                Comment: Probably Akun Cove which is now called Akun Bay.  WG

                Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 7, 2. The San Francisco Call (October 17, 1896) “Wrecked off Akum Cove” Pg 3

SAN JUAN #1 (1919)     The 26 ton scow barge San Juan #1 was lost in the Gulf of Alaska in 1919

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska Unknown

                Comment: This vessel wasn’t reported lost until 1928.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 26, Built 1912, ON 164944

                Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 312, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 888

SAN JUAN #3 (1920)     The 24 ton wooden deck scow San Juan #3 foundered in the Gulf of Alaska at 5 a.m. Thursday March 11, 1920.  The vessel departed March 10th from Port Althorp bound for Unakwik Inlet in Prince William Sound.  The master of the San Juan #3 was aboard the tug towing the scow.  The following are statements taken from the casualty report submitted by I D Nordyke, master:

                “About 6 miles off shore Lat. 59 11 N Long. 139 05 W”  “Wind about 4, coming daylight, cross swell”  “FOUNDERED”  “Scows not recaulked since built and not sheeted on bottom”  “Stood by 7 hours, then wind and sea increasing and scow drifting inshore, had to leave”  “Two men in shallow 14 ft. skiff did not take any water when sent alongside scow.  Too heavy swell to handle both scows with one foundered”  “total loss”

                The San Juan #3 had a 10 ton deck load of cannery supplies worth $1,690.  The scow was valued at $1,000.  Both scow and cargo were total losses.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 11 N 139 05 W   Chart 16016

                Comment: These coordinates put the wreck offshore between Dangerous River and Dry Bay.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 24, Built 1915, Registered Friday Harbor WA, ON 165976, Master I D Nordyke of Friday Harbor WA, Owner San Juan Canning Company of Friday Harbor WA

                Source: U S C G Report of Casualty April 11, 1920 at Juneau

SAN JUAN #4 (1964)     The barge San Juan #4 was reported destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Seward.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 06 30 N 149 26 30 W   Chart 16680

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SAN MARCO (1923)     The 30 ton 50 foot gas screw fishing vessel San Marco stranded and was lost at Kanak Island December 9, 1923.  No lives were lost from the crew of 8.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 08 N 144 21 W   Chart 16723

                Comment: This vessel was salvaged and lost again in 1938 (see).  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 30 Gross 20 Net, Length 49.8, Breadth 14.4, Depth 6.3, IHP 40, Built 1915 at Dockton WA, Home Port Tacoma WA, ON 213320

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1923) Pg 272, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1924) Pg 438

SAN MARCO (1938)     The 30 ton 50 foot wooden gas screw San Marco broke her moorings and stranded on a reef at 4 a.m. Friday February 4, 1938 near Seldovia.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report submitted by Jack Anderson, master and owner of the San Marco:

                “Broke mooring cable, drug anchor, Seldovia, Alaska”  “Northwest gale, night, dark”  “San Marco was moored after a cable about 800 pound weight, also a 150 pound anchor.  With a fathom of line and 8 fathom of chain.  Was anchored at about 2 fathoms of water at low tide.  Northwest gale broke cable and she drug her anchor and landed on a reef, across from Seldovia”

                The San Marco had a value of $3,500 and was a total loss.  She was insured for $3,000.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 26 15 N 151 42 30 W   Chart 16640

                Additional Information: Tonnage 30 Gross 20 Net, Length 49.8, Breadth 14.4, Depth 6.3, IHP 40, Built 1915 at Dockton WA, Registered Cordova, ON 213320, Master and owner John(Jack) Conrad Anderson of Seldovia

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty March 9, 1938 at Cordova by Anderson, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1938) Pg 270

SAN MARTIN (2000)     The 48 foot wooden salmon fishing vessel San Martin was consumed by an engine room fire and lost August 19, 2000 at Polk Island southwest of Ketchikan.  All four crewmembers made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 00 30 N 131 58 45 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: ON 262906

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SAN MATEO (1909)      The steamer San Mateo was damaged by ice and went aground in the Bering Sea in 1909.  The vessel was valued at $13,000 with cargo and became a total loss.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Unknown

                Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 165

SAN PATRICK (1964)     The 521 foot Liberian cargo steamer (converted tanker) San Patrick ran up on the rocks and was lost December 17, 1964 on Ulak Island 120 miles west of Adak.  The vessel broke up in heavy seas and all 32 crewmembers were lost.  Only one body was recovered.  The entire crew was from northwestern Spain. Lost were captain Julián Diaz Marcuartu, Alfredo Burgos Gastón, radio operator Antonio Herrero Monsalve, Antonio Julio Vilariño, Carlos Vazquez Lopez, Cesareo Martija Uriarte, Federico Escobedo Ricos, Fidel Escandon Araujo, Francisco Erauzquin Elexpe, Francisco Martín Rodríguez, Graciano Gutiérrez Celis, Jaime Barturen Gaubeca, engineer Jesús Maria de la Torre Ruiz de Asúa, Jesús Villalabeitia Líbano,  Jose Angel Tejada Larrea, Jose Antonio Manterola Recagorri, José Manuel Álvarez Iriondo, Jose Manuel Arzá Bastineza, Juan Bello Seco, Juan Manuel Gordó de Llanos, Juan Rodríguez Caamaño, Julián Alberdi Gardiazabal, Manuel Lado Beiro, Manuel Lago Oliveira, Manuel Pais Garcia, 1st Mate Pedro Beascoechea Gorordo, Pedro Maria Ozamiz Frade, Ramón Romero Cubina, 2nd Mate Ricardo Alzaga Varela, Santiago Tellechea Asteinza, Víctor Manuel Sestayo Santiago and Vlaho Gjurasic.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 02 40 N 175 54 W   Chart 16012

                Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. State Times Advocate (Baton Rouge LA) (January 29, 1965) “Unknown sailor buried in Alaska” Pg 9 C, 4. Seattle Daily Times (December 21, 1964) “Freighter aground in Aleutians” Pg 27, 5. M Burwell research notes

 

SAN TOY (1967)     The 10 ton 29 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel San Toy foundered April 16, 1967 in Chomly Sound.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 17 N 132 04 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 9 Net, Length 29.5, Breadth 8.7, Depth 4.3, Built 1928 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 135, Registered Ketchikan, ON 227476

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 615, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1174

 

SANCE (1940)     The seiner Sance collided in heavy fog with the cannery tender Spencer and sank July 11, 1940 in Wrangell Narrows.  The seiner was nearly cut in half and sank in five minutes.  The Spencer rescued the crew of the Sance and transported them to Wrangell.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 31 N 132 55 W   Chart 17360

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SANCO (1956)     The 15 ton 40 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sanco burned September 8, 1956 due east of Round Point Light, Zarembo Island, one quarter mile from Etolin Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 16 40 N 132 39 30 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 15 Gross 10 Net, Length 40, Breadth 11.8, Depth 5, Built 1917 at Shaw Island WA, Horsepower 110, Owner Hans Nergaard, Registered Wrangell, ON 214983

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 464, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 758

 

SAND PEBBLE (1986)     The cabin cruiser Sand Pebble grounded and was lost March 26, 1986 on Low Island in Sitka Sound.  Of the five persons aboard the Sand Pebble, three were lost in the disaster.  The vessel was traveling from a mine on Chichagof Island to Sitka.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 00 40 N 135 36 35 W   Chart 17320

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SANDA (1990)     The 44 foot wooden longline halibut fishing vessel Sanda drug anchor, grounded and broke up in the surf September 16, 1990 in Main Bay.  Both crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessel Rain Song.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 33 N 148 02 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: ON 256218, Built 1948

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SANDRA (1963)     The 10 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sandra stranded and was lost July 11, 1963 off of Kalgin Island in Cook Inlet.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 28 N 151 55 W   Chart 16660

                Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 9 Net, Length 30, Breadth 12.3, Depth 3.7, Built 1950 at Seldovia, Horsepower 115, Owner George J Tschertner, Registered Juneau, ON 260293

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) Pg 574, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 966

 

SANDRA J (1988)     The halibut fishing vessel Sandra J flooded and sank May 24, 1988 near Cape Junken.  The crew was rescued by a fishing vessel that was nearby.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 55 N 148 38 W   Chart 16680

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SANDRA MARIE (1970)     The oil screw Sandra Marie was consumed by fire May 4, 1970 off of Cordova.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 33 N 145 45 W   Chart 16700

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SANDRA W (1997)     The 49 foot fishing vessel Sandra W capsized and sank January 21, 1997 approximately 10 miles east of Sitkalidak Island.  The Sandra W was fishing when her load shifted and something gave way causing the vessel to flood.  Her three crewmembers escaped to a life raft and were rescued by the fishing vessel Green Hope.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 07 N 153 14 W   Chart 16580

                Comment: This vessel may have been more east of Twoheaded Island.  WG

                Additional Information: ON 519547

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SANDY (1928)     The 8 ton 38 foot wooden gas screw Sandy was destroyed by fire in Auke Bay at 4 a.m. Thursday August 9, 1928.  There were two persons aboard along with an illicit cargo of liquor in kegs.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by L F Morris, master and owner of the Sandy:

                “Auk Bay”  “calm, rainy, getting daylight”  “Engine backfired”  “In starting engine, backfire started fire which consumed vessel”  “Custom and prohibition officers apprehended crew and captured saved cargo”  “TOTAL LOSS”

                The Sandy, valued at $2,500, was a total loss along with all but six 10 gallon kegs of illicit liquor.  Those were taken by customs and prohibition officers.  There were no lives lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 11 N 134 34 W   Chart 17300

                Comment: Auk Bay probably Auke Bay.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 5 Net, Length 38.7, Breadth 10.7, Depth 3, Built 1919 at Funter Bay, IHP 20, Registered Juneau, ON 220229, Master and owner L F Morris of Juneau, Insurance unknown

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty August 15, 1928 at Juneau, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) Pgs 492-3

SANDY JOY (1966)     The 9 ton 31 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Sandy Joy stranded and was lost July 1, 1966 at Aniakchak Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 42 N 157 22 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 8 Net, Length 31.4, Breadth 10.9, Depth 3.5, Built 1955 at Seattle WA, Former Name Cecelia G, Horsepower 87, SL WG2509, Registered Bellingham WA, ON 269298

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 617, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1174

 

SANTA RITA (1940)     The 15 ton 48 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Santa Rita was destroyed by fire November 19, 1940 two miles south of Baranof.  The only person aboard made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 05 10 N 134 50 20 W   Chart 17320

                Comment: This vessel is listed as a gas screw in 1939, oil in 1941.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 15 Gross 12 Net, Length 48.3, Breadth 11.1, Depth 3.4, Built 1901 at Astoria OR, Horsepower30, Owner Chris Pedersen, Registered Sitka, ON 117021

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1941) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 511, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1939) Pg 269

 

SANTIAGO (1941)     The 979 ton 207 foot iron bark Santiago began leaking and was beached in Monashka Bay near Kodiak in 1941.  She had been in service to the U S Navy as an oil storage barge.  The Santiago was built in 1885 at Belfast, Ireland and became known as one of the speediest schooners that ever sailed the high seas while in service in the England and South America trade.   She worked her way into the Pacific and was used for a short time as a passenger and freight hauler between Hawaii and the west coast of the United States.  In 1905 after the speedier steamers had begun to replace sailing vessels the Santiago had her masts removed and was converted to an oil barge.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 50 N 152 25 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 979 Gross 928 Net, Length 198.1, Breadth 33.5, Depth 19.8, Built 1885 Belfast Ireland, ON 116973

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1929) Pg 736, 2. American Merchant Ships 1850-1900 (1987) Pg 218, 3. Tacoma Sunday Ledger (September 4, 1927) “Once Queen of the Ocean, Now Only an Oil Barge” Pg A 5

 

SAPPHIRE (1897)     The 109 ton sealing schooner Sapphire was destroyed by fire 20 miles offshore from Ucluelet.  Aboard the vessel were captain William Cox and three crewmen.  The Sapphire caught fire, which quickly spread and ignited her powder kegs.  The crewmen aboard narrowly escaped before the explosion.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Vancouver Island, British Columbia

                Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 24, 2. Victoria Daily Colonist (April 27, 1897) “Entirely Discharged” Pg 2 Col 1

SAPPHO (1882)     The 263 ton bark Sappho was stove in by ice and became a total loss while whaling in the North Pacific May 6, 1882.  The bark departed on her whaling voyage from San Francisco December 25, 1881.  The vessel had a value of $25,000 with her cargo of whale oil and bone.  The disaster occurred off Bukhta Provideniya, Chukotka, Russia, northwest of Saint Lawrence Island, Alaska.

                Mapping and Location: Russia   Chart 16006

                Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. The Northern Mariner (April 2006) “Nineteenth Century Commercial Shipping Losses” Pg 64

SARA B (1962)     The 9 ton 34 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Sara B was consumed by fire August 4, 1962 on the west side of Renard Island approximately 15 miles from Seward.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 55 N 149 20 W   Chart 16670

                Comment: Renard (fox in French) Island is also called Fox Island on charts. WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 34.3, Breadth 9.8, Depth 3.8, Built 1920 at Ilwaco WA, Horsepower 38, SL WR9691, Owner Harvey P Seaberg, Registered Astoria OR, ON 234862

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) Pg 578, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 966

 

SARAH (1879)     The 142 ton two masted schooner Sarah became a total loss while cod fishing in the North Pacific in 1879.  The vessel was owned by Lynde and Hough of San Francisco.

                Mapping and Location: Alaska Unknown

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SARAH MARIE (1988)     The 42 foot longline fishing vessel Sarah Marie ran onto the rocks and was destroyed October 3, 1988 at Big Branch Bay on the southwest shore of Baranof Island.  Only one of four crewmembers survived.  The sole survivor was the only one able to don a survival suit and swim to shore.  He was picked up on Beavertail Island by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 20 N 134 50 W   Chart 17320

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SARANAC (1875)     The side wheel steam ship Saranac was lost in Seymour Narrows June 15, 1875.  The vessel with her 10 guns and crew of 300 men was out of San Francisco on a trip to Alaska to collect curios for the Centennial Exposition.  She was running at 14 knots when she struck heavily on her port side and began filling rapidly.  She was headed for Vancouver Island where she was grounded among the rocks.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Vancouver Island, British Columbia

                Source: Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1895) Pg 229

SARATOGA (1908)     The 2,820 ton 298 foot iron steam ship Saratoga stranded and was lost in Prince William Sound at 2:28 p.m. Friday March 20, 1908.  The vessel departed Valdez that morning at 12:01 bound for Cordova.  There were 78 officers and crewmen aboard and 300 tons of copper ore and general merchandise.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report submitted by L J Schage, master of the Saratoga:

                “Southwest end of Busby Island, Prince William Sound, Alaska’  “Snowstorm”  “Stranded”  “Strong breeze, daylight, moderate sea, heavy snowstorm”  “Reversed engine”  “Run out anchor and tried to heavy ship off”  “S S Elsie took off passengers”

                The Saratoga had a value of $200,000 of which the loss was listed as “probably total”.  The cargo had a value of $7,000 of which $5,000 was reported lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 53 30 N 146 42 W   Chart 16708

                Comment: The 47 foot wooden schooner Olga is lost in 1909 while doing salvage work on the Saratoga the following year.  In 1910 the 335 foot iron steam ship Olympia is lost on adjacent Bligh Reef.  In 1989 the Exxon Valdez fetched up hard aground in the same location creating one of the largest oil spills in U S history.

                Additional Information: Tonnage 2,820 Gross 1973 Net, Length 298, Breadth 38.6, Depth 23.5, Built 1878 at Chester PA, Ex Port Valdez, SL JTDP, Decks 2, Masts 3, Registered Port Townsend WA, ON 115630, Master L J Schage of Seattle, Owner Alaska Steamship Company of Seattle (purchased from Northwestern Steamship Company and renamed in 1906)

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report March 23, 1908, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1907) Pg 31, 3. Alaska Steam (1984) Pg 43

SARATOGA (1971)     The fishing vessel Saratoga ran up on the rocks and was lost November 8, 1971 near the mouth of Little Tonki Bay on Afognak Island.  There were seven men on board on a hunting trip.  They were all able to escape to a nearby rock where they were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 20 N 152 04 W   Chart 16580

                Comment: Little Tonki Bay is a local name for the smaller of the two inlets that make up Tonki Bay.  WG

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SARATOGA (1993)     The 51 foot longline halibut fishing vessel Saratoga shifted her load, flooded and sank June 11, 1993 near Yakutat.  All five crewmembers were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 33 N 139 44 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: ON 561435

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SATSUMA MARU (1907)     The Japanese sealing schooner Satsuma Maru broke her anchor cable in a gale and was driven ashore and lost at Point Manby November 5, 1907.  The captain and 8 men made their way to Yakutat for help while the 11 other survivors stayed at the wreck site below the Malaspina Glacier.  They were rescued the following year by the cutter Thetis.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 41 30 N 140 18 15 W   Chart 16016

                Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 137

SAUVEUR (1965)     The 8 ton 28 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sauveur was consumed by fire August 25, 1965 at Naknek.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 43 40 N 157 00 45 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 6 Net, Length 28.4, Breadth 10.3, Depth 4.1, Built 1961 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 165, SL WR5773, Owner Tim Aliotti, Registered Juneau, ON 284854

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 620, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1175

 

SAWTOOTH (1936)     The 11 ton 41 foot fishing vessel Sawtooth stranded and was lost in Golovin Bay at 6:30 p.m. August 19, 1936.  The vessel departed Golovin Cold Storage Plant bound for Golovin Village with two persons aboard and no cargo.   The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Near Caroline Island in Golovin Bay” “SW probably 30 mile wind”  “Stranded”  “Quadrant broke and boat headed for beach”  “Tried to hold tiller by hand, dropped anchor”  “After supper, Hjalmar Wiggen, Master, and Roy Ashenfelder took the Sawtooth and were going to Golovin Village so as to have more shelter in case it should be very stormy.  About 300 yards from the Plant the steering gear let go and rudder shipped around and headed the boat for the beach.  One man tried to hold the tiller by hand and the other man dropped the anchor, but the initial momentum carried the boat so close to the beach that when the chain tightened the stern struck bottom and it was not long before the surf had turned the bow around and up on the beach.  When the men saw they could do nothing more to save the vessel, they jumped and got ashore.  The direct cause of the accident is that the quadrant brace broke and then the rudder evidently shipped around and tore the quadrant off the tiller proper.  The ship’s papers were lost”

                The Sawtooth had a value of $10,000 and was a total loss.  There was no insurance on the vessel.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 33 N 163 02 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Length 41, Breadth 10.8, Depth 4.4, Built 1901 at Alameda CA, IHP 65, Registered Nome, ON 201441, Master Hjalmar Wiggen, Owner Lomen Commercial Company of Nome

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty August 25, 1936 by Arnold Nuden, agent for Loman Commercial, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1936) Pgs 558-9

SC-1067 (1943)     The 110 foot Navy sub chaser SC-1067 foundered in a storm November 19, 1943 off of Attu Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 55 N 172 55 E   Chart 16012

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SCANDIA (1920)     The 116 ton 91 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Scandia (Skandia)  stranded on the north end of Montague Island at 8:45 p.m. March 19, 1920.  The vessel departed Ketchikan March 16, 1920 bound for deep sea fishing with 17 crewmembers.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by A Mornas, master of the Scandia:

                “Stranding”  “Snow storm and tides”  “Moderate breeze, 15 knot, dark”  “Ran off Middle Point 10 minutes before changing course”  “Reason we were on northern side of Montague was to make a quick run to Latouche, having sick man aboard who needed prompt medical attention.  Picked up Zaikof Point and Middle Point and were trying to pick up Montague in order to shape course for Smith Island Light”  “Gas boat Sunset, Capt. Hofstad took sick man to Latouche, and also message to get oil drums to float boat.  Could not get drums but returned later after storm had put vessel in such shape she could not be taken off”

                The Scandia had a value of $35,000 and damage was reported at $15,000.  She had a 55 ton cargo of stores, ice, bait and oil valued at $2,500 which was a total loss.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 20 40 N 147 W   Chart 16700

                Comment: The Scandia was salvaged and then lost again in 1927.  Evidence of this earlier disaster may still be on site and of interest.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 116 Gross 79 Net, Length 90.8, Breadth 19.8, Depth 9.3, Built 1913 at Seattle, Registered Seattle, ON 211919, IHP 140, Master A Mornas of Seattle, Owner National Independent Fisheries Corp. of Seattle, Insurance unknown

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty March 23, 1920 at Cordova, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1920) Pg 320

SCANDIA (1927)     The 116 ton 91 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Scandia stranded and was lost near Kodiak at 11:58 p.m. February 23, 1927.  The vessel departed Seward bound for Kodiak with 15 crewmen aboard and $300 worth of ice and frozen herring.  The following are statements taken from the casualty report submitted by O O Hvatum, part owner and master of the Scandia:

                “Wind 25-30 miles, dark about midnight”  “Had lookout on forecastle, tried to locate buoy with searchlight”  “Outer rocks, entrance to Kodiak”  “Stranding”  “Bell buoy on reef adrift and snow thick with NE wind”  “(assistance) from Capt. Stone on Duncan 1”  “Capt. Wm. Stone showed remarkable presence of mind in going inside reef in passage only about 200 yards wide and standing by until we all got on board his boat.  As we lost two of our three dories in the breakers we had to make two trips to land all of the men on the Duncan.  By that time a strong gale was blowing with danger of the Duncan having the same fate as the Scandia”  “TOTAL LOSS”

                The Scandia had a value of $45,000 which was a total loss along with her cargo.  The vessel was insured for $19,000.  Thanks to the efforts of the crew of the Duncan 1, there was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 49 45 N 152 18 W   Chart 16595

                Comment: Possibly hit the same rocks at the northern entrance to Kodiak that the 100 ton schooner St George hit in 1881 and the 90 foot Marten in 1975.  The Scandia (Skandia) had serious damage done to her when she struck a rock and stranded on the north end of Montague Island March 19, 1920.  Her crew was assisted by the gas screw Sunset.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 116 Gross 79 Net, Length 90.8, Breadth 19.8, Depth 9.3, Built 1913 at Seattle, Registered Ketchikan, ON 211919, IHP 140, Master O O Hvatum of Seattle, Owners O O Hvatum and Egill Eriksen of Ketchikan

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty March 14, 1927 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1926) Pgs 494-5

SCENIC (1967)     The 14 ton 38 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Scenic was destroyed by a storm March 17, 1967 off of the Barren Islands.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 57 N 152 15 W   Chart 16013

                Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 9 Net, Length 38, Breadth 11.3, Depth 4.7, Built 1949 at Petersburg, Horsepower 150, SL WC7197, Registered Juneau, ON 259487

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 621, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1175

 

SCHCOLD (1914)     The purse seine fishing vessel Schcold was lost in Frederick Sound in 1914.  The vessel was worth $7,000 with cargo at the time of the loss.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 50 N 134 25 W   Chart 17360

                Source: Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route (1916) Pg 34

SCHORN (1934)     The 29 ton 46 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Schorn foundered at Key Reef in Clarence Strait November 7, 1934.  The five crewmen aboard made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 09 35 N 132 49 45 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 29 Gross 19 Net, Length 46.2, Breadth 13.8, Depth 6.7, Built 1930 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 66, Owner George Burke, Registered Ketchikan, ON 229519

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1935) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1030, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1934) Pgs 548-9

 

SCOTER (1949)     The USF&W Service vessel Scoter went on the rocks and was lost September 19, 1949 in Slocum Arm.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 34 N 136 03 W   Chart 17300

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SCOTER (1970)     The gas screw Scoter was consumed by fire September 18, 1970 off of the southeast end of Spoon Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 20 15 N 134 39 30 W   Chart 17300

                Comment: Probably Spuhn Island.  WG

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SCOTIA (1943)     The 2,649 ton steam freighter Scotia (Built 1919) stranded and sank December 23, 1943 off of Alcan Cove on Shemya Island.  There were 100’s of cases of beer onboard.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 43 45 N 174 04 30 E   Chart 16420

                Comment: This vessel may have been salvaged by the Navy tug Ute early the following year.

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SCOUT (1927)     Fire destroyed the 11 ton 36 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Scout in the San Lorenzo Islands at noon October 28, 1927.  The vessel was at anchor with two person aboard when the fire started.  The following are comments made in the casualty report by the owner A R Bruger:

                “Hole-in-wall, San Lorenzo Island”  “Heavy rain”  “Backfire from carburetor”  “FIRE”  “TOTAL LOSS”

                Warren Wilkins, master of the Scout, and crewman A J Young tried to extinguish the blaze with Pyrene.  The Scout, valued at $4,000, became a total loss.  She was insured for $2,400.  There was no cargo and no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 35 50 N 133 36 40 W   Chart 17404

                Comment: Hole in the Wall is located on the east island of the San Lorenzo Islands of the Maurelle Islands in the Gulf of Esquibel.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 9 Net, Length 36.7, Breadth 11.2, Depth 4.6, Built 1917 at Everett WA, IHP 20, Registered Ketchikan, ON 215174, Master Warren Wilkins of Craig, Owner A R Bruger

                Sources: U S C G Report of Casualty October 31, 1927 at Craig, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1927) Pgs 478-9

Fishing Vessel Sea Bear stranded April 26, 2007 U S Coast Guard Sitka photo

Fishing Vessel Sea Bear stranded April 26, 2007
U S Coast Guard Sitka photo

SEA BEAR (2007)     The fishing vessel Sea Bear stranded April 26, 2007 near Klag Bay on Chichagof Island.  The crew of three abandoned ship to a skiff and was rescued from the shore by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 38 N 136 06 W   Chart 17320

                Sources: 1. U S C G News Release (April 26, 2007) “Air Station Sitka Rescues Three”, 2. U S Coast Guard Enforcement Report (April 27, 2007)

 

SEA BIRD (1909)     The tug Sea Bird was wrecked off Ketchikan and became a total loss in March of 1909.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 20 30 N 131 38 45 W   Chart 17420

                Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 165

SEA BIRD (1929) SE     Fire destroyed the 12 ton 35 foot gas screw fishing vessel Sea Bird at 1:30 a.m. May 28, 1929 at Cape Strait.  The vessel departed Petersburg that morning bound for Cape Ommaney with one person aboard.  A backfire from the carburetor set the Sea Bird ablaze.  The survivor was plucked from the water by the gas screw Betty.  The Sea Bird had a value of $4,000 of which all was lost.  She was insured for $3,000.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 59 55 N 133 05 30 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 8 Net, Length 35.5, Breadth 10, Depth 5.5, Built 1928 at Tacoma WA, IHP 20, Registered Tacoma WA, ON 227325, Master and Owner Charles Armstrong of Raymond WA

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty May 29, 1929 at Petersburg by Armstrong, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) Pgs 494-5

SEA BIRD (1929) SC     The 41 ton 51 foot wooden oil screw halibut schooner Sea Bird was destroyed in a gale near Cape St Elias at 10 p.m. Monday November 11, 1929.  The vessel was returning from the fishing banks to Juneau, where they had departed on November 5th.  The Sea Bird had a 15 ton load of fresh halibut on board valued at $3,500. Two of the seven crewmen were lost in the disaster.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report submitted by H M Reitan, master of the Sea Bird:

                “Estimate a 90 mile gale blowing a northeasterly, sea extremely rough, dark”  “35 miles east of Cape St Elias, Alaska”  “Sea carried away pilot house and other deck structures in heavy gale carrying away two members of crew.  Remainder of crew managed to reach Wingham Id., Prince Wm. Sound with what remained of vessel on November 14, 1929”  “Gale came up suddenly, the barometer not giving any previous warning.  During accident pump was disabled, bailed water out of hold for six hours straight”  “After vessel reached Wingham Id., shelter was given the members of crew by a fox farmer.  Vessel was anchored in harbor & on Nov. 20th another heavy gale blew vessel ashore.”  “U S Coast Guard Cutter Unalga reached Wingate Is. on Nov. 27th and took members of crew to Juneau, Alaska”  “The Sea Bird was not equipped with radio”  “Believe will be total loss”

                Lost with the Sea Bird and her cargo were crewmen Louis Dyb and Elias Dyb.  The vessel had a value of $22,000.  She was insured for $16,000 with no insurance for the cargo.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 54 N 144 36 W   Chart 16013s

                Additional Information: Tonnage 41 Gross 28 Net, Length 51.6, Breadth 16.1, Depth 8.3, Built 1928 at Tacoma WA, IHP 90, Registered Seattle, ON 227223, Master H M Reitan of Seattle, Owner Kveite Fish Company of Seattle

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty November 30, 1929 at Juneau, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) Pgs 494-5

SEA BIRD (1964)     The 41 ton 51 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Sea Bird was lost in a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Woody Island near Kodiak.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 N 152 20 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 41 Gross 28 Net, Length 51.6, Breadth 16.1, Depth 8.3, Built 1928 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 176, SL WB2598, Owner D C Serwold, Registered Seattle, ON 227223

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 601, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

SEA BREEZE (1920)     The 8 ton 35 foot gas screw fishing vessel Sea Breeze was destroyed by fire in Sumner Strait August 25, 1920.  Two of her three crewmen died in the disaster.  Lost were W R Woodworth, master of the Sea Breeze, and crewman J Close.  The vessel had departed Ketchikan bound for west coast canneries.  They had reached “Yasha Island, Sumner Strait” when the vessel caught fire. The Sea Breeze was valued at $1,500 and was a complete loss with no insurance.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 58 N 1354 33 30 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 5 Net, Length 35, Breadth 9.2, Depth 4, Built 1909 at Seattle, IHP 16, Registered Ketchikan, ON 208172, Master W R Woodworth of Ketchikan, Owner D C Volie of Ketchikan

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty June 28, 1921 at Ketchikan by Volie, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1920) Pg 321

SEA BREEZE (1992)     The 47 foot longline halibut fishing vessel Sea Breeze sank without a trace September 11, 1992 near Yakutat.  All three crewmembers were lost.  The skipper’s body later was found on Middleton Island and one of the crewmembers in Resurrection Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 33 N 139 44 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: ON 240592

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SEA DANCER (1985)     One person was lost August 7, 1985 when the 90 foot barge tender Sea Dancer took on water in heavy seas and sank 60 miles north of False Pass.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 51 15 N 163 24 30 W   Chart 16535

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEA ERMINE (1968)     The crab fishing vessel Sea Ermine ran aground and was lost December 21, 1968 on Marmot Island near Kodiak.  All five persons aboard, including a 10 year old boy were rescued by the United States Coast Guard.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 13 N 151 50 W   Chart 16580

                Sources: 1. Seattle Daily Times (December 25, 1968) “Crab Boat Grounded; Five Rescued” Pg 77, 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEA FAIR (1970)     The vessel Sea Fair grounded and was lost January 1, 1970 on the south end of Montague Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 10 N 147 15 W   Chart 16700

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEA FISHER (1980)     The 54 foot fishing vessel Sea Fisher ran aground October 11, 1980 at Terror Bay.  The crew was picked up by the vessel Cold Stream.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 46 N 153 12 W   Chart 16580

                Source: Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak)

 

SEA FOAM (1981)     The fishing vessel Sea Foam stranded and was lost September 27, 1981 in Summers Bay on Unalaska Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 54 45 N 166 27 30 W   Chart 16520

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEA FOX (1991)     The 48 foot fishing vessel Sea Fox foundered August 17, 1991 north of Point Nowell in Knight Island Passage.  The vessel, heavily loaded with fish, rolled over on her side and sank in rough seas.  All five crewmembers were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 26 15 N 147 56 05 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: ON 615127

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SEA GLIDER (1997)     The 32 foot salmon seiner Sea Glider sank October 11, 1997 near the Barren Islands.  All four crewmembers, a father and his three sons, abandoned ship to a life raft and were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter only 200 yards from shore.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 57 N 152 15 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: ON 961228

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SEA GRAM (1953)     The 13 ton 41 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sea Gram burned October 25, 1953 at Saltery Bay in Tenakee Inlet.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 47 N 134 57 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 11 Net, Length 41.8, Breadth 12, Depth 4, Built 1927 at Hoonah, Former Name Martha J, Crew 7, Horsepower 115, Owner Mrs. Robert Greenewald, Registered Juneau, ON 226826

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 509, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 740

 

SEA GULL (2001)     The 30 foot fishing vessel Sea Gull swamped while hauling nets in heavy seas and capsized August 19, 2001 at Point Marsden near Hawk Inlet, Admiralty Island.  All six crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessel Steadfast.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 03 30 N 134 48 25 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: ON 259717

                Source: U S C G District 17 Enforcement Report (August 20, 2001)

 

SEA HAWK (1982)     The 102 foot crab fishing vessel Sea Hawk foundered February 8, 1982 approximately 50 miles southeast of Dutch Harbor.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 53 27 N 166 32 05 W   Chart 16011

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEA HAWK (1983)     The 66 foot crab fishing vessel Sea Hawk capsized and sank March 12, 1983 in Inanudak Bay, on Umnak Island.  The vessel’s automatic steering locked putting her in a tight turn which caused her to roll over.  The cook for the Sea Hawk, Justina McGlashan Stepetin (27) of Akutan and Port Lions was lost.  Captain Bill Maxwell (32) and crewmen Corey Eisenbarth, Allen Dille, Bruce Blyth and Greg Sage were rescued by the Coast Guard Cutter Boutwell.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 18 N 168 25 W   Chart 16011

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 3. The Oregonian (March 15, 1983) “Bering Sea Claims 16 in winter storms” Pg B6

 

SEA HAWK (1991)     The 38 foot salmon seiner Sea Hawk grounded and broke up September 26, 1991 near Valdez.  A clogged fuel filter caused the vessel to lose power.  Both crewmembers were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   61 07 N 146 16 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: ON 252224, Built 1947

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SEA HAWK (1992)     The 38 foot fishing vessel Sea Hawk struck a submerged reef and sank June 24, 1992 in the Copper River Delta.  Both crewmembers were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 25 N 145 W   Chart 16013

                Additional Information: ON 952644, Built 1989

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SEA HORSE (1955)     The 142 ton 100 foot steel oil screw Sea Horse foundered December 18, 1955 approximately 10 miles off of East Chugach Island in the Gulf of Alaska.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 08 N 151 28 W   Chart 16640

                Additional Information: Tonnage 142 Gross 122 Net, Length 100.2, Breadth 32, Depth5.1, Built 1943 at Memphis TN, Former Name LCT-583 (U S N), Service freight, Horsepower 675, SL WB2692, Owner Kodiak Aleutian Salvage Company, Registered Juneau, ON 250904

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 473, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 758

 

SEA IDLE (1964)     The 11 ton 29 foot wooden gas screw Sea Idle was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Seward.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 06 30 N 149 26 30 W   Chart 16680

                Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 10 Net, Length 29.1, Breadth 9.8, Depth 4.8, Built 1941 at Holland MI, Service pleasure, Horsepower 130, Owner George H Edmondson, Registered Juneau, ON 241251

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 628, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1175

 

SEA IT (1946)     The 17 ton 45 foot wooden oil screw Sea It foundered December 7, 1946 off of Point Adolphus.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 17 15 N 135 47 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 14 Net, Length 45, Breadth 12.7, Depth 4.4, Built 1945 at Hoonah, Service freight, Horsepower 60, Crew 4, Owner Harold C Jones, Registered Juneau, ON 248520

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1947) Pg 456, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1948) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 862

 

SEA KING I (1982)     The 82 foot tug Sea King I sustained damage and sank December 27, 1982 in Aurora Basin, Juneau.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 18 15 N 134 24 30 W   Chart 17300

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEA LADY (1990)     The 36 foot fiberglass salmon fishing vessel Sea Lady was consumed by an engine room fire and sank September 1, 1990 approximately 28 nautical miles from Kalgin Island off of Ninilchik.  Both crewmembers abandoned ship to a raft and were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 03 N 151 40 W   Chart 16013

                Additional Information: ON 604388

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEA LIGHT (1910)     The 20 ton 43 foot wooden gas screw Sea Light stranded and was lost near Cape Ommaney the morning of Sunday November 13, 1910.  The vessel departed Ketchikan November 4th on a fishing voyage with 8 crewmembers on board.  The following are statements from the wreck report filed by John Wilson, master of the Sea Light:

                “Larch Bay, 4 mi. N Cape Ommaney, Alaska”  “Christian Sound”  “Stranded”  “Gale, 60 mi. per hr., night very dark”  “Full speed ahead but could not make headway”  “All crew took to the two boats and one proceeded to Sitka and the other to Petersburg.  Will try to get tugboat to go and get the vessel and may be able to save her”

                The Sea Light had a value of $3,000 and was carrying a cargo of 2 tons of fresh fish worth $200.  The cargo was lost, but the vessel was salvaged and returned to service.  It is included in this compilation as evidence of the wreck may still be on site and of interest.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 12 N 134 43 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: Tonnage 20 Gross 17 Net, Length 42.7, Breadth 14.3, Depth 4.7, Built 1894 at Hoquiam WA, Registered Ketchikan, ON 116637, Master John Wilson of Ketchikan, Owner Hans Apsch

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report December 2, 1910 by Wilson, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1912) Pg 291

SEA LION (1892)     The 50 ton Canadian schooner Sea Lion lost six of her sealing boats, all of her water casks and her galley was stove in, when caught in a fearful storm off of Attu September 15, 1892.  She was returning from a sealing voyage off the coast of Russia.  She was able to put in at Sand Point for repairs September 25, 1892 but left abruptly when threatened with seizure for violation of sealing laws.  She delivered her cargo to Victoria, British Columbia soon after.  The Sea Lion was renamed the Diana the following year.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 56 25 N 173 15 E   Chart 16012

                Additional Information: Built 1889, ON 94811, Crew 19

                Source: 1. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1895)  Pgs 440-1, 2. U S Dept. of State Papers Relating to the Foreign Relations of the United States (1896) Pg 645

SEA LION (1895)     The 51 ton Canadian sealing schooner Sea Lion was lost with all hands in the North Pacific in 1895.

                Mapping and Location: Unknown

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SEA LION (1996)     The 32 foot fishing vessel Sea Lion grounded and became a total loss September 12, 1996 at Fox Island near Katalla.  Both those aboard made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 10 N 144 37 W   Chart 16723

                Additional Information: ON 972645

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SEA LION II (1932)     The 18 ton 44 foot wooden fishing vessel Sea Lion II foundered off Point Alava at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday January 27, 1932.  Joe Burdett, master and owner of the Sea Lion II was the only one aboard.  He had departed Foggy Bay three hours earlier and was headed for Ketchikan.  The following are statements taken from the casualty report submitted by Burdett:

                “Just south of Point Alva (Alava)”  “Foundered”  “Struck submerged object while running”  “Dark, light wind, waters calm”  “While proceeding to Ketchikan, vessel struck a sunken log or some other submerged object causing vessel to leak and fill; tried to keep vessel afloat by pumping but vessel filled so rapidly that I had to take to the skiff.  After striking object vessel filled and foundered in about one hour’s time.”  “Total loss, $6,000”

                The Sea Lion II had a value of $6,000 and was a total loss.  There was no cargo onboard.  She was insured for $4,000.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 11 30 N 131 11 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 18 Gross 12 Net, Length 43.8, Breadth 12.5, Depth 5, IHP 30, Built 1911 at Poulsbo WA, Registered Ketchikan, ON 208827

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty January 29, 1932 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1931) Pgs 500-1

SEA MAID (1965)     The 8 ton 28 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sea Maid was destroyed by fire August 1, 1965 at the Arctic Maid Fisheries warehouse at Naknek.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 43 40 N 157 00 45 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 7 Net, Length 28.7, Breadth 10.3, Depth 4, Built 1960 at Seattle WA, Former Name Jennie D, Horsepower165, SL WM8398, Owner Antonio A Aiello, Registered Juneau, ON 281272

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 630, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1175

 

SEA MAID (1991)     The 36 foot troller Sea Maid flooded and sank September 13, 1991 off of Cape Edgecumbe.  A leaking stuffing box or loose plank may have caused the disaster.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast 56 59 45 N 135 51 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: ON CG033943

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SEA MINT (1997)     The 54 foot salmon seiner Sea Mint flooded and sank April 16, 1997 off of Sitkalidak Island on her way to Alitak.  There was no one on board at the time of the sinking.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 07 N 153 14 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: ON 570654

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEA NOTE (1992)     The 35 foot sea cucumber and urchin dive boat Sea Note sank October 20, 1992 near Yakutat.  Both crewmembers were lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 33 N 139 44 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: ON AK6539C

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SEA OTTER (1786)     The 100 ton two masted British snow Sea Otter disappeared from Snug Harbor Cove in September of 1786.  She was purchased by “a society of investors in Bengal” headed by Captain John Mears, January 20, 1786 along with the 200 ton vessel Nootka (also snow rigged). The vessels were to be used for fur trading on the northwest coast of America.  The Sea Otter was commanded by William Tipping, a lieutenant in the Royal English Navy.  The Nootka was commanded by Captain John Meares also a lieutenant in the Royal English Navy.  After parting ways with the Nootka February 20, 1786 in Calcutta, the Sea Otter was off to Malacca with trade goods (opium).  The Sea Otter arrived in Prince William Sound in September.  She was scheduled to meet with the Nootka in Snug Harbor Cove.  The Nootka arrived at the rendezvous site September 20, 1786, but the Sea Otter had already departed.  The Sea Otter is reported to have met with the vessels Captain Cook and Experiment earlier in September in Prince William Sound.  She then departed for Cooks River (Cook Inlet) and nothing has been heard of her since.  The Sea Otter was lost with all hands.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 45 N 146 39 W   Chart 16700

                Sources: 1. Meares Voyages (1791) London, 2. The European Magazine and London Review (November 1788) Pg 332-4 “New Fur Trade”

SEA OTTER (1933)     The 7 ton 27 foot gas screw Sea Otter stranded at Point Arden at 2:00 p.m. January 23, 1933.  The vessel departed Taku Harbor that day bound for Juneau with two passengers and one crewman aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by J L Johnson, master of the Sea Otter:

                “Point Arden, Alaska”  “Taku wind, clear and cold, freezing”  “Stranding”  “Engine broke down, vessel drifted onto rocks”  “Tried to repair engine”  “None (assistance) at time of wreck, crew and passengers taken off 4 days afterward”

                The Sea Otter was valued at $1,400 and was a total loss.  There was no insurance on the vessel and she was not carrying cargo.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 09 30 N 134 10 30 W   Chart 17300

                Comment: “Taku wind” a local expression to describe harsh northerly and northeasterly winds that occur occasionally (from mid September till around April).  Cold northern air is forced through mountain passes and over glaciers causing extremely dangerous conditions for maritime travel.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 5 Net, Length 27.6, Breadth 9.1, Depth 4.6, Built 1914 at Stanwood WA, IHP 20, Registered Juneau, ON 212159, Master J L Johnson of Juneau, Owner Susie M Ptack of Juneau

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty March 4, 1933 at Juneau, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1932) Pgs 520-521

SEA OTTER (1957)     The 17 ton 40 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sea Otter foundered August 3, 1957 in Montague Strait, Prince William Sound.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 N 147 45 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 13 Net, Length 40.2, Breadth 11.5, Depth 4.2, Built 1916 at Seattle WA, Former Names Sea Otter (U S Agriculture Dept.) and Institute I (U S Interior Dept.), Horsepower 140, SL WG5516, Owner Allen D Spraque, Registered Juneau, ON 253334

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) Pg 483, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 779

 

SEA PARROT (1956)     The 25 ton 46 foot steel oil screw fishing vessel Sea Parrot foundered December 14, 1956 at Prince William Sound.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 45 N 147 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: Tonnage 25 Gross 17 Net, Length 46, Breadth 14.5, Depth 4.4, Built 1943 at Emoryville CA, Former Name LCMC-21184 (U S N), Horsepower 330, SL WE6020, Owner Guy G Beedle, Registered Juneau, ON 257998

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 508, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 826

 

Web Sea Quail 1977-2

SEA QUAIL (1999)     The 74 foot fishing vessel Sea Quail struck Ikognak Rock and sank February 18, 1999 in Whale Passage near Kodiak.  A crewman sleeping at the wheel was the cause of the disaster.  All four crewmembers abandoned ship to a life raft and were rescued by the fishing vessel Midnight Sun.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 56 N 152 50 W   Chart 16594

                Additional Information: ON 248228

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEA RAIDER (1986)     The fishing vessel Sea Raider was struck by a huge wave, flooded and capsized May 30, 1986 near Matushka Island south of Seward.  Two crewmembers were picked up by the fishing vessel Grand Mariner and three others by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 37 N 149 37 W   Chart 16680

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEA RAIDER (1989)     The 38 foot halibut longline fishing vessel Sea Raider capsized in heavy seas and was lost October 13, 1989 off of Ugak Island.  Two crewmembers and a 6 year old were rescued from the overturned hull.  A third crewmember, David Lee Tanner (18) of Kodiak, was lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 23 N 152 17 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: ON 571053

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEA RANGER (1893)     273 ton 106 foot wooden bark Sea Ranger stranded and was lost near Kayak Island at 9 a.m. May 26, 1893.  The vessel departed San Francisco March 23, 1893 bound for Kodiak, Bristol Bay and the Arctic Ocean.  She had a crew of 40 on board and 30 tons of whale oil and bone when the disaster occurred.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by Charles H Foley, master of the Sea Ranger:

                “3 miles W of Kayak Island, Alaska”  “Stranded on ledge not on chart”  “Attempting to get close to land to bury one of the crew”  “Moderate breeze, slight swell, morning”  “Impossible to do anything after striking”  “We were totally unprepared for accident of any kind.  On chart showed 20 fathoms of water within one mile of beach and no rocks or ledges in that vicinity”

                The Sea Ranger had a value of $25,000 and her cargo between $10,000 and $15,000.  Both the vessel and her cargo were total losses.  James McKee was the crewman that the crew was attempting to bury.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 56 N 144 23 W   Chart 16723

                Comment: Sea Ranger Reef is now on the Chart NNW of Cape St Elias off Kayak Island.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 273.12 Gross 259.46 Net, Length 106.8, Breadth 27.3, Depth 16.3, Built 1856 at Rochester MA, SL HRBQ, Registered San Francisco, ON 22612, Master Charles H Foley of New Bedford MA, Owner Robert W Bartlett of New Bedford MA, Insurance Unknown

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report June 6, 1893 at Sitka by Foley, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1892) Pg 236, 3. The Victoria Colonist (June 17, 1893) “Loss of the Sea Ranger” Page 7, 4. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1895) Pg 413

SEA ROOTER (1978)     The Bayliner sport cruiser Sea Rooter ran aground and was capsized by the surf July 5, 1978 in Strawberry Channel two miles from Point Bentinck.  The one person aboard was lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 24 N 146 W   Chart 16700

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEA ROSE (1963)     The 128 ton 80 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Sea Rose stranded and was lost June 8, 1963 on a reef at Seal Cape, Shumagin Islands.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 21 45 N 161 18 30 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: Tonnage 128 Gross 71 Net, Length 80.5, Breadth 22.4, Depth 10.4, Built 1946 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 400, SL WB2784, Owner A E Bertelsen, Registered Seattle WA, ON 250772

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) Pg 589, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 966

 

SEA SCOUT BOAT (1964)     A vessel referred to as Sea Scout Boat was reported missing at Kodiak in the Good Friday earthquake of March 27, 1964.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Source: Unofficial Wreck List

 

SEA SHELL (1950)     The 11 ton 33 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Sea Shell was destroyed by fire January 21, 1950 at Gambier Point on Admiralty Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 26 N 133 50 15 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 10 Net, Length 33.7, Breadth 10.5, Depth 4.6, Built 1944 at New Orleans LA, Horsepower 225, Owner Cliff Richmond, Registered Juneau, ON 253138

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1950) Pg 501, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1951) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 939

 

SEA SPRAY (1954)     The 20 ton 43 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sea Spray burned July 19, 1954, 70 miles north of Chignik.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 18 N 158 24 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 20 Gross 16 Net, Length 43 .6, Breadth 13.3, Depth 4.1, Built 1913 at Seattle WA, Former Name C-25386 (U S N), Horsepower 110, Owner Joseph I Harrington, Registered Juneau, ON 257686

                 Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 514, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 740

 

SEA SPRAY (2002)     The 32 foot bowpicker Sea Spray was consumed by fire May 8, 2002 in Nushagak Bay.  The only person aboard managed to ground the vessel when it caught on fire.  The survivor walked to a nearby cannery to report the disaster.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 30 N 158 30 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: ON 635052

                Source: U S C G Enforcement Report (May 8, 2002)

 

SEA TIGER (1980)     The oil screw Sea Tiger was destroyed by a storm August 17, 1980 at Pederson Point northwest of Naknek.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 46 15 N 157 03 45 W   Chart 16323

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEA TOAD (1991)     The 30 foot fish tender Sea Toad flooded from the bow and sank July 1, 1991 in the Yukon River.  Of the two persons aboard, only one survived.

                Mapping and Location: Central Alaska

                Additional Information: ON CG032858

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SEA TURTLE (1987)     The 22 foot houseboat Sea Turtle sank June 29, 1987 in western Cook Inlet.  Owner Willfried Stache (52) and Rodney Launders were lost in the disaster.  Stache and Launders were traveling across Cook Inlet and were intending to truck the house boat up a haul road to his Stache’s home at Nondalton on Lake Iliamna.  Debris from the vessel washed up on the beach at Dry Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 40 N 153 08 W   Chart 16640

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEA VAMP (1984)     The fishing vessel Sea Vamp capsized and sank March 29, 1984 near Sitka.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 135 20 W   Chart 17320

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEA VENTURE (1962)     The 150 ton 130 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Sea Venture foundered May 15, 1962 approximately 20 miles north of Seguam Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 19 N 172 30 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: Tonnage 150 Gross 102 Net, Length 130.1, Breadth 21, Depth 7.7, Built 1906 at Tacoma WA, Former Names Monticello and Penaco, Horsepower210, SL WC8939, Owner Island Ventures Inc., Registered Seattle, ON 203142

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) Pg 570, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 932

 

SEA VENTURE I (1992)     The 39 foot fishing vessel Sea Venture I capsized and sank February 4, 1992 south of Homer near Seldovia.  Todd Jensen (35) was lost.  Two other crewmen were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 26 15 N 151 42 30 W   Chart 16640

                Additional Information: ON 621187

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEA WIFE (1982)     The fishing vessel Sea Wife sank June 28, 1982 approximately 50 miles southwest of Homer.  Both crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessel Lobo del Mar.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 38 40 N 151 33 W   Chart 16640

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEA WITCH (1907)     The 1,289 ton bark Sea Witch became waterlogged and was abandoned by her 16 crewmen on December 6, 1907 at Lat. 45 41 N Lon. 127 30 W.

                Mapping and Location: Unknown

                Comment: This vessel is included in this compilation on the off chance that she drifted north and wrecked along the vast Alaska coastline.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 1,289 Gross 1,172 Net, Length 197, Breadth 87.8, Depth 24.2, Built 1872 at East Boston MA, Registered San Francisco, ON 115064, SL JLQM

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1907) Pg 377, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1905) Pg 155

SEA WITCH (1976)     The fishing vessel Sea Witch grounded and was lost October 9, 1976 on Saint Paul Island in the Pribilofs.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   57 10 N 157 15 W   Chart 16011

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEA WOLF (1910)     The power schooner Sea Wolf foundered one mile from Nome in the late fall of 1910.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

                Source: H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 180

SEA ZZZS (1985)     The gillnet fishing vessel Sea ZZZs exploded and burned July 13, 1985 in the small boat harbor at Valdez.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   61 07 N 146 16 W   Chart 16700

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEABREEZE (1872)     The 473 ton whaling vessel Seabreeze was abandoned in the Arctic in 1872.  The crew may have returned and rescued the vessel.

                Mapping and Location: Unknown Northern Alaska

                Source: Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914 (1966) “Vessel Losses 1868-1888”

SEAFARER (1973)     The shrimper Seafarer flooded from the stern and sank November 18, 1973 on the west side of Kodiak Island two miles north of Uganik Bay.  All four crewmembers were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 50 N 153 32 W   Chart 16580

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEAFARER (2009)     The 58 foot purse seiner Seafarer flooded and sank April 17, 2009 in Clarence Strait seven miles north of Thorne Bay near Narrow Point.  The Seafarer was on her way to Thorne Bay with five crewmembers on board when the disaster occurred.  All crewmembers were able to escape to a skiff as the vessel flipped on her side and sank.  Rescue efforts by the U S Coast Guard were greatly enhanced because the crew of the Seafarer took the vessel’s EPIRB and a flashlight with them in the skiff.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 47 30 N 132 28 30 W   Chart 17420

                Sources: 1. U S C G News Release (April 17, 2009) “Coast Guard Rescues five fishermen near Ketchikan”, 2. U S C G District 17 Enforcement Report (April 18, 2009)

 

SEAGULL II (1986)     The converted landing craft Seagull II disappeared August 10, 1986 on a trip from Kotzebue to Deering.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   66 04 N 162 42 W   Chart 16005

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEAL (1887)     The small steamer Seal was lost in Lynn Canal north of Berners Bay March 20, 1887.  12 persons were lost in the disaster.  The vessel was said to be travelling from Juneau to Dyea with passengers, freight and mining gear.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 43 N 135 W   Chart 17300

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SEAL (1945)     The 43 ton 58 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Seal foundered in the harbor at Seldovia November 1, 1945.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 26 15 N 151 42 30 W   Chart 16640

                Additional Information: Tonnage 43 Gross 29 Net, Length 58, Breadth 13.2, Depth 6.8, Built 1913 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 140, Owner Merrill W Henington, Registered Juneau, ON 211289

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1946) Pg 443, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1947) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 824

 

SEALEE (1975)     The fishing vessel Sealee was lost in severe weather December 3, 1975 in Culross Passage near Night Island.

                Mapping and Location:  South Central Alaska   60 41 N 148 14 W   Chart 16700

                Comment: Probably Knight Island. Sharkay lost same place same day.  WG

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEA MILL (1970)     The 50 foot crab fishing vessel Sea Mill was lost in heavy seas when her navigation gear failed October 26, 1970.  The vessel issued a distress call when her radar and depth sounder failed near Spruce Island and the crew was unsure of their position.  Seas were at 30 feet and wind 60 miles an hour.  Debris was sighted off of Spruce Island near Kodiak but the two persons on board were never found.  Lost were skipper Paul Dick Knowles (28) of Anacortes WA and Roscoe Balance (45) of Kodiak.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 55 N 152 25 W   Chart 16580

                Sources: 1. Seattle Daily Times (October 31, 1970) “Search for missing fishermen canceled”, 2. Seattle Daily Times (October 27, 1970) “Debris from missing boat is sighted” Pg B 10, 3. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEATTLE (1956)     The 21 ton 44 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Seattle stranded and was lost in King Cove September 12, 1956.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 03 20 N 162 19 W   Chart 16549

                Additional Information: Tonnage 21 Gross 16 Net, Length 44.4, Breadth 13.2, Depth 5.6, Built 1915 at Seattle WA, Former Name Kate Mirkovicha, Horsepower 60, SL WB2822, Owner Andrew D Hotovitzky, Registered Juneau, ON 212993

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 480, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 758

 

SEATTLE (1968)     The 1,357 ton barge Seattle burned January 1, 1968 at Ugashik.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 30 45 N 157 23 45 W   Chart 16006

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEBEZH (1965)     The Russian trawler Sebezh was lost January 20, 1965 between the Pribilof Islands and Saint Matthew Island, approximately 80 miles northwest of Saint Paul Island.  Fourteen crewmembers perished in the disaster.  The Russian trawlers Nahichevan and Sevsk were also lost with the same number of crewmembers on each.  Two of the three trawlers sank and a third was found overturned with one crewmember clinging to the hull.  The three vessels had been fishing herring south of the pack ice and delivering to the 532 foot Russian factory ship Pavel Postyshev.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   57 10 N 170 15 W   Chart 16006

                Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. Morning Advocate (Baton Rouge January 22, 1965) “U S is asked to help locate Soviet trawlers” Pg 4-B

 

SEDDON (1914)     The 14 ton 52 foot gas screw passenger steamer Seddon foundered in Kotzebue Sound August 15, 1913.  The three persons aboard made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   66 45 N 163 W   Chart 16005

                Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 10 Net, Length 52, Breadth 12, Depth 4.5, Built 1903 at Tacoma WA, Registered Nome, ON 117251

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1914) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 430, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1913) Pg 292

SEEKUM (1939)     The 12 ton 35 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Seekum stranded and was lost near Sitka November of 1939.  The one person aboard was lost with the vessel.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 135 20 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 9 Net, Length 35.3, Breadth 12.1, Depth 4, Built 1920 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 20, Registered Ketchikan, ON 219784

                 Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1941) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 511, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1939) Pg 274

 

SEHOME (1904)     The 11 ton 38 foot wooden schooner Sehome stranded and was lost in Lynn Canal at 10 p.m. Sunday February 28, 1904.  Two persons were aboard at the time of the disaster; master Peter Sneby and one crewman.  The Sehome had departed Sitka September 1, 1903 bound for the Haines Mission.  The following are statements found on the wreck report:

                “Opposite Mexican Mills, Douglas Islands, Alaska (Lynn Canal)”  “Dark night, N W wind severe”  “Severe storm, dragged anchor, and pounded to pieces on shore”

                The Sehome had a value of $1,200 and was reported as a total loss.  Her cargo of personal effects and tools valued at $400 were also lost.  Neither the vessel nor her cargo was insured.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 15 30 N 134 16 30 W   Chart 17300

                Comment: This vessel appears to have been salvaged and then wrecked again in 1906.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 11 gross 10 Net, Length 38.2, Breadth 12, Depth 4.6, Built 1891 at Sehome WA, Registered Sitka, ON 116415, Owner and master Peter Smeby of Sitka

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report March 14, 1904 by Peter Sneby at Juneau

SEHOME (1906)     The 11 ton 38 foot wooden schooner Sehome stranded and was lost with all hands October 26, 1906.  Lost with the Sehome were Ole Neilson, Paul Jacobson and John Engy.  The vessel departed Petersburg on a fishing trip to Frederick Sound.  The disaster occurred at Point Gardner on Admiralty Island.  Winds were high and southeasterly.  The Sehome had a value of $600.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 01 N 134 37 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: Tonnage 11 gross 10 Net, Length 38.2, Breadth 12, Depth 4.6, Built 1891 at Sehome WA, Registered Sitka, ON 116415, Master Peter Horgen of Petersburg, Owner John Gauffin of Juneau,  Insurance unknown

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report November 23, 1906 by John Gauffin at Juneau

SELDOVIA (1928)     The 144 ton fishing scow Seldovia foundered October 17, 1928 on Barren Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 44 45 N 131 20 30 W   Chart 17434

                Comment: Could have been Barren Islands in South Central.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 144, Length 57, Breadth 22.2, Depth 5.2, Built 1925 at Seldovia, Registered Seward, ON 169391, Owner John Colberg of Seward

                Sources: 1. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 392, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1929) Pg 914 “Vessels Lost”, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) Pgs 726-7

SELDOVIA (1958)     The 10 ton 32 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Seldovia burned July 1, 1958 near Elizabeth Island at the mouth of Cook Inlet.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 10 N 151 50 W   Chart 16640

                Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 7 Net, Length 32.7, Breadth 12.5, Depth 4.2, Built 1945 at Seldovia, Horsepower 115, SL WH7875, Owner Alaska Year Round Canneries Company, Registered Juneau, ON 265692

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) Pg 502, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 803

 

SELENA (1969)     The oil screw Selena foundered and was lost June 25, 1969 south of Yakutat in the Gulf of Alaska.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 33 N 139 44 W   Chart 16016

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SELENDANG AYU (2004)     The 738 foot freighter Selendang Ayu lost power and drifted ashore on Unalaska Island near Skan Bay December 8, 2004. The vessel departed Puget Sound bound for China with a load of soybeans, 500,000 gallons of No. 6 fuel oil (bunker crude) and 26 crewmembers aboard. The Selendang Ayu lost power December 6, 2004 and drifted two days while unsuccessful attempts were made to restart her engines. A tug managed to get the freighter in tow but the eight inch thick tow line parted under heavy strain. The Selendang Ayu grounded on the north shore of Unalaska Island in deteriorating weather and soon broke in two. 20 of 26 crewmembers were rescued by U S Coast Guard helicopters. A U S Coast guard HH-60 Jayhawk helicopter from Kodiak Air Station was lost in the rescue attempt along with six of the crewmembers from the Selendang Ayu. The resulting oil spill was the worst in Alaska since the Exxon Valdez spill of 1989.

               Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 38 N 167 02 30 W   Chart 16500

               Sources: Multiple U S Coast Guard Press Releases December 2004 and January 2005

 

SELIEF (1964)     The 163 ton 82 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Selief was reported lost in the Good Friday earthquake of March 27, 1964 at Kodiak.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 163 Gross 131 Net, Length 82.2, Breadth 26.6, Depth 8.7, Built 1942 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 115, SL WA2206, Owner Personal Property Leasing Company, Registered Juneau, ON 251230

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 615

 

SELIEF (1992)     The 86 foot fishing vessel Selief was reported to have grounded and become a total loss July 26, 1992 on Shag Rock in Whale Pass near Kodiak.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 54 30 N 152 47 25 W   Chart 16594

                Source: Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak)

 

SENATOR (1935)     Fire destroyed the 41 ton 58 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Senator near Nutkwa Inlet at 4:40 P.m. Tuesday August 27, 1935.  The vessel departed Ketchikan August 25th bound for Nutkwa Inlet in Cordova Bay with three crewmen aboard.  The Senator had 1,000 pounds of fresh fish aboard when the disaster occurred.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by Marcus Ness, master and part owner of the Senator:

                “Light NW wind, clear”  “3/4 mile east X South off Mabel Isl., Nutkwa Inlet, Alaska”  “Caught fire and sunk”  “Caught fire in engine room and oil tanks exploded”  “(assistance) by the ol. s. Tom & Al

                The Senator was a total loss along with her cargo.  The vessel was valued at $13,500 and her cargo of fish at $100.  She was insured for $7,000.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 59 30 N 132 35 45 W   Chart 17400

Additional Information: Tonnage 41 Gross 11 Net, Length 58, Breadth 16.4, Depth 7.4, Built 1911 at Seattle,  IHP 100, Registered Ketchikan, ON 208333, Master Marcus Ness Of Ketchikan, Owners Marcus Ness and Sig Ness of Ketchikan

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty August 28, 1935 by Marcus Ness, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1935) Pgs 566-7

SENECA (1871)     The 328 ton wooden whaling bark Seneca was abandoned in the ice around Point Belcher September 14, 1871. The home port of the Seneca was New Bedford, Massachusetts.  On visiting the location of the abandoned fleet the following year, Capt. Wm. H. Kelley who commanded the Bark Gay Head at the time of the disaster to the whaling fleet reported:

“The Seneca was dragged by the ice up the coast some distance; her bowsprit was gone, bulwarks stove and rudder carried away, and she was frozen in solid”

The Seneca had a value of $70,000 at the time of the disaster.

Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   70 47 40 N 159 39 02 W   Chart 16005

Sources: 1. Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914 (1966) Microcopy, 2. Harper’s Weekly (December 2, 1871) “Destruction of the Arctic Whaling Fleet of 1871”

SENORA SUE (1978)     The 35 ton oil screw Senora Sue foundered May 29, 1978 in Lituya Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 36 45 N 137 39 30 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: Tonnage 35 Gross, Built 1977, ON 582878

                Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1979) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2244

 

SENORITA (1898)     The sloop Senorita disappeared in the north Pacific in 1898.  She departed Seattle for Juneau with seven men aboard February 1, 1898.  Thomas Farmer of Milwaukee WI and Frank McClain of Glendive SD were two of the lost crewmembers.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska Unknown

                Comment: Probably the 23.8 foot sloop Senorita built at Stanwood WA in 1896, ON 116718. WG

                Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. The San Francisco Call (June 20, 1898) “Two Alaskan Vessels Given up as Lost” Pg 2, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1898) Pg 172, 4. The Evening Star (June 20, 1898) “Two Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2

SENTINEL (1982)     The fishing vessel Sentinel sank May 13, 1982 six miles south of Danger Island.  Both crewmembers were rescued by Chisolm Flying Service out of Cordova.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 55 30 N 148 05 W   Chart 16700

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEPTEMBER SONG (1997)     The 33 foot longline cod fishing vessel September Song plugged her scuppers with fish, flooded and sank November 20, 1997 southwest of Baranof Island.  Both crewmembers made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 45 N 135 10 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: ON 630337

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SEQUEL (1989)     The 67 foot steel trawler Sequel capsized and sank August 15, 1989 in Prince William Sound.  A transfer of ballast water was reported to have precipitated the disaster.  Three of the four persons on board were lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 45 N 147 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: ON 511260

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEQUOIA (1900)     The 341 ton 150 foot wooden schooner Sequoia was blown ashore and wrecked at Nome on Friday September 7, 1900.  The crew of eight escaped to safety, but the Sequoia, valued at $25,000 was a total loss.  There was no cargo on board.  The vessel was insured for $19,000.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 26 N 165 W   Chart 16006

Comment: The Sequoia was wrecked along with the 45 foot wooden schooner Prosper, and some reports indicate the two were salvaged in 1902.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 341 Gross 324 Net, Length 150, Breadth 35, Depth 11, SL KHMC, Built 1890 at Fairhaven CA, Registered Port Townsend WA, ON 116349, Master Capt. A G Banks, Managing Owner M A Walters of Port Townsend WA, Last Port – Port Townsend WA July 1, 1900

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report December 28, 1900 at San Francisco by George D Gray, Managing Agent, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1900) Pg 173, 3. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 63

SERENDIPITY (1983)     The gillnet fishing vessel Serendipity caught fire and became a total loss August 25, 1983 off of Port Moller.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 53 N 160 28 W   Chart 16006

                Comment: The fishing vessel Show Girl burned the same day in the same area.  WG

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SERENITY (1994)     The 36 foot halibut longliner Serenity flooded, capsized and sank June 8, 1994 in the lower Shelikof Strait.  The vessel was under tow by the fishing vessel Royal Baron.  All five crewmembers were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 29 N 155 06 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: ON 252372

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Alaska), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SERVIA (1907)     The 1,866 ton 234 foot wooden bark Servia was blown onto the beach at Karluk and destroyed at 2 p.m. November 6, 1907.  The vessel departed San Francisco August 23, 1907 bound for Karluk with 20 officers and crew aboard.  The vessel was anchored off of Karluk taking on the last of the year’s salmon canning production.  Her cargo at the time of the disaster was 1,450 tons of cases of canned salmon worth $170,000.  A strong northeasterly gale broke the two anchor chains of the Servia and forced her onto the shore at Julia Foard Point.  The vessel began breaking up immediately.  Some of the crew was taken aboard Alaska Packers Association cannery tenders and some swam for their lives.  17 of the crew survived.  Lost were Gust Headland (35) of Sweden, Louis Huron (27) and Olof Fenning (30).  The Servia had a value of $35,000 and was a total loss along with her cargo of canned salmon.  The vessel was insured for $3,000 and her cargo for $160,000.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 34 10 N 154 27 30 W   Charts 16580, 16599

                Comment: Julia Foard Point is a local name of the point of land near Karluk where the 446 ton 136 foot bark Julia Foard was lost in 1888.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 1,866 Gross, 1,736 Net, Length 234.1, Breadth 41.1, Depth 18.1, Built 1883 at Bath ME, SL KCBH, Registered San Francisco, ON 115972, Master Andrew Aas of San Francisco, Owner Henry Nelson MO of San Francisco

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report at San Francisco, 2. Salmon From Kodiak (1986) Pg 203, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1907) Pg 134

SESLIN (1884)     The 20 ton schooner Seslin stranded on a hidden rock and was lost near Howkan, Long Island May 1, 1884.  The vessel departed San Francisco April 28, 1883 for a fishing cruise in northern waters with three crewmen aboard.  The Seslin was valued at $800 at the time of the casualty.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 52 15 N 132 48 05 W   Charts 17400, 17408

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SESNON #2 (1928)     The 19 ton barge Sesnon #2 washed ashore at Nome and was lost at 4 a.m. Friday July 27, 1928.  The vessel was at anchor in the Nome roadstead with no one on board and no cargo.  The following are statements taken from the casualty report:

                “Strong southeast gale, weather stormy, sea very heavy, medium dark”  “Opposite Standard Oil Co. in the eastern end of the town of Nome”  “Stranding”  “Vessel broke loose from moorings, was driven ashore, thrown on beach and broken up by waves”  “TOTAL LOSS”

                The Sesnon #2 had a value of $1,500 and was not insured.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 19, Built 1899, Registered Nome, ON 162582, Master Alfred J Lomen of Nome, Owner Nome Lighterage & Commercial Co.

                Source: U S C G Report of Casualty at Nome July 28, 1928 by Charles J Milat, Cashier for Owner

SESNON #3 (1913)     The 21 ton barge Sesnon #3 stranded and was lost at Nome October 6, 1913.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 21, Built 1901, ON 162583

                Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1914) “Losses Reported” Pg 431

SESNON #3 (1915)     The 41 ton scow Sesnon #3 foundered at Nome November 8, 1915.  No one was on board and no lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 41, Built 1900, ON 165705

                Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) “Losses Reported” Pg 422

SESNON #4 (1919)     The 23 ton wooden barge Sesnon #4 washed up on the beach at Nome and was lost at 3:00 a.m. Wednesday October 8, 1919.  There was no one aboard and no cargo at the time.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “S W gale, cloudy with a very heavy sea running”  “Moorings in Nome roadstead”  “Beach about 2 miles east from Nome, Alaska”  “STRANDING”  “Broke away from moorings during severe storm, driven on beach and broken up”  “…conditions impossible to reach the vessel on account of the prevailing storm”  “Vessel broke from her moorings in the Nome roadstead, came ashore, filled with sand and water, and was completely broken up by the storm”

                The Sesnon #4 had a value of $500 and was a total loss with no insurance.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 23, Built 1900, Registered Nome, ON 162584, Master A H Kellogg of Nome, Owner Alaska Lighterage & Commercial Co of Nome

                Source:  U S C G Report of Casualty October 18, 1919 at Nome by H Jacoken, Manager for Owner

SESNON #4 (1921)     The barge Sesnon #4 was lost at Bluff in 1924.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 34 N 163 45 W   Chart 16006

                Source: H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 329

SESNON #5 (1907)     The 27 ton wooden barge Sesnon #5 was blown onto the beach and lost at 10 a.m. Sunday October 21, 1907 near Nome.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report submitted by John H Bullock, master of the Sesnon #5:

                “Broke loose from moorings”  “Moderate gale, very heavy sea, wind southeast”  “Stranding”  “On beach 6 miles west of Nome”  “Anchored at fixed mooring in Nome roadstead when storm arose, causing moorings to break.  Completely demolished in storm of Jan. 4, 1907, by crushing of ice”

                The Sesnon #5 had a value of $1,500 and was a complete loss with no insurance.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 27, Built 1901 at St Michael, Registered Nome, ON 162585, Master John H Bullock of Nome, Owner John J Sesnon Co of Nome

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report September 1, 1907 at Nome

SESNON #5 (1920)     The 58 ton wooden scow Sesnon #5 stranded and was lost near Lost River at 2:30p.m. Thursday July 22, 1920.  The vessel was moored with no one aboard and no cargo at the time of the loss.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by George D Schofield, master and owner of the Sesnon #5:

                “S E gale, stormy weather, heavy on shore sea, daylight”  “Could not get aboard as weather was too rough”  “About one fourth mile west of the mouth of Lost River, Bering Sea”  “Heavy sea, on shore blow, dragged her anchor”  “STRANDING”  “Tried to get to vessel with a tram to pull her on shore, but could not”

                The Sesnon #5 was valued at $1,000 and was a total loss.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   65 23N 167 09 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 58, Built 1900, Registered Nome, ON 165706

                Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty August 16, 1920 at Nome

SESNON #6 (1910)     The 16 ton wooden barge Sesnon #6 stranded on the beach near Nome and was lost at 2 p.m. Tuesday August 16, 1910.  There was no one aboard and the vessel had no cargo at the time of the loss.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by W B Watts, Master of the Sesnon #6:

                “On beach 4 miles west of Nome”  “Stranded”  “Broke loose from moorings and went ashore during storm”  “Strong SE gale, cloudy and rainy”  “Broken to pieces by stranding in storm”  “Total loss”

                The Sesnon #6 had a value of $450 and was a total loss.  There was no insurance on the vessel.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 16, Built 1900 at St Michael, Registered Nome, ON 162586, Master W B Watts of Nome, Owner John J Sesnon Co of Nome

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report August 31, 1910 by W B Watts at Nome

SESNON #7 (1910)      The 21 ton wooden barge Sesnon #7 stranded on the beach near Nome and was lost at 2 p.m. Tuesday August 16, 1910.  There was no one aboard and the vessel had no cargo at the time of the loss.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by W B Watts, Master of the Sesnon #7:

                “Strong S E gale, cloudy and rainy”  “Broke loose from moorings and pounded to pieces against wharf about 400 feet west of N A T dock in the city of Nome, Alaska”  “Drifted on the beach where she pounded herself to pieces against the North Coast wharf”

                The Sesnon #7 had a value of $450 and was a total loss.  There was no insurance on the vessel.  There was no loss of life.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 21, Built 1900 at St Michael, Registered Nome, ON 162587, Master W B Watts of Nome, Owner John J Sesnon Co of Nome

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report August 31, 1910 by W B Watts at Nome

 

SESNON #8 (1910)     The barge Sesnon #8 is reported lost at Nome in 1910.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

Source: H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 180

SESNON #8 (1915)     The barge Sesnon #8 was reported lost at Nome November 8, 1915.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

Source: H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 258

SESNON #8(1928)     The 19 ton barge Sesnon #8 stranded and was lost August 22, 1928 at Teller.  No one was aboard when the casualty occurred and no lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   65 16 N 166 22 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 19, Length 45.6, Breadth 16.4, Depth 4.2, Built 1899 at San Francisco, Registered Nome, ON 162588, Owner Nome Lighterage & Commercial Co

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1929) Pg 914, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) Pgs 728-9

SESNON #9 (1906)     The 18 ton wooden barge Sesnon #9 stranded and was lost near Nome at 10:30 a.m. Sunday October 21, 1906.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by John H Bullock, master of the Sesnon #9:

                “On beach about 6 miles west of Nome”  “Stranding”  “Broke loose from mooring”  “Moderate gale, very heavy sea, wind southeast”  “Anchored at fixed moorings in Nome roadstead when storm arose, causing moorings to break.  Completely demolished in storm of Jan. 4, 1907, by crushing of ice”

                The Sesnon #9 had a value of $1,500 and was a total loss.  There was no cargo on board and no insurance on the vessel.  No lives were lost.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information:  Tonnage 18, Built 1899 at San Francisco, Registered Nome, ON 162589, Master John H Bullock of Nome, Owner John J Sesnon of Nome

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report September 1, 1907 at Nome by John H Bullock

SESNON #10 (1919)     The 20 ton wooden barge Sesnon #10 stranded and was lost near Nome at 3:00 a.m. Wednesday October 8, 1919.  There was no one aboard and no cargo at the time of the loss.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “S W gale, cloudy with heavy sea, dark”  “Beach about 2 miles east from Nome, Alaska”  “STRANDING”  “Broke away from moorings during storm”  “Conditions impossible to reach vessel on account of storm prevailing”  “Vessel broke loose from moorings, came ashore, filled with water and sand, and was broken up by the storm”

                The Sesnon #10 had a value of $500 and was a total loss.  There was no insurance.  No lives were lost.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 20, Built 1899, Registered Nome, ON 162590, Master A H Kellogg of Nome, Owner Alaska Lighterage & Commercial Company of Nome

Source: U S C G Report of Casualty October 18, 1919 by H Jacoken, Manager for Owner

SESNON #13 (1912)     The 24 ton barge Sesnon # 13 foundered at Nome November 1, 1912.  There was no loss of life.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 24, Built 1906, ON 163139

Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1913) Reported Loss Pg 426

SESNON #14 (1941)     The 24 ton 48 foot barge Sesnon # 14 foundered eight miles off of Bluff October 3, 1941.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 34 N 163 45 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 24 Gross and Net, Length 47.8, Breadth 17.8, Depth 4.3, Built 1906 at Nome, Owner Lomen Commercial Company, Registered Juneau, ON 163140

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1943) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 757, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1942) Pg 407

 

SESNON #15 (1919)     The 40 ton wooden scow Sesnon #15 stranded and was lost in Golovnin Bay at 10 p.m. October 3, 1919.  The scow departed Chinik with 6 crewmen aboard and was returning from a steamer in the bay when the disaster occurred.  Her cargo was 25 tons of general merchandise valued at $7,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report submitted by E H Pfaffle, master of the Sesnon #15;

                “Heavy S W gale, dark, high sea running”  “STRANDING”  “The Old Mission at Golovin Bay, Alaska”  “Cast adrift from steamer and went on rocks”  “Dropped the anchors but the sea was so rough that they would not hold and the vessel was cast on the rocks”  “The vessel was cast on the rocks by the gale, and completely demolished by the sea”

                The Sesnon #15 had a value of $1,500 which was a total loss.  Her $7,000 cargo was reported a $6,000 loss.  There was no insurance on the vessel.  No lives were lost in the disaster.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 26 N 162 50 W   Chart 16200

                Comment: Chinik was an early name of Golovin.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 40, Built 1900, Registered Nome, ON 165709, Master E H Pfaffle of Council, Owners Pfaffle & Porter of Council, Cargo insurance unknown

                Source: U S C G Report of Casualty November 4, 1919 at Nome

SESNON #21 (1913)     The 39 ton wooden barge Sesnon #21 stranded and was lost near Nome at 6 a.m. Monday October 6, 1913.  The barge was anchored in the Nome roadstead with no one aboard and no cargo.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “S E Gale blowing 50 miles per hour from 2 a.m. to 10 a.m. weather very stormy and night very dark”  “Stranding”  “On beach about two miles west of Nome”  “Broke loose from moorings, driven on shore by gale and broken to pieces after continual pounding”  “All vessels in roadstead were driven ashore by the gale and more or less damaged”

                The Sesnon #21 had a value of $3,200 which was a total loss with no insurance on the vessel.  There was no loss of life.

Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

Additional Information: Tonnage 39, Built 1907 at Seattle, Registered Nome, ON 163210, Master A H Kellogg of Nome, Owner John J Sesnon Co of Nome

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report November 4, 1913 by E Chas. Elwood, Agent for Owner

SESNON #23 (1924)     The 39 ton wooden barge Sesnon #23 stranded and was lost near the Snake River at 11 p.m. Friday November 14, 1924.  The barge was anchored in the roadstead with no one aboard and no cargo.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Anchored in roadstead”  “2 mi. W. of Snake River”  “S E gale, cloudy, misty and heavy sea, dark”  “Stranded”  “Broke loose from mooring, drifted ashore and was broken up by force of the waves”  “When we found the vessel she was broken up and a total loss”

                The Sesnon #23 was valued at $5,000 and was a total loss with no insurance.  There were no lives lost.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16200

                Additional Information: Tonnage 39, Built 1907, Registered Nome, ON 163211, Master and owner H G Gabrielson of Nome

                Source: U S C G Report of Casualty June 25, 1925 by E K Johansen, Agent

SEVEN SEAS (1971)     The fishing vessel Seven Seas disappeared with four people on board December 3, 1971 on her way to Wide Bay near Kodiak Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 22 N 156 11 W   Chart 16013

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SEVEN SISTERS (1908)     The 129 ton 97 foot schooner Seven Sisters stranded and was lost near Cape Espenberg at 1:00 a.m. Tuesday September 1, 1908.  The vessel departed Nome August 7, 1908 with 9 crewmen aboard bound for “Kuwalisk” (probably Kiwalik).  Her cargo was 200 tons of coal of which 25 tons were on deck.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “About 5 miles to eastward of Cape Espenberg”  “Strong N W wind, dark, and heavy sea”  “Carried away steering gear”  “Dropped anchor, but before the chain became taught the vessel was aground”  “Stranding”  “After the steering gear was carried away the vessel was unmanageable and the wind was so strong from on the shore that before the anchor could be lowered the vessel had struck”

                The Seven Sisters had a value of $7,000 and her cargo $3,000.  Both were total losses and neither was insured.  The crewmen managed to reach safety.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   66 33 N 163 36 W   Chart 16005

                Additional Information: Tonnage 129 Gross 122 Net, Length 97, Breadth 27.2, Depth 7.5, SL KFCR, Built 1888 at Benicia CA, Registered Nome, ON 116196, Master William S Thompson of Nome, Owner William McIntosh of Nome

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report September 10, 1908 by Fenlay McIntosh by power attorney for William McIntosh, owner

 

SEVENTY-SIX (1895)     The 38 ton 60 foot schooner Seventy Six departed Wooded (Woody) Island December 11, 1895 with six crewmen and one passenger aboard. The Seventy-Six was bound for Kayak Island continuing on to Prince William Sound on a trading voyage.  The vessel disappeared with all hands.  The Seventy-Six was owned by the North American Commercial Company whose principal station was at Woody Island. Weather was fair when the vessel departed the island but deteriorated into a terrific northerly gale soon after. Friends of the Seventy-Six crew reported their concern that the vessel had no extra sails and that those they were using were not in good condition and may not be able to withstand a storm. Lost with the Seventy-Six were Captain Henry R. Bowen (45) of Massachusetts and North American Commercial Company’s foreman who was in charge of the expedition, Charles Whittier (27) master from England, Nelson Davies (35) mate from England, Fred Chapman (23) steward from California, Martin Johnson (40) seaman from Sweden, Gustav O. Carlson seaman from Sweden and Otto (Adolph) Anderson (35) storekeeper from Sweden who was to take charge of the store at Kayak.  Anderson left behind a wife and two children at Kodiak. Mrs. Anderson had lost her previous husband to a shipwreck. Captain Bowen left behind a wife and nine children. The steamer Dora reported that wreckage from the vessel drifted ashore near Kodiak.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska Unknown

Comment: Captain Bowen is the same captain who was in command of the fur trading schooner Pauline Collins when she broke up on the rocks at Karluk, October 6, 1881. WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 38.11 Gross 36.22 Net, Length 60, Breadth 21, Depth 5, Built 1876 at Mayhew Landing CA, Registered Kodiak, ON 115475

Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. Salmon from Kodiak (1986) Pg 6, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1895) Pg 183, 4. San Francisco Chronicle (May 18, 1896) “No News of the Seventy-Six” Pg 5, 5. The Repository (November 11, 1896) “All On Board Perished” Pg 6

 

SEVSK (1965)     The Russian trawler Sevsk was lost January 20, 1965 between the Pribilof Islands and Saint Matthew Island, approximately 80 miles northwest of Saint Paul Island.  Fourteen crewmembers perished in the disaster.  The Russian trawlers Sebezh and Nahichevan were also lost with the same number of crewmembers on each.  Two of the three trawlers sank and a third was found overturned with one crewmember clinging to the hull.  The three vessels had been fishing herring south of the pack ice and delivering to the 532 foot Russian factory ship Pavel Postyshev.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   57 10 N 170 15 W   Chart 16006

                Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. Morning Advocate (Baton Rouge January 22, 1965) “U S is asked to help locate Soviet trawlers” Pg 4-B

 

SHAKTOOLIK (1980)     The processing barge Shaktoolik sank August 1, 1980 between Dillingham and Kodiak.

                Mapping and Location: South Central   Unknown

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SHAMROCK (1929)     The 13 ton 38 foot wooden gas screw Shamrock stranded and was lost near Ninilchik April 22, 1929.  The vessel departed Seldovia the day before bound for Ninilchik with two persons aboard and no cargo.  The following are statements taken from the casualty report filed by W R Harris, master and owner:

                “About two miles southerly from Ninilchik”  “Force of wind about 50 miles” “Stormy weather and rough sea”  “Bad weather, strong N W wind and strong ebbing tide”  “Stranding”  “Engine run at full speed.  Anchors thrown out and everything possible done to avoid disaster”  “No assistance rendered”  “Total loss”

                The Shamrock had a value of $3,400 and was a total loss.  There was $1,600 worth of insurance on the vessel.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 02 N 151 42 W   Chart 16661

                Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 9 Net, Length 38.5, Breadth 11.9, Depth 4.6, Built 1912 at Tacoma WA, IHP 27, Registered Juneau, ON 209578, Master and owner W R Harris of Seldovia

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty May 28, 1929 at Seldovia, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) Pgs 500-501

SHANGRI-LA (1950)     The 8 ton 31 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Shangri-La burned April 12, 1950 travelling from Sitka to Pelican.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 57 30 N 136 13 30 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 5 Net, Length 31.3, Breadth 9.1, Depth 3.7, Built 1946 at Juneau, Horsepower 90, Owner Donovan C McGee, Registered Juneau, ON 250176

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 519, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 750

 

SHANNON BELLE (1949)     The troller Shannon Belle went aground and wrecked September 20, 1949 at the entrance to Lituya Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 36 45 N 137 39 30 W   Chart 16016

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

Lands End Resort on the Homer Spit 1975

Lands End Resort on the Homer Spit 1975

SHAPACY (1978)     The 90 foot steel oil screw crab fishing vessel Shapacy rolled over and sank December 7, 1978 in Kachemak Bay 2 miles off the Homer Spit.  Crewmen Woody Smith and Shaun E Kirby were lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 37 N 151 27 W   Chart 16640

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List, 2. BOEM Wreck List (2011)

 

SHARK (1915)     Fire destroyed the 19 ton 47 foot gas screw fishing vessel Shark at Seldovia October 29, 1915.  The two persons aboard made it to safety, but the Shark was a complete loss.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 26 15 N 151 42 30 W   Chart 16640

                Additional Information: Tonnage 19 Gross 13 Net, Length 46.7, Breadth 11.9, Depth 4.8, IHP 30, Built 1910 At Port Orchard WA, Registered Port Townsend WA, ON 217995

                Sources: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 421, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1915) Pg 311

SHARKAY (1975)     The fishing vessel Sharkay was lost in severe weather December 3, 1975 in Culross Passage near Night Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 41 N 148 14 W   Chart 16700

                Comment: Probably Knight Island.  Sealee lost same place same day.  WG

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SHARON D (1984)     The fishing vessel Sharon D took a wave over the stern, flooded and sank April 28, 1984 approximately 50 miles south of Kodiak.  The vessel and her crew of 3 were traveling from Dillingham to Kodiak.  The 3 crewmembers were plucked from the wheelhouse roof by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SHARON PATRICIA (1969)     The diesel screw Sharon Patricia capsized and was lost August 22, 1969 in the Shelikof Strait.  Gordon Lauritzen of Portland, Oregon was lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 30 N 155 00 W   Chart 16580

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SHARON W (2004)     The 52 foot fishing long line vessel Sharon W capsized and sank July 24, 2004 in Marmot Bay off of Peril Cape.  The four persons on board escaped to a skiff and were picked up by the fishing vessel Kathleen K.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 07 30 N 152 16 20 W   Chart 16594

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. Alaska Daily News (July 25, 2004) “Tour boat evacuated; fishing boat goes down”

 

SHARYN A (1992)     The 40 foot salmon troller Sharyn A grounded, made repairs, but sank in spite of them September 2, 1992 approximately 30 miles southeast of Ketchikan.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 20 30 N 131 38 45 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: 298176

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SHELIKOF (1966)     The 72 foot crab fishing vessel Shelikof foundered, was driven ashore and pounded to pieces by heavy seas December 15, 1966 at Cape Lazaref on Unimak Island.  All four crewmembers reached the beach safely.  Two were picked up by the tug Trojan and two by the U S Coast Guard cutter Storis.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 37 N 163 35 10 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: Built 1944, Owner Wakefield Seafood

                Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. Seattle Daily Times (December 17, 1966) “Shelikof Reported Total Loss” Pg 10

 

SHELLY ANN (1975)     The 34 foot vessel Shelly Ann sank July 23, 1975 at Narrow Cape.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 25 30 N 152 20 W   Chart 16580

                Source: Unofficial Wreck List

 

SHENANDOAH (1986)     The fishing vessel Shenandoah sank may 30, 1986 near Seward.  All three persons on board donned survival suits and were rescued by the U S Coast Guard.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 06 30 N 149 26 30 W   Chart 16680

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SHENANDOAH (2002)     The 48 foot fishing vessel Shenandoah disappeared with two persons aboard October 11, 2002.  The vessel was towing the 65 foot Mary J from Homer to Seward.  The U S Coast Guard responded to a weak EPIRB signal from the Shenandoah in the vicinity of Chugach Bay.  Debris from the Shenandoah was found in and near Chugach Bay.  The Mary J was found washed ashore at the entrance to Windy Bay.  Lost with the Shenandoah were Mark Thibault (31) of Nashua NH and Pat DiMichele of Seward.

            Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 11 N 151 34 W   Chart 16640

                Additional Information: ON 607362

                Sources: 1. U S C G News Release (October 12, 2002) “Coast Guard suspends search for two missing from sunken fishing vessel”, 2. Anchorage Daily News (October 16, 2002) “Storm likely tore apart fishing boat The Shenandoah, experts say”

 

SHIN YANG HO (1990)     The 261 foot South Korean fishing vessel Shin Yang Ho sank after colliding with the Japanese vessel Shinei Maru No 63 approximately 60 miles south of Dillingham in Bristol Bay.  All 55 crewmembers were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 02 30 N 158 27 30 W   Chart 16006

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SHINKOKU MARU (1923)     The steamer Shinkoku Maru was lost November 26, 1923 off Montague Island.  The vessel was on a voyage from Yokahama, Japan to Portland, Oregon when she became disabled in the Aleutians with a broken tail shaft.  She was taken in tow by the tug Humaconna.  They encountered a furious gale off of Montague Island and the Shinkoku Maru had to be cut loose.  She was blown onto the rocks and became a complete loss.  All but one of the crew survived escaping to the shore.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 10 N 147 15 W   Chart 16700

                Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 343

SHIRLEY (1919)     The 1,049 ton barge Shirley was abandoned at Skagway in 1919.  The vessel was brought out of retirement during the gold rush of 1898.  Investors from Tacoma had the vessel towed from there to Skagway full of paying miners and supplies during the gold rush, and then used as a floating hotel.  The Shirley had been built as a bark in 1850 in Medford, Massachusetts.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   59 27 30 N 135 18 45 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 1,049 Gross 996 Net, Built 1850 at Medford MA, Registered Seattle, ON 23297

                Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), Merchant Vessels of the U S (1914) Pg 394

SHOSHONE (1981)     The 76 foot fishing vessel Shoshone struck a rock and sank two miles off of the northern coast of Egg Island at 4:45 a.m. July 20, 1981.  The five crewmembers aboard were rescued by the fishing vessel Captain Banjo.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 51 50 N 166 03 W   Charts 16011, 16520

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SHOWGIRL (1983)     The fishing vessel Showgirl caught fire and became a total loss August 25, 1983 ten miles off of Port Moller.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 53 N 160 28 W   Chart 16006

                Comment: The fishing vessel Serendipity burned the same day in the same area.  WG

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SHUSANA (1920)     The 49 ton 80 foot stern-wheel river steamer Shusana stranded on the Tanana River near Nenana and became a total loss May 11, 1920.  There were 11 persons aboard at the time of the disaster and all made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Central Alaska

                Additional Information: Tonnage 49 Gross 31 Net, Length 79.8, Breadth 20.9, Depth 3.9, Built 1913 at Fairbanks, Registered Eagle, ON 211609

                Sources: 1. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 313, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1919) Pg 164, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1922) Pg 451

SHUYAK (1964)     The 31 ton 53 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Shuyak was reported lost at Kodiak in the Good Friday earthquake of March 27, 1964.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 31 Gross 21 Net, Length 53.8, Breadth 14.3, Depth 6, Built 1926 at Port Ashton AK, Horsepower 165, SL WB2994, Owner Margarete von Scheele, Executrix, Estate of Robert von Scheele, Registered Juneau, ON 225854

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 623

 

SIDNEY (1970)     The oil screw Sidney foundered and was lost May 2, 1970 off of Orca.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 39 50 N 145 43 W   Chart 16710

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SIERRA MADRE (1988)     The 58 foot fishing vessel Sierra Madre sank in three foot seas January 8, 1988 off of Cape Decision.  All three crewmembers jumped into the water and swam over to the fishing vessel Rachael Pauline.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 00 10 N 134 08 W   Chart 17320

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SIGRID (1924)     The 11 ton 36 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sigrid stranded and was lost near Vancouver Island at 8 p.m. January 25, 1924.  James Hodnet, master and owner of the Sigrid was on board with his Wife and one crewman when the disaster occurred.  They had departed Seattle January 20, 1924 and were on their way to Katalla, Alaska.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by Mr. Hodnet:

                “Reef 7 mi. S. of Campbell River, Vancouver I.”  “Driven onto reef by wind in darkness”  “About 30 mile wind, weather wet, rainy, foggy, very dark night”  “Attempting to make shelter at lighthouse, miscalculated force of wind and nearness of reef”  “Came as a surprise”  “Total loss, engine later salvaged”

                The Sigrid had a value of $2,500 and the ton of supplies on board was worth $200.  The vessel and half her cargo were lost with no insurance.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: British Columbia

                Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Length 36.2, Breadth 10.3, Depth 4.9, Built 1917 at Seattle WA, IHP 20, Registered Seattle, ON 215615

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty August 16, 1924, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1924) Pg 273

SILVER BULLIT (1992)     On October 14, 1992, while towing the 29 foot fishing vessel Mary Anne and 49 foot vessel New Star, the 32 foot fishing vessel Silver Bullit struck a rock.  The three vessels tied side by side to make repairs, but caught fire and all three burned and sank near Mitrofania Island.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 53 N 158 50 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: ON 949111

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SILVER CHALICE (1992)     The 71 foot fishing vessel Silver Chalice flooded and sank January 13, 1992 60 miles east of Kodiak.  The vessel began taking on water through her shaft alley.  The U S Coast Guard dropped pumps in an attempt to save the vessel but to no avail.  All four crewmembers were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: ON 598904

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SILVER CLIPPER (1984)     The fishing vessel Silver Clipper flooded her engine room and sank June 9, 1984 approximately 28 miles northwest of Dutch Harbor.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 54 N 166 31 W   Chart 16011

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SILVER EAGLE (1991)     The 29 foot fishing vessel Silver Eagle sank in heavy seas July 10, 1991 in Bristol Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 N 162 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: ON 595585

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SILVER SPRAY (1964)     The 14 ton 35 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Silver Spray was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Seward.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 06 30 N 149 26 30 W   Chart 16680

                Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 9 Net, Length 35, Breadth 10.2, Depth 5.3, Built 1941 at Point Roberts WA, Horsepower 103, SL WB3030, Owner Theodore J Sires Jr., Registered Juneau, ON 240664

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 625, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

SILVER STAR (1961)     The 37 ton 44 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Silver Star foundered some time after October 8, 1961 near Sukoi Bay.  The vessel was reported missing by the Seldovia Wakefield Cannery October 12th.  The Ruth L, another vessel fishing for the Wakefield Cannery, found the wreckage October 14, 1961 strewn along the beach near Cape Douglas.  Lost with the Silver Star were owner Raymond Martin as well as crewmembers Charles Nelson Jr. and Benny Bowers.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 52 N 153 16 W   Chart 16013

                Comments:  The Ruth L sank in the same area a month later with the loss of her crew of three.  There are two dangerous submerged pinnacles just north of Sukoi Bay toward Shaw Island that were not marked on charts in use at that time.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 37 Gross 30 Net, Length 43.9, Breadth 14.2, Depth 9, Built 1945 at Everett WA, Horsepower 165, SL WC 8296, Owner Raymond Martin, Registered Juneau, ON 248474

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) Pg 584, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 932, 3. Seattle Daily Times (October 16, 1961) “Maritime News around the World” Pg 21

 

SILVER STAR (1992)     The 32 foot fishing vessel Silver Star stranded and sank March 25, 1992 in Whale Pass toward Kupreanof Strait.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 56 N 152 50 W   Chart 16594

                Comment: The Silver Star was salvaged and renamed Sylvia Star and returned to fishing. WG

                Source: Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SILVER WAVE (1924)     The 32 ton 55 foot wooden gas screw power schooner Silver Wave became frozen in the ice and abandoned in Kotzebue Sound at 1:00 p.m. Wednesday October 29, 1924.  The vessel departed Nome October 8, 1924 bound for Kotzebue Sound with 5 passengers and 4 crewmen on board.  The Silver Wave was carrying 12 tons of general merchandise valued at $4,100.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Moderate wind.  Weather 10 below zero, in daytime”  “About 12 miles west of Cape Espenberg and about 8 miles off shore”  “Frozen in and carried away in ice”  “Unexpected change of weather and ice forming vessel was frozen in and strained causing to leak badly”  “Tried to work vessel out of ice and had U S cutter Mojave go to her assistance but the ice was so heavy she could not get near her and she was abandoned”  “The crew and 4 natives from shore and U S Coast Guard cutter Mojave (assisted)”  “The vessel left Nome with the U S mail for Kotzebue Sound points.  The ice formed earlier than usual and she was frozen in and it was necessary for the crew to abandon her after removing all mail”

                The Silver Wave was valued at $8,500 and was a total loss along with her cargo.  All passengers and crew made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   66 33 N 163 36 W   Chart 16005

                Additional Information: Tonnage 32 Gross 21 Net, Length 54.8, Breadth 16.9, Depth 5.2, Service passenger, IHP 65, Built 1889 at Bandon OR, Registered Nome, ON 116255, Master John Hegness of Nome, Owner Lomen Reindeer and Trading Corp. of Nome

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty June 15, 1925 by J F Malen, Auditor for Owner, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1924) Pg 273

SILVER WAVE (1940)     The 20 ton 41 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Silver Wave was destroyed by fire on the cannery dock at Wrangell July 22, 1940.  The six crewmen aboard made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 28 N 132 22 40 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 20 Gross 13 Net, Length 41.4, Breadth13.2, Depth 5.5, Built 1915 at Poulsbo WA, Horsepower 20, Owner Sidney Carle, Registered Wrangell, ON 213310

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1941) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 511, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1939) Pg 277

 

SILVERADO (1992)     The 32 foot crab fishing vessel Silverado ran aground and broke up in the surf January 24, 1992 in Beaver Inlet on Unalaska Island.  All three crewmen were rescued by the vessel Sea Spider.

                 Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 50 N 166 15 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: ON 912690

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SIMEON I ANNA (1797)     The Russian vessel Simeon I Anna was lost in 1797 on her way to the Pribilof Islands from Okhotsk, Russia.

                Mapping and Location: Unknown

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SINBAD (1954)     The 9 ton 32 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sinbad foundered May 9, 1954 at Gravina Point in Prince William Sound.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 37 30 N 146 15 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 7 Net, Length 32.6, Breadth 10, Depth 3.7, Built 1945 at Cordova, Horsepower 90, Owner Western Fisheries Company, Registered Juneau, ON 253526

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) Pg 511, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 803

 

SINTRAM (1915)     The 1,656 ton 215 foot wooden ship Sintram stranded and was lost near the Egegik River at 1:30 a.m. May 2, 1915.  The vessel departed from San Francisco bound for Naknek, Bristol Bay, Alaska.  There were 105 cannery hands and 74 officers and crewmen aboard.  The Sintram was also carrying 1,400 tons of salmon cannery supplies including tin plate, cans, shooks, etc.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “About 7 miles north and west of Egegik river, Alaska”  “Stranding”  “Foggy and thick weather”  “Light wind, dark and rainy, choppy sea”  “Had taken soundings and found an average of 17 fms. water”  “Steamer Kadiak, belonging to the Alaska Packers Assn. took off crew and landed them at Nakuck”  “Steamer Kadiak took off crew and some part of provisions the day following the stranding.  Subsequently the Company got ashore nearly all cargo but in damaged condition”

                The Sintram had a value of $20,000 and became a total loss.  Her cargo had a value of $68,000 and was about 50% lost or damaged.  No lives were lost in the disaster.  The Sintram had vessel insurance for $5,000 and cargo insurance for $55,000.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 12 N 157 24 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 1,656 Gross 1,495 Net, Length 215.4, Breadth 42.9, 24.2, SL JSQD, Built 1877 Freeport ME, Registered San Francisco, ON 115575, Master Oskar Anderson of Oakland CA

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty by Ferd. C Peterson for owners at San Francisco, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1914) Pg 81

SIRIUS (1979)     The Seattle based 72 foot crab fishing vessel Sirius stranded and broke up February 28, 1979 on Douglas Reef north of Kodiak.  The six crew members were rescued by the crab fishing vessel Polar Shell.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 45 45 N 153 16 W   Chart 16580

                Source: Seattle Daily Times (March 2, 1979) “7 lifted from crab vessel in Alaska” Pg 64

 

SISU (1962)     The 11 ton 32 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sisu foundered September 14, 1962 at Swanson Harbor, southeastern Alaska.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 11 30 N 135 05 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Length 32.4, Breadth 10.1, Depth 4.4, Built 1941 at Sitka, Horsepower 110, SL WF9588, Owner Leonard Rodman, Registered Juneau, ON 245300

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) Pg 586, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) “Vessels Subject to Removal” Pg 732

 

SITKA (1875)     The schooner Sitka was driven ashore and wrecked near Wrangell September 20, 1875.  The vessel departed Sitka April 5, 1875 bound for Hootzenoo.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 28 N 132 22 40 W   Charts 17360, 17385

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SITKA (1898)     The 17 ton two masted fur sealing trading schooner Sitka was lost off of Cape Ommaney March 30, 1898.  Her three crewmen perished with the vessel.  The Sitka was last seen in Redfish Bay.  She departed out of Sitka and was bound for Ft Wrangell.  Her masts were picked up by the schooner Northern Star.  The Sitka had a value of $800.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 10 N 134 40 20 W   Chart 17320

                Comment: H W McCurdy (Pg 40) calls this vessel City of Sitka.  This is probably the 17.44 ton 41.5 foot schooner Sitka (ON 116253) out of Sitka. WG

                Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1897) Pg 176 Sitka

SITKA (1935)     The 74 ton 73 foot wooden oil screw Sitka struck a rock in Clarence Strait at 5:15 a.m. October 3, 1935.  The Sitka departed Ketchikan the day before and was bound for Juneau with 11 crewmen aboard.  She was carrying a cargo of 1,500 pounds of general merchandise.  The vessel struck a rock near Narrow Point in Clarence Strait.  The tide was ebbing and there was a thick fog.  The Sitka was valued at $15,000 and damage to the vessel was $1,200.  She was assisted off the rock by the gas screw St Nichols.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 47 30 N 132 28 30 W   Chart 17420

                Comment: This vessel is mistakenly reported as a total loss on some wreck lists.  WG

                Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty October 12, 1935 by William Doucett, master of the Sitka

SITKA (1964)     A vessel named Sitka was reported missing out of Kodiak in the Good Friday earthquake of March 27, 1964.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Source: Unofficial Wreck List

 

SITKA (1969)     The fishing vessel Sitka stranded and burned on the beach January 31, 1969 seven miles 200 degrees true from Point Astley near the entrance to Holkham Bay.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 43 N 133 39 W   Chart 17360

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SIVUTCH (1831)     The Russian vessel Sivutch was lost east of Wall Bay on Atka Island in 1831.  Her last port was Korovin Bay.  The cargo of the Sivutch was offloaded into baidaras and the vessel broken up for wood and iron.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 06 30 N 174 53 10 W   Charts 17480, 17487

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SKAGIT EAGLE (1991)     The 91 foot fishing vessel Skagit Eagle stranded and was lost February 8, 1991 in Reese Bay on Unalaska Island.  The five crewmembers made shore and were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.  Efforts to salvage the vessel were successful.  Evidence of the wreck may be on site and of interest.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   54 00 15 N 164 43 W   Chart 16500

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SKAGWAY (1929)     The 1,838 ton steam ship Skagway burned at Tatoosh Islands December 15, 1929.  There were 27 persons on board but no lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 31 N 131 50 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 1,838, Built 1908, ON 205052

                Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1930) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 917

SKAGWAY HELEN (1974)     The gillnetter Skagway Helen burned from a fire caused by a faulty cook stove July 24, 1974 in Lynn Canal near Haines.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   59 14 10 N 135 26 15 W   Chart 17300

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SKANDIA (1920)     (see Scandia 1920)

SKARSTONE (1948)     The 261 ton 98 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Skarstone stranded and was lost October 15, 1948 on Yakataga Beach, 40 miles west of Yakutat.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 03 40 N 142 26 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: Tonnage 261 Gross 222 Net, Length 98.6, Breadth 30, Depth 10.1, Built 1943 at San Francisco CA, Former Name BSP-1052 (U S A), Crew 8, Horsepower 270, SL KIYD, Owner Cape Douglas Canning, Registered Juneau, ON 252402

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 527, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 750

 

SKEE-DUNK (1958)     The 44 ton 47 foot steel oil screw Skee-Dunk stranded and was lost January 31, 1958 at Driftwood Bay near Dutch Harbor, Unalaska Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 59 N 166 51 W   Chart 16500

                Additional Information: Tonnage 44 Gross 30 Net, Length 47, Breadth 14, Depth 5.6, Built 1943 at Wilmington DE, Former Name LCMC-28811 (U S N), Service freight, Horsepower 450, Owner G E Calhoun, Registered Juneau, ON 257596

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) Pg 512, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 803

 

SKILAK (1969)     The oil screw Skilak foundered and was lost August 26, 1969 between Chinitna Point and Anchor Point in Cook Inlet.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 46 45 N 151 49 50 W   Chart 16640

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SKIP (1906)     The 16 ton wooden scow Skip stranded and was lost at Mount Andrew at 2 a.m. September 22, 1906.  The scow had been tied at the wharf but her lines parted during the night.  Winds were high and seas heavy when the vessel stranded and was broken up.  Her reported value was $200.  The Skip was a total loss with no insurance.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 30 N 132 20 W   Chart 17426

                Comment: Mount Andrew was a mining camp operated by the Andrew Mining Company on the Kasaan Peninsula.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 16, Age 5 years, Registered Ketchikan, ON 58105, Master Nicholas Madson of Ketchikan, Owner A C Strong of Ketchikan, Last port Ketchikan

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report September 26, 1906 by A C Strong, 2. Dictionary of Alaska Place Names (1967) “Mount Andrew” Pg 661

SKIPPY JACK (1974)     The gas screw Skippy Jack foundered and was lost August 2, 1974 at the mouth of Resurrection Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 48 N 149 30 W   Chart 16680

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SKOOKUM (1900)     The 1,981 ton wooden schooner barge Skookum stranded and was lost near Nome at 8 p.m. Wednesday September 12, 1900.  The vessel departed Seattle May 18, 1900, passing through Ketchikan and Dutch Harbor before reaching Nome.  There were 2 passengers and eleven crewmen aboard when the disaster occurred.  There was also a 200 ton cargo of lumber, stores etc. valued at $5,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by L O Waldo, master and managing owner of the Skookum:

                “Nome Beach in front of A E Co. Store”  “Stranding”  “Wind SE, velocity about 35 miles per hour.  Heavy gale.  Breakers two miles to windward.  Dark night”  “Vessel was laying at anchor.  In the heavy sea running vessel was breaking up; anchors were slipped and vessel allowed to drift ashore to save lives of crew.”  “Vessel waterlogged and breaking up rapidly; anchors slipped to avoid foundering”  “Received assistance from no one, but rescued two men from steamer America

                The Skookum had a value of $40,000 at the time of the casualty.  All passengers and crew were removed to safety.  The Skookum wreck was sold for $1,600 and her cargo for $400.  Neither the vessel nor her cargo had insurance.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 1,981 Gross 1,869 Net, Built 1898 at Tacoma WA, Registered Seattle, ON 57960, Master and owner L O Waldo of Tacoma WA

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report September 27, 1900 at Sitka

SKREAMIN DEAMON (1978)     The 27 foot vessel Skreamin Deamon foundered October 9, 1978 off of Spruce Island near Monashka Bay while under tow.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 55 N 152 25 W   Chart 16580

                Source: Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak)

 

SKYLO (1988)     The 42 foot longline fishing vessel Skylo swamped and sank October 4, 1988 two miles offshore south of Cape Cross.  A series of 42 foot waves washed over the stern of the vessel which had a full load of halibut.  All three crewmembers donned survival suits and abandoned ship.  They were rescued eight hours later by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 55 N 136 33 30 W   Chart 17300

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SLAYER (2006)     The 32 foot troller Slayer foundered March 12, 2006 on a trip from Kake to Sitka to offload fish.  A mayday was heard indicating that the vessel was sinking with two persons on board four and a half miles south of Point Gardner.  A survival suit, life ring and partially deflated zodiac were all that was found.  Lost were Richard Nebert (42) of Juneau and Matthew Young (18) of Sitka.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 01 N 134 37 W   Chart 17320

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Alaska), 2. U S C G Press Release (March 12, 2006) “Coast Guard suspends search for crew of fishing vessel Slayer

 

SMILE (1961)     The 8 ton 31 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Smile was consumed by fire September 11, 1961 off of Alaska Packers Association north of Wrangell Island.

                 Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 16 N 132 12 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 7 Net, Length 31.5, Breadth 9.4, Depth 4.2, Built 1919 at Seattle, Horsepower 110, Owner Tom Ukas, Registered Wrangell, ON 217781

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 630, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

SMITH (1951)     The 94 ton 105 foot wooden oil screw Smith foundered August 16, 1951, 10 miles east of Middleton Island in the Gulf of Alaska.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 26 N 146 20 W   Chart 16013

                Additional Information: Tonnage 94 Gross 63 Net, Length 105.1, Breadth 14.8, Depth 8.3, Built 1917 at Jacksonville FL, Former Names Smith (U S C G) and SC-155 (U S N), Service freight, Horsepower 590, SL WB3110, Owner H J Emard, Registered Juneau, ON 237195

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) Pg 489, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 745

 

Port Wakefield near Port Lions in Kizhuyak Bay

Port Wakefield near Port Lions in Kizhuyak Bay

SMOKWA (1990)     The 167 foot fish processor Smokwa was towed out of Kizhuyak Bay to 1,000 fathoms of water and scuttled May 15, 1990.  The 1,588 ton vessel had been moved to Port Lions to process seafood.  She sank near Port Lions and was raised by the Salvage Chief but was found to be beyond repair.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   Unknown

                Additional Information: Built 1946, ON 655811

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SNOQUALMIE (1974)     The 98 foot wooden former Seattle fire boat Snoqualmie was destroyed by fire in late February of 1974 at Kodiak.  The vessel was Seattle’s first fireboat, built there in 1890 as a response to the great Seattle fire of 1889.  Snoqualmie was launched on August 1st of 1890.  She was retired from the Seattle Fire Department in 1932 and worked after that in many capacities.  The Snoqualmie was most recently used as a shrimp hauler for Northern Processors.  She was at the fuel dock in Kodiak when fire broke out.  The U S Coast Guard towed the vessel a safe distance from the dock where she burned for 36 hours and was lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. The Seattle Times (March 6, 1974) “Fireboat comes to a flaming end off Kodiak docks” Pg E 15

 

SNUG (1966)     The 6 ton 27 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Snug foundered August 14, 1966 in Cook Inlet.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 05 N 152 30 W   Chart 16013

                Additional Information: Tonnage 6 Gross 5 Net, Length 27.8, Breadth 10.3, Depth 2.8, Built 1957at Winslow WA, Horsepower 60, SL WH9508, Owner Simon F Josefsen, Registered Juneau, ON 273993

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 655, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1175

 

SOFTUK (1971)     The gas screw Softuk was found abandoned October 16, 1971 at Orca Inlet in Prince William sound.  One person was lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 31 N 145 52 W   Chart 16700

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

Web George W & Sogn 1985SOGN (1986)     The 70 foot fishing vessel Sogn burned and sank February 25, 1986 off of Sitkalidak Island.  The three crewmen aboard were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 07 N 153 14 W   Chart 16580

                Source: Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak)

 

SOLAR (1952)     The 36 ton 43 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Solar stranded and was lost July 10, 1952 in Oil Bay, Cook Inlet.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 38 N 153 17 W   Chart 16640

                Additional Information: Tonnage 36 Gross 24 Net, Length 43.7, Breadth 14.5, Depth 9.8, Built 1947 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 165, SL WB5965, Owner Daniel Twiet, Registered Juneau, ON 252878

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 531, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 746

 

SOLAR (1967)     The gas screw Solar was destroyed by a storm June 15, 1967 in Anchorage Bay west of Chignik.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 19 N 158 23 W   Chart 16013

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SOMEHOW (1946)     The 14 ton 33 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Somehow was consumed by fire July 14, 1946 in Elfin Cove.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 12 15 N 136 21 30 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 9 Net, Length 33.3, Breadth 11.1, Depth 4, Built 1913 at Bremerton WA, Horsepower 110, Owner Nels H Mork, Registered Juneau, ON 211682

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1947) Pg 474, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1948) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 862

 

SONAR (1994)     The 46 foot salmon seiner Sonar ran aground and sank August 21, 1994 on Entrance Island near Sea Otter Harbor.  All five crewmembers were rescued by another fishing vessel.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 06 35 N 133 14 30 W   Chart 17407

                Additional Information: ON 261606

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SONDRA LEE (1947)     The 296 ton 99 foot wooden oil screw Sondra Lee burned March 9, 1947 in Wrangell Narrows.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 31 N 132 55 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 296 Gross 235 Net, Length 99.1, Breadth 31.1, Depth 10.5, Built 1943 at Seattle WA, Service freight, Horsepower 270, Crew 6, SL AXRA, Owner Earl T Forsythe, Registered Juneau, ON 250209

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1947) Pg 474, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1948) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 862

 

SONNY BOY (1978)     The 70 foot vessel Sonny Boy foundered June 12, 1978 approximately 10 miles out of Dutch Harbor.  The crew was rescued by the vessels Cape Lynch and Crystal.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 54 N 166 31 W   Chart 16011

                Source: Unofficial Wreck List

 

SONNY BOY (1992)                The 93 foot fishing vessel Sonny Boy lost power, capsized and was lost in rough seas February 23, 1992 in Akun Strait.  All four crewmembers were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   54 08 N 165 39 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: ON 546375

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SOPHIA (1913)     The 10 ton 35 foot gas screw Sophia foundered October 10, 1913 at Nome.  The crew of four escaped to safety, but the Sophia was a total loss.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 8 Net, Length 35, Breadth 12.6, Depth 4, IHP 5, Built 1904 at Unalakleet, Registered Nome, ON 209264

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1914) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 430, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1913) Pg 297, 3. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 231

SOPHIA KING (1964)     A vessel named Sophia King owned by Freddie Katelnikoff was reported lost at Kodiak in the Good Friday earthquake of March 27, 1964.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Source: Unofficial Wreck List

 

SOPHIA SUTHERLAND (1900)     The schooner Sophia Sutherland was lost in the Arctic August 31, 1900.  The vessel was towed into Baillie’s Island, Northwest Territories, Canada by the steamer Beluga, where she was lost in a gale.

                Mapping and Location: Northwest Territories, Canada

                Sources: 1. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 63, 2. The Daily Journal, Salem Oregon (November 1, 1900) “The Fleet of Arctic Whalers” Pg 1

SOPHIE (1949)     The 8 ton 29 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sophie foundered June 5, 1949, 1,000 yards west of Point Amelia.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 13 30 N 135 52 30 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 6 Net, Length 29.4, Breadth 9.5, Depth 4, Built 1928 at Ketchikan, Horsepower 12, Owner Albert J Erickson, Registered Sitka, ON 227393

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1949) Pg 516, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1950) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 927

 

SORTLAND (1953)     The 7 ton 28 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sortland was consumed by fire September 30, 1953 at Driftwood Bay in Day Harbor.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 56 N 149 13 W   Chart 16683

                Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 5 Net, Length 28.5, Breadth 9.2, Depth 4.1, Built 1919 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 110, Owner Earl A Moore Jr., Registered Juneau, ON 217959

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 532, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 750

 

SOUND (1967)     The gas screw Sound burned December 30, 1967 at Steamboat Bay, Noyes Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 33 N 133 38 W   Chart 17400

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SOUND INVESTOR (1989)     The 40 foot fiberglass salmon fishing vessel Sound Investor capsized suddenly and foundered June 20, 1989 in Port Valdez.  One of the three crewmembers on board was lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   61 05 N 146 39 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: ON 647661

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SOUTH WIND (1967)     The tug South Wind struck the mooring line of the barge it was towing and capsized May 6, 1967 in Cook Inlet.  All three crewmembers were rescued by the U S Coast Guard buoy tender Sorrel.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 05 N 152 30 W   Chart 16013

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SOUTH WIND (1997)     The 32 foot salmon seiner South Wind grounded and was lost when a plank gave way August 25, 1997 near Sand Point.  Both crewmembers made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 20 15 N 160 30 W   Chart 16553

                Additional Information: ON 270021

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SOUTHERN (1944)     The 18 ton 40 foot wooden gas screw Southern was consumed by fire at Hoonah June 12, 1944.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 06 30 N 135 26 30 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 18 Gross 12 Net, Length 40.6, Breadth 12.8, Depth 4.4, Built 1910 at Seattle WA, Service misc., Horsepower 20, Crew 5, Owner George B Williams, Registered Juneau, ON 208219

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1945) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 778, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1944) Pg 303

 

SOUTHERN EXPLORER (1968)     The diesel screw Southern Exposure was consumed by fire July 5, 1968 in the Gulf of Alaska 190 miles east of Cape Chiniak on Kodiak Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 37 N 152 10 W   Chart 16580

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SOUTHERN EXPLORER (1974)     The 87 foot vessel Southern Explorer sank near Sand Point.  All crewmen were safe.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 20 15 N 160 30 W   Chart 16553

                Source: Unofficial Wreck List

 

SOUTHERN VIKING (1987)     The fish tender Southern Viking struck a rock near Sutwik Island and sank June 11, 1987.  All four crewmembers abandoned ship to a life raft in their survival suits.  They were later picked up by a passing fish processor.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 20 N 153 22 W   Chart 16013

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SOUTHLAND (1972)     The oil screw Southland stranded and was lost September 5, 1972 in Berners Bay near Point Bridget.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 40 45 N 134 59 20 W   Chart 17300

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SOUVENIR (1939)     The 19 ton 39 foot oil screw fishing vessel Souvenir foundered in Dixon Entrance at 1:30 p.m. May 23, 1939.  There were two persons aboard travelling from Ketchikan to Hecate Strait.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by Carl Holm, master of the Souvenir:

                “About 30-35 miles S S E from Duke Island in Dixon Entrance”  “S E wind 30-35 miles, moderate fair, sea choppy”  “Believe plank sprung and caulking fell out”  “Foundered”  “Tried pumps, but water filled up in about ten minutes”  “Picked up by Ol. S. Mary Ellen and brought to Ketchikan, Alaska 11:10 p.m. May 23, 1939”  “The Ol.s. Mary Ellen, Ol.s. Tillie M and Ol.s. Sunrise attempted to get line about the vessel but could not do so”

                The Souvenir had a value of $7,500 and was a total loss. There was no cargo on board.  The vessel was insured for $3,100.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 55 N 131 20 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: Tonnage 19 Gross 13 Net, Length 39.7, Breadth 11.5, Depth 6.5, Built 1937 at Bremerton WA, HP 45, Registered Seattle, ON 236538, Master Chris Holm of Seattle, Owner Alfred Chray of Bremerton WA

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty May 24, 1939 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1939) Pg 280

SPARKY (1961)     The 7 ton 28 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sparky stranded and was lost November 16, 1961 on Copper River Flats.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 20 N 145 35 W   Chart 16013

                Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 6 Net, Length 28.7, Breadth 9.7, Depth 4.2, Built 1921 at Cordova, Horsepower 90, SL WF4370, Registered Juneau, ON 266272

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) Pg 545, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 905

 

SPARROWCASTLE (2002)     The 58 foot seiner Sparrowcastle flooded and sank September 24, 2002 approximately two miles south of Akutan Island.  The sole occupant of the vessel activated the EPIRB and abandoned ship to a Liferaft when the vessel began sinking.  She sank in 20 minutes.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   54 07 N 165 55 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: ON 288646

                Source: U S C G Enforcement Report (September 24, 2002)

 

SPENCER (1947)     The 61 ton 64 foot wooden oil screw Spencer foundered December 31, 1947 at Kanatak.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 34 05 N 156 02 15 W   Chart 16013

                Additional Information: Tonnage 61 Gross 48 Net, Length 64.5, Breadth 16, Depth 7.1, Built 1913 at Seattle WA, Service freight, Crew 6, Horsepower 75, SL WNJN, Owner William McKinley Jones, Registered Seattle WA, ON 210996

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1948) Pg 492, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1949) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 911

 

SPENCER II (1989)     The 48 foot longline fishing vessel Spencer II grounded and sank March 5, 1989 in Port Houghton, Stephens Passage.  All crewmembers made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 19 N 133 30 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: ON 241640

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SPENCER F BAIRD (1890)     The 7.91 ton 32 foot wooden schooner Spencer F Baird stranded and was lost near Sankin Island at 10:30 p.m. Sunday August 17, 1890.  The vessel departed Pauloff Harbor, Sanak Island that day bound for Tigalda Island with her master and one seaman aboard.  They were carrying 2 ½ tons of provisions and mining tools.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “Moderate gale, rough, dark”  “2 ½ miles east of Sankin Island”  “Stranding”  “Making a harbor in thick weather”  “Out of reckoning, mistook a low place between two bluffs for entrance to harbor”  “Total loss”

                The Spencer F Baird was worth $700 and her cargo $350.  Both were total losses with no insurance.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 58 30 N 163 16 20 W   Chart 16535

                Additional Information: Tonnage 7.91 Gross 7.53 Net, Length 31.8, Breadth 10, Depth 4.4, Built 1885 at Port Ludlow WA, Registered San Francisco, ON 116043, Master Harry Martin of San Francisco, Owner The McCollam Fishing and Trading Company of San Francisco

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report November 17, 1890 at San Francisco by George Tasheira, Manager, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1888) Pg 236

SPIDER (1923)     The 7 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw Spider stranded on Caroline Island at 2 a.m. Thursday October 18, 1923.  The vessel was fishing out of Golovin Bay with two persons on board at the time of the disaster.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Strong S W gale, stormy weather, dark, 2 a.m.”  “No one on board”  “Caroline Island in Golovin Bay, Alaska”  “Strong S W gale and anchor lines parted”  “Stranding”  “A severe storm came up during the night and the following morning the vessel was found on the beach in a very bad condition caused from the sea beating against her.  Also she was resting on the rocks which wore holes in her bottom”

                The Spider had a value of $1,000 and was damaged $400.  There was no cargo, no insurance and no loss of life.  Evidence of this wreck may still be on site and of interest.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 27 N 162 53 W   Chart 16006

                Comment: Probably Carolyn Island.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 5 Net, Length 30.6, Breadth 10.8, Depth 2.8, Built 1912 at Iglutalik, Registered Nome, ON 210580, Master and owner John Olson of Haycock

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty. 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1923) Pg 279

SPIRIT (1979)     The 50 foot fishing vessel Spirit capsized and sank June 12, 1979 approximately 6 miles north of the Barren Islands.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 57 N 152 15 W   Charts 16013 and 16580

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Wreck List (2011)

 

SPIRIT (1983)     The crab fishing vessel Spirit was found submerged at Pleasant Island near Gustavus December 3, 1983.  Two people were lost in the disaster.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 21 N 135 38 W   Chart 17300

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SPIRIT (1994)     The 54 foot halibut long line fishing vessel Spirit flooded and sank in a storm September 14, 1994 near Perl Island.  The five crewmembers were rescued from a life raft by the U S Coast Guard Cutter Roanoke.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 07 N 151 40 W   Chart 16640

                Additional Information: ON 265105

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Alaska), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SPIRIT OF KWANTLEN (2000)     The 35 foot sailboat Spirit of Kwantlen went adrift in foul weather, flooded and sank July 21, 2000 approximately 60 miles west of Sitka.  The vessel was on a trip from Sitka to Victoria, BC when she encountered a storm which damaged her sails and subsequently experienced engine problems.  All three persons on board were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 135 20 W   Chart 17320

                Sources: 1. U S C G News Release (July 22, 2000) “Coast Guard rescues Anchorage trio from sinking sailboat”, 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SPOKANE (1917)     The steamer Spokane became a total loss at Farallon Bay, N E Dall Island in 1917.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 11 40 N 133 04 45 W   Chart 17400

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SPRAT (1930)     The 27 ton 53 foot wooden scow Sprat foundered off of Point Hugh at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday March 18, 1930.  The vessel was in tow and had left Juneau that day bound for Wrangell.  There was no one aboard the scow and no cargo.  The following is an accounting of the loss by Earl Theile, master:

                “Strong northerly wind, heavy sea, daylight”  “Seven miles south of Point Hugh, Alaska”  “Seam opened up”  “Foundered”  “The tow line broke three times and nothing could be done.”  “Crew of the Oil Screw Margaret (assisted)”

                The Sprat had a value of $1,000 and was a total loss.  There was no insurance on the vessel.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 34 10 N 133 48 30 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 27, Length 52.8, Breadth 16.1, Depth 4.1, Built 1907 at Bellingham WA, Registered Port Townsend and Juneau, ON 163095, Master Earl Theile of Juneau, Owner Diamond Packing Co of Juneau

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty April 23, 1930 at Wrangell, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1929) Pgs 744-5

SPRAY (1929)     Fire destroyed the 13 ton 50 foot wooden gas screw Spray at 4 p.m. Friday October 25, 1929.  The vessel departed Ketchikan that day bound for Helm Bay with two persons aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report submitted by E B Simmons, master of the Spray:

                “S E wind, choppy sea, light rain”  “In Behm Canal, Alaska, abreast Tatoosh Point”  “Fire”  “Backfire through carburetor”  “Carburetor clogged up and stopped the engine.  When the engineer made preparations to start the engine again engine backfired throwing out a flame which ignited the entire engine room.  Used 3 extinguishers in attempt to put out fire.  Failing in this crew took to life boat and was picked up by T587 and brought to Ketchikan.”

                The Spray was valued at $3,000 and was a total loss.  There was no cargo aboard.  The crew made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 31 50 N 131 49 30 W   Chart 17422

                Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 9 Net, Length 50, Breadth 9.7, Depth 3.6, HP 28, Built 1904 at Sulzer AK, Service towing, Master E B Simmons of Ketchikan, Owner Amelia Hamilton of Ketchikan, Insurance unknown

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty October 26, 1929 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) Pgs 506-7

SPRAY (1963)     The 7 ton 33 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Spray was lost to unknown causes during September of 1963 at False Pass.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 51 15 N 163 24 30 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 5 Net, Length 33.1, Breadth 9.4, Depth 2.8, Built 1943 at New Orleans LA, Former Name LCVP-C-31962 (U S N), Horsepower 95, SL WL6480, Owner P E Harris Company, Registered Seattle WA, ON 275624

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 662, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1175

 

SPRAY (1964)     The 8 ton 31 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Spray was consumed by fire September 30, 1964 at Juneau.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 18 15 N 134 24 30 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 7 Net, Length 31.2, Breadth 8.8, Depth 3.1, Built 1918 at Juneau, Horsepower 110, Owner Knute Langseth, Registered Juneau, ON 260083

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 639, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

SPRING (1981)     The 42 foot troller Spring flooded and sank September 14, 1981 two miles off of Ratz Harbor off of the northeast coast of Prince of Wales Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 53 15 N 132 35 45 W   Chart 17360

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SPRUCE (1972)     The motor vessel Spruce was lost in heavy weather April 7, 1972 at Point Manby west of Yakutat.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 41 30 N 140 18 15 W   Chart 16016

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SPRUCE CAPE (1964)     The 17 ton 37 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Spruce Cape was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 on Kodiak Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 11 Net, Length 37.8, Breadth 12.1, Depth 5, Built 1949 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 165, SL WC2775, Owner Kadiak Fisheries Company, Registered Ketchikan, ON 257574

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 639, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

SPUTNIK (1998)     The 32 foot longline halibut fishing vessel Sputnik was consumed by an engine room fire September 25, 1998 near Shuyak Island.  All three crewmembers made it to safety,

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 31 N 152 30 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: ON 910054

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SPY (1890)     The 17 ton 41 foot wooden sloop Spy was crushed in the ice and lost at Point Barrow at 4 p.m. Tuesday November 25, 1890.  The crew of 4 was putting the vessel in winter quarters when the disaster occurred.  The Spy was in ballast with no cargo.  Conditions at the time were said to be dark with a moderate northeast gale.  The crew could do nothing for her and the vessel went to pieces.  The Spy was valued at $3,000 and was a total loss with no insurance.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   71 23 29 N 156 28 30 W   Chart 16003

                Additional Information: Tonnage 17.96 Gross 17.06 Net, Length 41, Breadth 14.4, Depth 5.3, Built 1886 at Randolph OR, Registered San Francisco, ON 116099, Master John Haverside of San Francisco, Owner C Goodall of San Francisco, Last Port San Francisco

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report November 13, 1891 at San Francisco by J N Knowles, Managing Owner

Lands End Resort on the Homer Spit 1975

Lands End Resort on the Homer Spit 1975

STAG (1971)     The crab fishing vessel Stag sank in rough weather August 7, 1971 off of Lands End on the Homer Spit.  All three crewmembers were picked up by a nearby pleasure craft.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 37 N 151 27 W   Chart 16640

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

STANDARD (1917)     The 1,534 ton 212 foot wooden ship Standard stranded and was lost at 8:30 a.m. Monday May 14, 1917 at Cape Constantine.  The vessel departed San Francisco April 9, 1917 bound for the Libby McNeil & Libby Ekuk Cannery in Bristol Bay.  There were 162 passengers and 15 crewmen aboard.  The Standard was also carrying 2,707,349 pounds of cannery supplies valued at $88,880.00.  The cause of the casualty is listed as “heavy storm”.  Passengers and crew of the vessel were rescued by the steamers George F Haller and North Star.  The Standard had a value of $20,000 and was a total loss along with her cargo.  There was no insurance on the vessel but the cargo was fully insured.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 23 39 N 158 53 30 W   Charts 16006, 16322

                Comment: Possibly hit the Sterling Shoal off Cape Constantine, named for the 208 foot wooden ship Sterling lost there in 1898.  On this same day, May 14, 1917, the 231 wooden ship Saint Francis was lost at Unimak Island.  She was also carrying workers and supplies for the Libby McNeil & Libby Locanock Cannery at Kvichak in Bristol Bay. WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 1,534 Gross 1,461 Net, Length 212, Breadth 40.2, 24.5, Built 1878 at Phippsburg ME, Registered San Francisco, ON 115634, SL JTFB, Master Captain S Christiansen of San Francisco, Owner Libby McNeil & Libby of San Francisco

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty June 27, 1917 by D W Brauch, Agent, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Pg 69

STANDARD (1923)     The 15 ton 46 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Standard foundered off Point Vallenor at 9:00 p.m. Friday July 6, 1923.  The vessel departed Union Bay that day after having made repairs to her hull, caused from a collision on the 4th of July.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Light breeze, clear daylight, slight swell”  “Midway between Guard Island and Vallenar Point”  “Foundering”  “Vessel sank so quickly that cause could not be determined, but perhaps as result of collision on July 3, 1923”  “At 1:00 a.m. July 4th this vessel was in collision with the Am. Ga. S. Asike off Point Baker in Sumner Straits making a hole in the Standard from the gunnel to about two feet below the waterline.  She was then beached and a temporary patch put on after which she was towed to Union Bay, and from thence attempted to tow her to Ketchikan for permanent repairs with the foregoing result”  “Ga. S. Mabel Robb tried to tow vessel ashore”  “Total loss”

                The Standard had a value of $4,000 with no cargo on board.  She was a total loss but was fully insured.  There was only one person aboard at the time of the disaster.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 25 35 N 131 51 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 15 Gross 10, Net, Length 45.8,Breadth 11.8, Depth 4, Built 1911 at Ketchikan, IHP 30, Registered Ketchikan, ON 208487, Master Ben Rodel of Union Bay, Owner A & P Products Corporation of Seattle

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty July 7, 1923 by W B Caldwell, Agent, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1923) Pg 280

STANDARD #1 (1920)     The 15 ton scow Standard #1 stranded and was lost in Norton Sound at 6:00 p.m. Tuesday July 6, 1920.  There was no one aboard the scow when the disaster took place.  The Standard #1 had departed Golovin July 3rd bound for Egavik.  The following are statements from the casualty report:

                “Westerly storm blowing about 20 miles an hour, strong wind, heavy sea, daylight”  “One half mile south of Egavik River, Norton Sound, Alaska”  “Stranding”  “The vessel was anchored about 200 feet from shore awaiting the arrival of the St. S. Ketchikan to discharge cargo.  A sudden storm came up, cast the vessel on shore, and before she could be hauled out, was broken up”

                The Standard #1 had a value of $500 and was a total loss with no insurance.  There was no cargo aboard at the time of the casualty.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 02 N 160 55 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 15 Gross and Net, Built 1918 at Nome, Registered Nome, ON 167340, Master Hans C Larsen, Owner Lomen & Co of Nome

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty July 14, 1920 by Carl J Lomen, Managing Owner, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1919) Pg 417

STANDARD NO 1 (1964)     The 226 ton 90 foot wooden barge Standard No 1 was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Copper River Flats near Cordova.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 25 N 145 W Chart 16013

                Additional Information: Tonnage 226 Gross and Net, Length 90, Breadth 34, Depth 8.7, Built 1914 at Seattle WA, SL WB5310, Owner Copper River Co-op Inc., Registered Juneau, ON 166579

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 640, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

STANLEY (1910)     The 355 ton 143 foot wooden schooner Stanley stranded and was lost on Sanak Island March 28, 1910.  Four of her crew of eight perished in the disaster.  The vessel departed San Francisco October 17, 1909 bound for Pauloff (Pavlof), Sanak, Alaska, via Pirate Cove.  She was carrying 150 tons of salt, lumber and provisions.  The Stanley stranded at the entrance to Pavlof Harbor on Sanak Island during a gale and became a total loss along with her cargo.  The four crewmen lost were Captain B Koehler, mate F Bauers, second mate P Williams and cook P W Herman.  The Stanley had a value of $15,000 and her cargo $1,000.  The vessel was insured for $12,500 and there was no insurance on the cargo.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 27 40 N 162 41 30 W   Chart 16547

                Additional Information: Tonnage 355 Gross 253 Net, Length 143.3, Breadth 32.2, Depth 10.7, Built 1900 at Fairhaven CA, SL KPRQ, Registered San Francisco, ON 116497, Master B Koehler of Alameda CA, Owner Union Fish Co of San Francisco

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report May 2, 1910 at San Francisco by C P Overton, VP and Mgr. for Union Fish Company

STANLEY (1938)     The 22 ton 40 foot oil screw fishing vessel Stanley foundered in Chatham Strait at 6:00 p.m. Sunday July 3, 1938.  Bert A Vig, master and owner of the Stanley, was the only one aboard at the time.  He had departed Port Alexander that day bound for Snipe Bay with no cargo.  There was no wind and seas were calm.  The Stanley foundered between Poorman’s Point and Wood (Wooden) Island in Chatham Strait.  The cause of the sinking was not known.  The oil screw Mars came to the assistance of the Stanley.  The Stanley, valued at $6,000, was a total loss with no insurance.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 09 40 N 134 39 30 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: Tonnage 22 Gross 15 Net, Length 40, Breadth 12.5, Depth 4.4, Built 1913 at Seattle, IHP 100, Registered Ketchikan, ON 211351

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty July 6, 1938 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1938) Pg 283

STANWOOD (1954)     The 78 ton 58 foot wooden oil screw Stanwood stranded and was lost August 7, 1954 after striking a log near Petersburg.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 48 10 N 132 58 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 78 Gross 68 Net, Length 58.8, Breadth 22.8, Depth 6.7, Built 1928 at Tacoma WA, Former Name City of Everett, Service freight, Crew 4, Horsepower 90, Owner Dean C Kayler, Registered Seattle WA, ON 227884

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 538, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 740

 

STAR (1918)     The 9 ton 34 foot gas screw fishing vessel Star stranded and was lost at Berners Bay in November of 1918.  The vessel had come to Berners Bay from Juneau and was at anchor with neither of her two crewmen aboard when the disaster occurred.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Berners Bay, S E Alaska”  “Stranding”  “Storm arose, smashed vessel on beach, master and crew absent at time”  “Total loss”

                The Star had a value of $2,000 and no cargo.  There was also no insurance on the vessel.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 43 N 135 W   Chart 17300

                Comment: Some reports put 20 persons aboard at the time of the disaster which is unlikely.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 5 Net, Length 34.3, Breadth 10.9, Depth 4.4, IHP 17, Built 1915 at Juneau, Registered Juneau, ON 213086, Master Henry Anderson of Juneau, Owners Henry and James Anderson of Juneau

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty at Juneau, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1918) Pg 316

 

STAR 2 (1951)     The 9 ton 33 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Star 2 foundered September 9, 1951 in Spoon River, Yakutat Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 40 N 140 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 33.5, Breadth 10.5, Depth 4.5, Built 1944 at New Orleans LA, Former Name LCVP-C-39773 (U S N), Horsepower 165, Owner Libby McNeill & Libby, Registered Ketchikan, ON 254046

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1951) Pg 533, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 958

STAR 2 (1962)     The 7 ton 28 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Star 2 burned May 28, 1962 at Larsen Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 32 20 N 153 58 45 W   Charts 16013, 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 5 Net, Length 28.4, Breadth 10.1, Depth 3.6, Built 1951 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 95, Owner Stanley E Lee, Registered Seattle, ON 261927

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) Pg 598, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 932

 

STAR NO 70 (1973)     The 39 ton 61 foot wooden gas screw Star No 70 foundered May 24, 1973 at the South Arm of Chomley Sound, Prince of Wales Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   Chart 17420

                Comment: Chomley Sound now called Cholmondeley Sound.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 39 Gross and Net, Length 61.4, Breadth 17.9, Depth 4.3, Built 1929 at Bellingham WA, ON 170276

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 664, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1974) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1637

 

STAR NO 71 (1942)     The 39 ton 61 foot wooden scow Star No 71 foundered in Alaskan Waters September 15, 1942.

                Mapping and Location: Alaska Unknown

                Additional Information: Tonnage 39 Gross and Net, Length 61.4, Breadth17.9, Depth 4.2, Built 1929 at Bellingham WA, Owner Pacific American Fisheries, Registered Bellingham WA, ON 170280

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1945) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 778, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1944) Pg 435

 

STAR NO 74 (1965)     The 39 ton 61 foot wooden barge Star No 74 was destroyed by a storm during October 0f 1965 at Old Sitka (Mikhailovsk).

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 07 50 N 135 22 20 W   Chart 17320

                Comment: Old Sitka was located 5.5 miles north of the current Sitka, in Starrigavan Bay.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 39 Gross and Net, Length 61.4, Breadth 17.9, Depth 4.2, Built 1929 at Bellingham WA, Owner Henry May Jr., Registered Sitka, ON 170386

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 664, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1175

 

STAR OF BENGAL (1908)     The 1,877 ton 263 foot bark Star of Bengal stranded and was lost at 9:32 a.m. Sunday September 20, 1908.  Aboard the vessel at the time were 117 passengers, including 110 Chinese cannery workers, and 20 officers and crew.  Of the 137 persons on board, 112 perished in the disaster.  The Star of Bengal departed Wrangel September 19, 1908 bound for San Francisco.  She was carrying a cargo of eighteen hundred tons of canned salmon and machinery valued at $216,000.  The following are excerpt from the wreck report submitted by N Wagner, master of the Star of Bengal:

                “1/2 mile north of Helm Pt. Coronation Island, Alaska”  “Stranding”  “Cut loose by tugs and anchor failing to hold”  “Strong breeze from SE, rough sea and dark”  “Tried to get ship on starboard tack and make sail, but tugs could not handle her.  Both anchors let go.”  “Finding that vessel was getting dangerously close to the lee shore, I endeavored to get ship on starboard tack to make use of topsails to work the ship offshore by signaling the tugs to starboard their help, but the signal was not heard on either vessel”  “Steamers Hattie Gage and Kyak (assisted)”  “Total Loss”

                The Star of Bengal was worth $70,000 and became a total loss along with her cargo.  There was no insurance on the vessel.  With the 112 who were lost, this is one of the top 5 marine disasters in Alaska History.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 49 30 N 134 17 W   Chart 17400

                Additional Information: Tonnage 1,877 Gross 1,694 Net, Length 262.8, Breadth 40.2, Depth 23.5, Built 1873 at Belfast Ireland, SL KQCM, Registered San Francisco, ON 116974, Master N Wagner of Berkeley CA, Owner Alaska Packers Association of San Francisco

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report September 24, 1908 at Wrangel, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1908) Pg 128

STAR OF FALKLAND (1928)     The 2,330 ton 277 foot steel ship Star of Falkland stranded in the fog and was lost at Akun Head, Unimak Pass at 2:00 a.m. Wednesday May 23, 1928.  The vessel departed San Francisco April 25, 1928 bound for Naknek, Alaska.  There were 288 cannery workers and 48 officers and crew aboard the ship.  She was carrying a cargo of 1,776 tons of merchandise, livestock and coal valued at $60,000.  All those aboard were rescued, but the Star of Falkland, valued at $40,000, was a complete loss along with her cargo.  There was no insurance on the vessel, but the cargo was insured for $55,000.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   54 17 35 N 165 37 35 W   Chart 16520

                Additional Information: Tonnage 2,330.13 Gross 1,866 Net, Length 276.8, Breadth 42, Depth 24, Built 1892 at Port Glasgow Scotland, SL LHJC, Master John Widerstrom of San Francisco, Owner Alaska Packers Association of San Francisco

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty at San Francisco, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1927) Pgs 588-9

STAR OF RUSSIA (1905)     The 1,981 ton 275 foot iron ship Star of Russia stranded in the fog on a sand beach on the northwestern end of Chirikof Island in August of 1905.  There were 280 passengers and 19 crewmen aboard.  The Star of Russia also had a cargo of 28,514 cases of canned salmon on board.  The vessel was floated after eight days and towed to Alitak Cannery.  There the passengers and cargo were removed, and the vessel sent on to San Francisco for repairs on August 26, 1905.  Damage to the vessel was $20,000 and her cargo $36,000.  Evidence of the wreck may still be on site and of interest.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 50 N 155 37 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 1,981 Gross 1,898 Net, Length 275.5, Breadth 42.2, Depth 24.2, Built 1874 at Belfast Ireland, SL KQCR, Registered San Francisco, ON 116977, Master Captain K Lindberg, Owner Alaska Packers Association

                Sources: 1. Salmon from Kodiak (1986) Pg 210, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1905) Pg 159

STAR TREK (2007)     The 35 foot cod fishing vessel Star Trek stranded and was lost March 7, 2007 in Island Bay off of Jute Bay on the Alaska Peninsula opposite Kodiak Island.  The crew managed to make it to the beach where they were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.  The vessel and her crew were out of Homer.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 33 20 N 155 50 W   Chart 16570

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. Kodiak Daily Mirror (March 7, 2007) USCG rescues 3 fishermen on Jute Bay”

 

STARLIGHT (1956)     The 14 ton 39 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Starlight stranded and was lost October 23, 1956 on the west side of Golf Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 47 30 N 135 23 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 11 Net, Length 39.2, Breadth 10.9, Depth 4.3, Built 1927 at Sitka, Horsepower 140, SL WE8433, Owner Charles Littlefield, Registered Sitka, ON 227018

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 185, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Subject to Removal” Pg 582

 

STARLING (1964)     The 20 ton 38 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Starling was consumed by fire January 25, 1964 at Alitak.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 56 40 N 154 10 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 20 Gross 14 Net, Length 38.2, Breadth 13.1, Depth 5.1, Built 1947 at Everett WA, Horsepower 165, SL WC2487, Owner Pacific American Fisheries Inc., Registered Bellingham WA, ON 252225

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 642, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

STARLING (1991)     The fishing vessel Starling sank from deteriorating wood while tied to a barge April 4, 1991 in Gastineau Channel.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 16 N 134 20 W   Chart 17300

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

STARLITE (1996)     The 35 foot fiberglass salmon gillnetter Starlite was destroyed by a stack fire and sank June 20, 1996 in Prince William Sound near Hinchinbrook Entrance.  The only person aboard made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 20 N 146 50 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: ON 535184

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

STARWOOD (1980)     The 31 foot fishing vessel Starwood swamped and sank May 3, 1980 one mile west of buoy #4 near Kodiak.  The vessel was loaded with three tons of herring.  The crew was rescued by the vessel Miss Stormy.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16595

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

STATE OF CALIFORNIA (1913)     The 2,266 ton 300 foot iron passenger steamer State of California foundered in Gambier Bay at 8:30 a.m. Sunday August 17, 1913.  The vessel was on her way out of Gambier Bay at 8:02 a.m. bound for San Francisco.  There were 74 passengers and 76 officers and crewmen aboard the State of California.  She was carrying a cargo of about 500 tons of general merchandise.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “Gambier Bay, Alaska”  “Foundered”  “Struck uncharted rock”  “Calm, smooth sea, daylight”  “Ship backed full speed, then went ahead full speed, to try and beach her before sinking”  “Launches from Gambier Bay and S S Jefferson (assisted)”  “Total Loss”

                32 of the 150 persons aboard perished in the disaster.  The State of California had a value of $200,000 which was a total loss along with her cargo.  The vessel was insured for $181,000.  Included in those lost were Mrs. Nellie B Ward, her 14 year old daughter Lila Ward, Miss Anne L Cassidy, Miss May Dixon, Mrs. Clara Vanderlass, Mrs. A Biernbaum, Mrs. H C Riordan (84), Miss Estella Riordan, Miss Alice Johnson, Lilian B Norman, Mrs. C E Spithill and child, Ben A Wade, Miss Wilson, Nick Pittulas, Frank Fuller, James Gustaveson, Ernest J Reid, Leslie Hobro, J Holman, August Vresh, W A Dyer, Miss Blanche Fridd and Miss Minette E  Harlan.  The purser’s records went down with the ship making identification of those lost very difficult.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 28 N 133 55 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 2,266 Gross 1,260 Net, Length 300, Breadth 38.6, Depth 24.4, Built 1879 at Philadelphia PA, IHP 1,800, SL JTGP, Registered San Francisco, ON 115645, Master T H Cann Jr of Seattle, Owner Pacific Coast Steamship Company of San Francisco

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report at San Francisco, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1913) Pg 299, 3. Daily Alaska Dispatch (August 18, 1913) “P C Co Liner Total Loss at Gambier Bay” Front Page, 4. Morning Oregonian (August 21, 1913) “Survivors Now Nearing Seattle” Pg 12, 5. Trenton Evening Times (August 19, 1913) “32 Go Down With Ship in Icy Water” Pg 9

 

STEADFAST (1989)     The tanker tug Steadfast capsized and sank while towing an empty 110 foot barge September 23, 1989 off the southwest end of Kayak Island.  The Steadfast had been employed in the Exxon Valdez cleanup effort and departed Valdez as the cleanup effort was winding down for the season. The vessel sent a radio message that they were taking on water and preparing to abandon ship.  When search crews arrived all that was found was a torn life raft and one survival suit between Hinchinbrook Island and Kayak Island.  Three crewmembers were lost in the disaster including  Don Berven (56) of Terminal Island, California, Harry Bellard (40) of Lake Charles, Louisiana and Kevin Thomas of Petersburg.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 56 N 144 23 W   Chart 16013

                Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. The Times (September 26, 1989) “Barge, tug go down” Pg B 1, 3. Baton Rouge LA State Times (September 26, 1989) “Searchers Find Torn Raft Believed to be from Tug Missing With 3 Aboard” Pg 4A

 

STEELHEAD (1964)     The 12 ton 36 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Steelhead was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Valdez.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   61 07 N 146 16 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 8 Net, Length 36, Breadth 10.9, Depth 3.9, Built 1943, Former Names FWS Steelhead (F&W L) and FWS 1453 (F & W L), Horsepower 175, SL WK5722, Owner Folger M Johnson, Registered Juneau, ON 277120

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 643, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

STELLA (1967)     The 9 ton 31 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Stella burned November 6, 1967 at Carroll Inlet.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 17 N 131 30 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 31.1, Breadth 11.2, Depth 3.5, Built 1943 at Aberdeen WA, Former Name MT-321 (U S A), Horsepower 115, SL WB3315, Registered Ketchikan, ON 250148

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 666, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1176

 

STELLA (2006)     The 58 foot seiner Stella stranded and was lost July 7, 2006 on Gull Island northwest of Juneau.  The crew of three was rescued from their life raft by the Alaska Marine Highway Ferry Taku.  The operator of the vessel was sleeping at the wheel when the vessel ran aground.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 30 10 N 134 52 W   Chart 17300

                Comment: This vessel was subsequently patched and refloated.  WG

                Source: U S C G News Release (July 8, 2006) “Coast Guard, ferry Taku assist crew of fishing vessel”

 

STERLING (1898)     The 1,731 ton 208 foot wooden ship Sterling stranded and was lost near Cape Constantine at 6 a.m. Friday May 20, 1898.  The vessel departed San Francisco April 27, 1898 on her way to Bristol Bay.  There were 150 Chinese cannery workers and 25 officers and crewmen aboard.  She was also carrying a $50,517 cargo of cannery supplies.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by C O Anderson, master of the Sterling:

                “SW by S from Cape Constantine, Alaska. Distance 10 miles”  “Struck a shoal not marked on chart”  “Stranded”  “Gentle breeze, clear weather, rough sea, daylight”

                The Sterling had a value of $25,400 and was a total loss along with her cargo.  All passengers and crew made it to safety.  The vessel had no insurance but her cargo was fully insured.  The shoal where the wooden ship Sterling was lost now bears her name.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 18 N 158 53 W   Chart 16322

                Additional Information: Tonnage 1,731.62 Gross 1,636.4 Net, Length 208.4, Breadth 42.7, Depth 17.8, Built 1873 at Bath ME, SL JMCB, Registered San Francisco. ON 115155, Master C O Anderson of San Francisco, Owner Alaska Packers Association of San Francisco

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report June 20, 1898 at San Francisco

STIKINE CHIEF (1898)     The British stern wheel steamer Stikine Chief was lost off of Yakutat August 1, 1898.  The vessel was in tow of the steam ship Fastnet, as was the British steamer Mono.  Both vessels broke free and were lost.  The Mono was lost in Clarence Strait and the Stikine Chief in the Gulf of Alaska.  The master of the Mono, in a letter to the Collector of Customs in British Columbia after she was wrecked, attributed some of the loss to the substandard tow lines used by the Fastnet.  Whatever the case, both vessel broke free and were lost. The wreckage of the Stikine Chief was found August 5, 1898 by the Dora.  The Stikine Chief encountered rough weather travelling between Cross Point and Kodiak and went to pieces off of Yakutat.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 40 N 140 W Chart 16016

                Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 41, 2. U S Customs Wreck Report at Port Wrangel and attached letter July 25, 1898 from the master of the Mono

STORK (1945)     The 17 ton 44 foot wooden oil screw Stork foundered off Sanak Island May 27, 1945.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 25 N 162 40 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 12 Net, Length 44.6, Breadth 13.2, Depth 5, Built 1911 at Port Blakely WA, Service tow, Horsepower 55 (Brake), Owner Gunder K Gunderson, Registered Juneau, ON 208564

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1946) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 806, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1945) Pg 325

 

STRANGER (1927)     The 9 ton 42 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Stranger stranded and was lost in a storm at the southern entrance to Rocky Pass at 11:30 a.m. October 26, 1927.  The vessel departed Ketchikan October 25, 1927 bound for Kake.  There were 4 crewmen aboard and no cargo.  The strong gale and misty and heavy seas contributed to the disaster.  The Stranger had a value of $3,000 and was a total loss with no insurance.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 40 N 133 44 W   Charts 17360, 17372

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 42, Breadth 10.5, Depth 3.6, Built 1913 at Craig, IHP 25, Master and owner Allen Miller of Ketchikan

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty November 3, 1927 by Miller at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1927) Pgs 492-3

STRANGER (1963)     The 16 ton 38 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Stranger was destroyed by a storm January 13, 1963 at Shearwater Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 20 N 152 55 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 16 Gross 11 Net, Length 38.3, Breadth 13.3, Depth 4.4, Built 1939 at Cordova, Horsepower 165, SL WC6946, Owner Edwin J Liljegren, Registered Juneau, ON 238993

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 645, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

SU-CE-K (1999)     The 44 foot cement salmon troller Su-Ce-K was consumed by fire and sank in 50 fathoms of water June 30, 1999 near Sitka.  The blaze was electrical and started in the engine room.  It was put out once by the crew but reflashed and engulfed the entire vessel.  Both crewmembers abandoned the Su-Ce-K and were rescued by the fishing vessel Destiny.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 135 20 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: ON 939617

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SUACO (1951)     The 42 ton 56 foot wooden oil screw Suaco stranded and was lost September 27, 1951 on Grass Island Bar in Copper River Flats near Cordova.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 15 N 145 17 W   Chart 16013

                Additional Information: Tonnage 42 Gross 28 Net, Length 56.5, Breadth 15.1, Depth 6.8, Built 1920 at Tacoma WA, Former Name Elliott, Horsepower 75, Owner Otto A Tiedeman, Registered Juneau, ON 220235

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1951) Pg 538, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) “Vessels Subject to Removal” Pg 570

 

SUCCESS (1916)     The 33 foot wooden gas screw halibut fishing vessel Success stranded and was lost March 13, 1916 at West Amatuli Island.  The vessel had departed February 13, 1916 from Seward bound for Cold Bay with four persons aboard.  The four had heard of a gold strike near Cold Bay and were headed there to take advantage of the potential prosperity.  The Success encountered foul weather and icing conditions in the vicinity of the Barren Islands while crossing toward Afognak Island.  Two of the persons aboard, Tom Campbell from Bremerton, Washington and John Larsen from Norway were lost while transiting the shore of West Amatuli Island in a skiff.  The Success stranded and was lost as well.  The two survivors, Charles Hansen, owner of the vessel, and E H Mitchell survived for 58 days.  They eventually made their way in a skiff to Dog Fish Bay and then Seldovia, where they were rescued.  From Seldovia, they were transported to Seward by the steamer Admiral Farragut.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 56 N 152 03 W   Chart 16580

                Comment: I have not found a vessel that matches the description of the Success in the Merchant Vessels of the United States from this period.  WG

                Sources: 1. San Diego Union (May 22, 1916) “Two Men Rescued, Marooned 58 Days on Barren Island” Pg 1, 2. Salt Lake Telegram (February 4, 1917) “Lives Two Months on Barren Island” Pg 11, 3. New Orleans States (September 2, 1917) “An American Robinson Crusoe on an Alaskan Island” Pg 16

 

SUCCESS (1932)     The 14 ton 45 foot wooden gas screw Success stranded and was lost near Labouchere Island at 8:50 p.m. Sunday September 25, 1932.  The vessel left Wrangell September 1, 1932 on her way to Shakan with two persons aboard.  The following are statements from the casualty report filed by George W Smith, master of the Success:

                “Strong southwest wind, heavy ground swell, dense fog and raining or a kind of drizzle”  “Reef ½ mile southeast of Labouchere Island”  “Stranding”  “Went on rocky reef in dense fog”  “No time to take any measures”  “Was running under a slow bell and had lookout on bow of vessel, but he failed to notify the master In time to avoid stranding”  “One week after loss of vessel the U S Coast Guard Tallapoosa made a thorough search of the waters in the vicinity where the vessel was lost but found no trace of her”

                The Success had a value of $4,000 and was a total loss with no insurance.  There was no cargo aboard and no lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 17 35 N 133 40 20 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 11 Net, Length 45.6, Breadth 10.2, Depth 4.5, Built 1906 at Bay Center WA, IHP 20, Registered Wrangell, ON 203574, Master George Smith of Wrangell, Owner J G Smith of Wrangell

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty November 7, 1932 at Wrangell, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1932) Pgs 534-5

SUCCESS (1965)     The 57 ton 62 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Success was consumed by fire October 29, 1965 at Jap Bay on Kodiak Island.  All three crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessel Brisk.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 56 N 153 41 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 57 Gross 39 Net, Length 62.1, Breadth 16.7, Depth 8.3, Built 1928 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 135, SL WB3363, Owner Jefferson Grey, Registered Juneau, ON 227480

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 670, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1176, 3. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SUDDEN (1913)     The motor vessel Sudden was wrecked and became a total loss at Kotzebue August 15, 1913.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   66 54 N 162 35 W   Chart 16005

                Source:  The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 231

SUE (1955)     The 19 ton 36 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Sue stranded and was lost March 8, 1955 in Phoenix Bay inside of Perenosa Bay.

                 Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 25 30 N 152 20 30 W   Chart 16604

                Additional Information: Tonnage 19 Gross 13 Net, Length 36.3, Breadth 12.2, Depth 5.6, Built 1943 at Aberdeen WA, Horsepower 165, SL WB3368, Owner Miram R McAlliser, Registered Juneau, ON 243066

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) Pg 501, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 745

 

SUE (1981)     The 32 foot fishing vessel Sue struck a log and sank December 29, 1981 in Izhut Bay on Afognak Island.  The two persons aboard were rescued by the fishing vessel Amber Dawn.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 11 N 152 15 W   Chart 16580

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SUEMEZ (1933)     The 26 ton 42 foot gas screw fishing vessel Suemez caught fire and became a total loss November 17, 1933 at Waterfall.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 17 50 N 133 14 30 W   Chart 17407

                Additional Information: Tonnage 26 Gross 15 Net, Length 41.7, Breadth 13.6, Depth 6.5, Built 1920 at Tacoma WA, IHP 35, Registered Ketchikan, ON 219970

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1934) “Vessels Lost” Pg 1008, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1933) Pgs 556-7

SUGAR BEAR (1995)     The 71 foot crab fishing vessel Sugar Bear capsized and sank January 27, 1995 in the Bering Sea approximately 50 miles southwest of Saint Paul Island.  All six crewmembers made it into the life raft.  Terje Leite (50) of Kodiak perished and five others were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   57 10 N 170 15 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: ON 587060

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Alaska), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SUKIE (1959)     The 20 ton 40 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Sukie burned September 10, 1959 in Duncan Canal.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 30 N 133 03 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 20 Gross 16 Net, Length 40, Breadth 12, Depth 5, Built 1948 at Wrangell, Horsepower 110, SL WB8797, Owner William L Binkley, Registered Wrangell, ON 256696

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 540, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 826

 

SUMAQU (1998)     The 105 foot fish tender Sumaqu burned and sank April 16, 1998 in Chatham Strait near Tenakee Springs.  A waste oil bucket tipped while changing fuel filters and volatile fuel splashed onto a space heater igniting the blaze.  The fire quickly spread to a paint locker and consumed the vessel.  Both crewmembers were able to escape to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 46 50 N 135 13 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: ON 254677

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SUMMER GALE (1995)     The 44 foot fiberglass salmon seiner Summer Gale stranded and was lost August 10, 1995 on Twoheaded Island near Kodiak.  The five persons on board made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 54 N 153 35 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: ON 654804

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Alaska), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SUMMIT (1962)     The 9 ton 28 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Summit foundered August 4, 1962 at Alitak Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 50 N 154 10 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 7 Net, Length 28.3, Breadth 11.8, Depth 3, Built 1947 at Seldovia, Horsepower 110, SL WC3889, Owner Ronald Rowhev, Registered Juneau, ON 257838

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) Pg 604, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 967

 

SUMNER (1916)     Three crewmen were washed overboard and lost from the 61 foot wooden gas screw halibut schooner Sumner December 3, 1916.  The vessel was about 30 miles off of Cape Ommaney on her way from Sitka to Puffin Bay with a crew of 14 aboard.  Lost were Ovin Johansen, Ira Wood and Ole Haren.  The disaster occurred during the evening of December 3rd with an 80 mile an hour gale blowing with heavy snow and unusually strong tides.  Much fishing gear and other equipment was lost with the three men.

                Mapping and Location:  Southeast Alaska   56 10 N 134 40 20 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: Tonnage 50 Gross 34 Net, Length 61.4, Breadth 18, Depth 7.8, Built 1912 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 65, Owner M J Rolie, Registered Seattle, ON 209542

                Sources: 1. Daily Alaska Dispatch (December 21, 1916) “Three of gas boat Sumner Lost at Sea” Pg 1, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Pg 310

 

SUMNER (1931)     Fire destroyed the 11 ton 46 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sumner at 5:30 p.m. Saturday February 7, 1931.  The vessel departed Ketchikan February 5th bound for Percy Island with one person aboard.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by L A Miller, master of the Sumner and the only one aboard at the time of the disaster:

                “3 miles N NW Pt. Percy S E Alaska”  “Strong easterly breeze, heavy seas, dark”  “Struck unknown submerged object, vessel broke out in flames”  “Was engaged in searching for wrecked plane and body of Pat (Robin) Renahan.  Sailed from Ketchikan Thursday, February 5, 1931, and anchored first night in Canoe Cove on Annette Island.  Next afternoon ran to anchorage behind Davidson Point and stayed all night.  The next afternoon, February 7th, started for Percy Island at about five o’clock and when about one mile off Davidson Pt. I struck some submerged object with great force and to prevent losing wheel, I immediately released clutch, racing engine for a second until I got throttle closed.  I think an intake valve stuck open and that the force of the collision broke gas line, for after a short inspection to determine damage, which revealed the fact that the vessel was making water rapidly, I let in clutch and opened throttle.  Fire broke out immediately and blew me out of the pilot house, whereupon I closed the door and took to the lifeboat.  Vessel burned several hours and then sank in about 100 fathoms of water.”  “Closed pilot house door, took to lifeboat and stood by for 2 hours”  “Vessel burnt and sank”  “Total loss”

                The Sumner had a value of $2,700 and had no cargo.  She had insurance for $1,500.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 56 50 N 131 37 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 8 Net, Length 46.7, Breadth 10, Depth 4.1, Built 1906 at Everett WA, IHP 32, Registered Ketchikan, ON 203476, Master L A Miller of Ketchikan, Owner Dave Bevan of Bellingham WA

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty February 10, 1931 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1930) Pgs 518-9

SUN BEAM (1966)     The 194 ton 89 foot wooden oil screw crab fishing vessel Sun Beam was destroyed by a storm February 25, 1966 in the Gulf of Alaska on her way to the town of Kodiak.  The vessel departed Seattle February 19th and was carrying a load of lumber.  A message was received from the vessel Endeavor on February 26th that the Sun Beam was experiencing difficulties.  No trace of the vessel was found.  Lost with the Sun Beam were Gordon I Nelson (51) owner and skipper of Seattle and Kodiak, Harlan Zehrung (52) engineer of Edmonds, John Moberg (39) cook of Seattle, George S Anderson mate of Kodiak, Mrs. Laurell D Hendrix (44) passenger of Seattle and Sonny Orcas deckhand of Seattle.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Comment: Location of the disaster varies from 130 miles to 25 miles from Kodiak.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 194 Gross 102 Net, Length 89.4, Breadth 26.5, Depth 11.5, Built 1948 at Alameda CA, Former Name ?, Horsepower 600, SL WA9066, Registered Tacoma, ON 254703

                   Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 671, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1176, 3. Seattle Daily Times (March 2, 1966) “Wide Search Ranges for Crab Boat” Pg 24, 4. Seattle Daily Times (March 4, 1966) “Debris on Sea near Kodiak Only Logs” Pg 14

 

SUNBEAM (1940)     The 8 ton 33 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sunbeam foundered October 25, 1940 on the Three Hill Island side of George Island in Cross Sound.  There were two persons aboard, one of whom was lost with the Sunbeam.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 12 N 136 23 45 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross, Length 32.9, Breadth 8.6, Depth 3.8, Built 1906 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 10, Owner Robert Carteti, Registered Sitka, ON 203274

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1942) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 512, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1941) Pg 282

 

SUNBEAM (1963)     The 58 ton 62 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Sunbeam stranded and was lost July 17, 1963 near Point Gardner.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 01 N 134 37 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: Tonnage 58 Gross 34 Net, Length 62.6, Breadth 16.8, Depth 7.8, Built 1927 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 200, SL WB3389, Owner Ronald F Schnell, Registered Seattle, ON 226577

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 648, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

SUNDANCER (1991)     The 58 foot long line fishing vessel Sundancer took a rogue wave, rolled over and sank September 8, 1991 in the Gulf of Alaska 185 miles east of Kodiak.  All five crewmembers were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: ON 592909

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SUNDE (1973)     The crab fishing vessel Sunde stranded and was lost November 3, 1973 in the Shelikof Strait.  The vessel had been fighting 40 foot seas.  All three crewmembers were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.  Surviving to tell the tale were Eugene Holsen of Seattle, Jerry Watson of Kirkland and Joe Hathaway of Tacoma.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 30 N 155 00 W   Chart 16580

                Sources: 1. Seattle Daily Times (November 5, 1973) “3 from here rescued off Alaska” Pg A-14, 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SUNDOWN (1952)     The 270 ton 107 foot wooden oil screw Sundown stranded and was lost August 1, 1952 on Akun Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   54 11 N 165 32 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: Tonnage 270 Gross 184 Net, Length 107.6, Breadth 26.8, Depth 12.5, Built 1943 at Tacoma WA, Former Name FS-30 (U S A), Service freight, Crew 6, Horsepower 640, SL WB 3401, Owner Dan Luketa, Registered Seattle WA, ON 250965

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 546, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 746

 

SUNDOWNER (1985)     The 68 foot fishing vessel Sundowner sank in rough weather October 28, 1985 near the Semidi Islands southwest of Kodiak Island.  Three crewmembers were rescued from a life raft by the U S Coast Guard.  The fourth crewmember, skipper Stuart Klinefelter of Kodiak was lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 10 N 156 47 W   Chart 16013

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SUNNY POINT (1928)     The 26 ton 47 foot gas screw fishing vessel Sunny Point was destroyed by fire at 4:30 p.m. Friday January 13, 1928 near Ward Cove.  The vessel departed Ketchikan that day on her way to Ward Cove with one person aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by W W Noyes, master and owner of the Sunny Point and the only one aboard at the time of the disaster:

                “Peninsula Point, near Ward Cove, Alaska”  “Fire”  “Engine backfired causing explosion”  “TOTAL LOSS”

                The Sunny Point was valued at $5,000 with no cargo aboard.  She was insured for $3,500.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 23 N 131 44 W   Chart 17428

                Additional Information: Tonnage 26 Gross 18 Net, Length 47.2, Breadth 13.9, Depth 5.8, Built 1914 at Tacoma WA, Registered at Ketchikan, ON 211934, Master and owner W W Noyes of Ketchikan

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty January 14, 1928 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1927) Pgs 494-5

SUNMORE (1958)     The 24 ton 40 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Sunmore foundered July 9, 1958 at Lituya Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 36 45 N 137 39 30 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: Tonnage 24 Gross 16 Net, Length 40.2, Breadth 12.8, Depth 7.7, Built 1946 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 165, SL WC2705, Owner Orville F Wagner, Registered Juneau, ON 249826

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 542, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 826

 

SUNRISE (1932)     The 23 ton diesel powered fishing vessel Sunrise is reported lost at Carlisle Island in the Aleutians in 1932.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska 52 53 30 N 170 03 30 W   Chart 16011

                Comment: This wreck has similarities to the wreck of the Eunice in 1932.  WG

                Source: The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 419

SUNRISE (1993)     The 40 foot salmon seiner Sunrise burned to the waterline and sank August 3, 1993 off of Hook Point.  The only person on board made it to safety.  The Sunrise had two crewmembers washed overboard and lost only five miles away in Strawberry Channel May 26, 1993.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 20 N 146 15 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: ON 946134

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

SUNRUNNER (2003)     The 58 foot long line cod fishing vessel Sunrunner sank January 11, 2003 off of Twoheaded Island, 75 miles southwest of Kodiak.  All five crewmembers were rescued with the help of a U S Coast Guard Helicopter and the fishing vessel Heritage.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 54 N 153 35 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: ON 605926

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. U S Coast Guard News Release 009-03 (January 12, 2002) “Five rescued from life raft, boat sinks near Kodiak”

 

SUNSET (1930)     The 35 ton 56 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sunset stranded and was lost in Litnik Bay at 10 p.m. September 1, 1930.  The vessel departed Perenosa Bay on Afognak Island that day and was headed to Uyak Bay with three crewmen and 15 tons of silver salmon worth $750.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Dangerous Rock, Litnik Bay, Afognak Island”  “Stranding”  “Misjudged distance to shore”  “Calm, dark and foggy”  “Stopped and listened for 5 minutes before stranded, then reduced speed to 3 miles pr. hour”  “No chance to refloat vessel as tide was ebbing when tide came in vessel swamped.  Then we secured the services from the gas screw Crescent, who succeeded in getting off about 2000 salmon”

                The Sunset was worth $6,500 and was a total loss.  2/3 of her cargo of fresh salmon was salvaged.  The vessel was fully insured.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 01 30 N 152 44 W   Chart 16594

                Additional Information: Tonnage 35 Gross 24 Net, Length 56.3, Breadth 16, Depth 6.4, Built 1912 at Tacoma WA, Registered Juneau, ON 209948, Master Robert Schulee of Afognak, Owner Ottar Hofstad of Juneau

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty February 9, 1931 at Juneau, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1930) Pgs 520-1

SUNSET (1949)     The 40 ton 58 foot wooden oil screw seiner Sunset capsized and sank in a southeast gale June 10, 1949 at False Pass.  Five crewmembers were lost including captain and owner Nick Mardesich, his son Tony Mardesich, cook Anton Marrowich of Seattle, Frank Suryan of Anacortes, and Vincent Vlastelica of Everett.  Three of the captain’s sons survived including Nick Mardesich Jr., August Paul and Joseph Mardesich, along with their cousin Tony Mardesich.  The four survivors were rescued by the fishing vessel Johnny B.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 51 15 N 163 24 30 W   Chart 16535

                Additional Information: Tonnage 40 Gross 27 Net, Length 58.9, Breadth 15.6, Depth 6.9, Built 1927 at Gig Harbor WA, Former Name Gowan, Crew 8, Horsepower 110, SL WB3434, Owner Nick Mardesich, Registered Seattle, ON 226379

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1950) Pg 533, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1951) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 939

 

SUNSET (1956)     The 7 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sunset was consumed by fire March 24, 1956 at Kodiak.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 5 Net, Length 30.6, Breadth 9.3, Depth 4.1, Built 1955 at Kodiak, Horsepower 87, Owner W C Anderson, Registered Juneau, ON 269921

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 507, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 758

 

SUNTORY (1975)     The oil screw Suntory was consumed by fire April 30, 1975 at Day Harbor.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 57 N 149 10 W   Chart 16580

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SUPREME (1953)     The 7 ton 33 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Supreme foundered May 9, 1953 at the Thomas Basin Float in Ketchikan.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 20 30 N 131 38 45 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 6 Net, Length 33.5, Breadth 9.3, Depth 3.2, Built 1919 at Wrangell, Horsepower 15, Owner Peter Wilson, Registered Ketchikan, ON 218447

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 548, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 750

 

SUSAN ANN (2004)     The 58 foot seiner Susan Ann flooded and sank October 17, 2004 near Catherine Island in Chatham Strait.  Both crewmembers donned survival suits and escaped to a skiff.  Salvage was under consideration.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 22 N 134 53 W   Chart 17320

                Source: U S C G News Release (October 18, 2004) “Coast Guard, others respond to sinking vessel in Chatham Strait”

 

SUSITNA (1915)     The 11 ton 45 foot gas screw Susitna stranded and was lost on the south end of  Kalgin Island in Cook Inlet November 12, 1915.  There were three persons aboard at the time of the disaster.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 28 N 151 55 W   Chart 16660

                Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Length 45.6, Breadth 8.6, Depth 2.4, Service passenger, IHP 12, Built 1908 at Tyonek, Registered Juneau, ON 208923

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 421, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1915) Pg 316, 3. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 258

SUTWIK (1939)     The 15 ton 42 foot gas screw towing vessel Sutwik was destroyed by fire at 10:00 a.m. September 6, 1939 off Sedge Island.  The vessel departed Solomon September 5th bound for Teller with two crewmen aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by Heinie Berger, master and owner of the Sutwik:

                “Off Sledge Island, Bering Sea, Alaska”  “Southwest wind, approx. velocity of 20 mph”  “Backfire of gasoline engine”  “As soon as port engine backfired, vessel took flames throughout, and in order to save our lives, it was imperative that we both jump overboard”  “Total loss”

                The Sutwik had a value of $3,000 and was not carrying cargo.  There was no insurance on the vessel.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 15 Gross 10 Net, Length 41.8, Breadth 11.6, Depth 4.3, Built 1916 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 40, Registered Juneau, ON 207228, Master and Owner Heinie Berger of Kasilof

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty November 21, 1939 at Juneau, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1939) Pg 286

SUZANNA (1975)    (See Suzanne 1975)

 

SUZANNA II (1974)     The oil screw Suzanna II foundered and was lost February 4, 1974 in Kachemak Bay, Cook Inlet.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 35 N 151 52 W   Chart 16013

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SUZANNE (1975)     The 275 ton barge Suzanne stranded and was lost January 14, 1975 at Cape Suckling.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 59 30 N 143 53 W   Chart 16013

                Additional Information: Tonnage 275 Gross and Net, Built 1944, ON 539478

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1976) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1871, 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SUZIE (1965)     The 12 ton 29 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Suzie was consumed by fire August 15, 1965 at Naknek.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 43 40 N 157 00 45 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 10 Net, Length 29.7, Breadth 11, Depth 4.9, Built 1960 at Bainbridge Island WA, Horsepower 165, SL WP2434, Owner Arctic Maid Fisheries, Registered Seattle, ON 281731

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 676, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1176

 

SV ARKHISTRATI MIKHAIL (1801)     The Russian vessel Sv Arkhistrati Mikhail was lost with all hands at Unalaska Island in 1801.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 35 N 166 50 W   Chart 16011

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SV EVPL (1785)     The Russian vessel Sv Evpl was lost in Pankov Harbor on the Bering Sea side of Amlia Island.  The vessel was picking up a hunting crew close to shore when the disaster occurred.  The crew survived and the cargo was salvaged.  They were returned to Okhotsk, Russia on other vessels.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 04 N 173 30 W   Chart 16480

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SV KAPITON (1758)     The small Russian ship Sv Kapiton was driven onto a rocky reef near the Kiska Islands and lost September 6, 1758.  The vessel was travelling out of Bering Island in the Commander Islands of Russia.  The crew made it to shore but 17 men died while on the Island.  The survivors were rescued in 1761 by the Sv Petr I Pavel.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   51 58 30 N 177 34 E   Chart 16012

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SV LEREMIIA (1753)     The Russian vessel Sv Leremiia parted an anchor cable and was driven onto offshore rocks at Adak September 3, 1753.  The Sv Leremiia had departed Kamchatka, Russia bound for the Aleutians.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   51 45 N 176 45 W   Chart 16012

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SV LOANN (1763-4)     The Russian vessel Sv Loann was destroyed by natives the winter of 1764-1764 in Nikolski Bay on Umnak Island.  After removing some cargo and fittings, the natives burned the Sv Loann where she was anchored in the bay.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 57 30 N 168 54 W   Chart 16011

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SV LOANN PRETECHA (1792)     The Russian vessel Sv Loann Pretecha was wrecked at St George Island before 1792.  The cargo was salvaged and there was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   56 35 N 169 35 W   Chart 16011

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SV MIKHAIL (1797)     The Russian vessel Sv Mikhail wrecked and washed ashore on Umnak Island, July of 1797.  The vessel was travelling from Kodiak.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 15 N 168 20 W   Chart 16011

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SV NIKOLAI (1764)      The Russian vessel Sv Nikolai was destroyed by Aleuts in Isanotski Strait between December of 1763 and January of 1764.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 49 30 N 163 23 W   Chart 16535

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SV OLGA (1804)     The small single masted single deck Russian vessel Sv Olga was wrecked and became a total loss at Yakutat in 1804.  Later Baranov had the wreck destroyed with salvos of canon fire to celebrate the conclusion of peace with the natives.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 33 N 139 44 W   Chart 16016

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SV PAVEL (1789)     The Russian vessel Sv Pavel was wrecked near the Pribilof Islands in 1789.  The crew survived and the cargo was salvaged.  The Sv Pavel was travelling from Okhotsk to Kenai Bay.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   57 N 170 W   Chart 16011

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SV PETR (1750)     The Russian lash planked shitik Sv Petr was lost in the Near Islands in 1750.  The crew was rescued.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 55 N 172 28 E   Chart 16012

                Comment: The Near Islands extend 95 miles.  WG

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SV PETR I PAVEL (1762)     The Russian vessel Sv Petr I Pavel wrecked close to shore at Shemya Island In 1762.  Most of the crew survived.  Some of those made their way to Attu in a baidara.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 43 20 N 174 07 E   Chart 16012

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SV ZAKHARII I ELIZAVETA (1763)     The Russian vessel Sv Zakharii I Elizaveta was burned by the Aleuts at Iliuliuk in December of 1763.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 52 48 N 166 32 40 W   Chart 16528

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

SVEA (1941)     The 8 ton 29 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Svea stranded and was lost on the easterly shore of McLean Arm January 25, 1941.  The two persons aboard made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 47 45 N 131 57 15 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 7 Net, Length 29.5, Breadth 9.5, Depth 4.1, Built 1918 at Port Madison WA, Horsepower 12, Owner Fritz Erickson, Registered Ketchikan, ON 216319

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1942) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 512, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1941) Pg 284

 

SWALLOW (1913)     The 9 ton 40 foot gas stern wheel steamer Swallow foundered at Nome October 6, 1913.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 5 Net, Length 40, Breadth 10.5, Depth 2.4, Built 1910 at Nome, Service freight, Registered Nome, ON 207831

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1914) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 430, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1913) Pg 302

SWALLOW (1924)     The 10 ton 32 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Swallow stranded and was lost in Nichols Passage at 6:00 p.m. Wednesday February 20, 1924.  The vessel departed Ketchikan that day bound for Metlakatla with three crewmen aboard.  The following is an accounting from the casualty report filed by Silas Booth, master of the Swallow:

                “Driest Point, Nichols Passage, S E Alaska”  “Strong east wind with rain and rough sea.  Dark”  “Stranding”  “Engine stopped and vessel drifted on the rock”  “When engines stopped threw out an anchor but vessel stranded before fetching up on anchor cable.  After stranding attempted to put out a kedge anchor in endeavor to pull vessel off but owing to rough sea was unable to do so”  “After stranding vessel slid off into deep water leaving only the mast visible.  On the third day vessel disappeared completely”  “Total loss”

                The Swallow had a value of $3,000 and was a total loss.  She had no cargo aboard.  There was no loss of life.

                 Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 10 40 N 131 36 15 W   Chart 17434

                Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 7 Net, Length 32.2, Breadth 11.2, Depth 3.7, IHP 35, Built 1907 at Dockton WA, Registered Ketchikan, ON 204153, Master Silas Booth of Metlakatla, Owner Annette Island Packing Company of Metlakatla, Insurance unknown

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty March 17, 1924 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1923) Pg 283

SWALLOW (1938)     The U S Navy minesweeper Swallow stranded on the rocks and was lost while entering Kanaga Harbor February 19, 1938.  There were 40 officers and men aboard.  All were rescued and taken to Dutch Harbor by the C G Cutter John C Spencer.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   51 42 30 N 177 11 30 W   Chart 16012

                Source: The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 465

SWAN (1933)     The 12 ton 36 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Swan foundered off Black Island October 6, 1933.  The four crewmen aboard made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location:  Alaska   Unknown

                Comment: Too many Black Islands

                Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 9 Net, Length 36, Breadth 11.6, Depth 5, Built 1924 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 30, Owner Ben Rognan, Registered Seattle, ON 223981

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1934) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1008, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1933) Pgs 560-1

 

SWAN (1939)     The 36 ton 54 foot wooden gas screw towing vessel Swan stranded and was lost on Tugidak Island February 27, 1939.  The two persons aboard the Swan made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 30 N 154 40 W   Chart 16580

Additional Information: Tonnage 36 Gross 24 Net, Length 54, Breadth 15.7, Depth 5.2, Built 1911 at Anacortes WA, Former Name Eclipse, Horsepower 80 (Brake), Owner Alfred Torgramson, Registered Juneau, SL WLEL, ON 208424

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1942) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 512, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1941) Pg 284

SWAN (1953)     The 23 ton 44 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Swan burned May 17, 1953 off of Takanis Bay on the southeast end of Yakobi Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 55 N 136 31 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 23 Gross 18 Net, Length 44.6, Breadth 13.4, Depth 5, Built 1949 at Wrangell, Horsepower 100, SL WC4956, Owner O R Haynes, Registered Wrangell, ON 257787

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 550, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 750

 

SWANNY (1984)     The seiner Swanny stranded and was lost September 28, 1984 at the northeast tip of Montague Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 10 N 147 15 W   Chart 16700

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

SWEET FISH (1964)     The 13 ton 40 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sweet Fish was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Seward.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 06 30 N 149 26 30 W   Chart 16680

                Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 9 Net, Length 40, Breadth 10.4, Depth 5, Built Unknown, Horsepower 150, Owner Martin J Urie, Registered Juneau, ON 284029

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 677, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1176

 

SWIFTSURE (1921)     The 32 ton 54 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Swiftsure foundered in a storm 50 miles off of Yakutat October 5-6, 1921.  The crew of 6 fishermen perished with the Swiftsure.  Lost were K R Skotheim, John Skotheim, Gust Bogen, Ole Astad, John Johnson and Andrew Thompson.  The vessel departed Ketchikan September 26th and was fishing the Yakutat fishing banks when the disaster occurred.  The Swiftsure had a value of $8,000 and was insured for $4,500.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 40 N 140 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: Tonnage 32 Gross 22 Net, Length 54, Breadth 17.4, Depth 6.7, IHP 60, Built 1912 at Seattle, Registered Seattle, ON 209942

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty at Seattle, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1921) Pg 335, 3. Juneau Empire (November 3, 1921) Pg 6

SWINOMISH (1957)     The 18 ton 41 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Swinomish foundered October 19, 1957 at Pavlof Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 20 N 161 38 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: Tonnage 18 Gross 12 Net, Length 40.9, Breadth 12.5, Depth 4.5, Built 1910 at Anacortes WA, Horsepower 60, SL WF6928, Owner Carl G Mack, Registered Juneau, ON 207090

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 546, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 826

 

5 Responses to Alaska Shipwrecks (S)

  1. James Sandin says:

    re: St. Patrick . Thanks for your work. Vanessa’s age was 23

    • captaingood says:

      Thank you for Vanessa’s age. I am sorry for your loss. I will update ASAP. This work is in a constant state of editing. I can post the changes to the internet quickly but the print books take awhile. RIP Vanessa.

  2. Pingback: Vallejo Homer Alaska | Home

  3. David B. says:

    FYI – These 2 vessels are the same one.

    SUZANNA (1975) The barge Suzanna stranded and was lost January 14, 1975 at Cape Suckling.
    Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska 59 59 30 N 143 53 W Chart 16013
    Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

    SUZANNE (1975) The 275 ton barge Suzanne stranded and was lost January 14, 1975 at Cape Suckling.
    Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska 59 59 30 N 143 53 W Chart 16013
    Additional Information: Tonnage 275 Gross and Net, Built 1944, ON 539478
    Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1976) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1871

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