Alaska Shipwrecks (T)

ABBREVIATIONS:  AluminumALBritish ColumbiaBCCentralCFiberglassFRPFishing VesselFVIndicated Horse PowerIHPLongliner-LLMotor VesselMVNorthNOfficial NumberONRevenue Cutter ServiceRCSSchoonerSchSignal LettersSLSouth CentralSCSoutheastSESouthwestSWSteel oil screwSOSSteam ShipSSUnknownUUnited States ArmyUSAUnited States Coast GuardUSCGUnited States NavyUSNWestcentralWCWood gas screwWGSWood oil screwWOS

T-1028 (1934)     The fishing vessel T-1028 departed Stikine bound for Wrangell with Albert Tausch as the sole occupant.  Wreckage of the vessel and the remains of Tausch were found June 2, 1940 on the beach between Sitkagi Bluffs and the Yana River near Yakutat.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 43 N 140 42 W   Chart 16016

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

T H TRAHEY (1936)     The 494 ton 130 foot freight barge T H Trahey stranded and was lost in the Yukon River August 26, 1936.  No lives were lost in the disaster.

                Mapping and Location: Central Alaska Unknown

                Additional Information: Tonnage 494, Length 130, Breadth 33.3, Depth 5.5, Built 1910 at St Michael, Registered St Michael, ON 164261, Owner American Yukon Navigation Company

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1937) “Vessels Lost” Pg 529, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1936) Pgs 816-7

T M (1963)     The 6 ton 28 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel T M foundered June 17, 1963 at Orca Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 36 N 146 36 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: Tonnage 6 Gross 5 Net, Length 28.7, Breadth 9.5, Depth 4.1, Built 1929 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 90, SL WP4352, Owner San Juan Fishing & Packing Company, Registered Juneau, ON 266704

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 656, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

T-MIKE (1999)     The 65 foot steel fishing vessel T-Mike was consumed by fire and sank October 30, 1999 approximately 10 miles northeast of McArthur Pass in Blying Sound.  The blaze was attributed to a leaking fuel line.  Both crewmembers abandoned ship to a life raft and were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 27 30 N 150 21 W   Chart 16680

                Additional Information: ON 630207

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

TACOMA (1918) SC     The 1,738 ton 222 foot wooden ship Tacoma was crushed by ice and foundered in Bristol Bay May 19, 1918.  The vessel departed San Francisco April 10, 1918 bound for the Nushagak River in Bristol Bay.  There were 151 salmon cannery employees and 21 officers and crewmen aboard the Tacoma.  She was also carrying 1,373 tons of salmon cannery supplies valued at $50,324.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report submitted by William Sorensen, master of the Tacoma:

                “Lat. 57’ 53” N Long. 158’ 04” W”  “Foundering”  “Crushed in ice pack”  “Wind moderate, thick fog, no sea”  “Total loss”

                The Tacoma, valued at $165,000 was a total loss with no insurance.  All passengers and crew were removed to safety.  The cargo was also a complete loss, but was insured for $37,939.15.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 43 30 N 157 41 30 W   Chart 16006

                Comment: Cape Greig is the nearest point of land to the coordinates given.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 1,738 Gross 1,671 Net, Length 222.2, Breadth 41, Depth 17.7, Built 1881 at Bath ME, SL JVKC, Registered San Francisco, ON 145257, Master William Sorensen of Alameda CA, Owner Alaska Packers Association of San Francisco

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty September 18, 1918 at San Francisco, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1918) Pg 63

TACOMA (1918) SE     The 11 ton 35 foot gas screw fishing vessel Tacoma stranded and was lost in Metlakatla Harbor at 4:00 a.m. December 16, 1918.  The vessel was out of commission and anchored in the harbor with no one aboard when the disaster occurred.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by Ed Atkinson, master and owner of the Tacoma:

                “Heavy SE gale, high seas, dark”  “Metlakatla Harbor, Alaska”  “broke loose from anchorage”  “Stranding”  “Vessel broke loose from anchorage and stranded on reef in harbor.  When found, was broken to pieces”  “total loss”

                The Tacoma had a value of $2,400 and was a total loss with no insurance.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 07 45 N 131 34 30 W   Chart 17434

                Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Length 35.7, Breadth 11.8, Depth 3.9, IHP 16, Built 1909 at Tacoma WA, Registered Ketchikan, ON 206242, Master and owner Ed Atkinson of Metlakatla

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty December 20, 1918 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1918) Pg 319

TAGALAK (1931)     Fire destroyed the 71 ton 65 foot oil screw fishing vessel Tagalak in Sukkwan Strait at 11:00 p.m. Thursday September 10, 1931.  The vessel departed Waterfall September 8, 1931 with six crewmen aboard to take in traps from Cordova Bay.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report submitted by J Hansen, master and part owner of the Tagalak:

                “2 miles S E of Hydaburg, Alaska in Sukkwan Strait”  “Moderate westerly wind”  “Boat caught fire in engine room supposedly from crossed electric wires”  “When fire discovered all fire extinguishers used also blocked engine room in attempt to smother fire”  “Within three minutes after smoke was discovered the entire boat was in flames.  It went so fast that the crew barely saved life of Capt. Hansen, who was fighting the fire.  The Tagalak had a trap and pile driver in tow at time of accident”  “Had tender Frederick C standing by for two days with man at wreck waiting instructions from insurance company”  “Total loss”

                The Tagalak had a value of $55,000 and was a total loss.  She was insured for $37,000.  There was no cargo aboard the vessel.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 12 20 N 132 49 28 W   Chart 17400

                Additional Information: Tonnage 71 Gross 48 Net, Length 65.3, Breadth 18.1, Depth 9.1, IHP 180, Built 1928 at Tacoma WA, Registered Ketchikan, ON 227707, Owner J Hansen of Seattle, Owners J Hansen and P M Hansen of Seattle

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty September 13, 1931 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1931) Pgs 520-1

TAGUKAK (1985)     The 43 foot vessel Tagukak burned February 26, 1985 off of Spruce Cape.  The vessels operator was rescued by the Kodiak Harbormaster shuttle ferry crew.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 49 15 N 152 20 W   Chart 16594

                Source: Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak)

 

TAHITI (1963)     The 36 ton 46 foot steel oil screw fishing vessel Tahiti  foundered June 27, 1963 in Raspberry Strait near Kodiak.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 02 N 153 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 36 Gross 28 Net, Length 46.5, Breadth 14.3, Depth 6.8, Built 1956 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 200, SL WH3061, Owner Clayton Harris, Registered Tacoma WA, ON 271609

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) Pg 637, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) “Vessels Subject to Removal” Pg 733

 

TAHOE (1940)     The 52 ton 61 foot wooden oil screw Tahoe foundered November 11, 1940 one half mile off of Humpback Light toward Long Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 42 30 N 152 15 W   Chart 16594

                Additional Information: Tonnage 52 Gross 35 Net, Length 61.2, Breadth 15.4, Depth 7.5, Built 1938 at Seattle, Service freight, Horsepower 165, Crew 2, Owner Ewald R Brodahl, SL WNQH, Registered Seattle, ON 237574

            Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1943) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 757, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1942) Pg 286

 

TAHOMA (1914)     The 1,215 ton 191 foot U S Revenue Cutter steam ship Tahoma hit an uncharted reef and was lost in the Rat Islands of the Aleutians September 20, 1914.  The officers and crew escaped in life boats.  Two of the life boats reached Agattu and Alaid Islands and the crews were picked up by the steamer Patterson.  The captain’s lifeboat was picked up at sea by the steamer Cordova.  The Tahoma had a value of $360,000 and was a total loss.  The reef that was struck now bears the name of the Tahoma.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   51 48 N 175 47 E   Chart 16012

                Additional Information: Total Displacement 1,215 tons, Length 191.7, Breadth 32.5, Depth 17.5, Guns 4, SL GVHQ, Officers 8, Crew 60, Headquarters Seattle, Built 1908 at Camden NJ

                Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 247, 2. Safeguard the Gateways of Alaska (1918) Pgs 19-20, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1914) “Vessels of the Revenue Cutter Service, Treasury Department”

 

TAKAN (1990)     The 45 foot wooden halibut longliner Takan flooded and was lost in 15 foot seas April 7, 1990 off of Cape Spencer.   All four crewmembers abandoned ship in survival suits and were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 12 45 N 136 39 30 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: ON 218055, Built 1919

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TAKU (1942)     The 60 ton 72 foot wooden oil screw Taku stranded and was lost on the north end of Kayak Island October 6, 1942.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 56 N 144 23 W   Charts 16016, 16723

                Additional Information: Tonnage 60 Gross 41 Net, Length 71.8, Breadth 17, Depth 5.7, Built 1898 at San Francisco CA, Service Misc., Horsepower 140, Crew 8, Owner Pioneer Sea Foods Company, Registered Juneau, ON 222379

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1945) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 778, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1944) Pg 311

 

TAKU II (1937)     Fire destroyed the 14 ton 52 foot wooden gas screw Taku II at Ketchikan at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday August 11, 1937.  There were two persons aboard the vessel when the disaster took place.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by Margaret P Noyes, owner of the Taku II:

                “Standard Oil Company Dock, Ketchikan, Alaska”  “Fire and Explosion”  “Engineer, Clarence Crawford was filling fuel tanks with gasoline when explosion occurred.  He was burned about hands, face and arms and received a cut near his left eye, severity of the injury is not as yet determined”  “Standard Oil Company Employees, Ketchikan City Fire Truck and Fire Boat (assisted)”  “All available fire equipment used”  “Total loss”

                The Taku II had a value of $2,500 which was a total loss.  She was carrying no cargo.  Her insurance was in the amount of $1,500.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 20 30 N 131 38 45 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 10 Net, Length 52, Breadth 11.3, Depth 4.9, Built 1910 at Seattle, Registered Ketchikan, Master John R Riggs of Ketchikan, Owner Margaret P Noyes of Ketchikan

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty August 12, 1937, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1937) Pg 296

TAKU NO 5 (1923)     The 19 ton scow Taku No 5 was blown ashore in high winds and broke up in Taku Harbor, Taku Inlet at 10:00 a.m. Friday September 28, 1923.  The wreckage of the vessel was hauled onto the beach and fired to avoid further damage.  The Taku No 5 had a value of $1,500 at the time of the loss and was not carrying cargo.  No one was aboard the scow.  The vessel was a total loss.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 03 30 N 134 02 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 19, Built 1919 at Taku Harbor, Registered Juneau, ON 167616, Master C F Ahues, Owner Libby, McNeil & Libby, Insurance unknown

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty October 1, 1923 by Ahues at Juneau, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1923) Pg 417

TALIA (1991)     The 58 foot herring fishing vessel Talia sank in rough seas with a heavy load of herring April 11, 1991 off of Point Gardner.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 01 N 134 37 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: ON 607610

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

TAMMY (1983)     The 52 foot fishing vessel Tammy caught fire and sank March 10, 1983 near Noisy Island on the west side of Kodiak Island.  Skipper Bruce Hinman and two crewmen, Jeff Moore and Mike Hubbard were picked up by the fishing vessel Moonbeam after 19 hours in a life raft.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 55 30 N 153 33 15 W   Chart 16580

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TAMMY K (1992)     The 32 foot salmon seiner Tammy K capsized and sank while under tow September 1, 1992 off of Seduction Point.  Only one of the two crewmembers on board survived.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   59 04 55 N 135 18 25 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: ON 556470

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

TAMORA (2000)     The 36 foot wooden salmon troller Tamora drug anchor, grounded, capsized and was lost August 25, 2000 in Kalinin Bay.  The only person aboard made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 20 N 135 47 W   Chart 17320

                Comment: Some reports have this vessel lost in Sitka Sound, not Salisbury Sound.  WG

                 Additional Information: ON 210074

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

TAMRA DAWN (1996)     The 29 foot sea cucumber urchin dive boat Tamra Dawn took on water and sank November 26, 1996 at Dall Head southwest of Ketchikan.  The vessel was on a dive trip for sea cucumbers with three persons on board.  The Tamra Dawn was lost with all hands.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 08 N 131 45 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: ON 237277

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

TANANA (1921)     The 495 ton 149 foot wooden passenger stern wheel steamer Tanana struck a submerged snag and was lost near Minto on the Tanana River at 11:30 p.m. Sunday October 2, 1921.  The vessel departed Fairbanks the day before bound for Tolovana with 21 crewmen aboard.  There were no passengers and there was no cargo on board.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Tanana River, 1 mile above Minto, Alaska”  “Dark, heavy offshore wind blowing”  “Struck submerged snag”  “Immediately after striking snag which tore hole in her bottom just aft of fire box, steamer was headed for shore and sank in 6 feet of water.  Lateness of season prevented necessary repairs being made and in the spring the vessel’s condition showed it was not worth repairing.  All machinery and equipment worth salvaging were removed from the vessel”  “Casualty unavoidable”  “Everything possible done by crew”  “Total loss”

                The Tanana had a value of $25,000 which was a total loss with no marine insurance.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Central Alaska

                Additional Information: Tonnage 495 Gross 372 Net, Length 149.6, Breadth 30.4, Depth 5.9, IHP 550, Built 1904 at St Michael, Registered Eagle, ON 201297, Master C W Adams of Seattle, Owner American Yukon Navigation Company of Seattle

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty April 20, 1925 by W D Gordon, Supt., 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1921) Pg 168

TANANA CHIEF (1906)     The 72 ton 59 foot stern wheel river steamer Tanana Chief stranded and was lost on the Kantishna River May 10, 1906.  The vessel had a value of $20,000.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Central Alaska

                Additional Information: Tonnage 72 Gross 36 Net, Length 59.2, Breadth 12.9, Depth 3.9, Service freight, Crew 5, Built 1898 at Unalaska, Registered St Michael, ON 145795

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1907) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 380, 2. Merchant Vessel of the U S (1906) Pg 308, 3. Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route (1916) Pg 33

TANIA DEE (2005)     The 38 foot halibut longline fishing vessel Tania Dee foundered in rough weather April 22, 2004 off of Cape Ommaney.  The two crewmen abandoned ship in survival suits.  One crewman was rescued by the fishing vessel Christina in good condition.  A second crewman was picked up by U S Coast Guard Helicopter but did not survive.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 10 N 134 40 20 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: ON 278829

                Source: U S C G News Release (April 23, 2005) “Coast Guard helicopter crew responds to vessel sinking”

 

TARLETON H BEAN (1958)     The 35 foot herring fishing vessel Tarleton H Bean disappeared December 10, 1958 in Taku Inlet.  The vessel was abandoned in a gale by three Alaska Fish and Wildlife Service men who had been doing herring research when they became entrapped in the ice of a small land projection.  The three men boarded the U S Coast Guard Cutter Sweetbriar unharmed.  A power barge was sent to recover the vessel but the Tarleton H Bean could not be found.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 12 N 134 06 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Former research vessel Black Bear

                Sources: 1. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013), 2. Seattle Daily Times (December 13, 1958) “Research Boat Lost in Gale near Juneau” Pg 11

 

TASMANIA (1932)     The 10 ton 34 foot wooden gas screw Tasmania caught fire and burned off Wrangell December 16, 1932.  The four persons aboard made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 28 N 132 22 40 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 7 Net, Length 33.9, Breadth 9.6, Depth 3.7, Built 1911 at Decatur WA, Horsepower 30, Owner Carl Anderson, Registered Petersburg, ON 208577

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1933) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 990, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1932) Pgs 542-3

 

TATOOSH (1938)     The 31 ton 50 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Tatoosh struck a navigational dolphin (Buoy #9) and foundered in Wrangell Narrows at 7 a.m. Tuesday September 27, 1938.  The vessel departed Juneau September 16th bound for the fishing banks of Area 3, and was on her way to Prince Rupert, B.C.  There were seven crewmen aboard when the disaster occurred.  The following statements are from the casualty report submitted by Kristian Martinsen, master and owner of the Tatoosh:

                “Dense fog and heavy tide”  “100 yard approximately from black dolphin south of red dolphin No 3, Wrangell Narrows”  “Struck dolphin No 8 and foundered”  “Calm, dense fog, no sea, heavy tide current, at night, dark”  “Master jumped from dolphin to stern in effort to put a line on the dolphin but ship was sinking too fast”  “Ship held against dolphin by force of tide current, no possible chance to work her by either way.  Force of current bore her down on side away from dolphin, soon filling engine room and forecastle.  Ship went down by head, and drifted away from dolphin with stern about two feet out of water, then finally sank in about seven fathoms water.  All aboard ship climbed on dolphin.”  “Oil screw Recovery picked the master and crew off the dolphin and took them to Petersburg, Alaska”

                The Tatoosh had a value of $10,000.  She had a cargo of 25,000 pounds of fresh halibut aboard valued at $2,000 and halibut fishing gear worth $1,500.  The vessel and her cargo were total losses.  There was no insurance on the vessel, but her cargo was insured for eight cents per pound.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 31 N 132 55 W   Chart 17375

                Additional Information: Tonnage 31 Gross 21 Net, Length 50.4, Breadth 14.3, Depth 7.8, Built 1917 at Seattle WA, IHP 60, Registered Ketchikan, ON 215345, Master and owner Kristian Martinsen of Seattle

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty October 1, 1938 at Petersburg, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1937) Pg 296

TAZLINA (1964)     The 17 ton 41 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Tazlina was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Seward.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 06 30 N 149 26 30 W   Chart 16680

                Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 15 Net, Length 41.5, Breadth 12.1, Depth 4.9, Built 1960 at Seward, Horsepower 165, SL WR7752, Owner Carl A Mills, Registered Juneau, ON 282176

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 660, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

TEACH (1994)     The 30 foot salmon troller Teach was consumed by fire and lost August 3, 1994 at False Pass.  Both crewmembers reached the shore safely in a skiff.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 51 15 N 163 24 30 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: ON 592314

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

TEAL (1945)     The 20 ton 44 foot wooden oil screw Teal foundered July 19, 1945 350 yards below Graveyard Creek at the mouth of the Kvichak River in Bristol Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 51 30 N 157 00 45 W   Charts 16006, 16323

                Additional Information: Tonnage 20 Gross 9 Net, Length 44.8, Breadth 13.2, Depth 5.2, Built 1927 at Oakland CA, Service tow, Horsepower 70, Owner Alaska Packers Association, Registered Juneau, ON 226347

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1946) Pg 478, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1947) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 824

 

TEAL (1989)     The 65 foot wooden fishing tender Teal split a seam and foundered May 15, 1989 off of buoy #3 near Spruce Cape north of Kodiak.  Five crewmembers and a dog were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 49 15 N 152 20 W   Chart 16594

                Additional Information: ON 249336

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TEDDY (1914)     The 12 ton 38 foot wooden gas screw Teddy stranded and sank in Nichols Bay at 6:30 p.m. Friday November 20, 1914.  The vessel departed Sulzer that day bound for Ketchikan with two persons aboard.  There was no cargo.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by A L Hubbard, master and owner of the Teddy:

                “Heavy S E Gale, night, snowing”  “Upper part of Nichols Bay, S E Alaska.  Drifted on reef, filled and sank”  “Stranded”  “Drifted on reef and sank”

                The Teddy was valued at $3,200 at the time of the disaster.  She was insured for $1,500.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 41 30 N 132 04 45 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 8 Net, Length 38.5, Breadth 8.5, Depth 2.8, Built 1904 at Ketchikan, Registered Ketchikan, ON 200982, Master A L Hubbard of Ketchikan, Owners Hubbard & Williams of Ketchikan

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty November 30, 1914, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1914) Pg 306

TEDDY (1943)     The 89 ton 69 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Teddy foundered near Kodiak January 24, 1943.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 89 Gross 74 Net, Length 69.5, Breadth 24.4, Depth 5, Built 1937 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 130, Crew 4, Owner Nakat Packing Corporation, SL WOUF, Registered Ketchikan, ON 235977

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1944) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 757, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1943) Pg 295

 

TEDDY H (1930)     The 153 ton 74 foot wooden stern wheel steamer Teddy H was crushed in the ice during the spring thaw on the Tanana River at 10:00 a.m. May 9, 1930.  The vessel had been brought from Bettles July 11, 1929 to Nenana.  The Teddy H had a crew of 13 and was in the business of hauling freight.  The following is an accounting of the disaster from the casualty report filed by Samuel Dubin, owner of the Teddy H:

                “1/2 mile above Nenana”  “Wrecked by ice in Tanana River”  “Vessel ready to sail when the ice jam broke above, and it broke her up completely”  “Ship was taken up slough but could not get far enough to clear the ice”  “Total loss”

                The Teddy H had a value of $39,000 and was a complete loss.  There was $10,000 insurance on the boat and $1,500 worth on her barges.  There was no cargo and no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Central Alaska

                Additional Information: Tonnage 153 Gross 96 Net, Length 74.3, Breadth 20.8, Depth 4.3, Built 1910 at Fairbanks, Horsepower 50, Registered Seward, ON 208037, Master and Owner Samuel Dubin of Fairbanks

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty October 2, 1931 at Seward, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1931) Pgs 176-7

TEEJIN (1969)     The diesel screw crab fishing vessel Teejin stranded and was lost December 5, 1969 at Cape Lazaref, Unimak Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 37 N 163 35 10 W   Chart 16011

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TELLER (1910)     The 15 ton wooden scow Teller foundered in Grantley Harbor Friday October 7, 1910.  The vessel departed Teller October 7 with two crewmen aboard bound for Marys Igloo.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by S & VV Pean, masters and owners of the Teller:

                “Mouth of Tuksuk River, Grantley Harbor”  “Night, calm, sprung a leak, sank”  “Vessel at anchor, none on board”  “Total loss”

                The Teller had a value of $1,500 and was carrying 30 tons of general merchandise valued at $5,000.  Both the vessel and her cargo were total losses with no insurance.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   65 17 N 166 15 W   Chart 16204

                Additional Information: Tonnage 15, Built 1905 at Ballard WA, Registered Nome, ON 162395

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report October 20, 1910

TEMPEST (1909)     H W McCurdy lists the propeller steamer Tempest lost at Perry Island in Prince William Sound in 1909.  Merchant Vessels of the U S lists the propeller steamer Tempest lost at Parry Island, Parry Sound, Ontario, Canada June 28, 1909.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska 60 43 N 147 55 W   Chart 16700

                Comment: I have charted the former but am inclined to believe the latter.  WG

                Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 169, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1909) Pg 392

TEMPLAR (1941)     The 17 ton 39 foot wooden gas screw Templar stranded and was lost in Kuskokwim Bay in 1941.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 N 163 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 13 Net, Length 39.7, Breadth 10.7, Depth 4.1, Built 1917 at Boston MA, Service freight, Crew 2, Horsepower 20, Owner Christina Christiansen, Registered Seward, ON 225483

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1944) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 757, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1943) Pg 295

 

TERESA (1930)     The 8 ton 30 foot wooden fishing vessel Teresa foundered near Khaz Head at 2 p.m. Friday November 21, 1930.  The vessel departed Sitka November 12, 1920 bound for Lisianski Inlet with 3 passengers and 1 crewman aboard.  The vessel had no cargo.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report submitted by Hugo W Frederickson, master and owner of the Teresa:

                “Phil’s (Piehle) Passage, Khaz Head”  “High wind, severe storm”  “Ignition trouble and storm”  “Foundering”  “Tried sails and anchors but anchor lines chafed and parted”  “Passengers and master stayed on rock 42 hours until rescued by Estebeth”  “Total loss”

                The Teresa had a value of $2,000 which was a total loss.  There was no insurance on the vessel.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 31 45 N 136 01 W   Chart 17322

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 5 Net, Length 30, Breadth 10.5, Depth 3.8, Built 1910 at Colby WA, HP 10, Master and Owner Hugo W Frederickson of Sitka

                Sources: U S C G Report of Casualty November 11, 1930 at Sitka, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1930) Pgs 526-7

TERMINATOR (1989)     The fishing vessel Terminator stranded and was lost March 26, 1989 on Saint Paul Island.  The vessel was cut up and salvaged by Magone Marine.  Evidence of wreck may still be on site and of interest.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   57 10 N 170 15 W   Chart 16011

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TERN (1964)     The 8 ton 28 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Tern was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Seward.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 06 30 N 149 26 30 W   Chart 16680

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 6 Net, Length 28, Breadth 10.6, Depth 3.3, Built 1963 at Bainbridge Island WA, Horsepower 125, SL WN3145, Owner McAlister Equipment Leasing Company, Registered Juneau, ON 291639

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 683, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

TERRIGAIL (2011)     The 58 foot longline fishing vessel Terrigail stranded and was lost February 8, 2011 in Alimuda Bay on Unalaska Island.  A U S Coast Guard Helicopter rescued all five crewmembers.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 26 N 167 21 W   Chart 16500

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. U S C G News Release (February 9, 2011) “Coast Guard responds to grounded long-liner on Unalaska Island”

 

TETLIN (1922)     The 65 ton 60 foot wooden stern wheel steamer Tetlin stranded and was lost in the Nabesna River at 3:00 p.m. September 4, 1922.  The vessel was coming from the upper waters of the Nabesna River bound for Fairbanks.  There were 5 crewmen aboard and no cargo.  The following are remarks from the casualty report filed by J A Northway, master of the Tetlin:

                “About 10 miles above the mouth of the Nabesna River, Alaska”  “Struck sand bar”  “Stranding”  “No wind, daylight”  “Vessel struck sandbar when going at full speed downstream with a 7 mile an hour current.  Bottom was practically torn out of her, and as river was falling and commencing to freeze, no attempt was made to float her.  Machinery was removed, and crew went to Fairbanks in small boats.  Hull froze up in the ice and when the river broke up in the following spring the hull was totally destroyed”

                The Tetlin had a value of $3,000.  There was no insurance on the vessel.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Central Alaska

                Additional Information: Tonnage 65 Gross 41 Net, Length 60.5, Breadth 12.7, Depth 3.7, IHP 32, Built 1908 at Fairbanks, Registered Fairbanks, ON 208036, Master J A Northway of Fairbanks, Owner Royal Stores Co of Fairbanks

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty August 18, 1923, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1923) Pg 112

TEXAS GOLD (1980)     The fishing vessel Texas Gold was destroyed by a fire in two hours November 4, 1980 while anchored off of Unimak Island.  All five crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessel Sea Wolf.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 45 N 165 W   Chart 16011

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

THE FAITH (1981)     The converted 56 foot LCM6 landing craft/barge The Faith sprang a leak and sank September 30, 1981 near Whittier.  The leaking vessel had been towed to Shotgun Cove by the fishing vessel Tommell who also rescued the three divers on board.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 48 05 N 148 32 30 W   Chart 16706

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

THE NOVA (1964)     The 10 ton 29 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel The Nova was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Seward.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 06 30 N 149 26 30 W   Chart 16680

                Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 8 Net, Length 29, Breadth 10.4, Depth 4.7, Built 1958 at Seattle WA, Former Name Nyack, Horsepower 140, Owner David W Carr, Registered Seattle, ON 277026

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 666, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

THELMA (1933)     The 7 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Thelma foundered off Cape Muzon Light November 28, 1933.  The one person aboard was lost with the Thelma.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 39 50 N 132 41 30 W   Chart 17400

                Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 5 Net, Length 30.1, Breadth 9, Depth 4.1, Built 1929 at Ketchikan, Horsepower 20, Owner T H Paulsen, Registered Ketchikan, ON 228239

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1934) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1007, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1933) Pgs 566-7

 

THELMA M (1934)     The 10 ton 31 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Thelma M foundered off Portage Island March 8, 1934.  The three crewmen aboard made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 01 10 N 133 20 50 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 7 Net, Length 31, Breadth 10.8, Depth 5.2, Built 1917 at Astoria OR, Horsepower 20, Owner Sigurd Klabo, Registered Petersburg, ON 215091

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1934) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1007, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1933) Pgs 566-7

 

THELMA NO 1 (1923)     Five crewmen were swept off of the Canadian halibut boat Thelma No 1 November of 1923 near Cape Fairweather.  Three made it back aboard the vessel but two drowned.  The Thelma No 1 was towed to Yakutat by the schooner Lituya.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 48 30 N 137 56 45 W   Chart 16016

                Source: Juneau Empire (November 19-20, 1923) Pg 6

 

THEMIS (1906)     The 270 foot Norwegian cargo steamer Themis was lost December 14, 1906 travelling from Ketchikan to Crofton, British Columbia.  The vessel was carrying copper ore and canned salmon.  She struck Crocker Rock and sank 2 miles NW of Scarlett Point, Vancouver Island.  No lives were lost in the disaster.  What is left of the wreck is a popular dive site with maximum depths of 70 feet.

                Mapping and Location: British Columbia

                Sources: 1. Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route (January 1916) Pg 33, 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 128, 3. Internet Site wrecksite.eu “SS Themis +1906”

THEO E (1960)     The 72 ton 68 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Theo E foundered September 7, 1960 at Yakutat.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 33 N 139 44 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: Tonnage 72 Gross 49 Net, Length 68.2, Breadth 18.2, Depth 8.6, Built 1929 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 135, SL WB3694, Owner P N Holm, Registered Bellingham WA, ON 228298

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) Pg 570, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1961) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 863

 

THERESE (1897)     The 74 ton 78 foot wooden schooner Therese was lost in Cold Bay (Puale Bay) at 1:00 p.m. Saturday April 17, 1897.  The vessel departed San Francisco March 20, 1897 and Kodiak April 12, 1897 expecting to return to Kodiak.  There were 7 passengers and 6 crewmen aboard.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by J P Ryan, master of the Therese:

                “Cold Bay, mainland, Lat 57 43 N, Long 155 28 W, Shelikof Strait”  “Strong SE gale, heavy sea”  “Stranded”  “Sails blew away”  “Vessel dragging ashore, slipped cables and put to sea.  Sails all lost”  “Total loss”

                The passengers and crew all made it to safety, but the Therese was a total loss.  She had aboard about 10 tons of general merchandise.  The vessel was valued at $3,000.  The value of the cargo and amount of insurance was not known.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 41 N 155 29 W   Chart 16575

                Comment: Puale Bay often referred to as Cold Bay because of the strong cold winds blowing through a deep ravine from Becharof Lake.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 74.45 Gross 70.76 Net, Length 77.8, Breadth 25.2, Depth 7.5, Built 1869 at California City CA, Registered San Francisco, ON 24789, Master J P Ryan of San Francisco, Owner J C ued of Oakland CA

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report May 4, 1897 at Kodiak, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1896) Pg 187, 3. Dictionary of Alaska Place Names (1971) ”Puale Bay” Pg 781, 4. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 24

THISTLE (1917)     The 102 ton 90 foot wooden fishing steam screw Thistle was lost off of Pender Island at midnight Wednesday April 18, 1917.  The vessel departed Seattle April 17th at noon bound for Nushagak in Bristol Bay.  There were 7 fishermen and 7 crewmen aboard.  There was $3,500 worth of sacked coal and supplies on board as cargo.  The following are statements from the casualty reports filed in San Francisco and Seattle:

                “Very dark night and tide rip”  “Light wind, rain, no sea, dark”  “Pender Island, B C, went on rock in fog and when tide turned it turned her around and she slid off and capsized and went down”  “Steamer Admiral Farragut brought crew to Seattle”

                The Thistle was valued at $10,000 and was a total loss along with her cargo.  The vessel was fully covered with insurance but not her cargo.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: British Columbia

                Additional Information:  Tonnage 102 Gross 56 Net, Length 90.5, Breadth 18, Depth 9.5, Built 1887 at Benicia CA, Registered San Francisco, ON 145444, Master Martin Kalnin of San Francisco, Owner Alaska Salmon Co of San Francisco

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty April 21, 1917 by Martin Kalnin, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Pg 174

THLINKET (1969)     The oil screw Thlinket foundered and was lost August 8, 1969 in Sumner Strait.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 53 N 133 59 W   Chart 16016

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

THOMAS DICKASON (1871)     The 461 ton wooden whaling ship Thomas Dickason was abandoned in the ice around Point Belcher September 14, 1871.  The vessel was out of New Bedford, Massachusetts and had an estimated value of $50,000.  The ship was found the following summer “on her beam end on the bank, bilged and full of water”.

                Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   70 47 40 N 159 39 02 W   Chart 16005

                Source: Harper’s Weekly (December 2, 1781) “Destruction of the Arctic Whaling Fleet” “Capt. W H Kelley in 1872 Visits Scene of Disaster”

THOMAS POPE (1890)     The 227 ton 100 foot wooden whaling bark Thomas Pope stranded and was lost near Point Hope July 28, 1890.  The vessel departed San Francisco June 10 bound for the Arctic Ocean with 12 officers and crewmen aboard.  At the time of the disaster she had 75 tons of oil, bone, ivory and furs on board with a value of $135,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “Near Point Hope, Arctic Ocean”  “Stranding.  Cutting away of masts”  “Gale of wind, high sea and daytime”  “Crew was taken off by steamer William Lewis and Brig F A Barstow and landed at San Francisco.  The most of the cargo was saved by the steamer William Lewis, and landed at the same place, after being transferred in Arctic Ocean on board other vessels”

                The Thomas Pope had a value of $8,000 and became a total loss.  She was insured for $1,500.  Only $1,500 was lost from the $135,000 cargo, which was insured for $100,000.  There was no loss of life.  The wreck and cargo were sold for $525 but the sale was set aside by a court and $300 salvage allowed.

                Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   68 20 20 N 166 50 40 W   Chart 16005

                Additional Information: Tonnage 226.86, Length 100.6, Breadth 27.9, Depth 14.7, Built 1855 at Mattapoisett MA, SL HRTN, Master John W Fisher of Oakland CA, Owner J & W R Wing

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report March 3, 1891 at New Bedford by J & W R Wing, Agents, 2. Report of the Secretary of the Interior Volume III (1892) “Shipwrecks” Pgs 493-4

THOMAS W (1996)     The 35 foot vessel Thomas W sank September 2, 1996 in Gibson Cove.  There was no one on board at the time of the loss.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 46 45 N 152 26 40 W   Chart 16595

                Additional Information: ON 254745

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

THOR (1963)     The 59 ton 60 foot steel gas screw fishing vessel Thor foundered April 29, 1963 in Behm Canal.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 28 N 131 55 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 59 Gross 53 Net, Length 59.9, Breadth 20, Depth 4.6, Built 1951 at Bellingham WA, Horsepower 242, SL WE3067, Owner Port Ashton Packing Company, Registered Bellingham WA, ON 261655

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) Pg 648, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 967

 

THORNTON (1886)     The 29 ton Canadian power sealing schooner Thornton went to pieces at Unalaska after 1886.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 52 30 N 166 32 W   Charts 16011, 16520

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

THRASHER (1958)     The 11 ton 38 foot wooden gas screw tug Thrasher foundered August 15, 1958 off of Mary Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 06 N 131 10 08 W   Chart 17420

                Comment: There are other Mary Islands this wreck could have been near.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 8 Net, Length 38.1, Breadth 11.4, Depth 4.6, Built 1920 at Lake Bay WA, Service towing, Horsepower 141, SL WB7941, Owner Elmer A Almquist, Registered Ketchikan, ON 221011

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 559, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 826

 

THREE BROTHERS (1879)     The 357 ton whaling bark Three Brothers was stove in by ice and abandoned near Point Barrow September 11, 1877.  Her estimated value at the time of the disaster was $40,000.  She had a cargo of 30 barrels of sperm oil, 2,213 barrels of whale oil, 14,920 pounds of whale bone and 2 casks of ivory.  Her cargo had a value of $90,000.  The Three Brothers home port was New Bedford, Massachusetts and her captain Leander C Owen.

                Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   71 23 29 N 156 28 30 W   Chart 16003

                Source: Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914

THREE DEUCES (1949)     The 14 ton 45 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Three Deuces burned one hundred yards offshore one quarter mile south of Bear Creek on Admiralty Island August 14, 1949.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 16 55 N 134 46 30 W

                Comment: Bear Creek flows into Stephens Passage from the Mansfield Peninsula 1.8 miles NW of Colt Island.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 9 Net, length 45.1, Breadth 9.1, Depth 4.7, Built unknown, Horsepower 110, Owner Ludwig Nelson, Registered Juneau, ON 235795

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1949) Pg 545, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1950) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 928, 3. Dictionary of Alaska Place Names (1971) “Bear Creek” Pg 113

 

THREE SAINTS (1796)     The Russian vessel Three Saints (Trisviatitalia) was lost at Kamishak in 1796.  An unsuccessful attempt was made to repair the vessel.  She was burned in 1798 to retrieve the iron hardware.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 07 30 N 154 15 W   Chart 16640

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

THREE TWINS (1927)     The 10 ton 34 foot wooden gas screw 3 Twins foundered near Prince of Wales Island at 2:00 p.m. January 5, 1927.  Two of the three persons aboard perished in the disaster.  The vessel departed Ketchikan and was bound for Kendrick Bay.  The following information comes from the casualty report much of which came from the Ketchikan Chronicle from the day after the tragedy; details given by the only survivor, Tom Berry:

                “Coast of Prince of Wales Island opposite Ketchikan”  “Heavy sea, very cold, in day time”  “Open hatch and loss of skiff, cover blew off and seas filled boat”  “Foundering”  “Owner of boat was in engine room because of engine trouble when boat sank”  “Total Loss”

                Lost with the 3 Twins were master and owner, T H Voss, and crewman Gus Swenson.  The vessel had a value of $1,500.  She had 2,500 pounds of cargo including coal, $50 worth of groceries for camp and some boom chain on deck.  All was lost with no insurance for the vessel or her cargo.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 51 15 N 131 58 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 7 Net, Length 33.8, Breadth 9.6, Depth 4.6, HP 20, Built 1911 at Seattle WA, Registered Ketchikan, ON 208607, Master and owner T H Voss of Ketchikan

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty March 11, 1927 by Mrs. Anne Voss at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1926) Pgs 520-1

THUNDERBIRD (1991)     The 35 foot longline fishing vessel Thunderbird flooded and sank February 14, 1991 in Chatham Strait.  Two persons were on board but only one survived the disaster.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 134 32 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: ON 255145

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

TIDERIP (1953)     The 15 ton 39 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Tiderip foundered October 13, 1953 near Kodiak.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 15 Gross 10 Net, Length 39.6, Breadth 12.7, Depth 4, Built 1943 at Seattle WA, Former Name J-487 (U S A), Horsepower 65, Owner Island Seafood Company, Registered Juneau, ON 253467

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 561, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 826

 

TIDINGS (1947)     The 17 ton 40 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Tidings stranded and foundered September 3, 1947 off of Soapstone Point in Cross Sound.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 06 10 N 136 29 50 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 11 Net, Length 40.5, Breadth 11.7, Depth 5.4, Built 1902 at Seattle, Crew 2, Horsepower 145, SL AYEO, Owner Richard Perry, Registered Sitka, ON 145941

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1947) Pg 501, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 905

 

TIDINGS (1989)     The 51 foot fishing vessel Tidings sank January 26, 1989 off of Cape Chiniak.  There was no loss of life.  The skipper of the vessel narrowly escaped death when he became trapped inside, ears popping, as the Tidings headed for the bottom.  The only thing he was able to remember before the vessel imploded was hearing the Lynard Skynard song “Gimme Three Steps, Gimme Three Steps Mister, Gimme Three Steps toward the door” playing over and over in his head.  He was able to claw his way to the surface, rejoin the rest of the crew and be rescued.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 37 N 152 10 W   Chart 16580

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. Personal Interview. WG

 

TIGER LIL (1976)     The 38 foot sailboat Tiger Lil disappeared on a trip from Seward to Seattle September 22, 1976.  Three persons were lost in the disaster including owner Donald Lowcock (65), his wife Catherine (61) of Anchorage and Bert Stroud (68) of Seattle.  Wreckage of the vessel was found on Montague Island and the body of Stroud washed ashore on Kayak Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 10 N 147 15 W   Chart 16013

                Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. Seattle Daily Times (September 30, 1976) “Body found, searchers seek two more” Pg D 2

 

TILLIKUM (1959)     The 26 ton 47 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Tillikum foundered December 1, 1959 near Dundas Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 19 N 136 14 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 26 Gross 18 Net, Length 47, Breadth 12.7, Depth 6.8, Built 1918 a Seattle WA, Horsepower 65, Owner Edna E Almquist, Registered Seattle, ON 215954

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) Pg 575, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1961) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 863

 

TILLAMOOK (1900)     The 265 ton 126 foot wooden steam screw schooner Tillamook stranded and was lost near Kodiak at 5:00 p.m. Thursday November 29, 1900.  The vessel departed Unalaska November 5, 1900 bound for Seattle, Washington and way ports with 9 passengers and 19 officers and crewmen aboard.  She had no cargo.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “North end of Wood Island Reef, Alaska”  “Stranding”  “Miscalculation of location of reef”  “Moderate NW wind, sea smooth, starlight”  “Two pilots, Captain and Second Officer were on watch at the time of striking reef”

                The Tillamook had a value of $30,000 and was a total loss.  All passengers and crewmen made it to safety.  H W McCurdy reports this vessel was on a mail run.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 N 152 20 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 265 Gross 215 Net, Length 126.8, Breadth 33.8, Depth 9.9, Built 1887 at San Francisco, Registered San Francisco, ON 145448, SL KDRH, Master H M Hughes of San Francisco, Owner Swayne and Hoyt of Alameda CA, Insurance unknown

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report December 7, 1900 at Kodiak, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1900) Pg 303, 3. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 63

 

TIMANDRA (1879)     The 119.88 ton wooden brig Timandra struck a reef and was lost near Nunivak Island at 6 a.m. Thursday May 22, 1879.  The vessel sailed out of Honolulu, Hawaii and was bound for the Arctic.  There were 12 officers and crewmen aboard and 75 ton of general merchandise valued at $12,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by Wellington Thomas, Master of the Timandra:

                “Moderate wind, thick and hazy, swell, dawn”  “Six miles N Nounivak Island”  “Vessel struck reef off West end of Island”  “Thick weather”  “Brig had been off and on the Island for ten days, waiting to communicate with schr. E J McKinnon from San Francisco, to take aboard pilot Hy Ravens”

                The Timandra had a value of $12,000 and was a total loss.  $9,000 worth of her cargo was lost.  The crewmen all survived and were assisted by local natives.  There were reports that the Timandra was on an illegal trading expedition and was carrying 3,000 gallons of rum when she ran onto the reef.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   60 12 N 167 25 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 119.88, Built 1859, Registered New Bedford MA, Master Thomas Wellington of San Francisco, Owner Edward Merrill of New Bedford MA, Vessel Insurance $10,000, Cargo Insurance $10,000, SL JBCF

                Sources: 1.U S Customs Wreck Report September 24, 1879 by W Thomas at San Francisco, 2. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1895) Pg 273

TIMBERMAN (1952)     The 53 ton 61 foot wooden oil screw tug Timberman stranded and was lost October 18, 1952 at Caamano Point.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 30 N 131 58 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 53 Gross 36 Net, Length 61.1, Breadth 16.9, Depth 6.9, Built 1914 at Port Angeles WA, Former Name Albert, Service towing, Horsepower 240, Owner Clarence Purdy, Registered Ketchikan, ON 212551

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) Pg 549, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 803

 

TINA RAE (1982)     The 30 foot vessel Tina Rae sank August 16, 1982 off of Spruce Cape near Kodiak.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 49 15 N 152 20 W   Chart 16594

                Source: Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak)

 

TINEA (1920)     The gas screw Tinea was lost in Cook Inlet in July of 1920.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 05 N 152 30 W   Chart 16013

                Source: The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 313

TINY (1964)     The vessel Tiny owned by Harold Heglin was lost at Kodiak during the Good Friday earthquake of March 27, 1964.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Source: Unofficial Wreck List

 

TINY (1989)     The 65 foot steel fishing vessel Tiny flooded in heavy weather, rolled over and sank October 17, 1989 in Bristol Bay south of Cape Newenham.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: 58 39 N 162 10 30 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: ON 659553

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TINY BOY (1940)     The 27 ton 46 foot wooden oil screw freight hauling vessel Tiny Boy foundered October 11, 1940 1 ½ miles off shore between Funter Bay and Point Retreat.  The 6 crewmen aboard made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 24 45 N 134 57 15 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 27 Gross 18 Net, Length 46.4, Breadth 13.3, Depth 6.2, Built 1937 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 85, Owner W H Bowman, Registered Wrangell, ON 236443

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1942) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 512, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1941) Pg 291

TIPPY (1955)     The 17 ton 37 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Tippy was consumed by fire June 22, 1955 at Cordova.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 33 N 145 45 W   Chart 16640

                Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 15 Net, Length 37.2, Breadth 12.6, Depth 4.7, Built 1945 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 110, Owner Thomas R Clampffer, Registered Juneau, ON 247917

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 526, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 758

 

TOBY T (1948)     The 9 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Toby T burned October 25, 1948 three miles from Cordova in Orca Inlet.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 33 N 145 45 W   Chart 16700

                Comment: Some records have this vessel as the Tobey-T.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 8 Net, Length 29.9, Breadth 9.5, Depth 3.6, Built year unknown at Seattle WA, Horsepower 110, Owner F P Triber, Registered Juneau, ON 253588

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1948) Pg 520, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1949) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 912

 

TOGALOH (1931)     See TAGALAK (1931)

Comment: Reported in H W McCurdy (1966) Pg 413 with incorrect spelling.  WG

TOM (1960)     The 36 ton 50 foot steel oil screw tug Tom foundered September 7, 1960.  The vessel sank in 492 feet of water in Stephens Passage near Frederick Sound 75 miles south of Juneau. Lost with the vessel were skipper Earl Long of North Bend OR, Myrton Voellger of Poulsbo WA and William Povoa of Honolulu HI.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 50 N 134 25 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 36 Gross 24 Net, Length 50.8, Breadth 18.5, Depth 5.3, Built 1959 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 454, SL WL2619, Owner Puget Sound Dredging Company, Registered Seattle, ON 278299

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) Pg 576, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1961) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 863

 

TOM AND AL     The 84 foot wooden oil screw Tom and Al foundered February 2, 1980 approximately 14 miles off of the Barren Islands and 8 miles off of Shuyak Island.  She was hauling shrimp from Kodiak to Homer with two crewmen aboard.  There was no loss of life.  The Tom and Al was 80 years old and had survived a long and colorful career in the fisheries of the north Pacific.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 31 N 152 30 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 96 Gross 79 Net, Length 84, Breadth 17.8, Depth 8.6, Built 1900 at Ballard WA, Former Name Ragnhild, Horsepower 265, SL WB3861, ON 111286

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 700

 

TOMBSTONE (1999)     The 35 foot pleasure craft Tombstone grounded and sank December 31, 1999 on the northwest side of Shelter Island.  Both persons on board were rescued by the U S Coast Guard rescue boat from Juneau.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 26 N 134 52 W   Chart 17300

                Sources: 1. U S C G News Release (December 31, 1999) “Coast Guard rescues stranded hunters off Juneau’s Shelter Island”, 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

TOMI MARU NO 52 (1980)     The Japanese fishing vessel Tomi Maru No 52 sank after a collision with the Japanese fishing vessel Tomi Maru No 51 November 19, 1980 approximately 100 miles west of Adak.  Three crewmembers were lost in the disaster.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   51 45 N 176 39 W   Chart 16012

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TOMMY BOY (1974)     The private vessel Tommy Boy went missing November 4, 1974 at Shelter Island near Juneau with the loss of the three people on board.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 26 N 134 52 W   Chart 17360

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TONGASS (1971)     The fishing vessel Tongass stranded and sank May 2, 1971 at the south end of Baranof Island.  All six crewmembers were rescued by a nearby fishing vessel and taken to Sitka.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 45 N 135 10 W   Chart 17320

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TONGASS (1995)     The 110 foot tug Tongass capsized and sank in heavy weather December 1, 1995 near Hump Island north of Point Retreat.  Captain Mike Keso was lost in the disaster.  One other crewmember was rescued.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 27 30 N 134 59 W   Chart 17300

                Source: Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

TONI JEAN (1972)     The 14 ton 32 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Toni Jean foundered May 18, 1972 approximately 12 miles east of Cape Saint Elias.  Of the two crewmembers, Bill Smith (50) of Seattle was lost.  Jeff Miller, also of Seattle was able to swim to shore near the Saint Elias light station.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 54 N 144 36 W   Chart 16013

                Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 9 Net, Length 32.5, Breadth 10.5, Depth 4.7, Built 1958 at Ferndale WA, ON 276424

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 702, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1978) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2120

 

TONQUIN (1991)     The 86 foot long line fishing vessel Tonquin capsized and was lost October 13, 1991 off of Twoheaded Island near Kodiak.  Lost was skipper Larry Tousignant of Kodiak.  Four other crewmembers were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 54 N 153 35 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: ON 258868

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TOOTS (1964)     The vessel Toots owned by Willy Hall was reported lost at Kodiak during the Good Friday earthquake of March 27, 1964.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Source: Unofficial Wreck List

 

TOPSY D (1928)     The 9 ton 33 foot wooden fishing vessel Topsy D stranded and was lost at Point Amelius at 2:30 p.m. Saturday January 7, 1928.  The vessel was coming from Wrangell on her way to Louise Cove with two persons aboard; the master and engineer.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by Emil Meldahl, master and owner of the Topsy D:

                “Heavy southerly gale, weather was cloudy and rainy, dark”  “On Point Amelius, Alaska, close to Beauclaire Light”  “Stranded”  “Broke moorings and drifted on the rocks”  “Could do nothing as the engine was not strong enough to make any headway with the vessel”  “The reason the wreck was not reported before is that we were trying to salve the vessel and thought possibly she could be repaired, but when we got her off we found she was a complete wreck”  “TOTAL LOSS”

                The Topsy D had a value of $600, was not carrying cargo, and had no insurance.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 12 N 133 54 15 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 33, Breadth 9.7, Depth 3.6, Horsepower 14, Built 1907 at Seattle WA, Registered Wrangell, ON 213927, Master and Owner Emil Meldahl of Wrangell

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty March 24, 1928 at Wrangell, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1927) Pgs 506-7

TORRENT (1868)     The 576 ton wooden bark Torrent struck a reef and foundered in a storm July 15, 1868.   The Torrent was one of two American military sailing ships used to carry men and supplies to the newly acquired Alaska Territory to protect American interests.  She stranded and was lost in English Bay (Port Graham), Cook Inlet.  There was no loss of life.  This wreck site has been located and preliminary exploration begun in 2007.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 21 15 N 151 56 W   Charts 16640, 16646

                Comment: This is a historically significant wreck site and is being considered for the National Register of Historic Places.  State and Federal Archeological studies are forthcoming.  WG

                Sources: 1. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1895) Pg 170, 2. Wikipedia (2012) “Torrent

TOSHA (1964)     The 13 ton 35 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Tosha burned during September of 1964 on the Copper River Flats near Cordova.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 25 N 145 00 W   Chart 16013

                Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 11 Net, Length 35.5, Breadth 12, Depth 4.9, Built 1961 at Cordova, Horsepower 100, Owner Copper River Co-Op, Registered Juneau, ON 285784

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 704, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1176

 

TOTEM (1921)     The 12 ton 46 foot gas screw passenger vessel Totem went missing from Katalla December 24, 1921.  There were three persons aboard.  An eye witness, Hardy Trefsgar, said he saw the vessel sink off of Yakutat January 7, 1922.  The Totem and the three men aboard were never found.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska Chart 60 12 N 144 31 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 8 Net, Length 46, Breadth 11.5, Depth 3.6, Built 1907 at Seattle WA, Registered Cordova, ON 204313, Owner King Salmon Fisheries Company

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1925) “Vessels Lost” Pg 838, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1921) Pg 340, 3. Captain Lloyd H “Kinky” Bayers Collection (1898-1967) “Cordova” Pg 48

TOTSY (1963)     The 17 ton 42 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Totsy stranded and was lost December 30, 1963 at Waterfall.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 17 50 N 133 14 30 W   Chart 17400

                Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 11 Net, Length 42, Breadth 11.9, Depth 4.7, Built 1938 at Hydaburg, Horsepower 70, Owner Philip G Lauth Sr., Registered Ketchikan, ON 237826

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 678, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

TOWNSEND (1900)     The 450 ton 125 foot wooden steamer Townsend stranded and was lost near Haines Mission at 4 p.m. Tuesday January 16, 1900.  The vessel departed Skagway that day bound for Haines Mission with 8 passengers and 20 crewmen aboard.  They were not carrying cargo.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report file by W McKenzie, master of the Townsend:

                “Point of land midway between Haines Mission and Battery Point”  “Stranding”  “Boilers failed and engines stopped”  “In heavy sea vessel drifted on point”  “Gale from north, moderate sea, weather clear”  “No time to take any measures; was ashore in 15 minutes”  “No assistance rendered.  Crew and passengers landed through surf In boats”  “Anchors were let go as soon as engines failed, but could find no bottom until vessel was on the rocks; January 21 vessel had disappeared from sight”  “Total loss”

                The Townsend had a value of $70,000 and was a total loss with no insurance.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   59 12 30 N 135 21 40 W   Chart 17300, 17317

                Additional Information: Tonnage 450 Gross 240 Net, Length 125, Breadth 27, Depth 19, Built 1884 at Astoria OR, SL KCVB, Master W McKenzie of San Francisco, Owner Charles D Lane of San Francisco

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report at Seattle February 7, 1900

 

TRACY (1996)     The vessel Tracy ran up on the rocks and was lost October 4, 1996 in Gibson Cove near Kodiak.  The owner of the vessel salvaged what he could and burned the rest.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 46 45 N 152 26 40 W   Chart 16595

                Source: Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak)

 

TRADER (1908)     The schooner Trader became a total loss at Indian Point, Siberia in 1908.

                Mapping and Location: Siberia

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

TRADEWIND (1972)     The oil screw Tradewind burned September 27, 1972 at Sergius Narrows north of Sitka.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 24 20 N 135 38 W   Chart 17320

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TRADEWIND   (2002)     The 51 foot cod fishing vessel Tradewind foundered just after midnight February 18, 2002 approximately 35 miles south of King Cove.  All three crewmembers abandoned ship to a life raft and were rescued by the fishing vessel Temptation and transported to Sand Point.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 03 N 162 19 W   Chart 16520

                Comment: The fishing vessel Contentment sank nearby hours later.  WG

                Additional Information: ON 510290

                Source: U S C G News Release (February 18, 2002) “Five fishermen rescued after two vessels sink”

TRADITION (2000)     The 42 foot fiberglass salmon fishing vessel Tradition was consumed by an engine room fire and lost August 5, 2000 at King Cove.  All four crewmembers escaped to a skiff and made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 03 20 N 162 19 W   Chart 16540

                Additional Information: ON 610666

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

TRANSFORMER (1990)     The 32 foot fiberglass fishing vessel Transformer was destroyed by fire December 31, 1990 in Prince William Sound near Port Bainbridge.  The only person aboard was rescued by the fishing vessel Serenity.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 57 N 148 21 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: ON 928662, Built 1988

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TRANSIT (1913)     The 547 ton 165 foot wooden schooner Transit was crushed by ice and lost at 6:30 a.m. August 25, 1913 near Cape Smyth.  The vessel was departing Barrow bound for Seattle with 11 officers and crewmen aboard.  She was also carrying 100 tons of general merchandise valued at $8,000.  The following are statements from the wreck report submitted by John Backland, master of the Transit:

                “About five miles SSW of Cape Smyth”  “Struck Lee, filled with water and was beached”  “Crushed by ice”  “Strong NW gale with heavy snow and frost”  “Sails close reefed and vessel got under way but ice crowding in rapidly leaving no room for navigation”  “120 natives came on board and both the steam and hand pumps were manned but to no avail”  “The vessel was in the ice from August 6th to August 25th, 1913 and continually using every effort to get out”

                The Transit had a value of $10,000 with the damage to the vessel listed as $7,500.  Her cargo posted a loss of $5,000.  The vessel had no insurance but the cargo was fully covered.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   71 17 35 N 156 47 15 W   Chart 16003

                Additional Information: Tonnage 547 Gross 496 Net, Length 165.2, Breadth 37.1, Depth 13.1, Built 1891 at Ballard WA, SL KJWS, Master John Backland of Seattle, Owner E M Backland of Seattle, Registered Seattle, ON 145607

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report September 27, 1913 at Nome

TRANSITION (2008)     The 35 foot converted wooden troller Transition disappeared with two persons aboard February 22, 2008 on a trip from Juneau to Ketchikan.  Only a door to the vessel was found on Kupreanof Island in Frederick Sound.  Lost were Mike Dunne and Vern McGee.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 45 N 133 30 W   Chart 17360

                Sources: 1. U S C G News Release (February 23, 2008) “Coast Guard Searches for Two Unreported Mariners”, 2. U S C G News Release (February 28, 2008) “Search for Missing Mariners Suspended”

 

TRAVELER (1965)     The 9 ton 39 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Traveler burned March 10, 1965 at Klawock.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 33 15 N 133 05 45 W   Chart 17400

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 39.8, Breadth 9.1, Depth 3.5, Built 1910 at Portland OR, Horsepower78, Owner Kenneth Mauska, Registered Wrangell, ON 207305

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 705, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1176

 

TRAVELER (1972)     The oil screw Traveler foundered and was lost June 2, 1972 in Clarence Strait.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 45 N 131 42 W   Chart 16016

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TRI SVIATITELIA (1790)     The Russian vessel Tri Sviatitelia (Three Saints) was wrecked in Kashega Harbor, Unalaska Island in a northerly storm October 1, 1790.  The vessel departed Okhotsk, Russia August 19, 1790.  Much of the vessels cargo was salvaged.  The Tri Sviatitelia had a value of more than 19,000 rubles.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 28 50 N 167 10 30 W   Chart 16500

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

TRIDENT (1997)     The 26 foot salmon seiner Trident flooded and sank May 16, 1997 off of Hinchinbrook Island.  The only person aboard made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 23 N 146 28 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: ON 615378

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

TRILBY (1914)     The 12 ton 51 foot wooden schooner Trilby stranded and was lost at Semichi Island November 30, 1914.  The vessel departed Unalaska August 20, 1913 bound for Attu.  There were two persons aboard at the time of the disaster.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Semechie Island, 21 miles from Attu”  “Stranding”  “Drifted on beach”  “Heavy wind and heavy swell, at night”  “Two anchors put out, vessel was beyond control”

                The Trilby was valued at $1,000 and had two tons of general merchandise aboard worth $500.  The vessel became a total loss but the cargo was saved, as were the lives of the two aboard.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 44 N 174 E   Chart 16012

                Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 12 Net, Length 51.5, Breadth 12.3, Depth 4.2, Built 1901 at Anacortes WA, Registered Unalaska, ON 145688, Master and owner A B Somerville of Attu

                Source: U S C G Report of Casualty February 20, 1916 by Edwin Sarsen, Agent for Master

TRILBY (1989)     The 43 foot steel longline halibut fishing vessel Trilby struck a rock and sank quickly October 9, 1989 in Salisbury Sound.  All four crewmembers escaped to a life raft and were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 22 N 135 50 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: ON 635726

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TRINA (1997)     The 42 foot longline cod fishing vessel Trina flooded, rolled over and sank September 27, 1997 near Perl Island.  The only person aboard escaped to a life raft and was rescued by the fishing vessel Deva.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 07 N 151 40 W   Chart 16640

                Additional Information: ON 627246

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

TRINITY (1970)     The oil screw Trinity was consumed by fire July 11, 1970 off of Port Williams.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 29 30 N 152 35 W   Chart 16604

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TRINITY I (1972)     The tug Trinity I struck Lincoln Rock in Clarence Strait, slipped off and sank February 7, 1972.  Both crewmen were rescued by the U S Coast Guard Cutter Bittersweet.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 03 25 N 132 41 50 W   Chart 17360

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TRIO (1927)     Fire destroyed the 28 ton 46 foot wooden fishing vessel Trio in Kachemak Bay at 10:30 p.m. December 21, 1927.  The vessel was at anchor with two persons aboard when the disaster occurred.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Lagoon near Halibut Cove, Kachemak, Alaska”  “Fire, origin unknown”  “Clear and calm”  “Used hand fire extinguisher, but explosion scattered fire so that it was impossible to remain on board.”  “Cannery crew ashore did everything possible to extinguish flames but unavailing, so vessel was towed ashore and beached”  “Vessels documents lost in fire”  “TOTAL LOSS”

                The Trio had a value of $5,000 and was a total loss. There was no cargo aboard.  The vessel was insured for $5,000.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 35 15 N 151 11 W   Chart 16647

                Additional Information: Tonnage 28 Gross 19 Net, Length 46.4, Breadth 14.2, Depth 5.9, Built 1914 at Tacoma WA, HP 40, Registered Seward, ON 211996, Master L Bainter of Halibut Cove, Owner Enterprise Packing Company of LaTouche AK

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty January 9, 1928 by H B Bystad President and General Manager Enterprise Packing, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1927) Pgs 508-9

TRISH (1988)     The 40 foot troller/gillnetter/longliner Trish capsized and sank June 23, 1988 off of Tolstoi Point in Clarence Strait.  The vessel took a wave over the stern which precipitated the disaster.  All three crewmembers escaped to a life raft and were picked up by the fishing vessel Harvey-O.  The U S Coast Guard cutter Cape Hatteras attempted to tow the vessel to shallower water but the tow line broke.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 40 10 N 132 23 10 W   Chart 17420

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TRITON (1962)     The 19 ton 42 foot wooden oil screw Triton was consumed by fire March 12, 1962 at Craig.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 28 30 N 133 09 W   Chart 17400

                Additional Information: Tonnage 19 Gross 16 Net, Length 42.2, Breadth 10.8, Depth 5.8, Built 1920 at Everett WA, Service passenger, Horsepower 100, SL WC8144, Owner Gerald Garner, Registered Ketchikan, ON 220309

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 707, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1176

 

TROIKA (1997)     The 50 foot crab fishing vessel Troika flooded and sank September 22, 1997 approximately 12 nautical miles southeast of Saint Paul Island in the Pribilof Islands.  Three crewmembers who had donned survival suits were rescued by the fishing vessel Gala Maureen.  The fourth crewmember, captain Carl Koso (35) of King Cove was lost from hypothermia.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   57 10 N 170 15 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: ON 622020

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TROUBLE (2000)     The 50 foot fiberglass longline halibut fishing vessel Trouble flooded from the stern, capsized and sank March 31, 2000 seven miles off of Black Point at the south end of Sitkalidak Island.  All three crewmembers abandoned ship to a Liferaft and were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 N 153 18 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: ON 961384

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

TRUTH (1928)     The 15 ton 46 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Truth broke loose from her moorings in a storm and foundered in Nichols Passage at 11 p.m. Sunday December 1, 1928.  The Truth had departed Metlakatla November 29th and was bound for Dall Island.  The crew of three was not aboard when the vessel broke free.  It was very dark with a 50 mile an hour wind and heavy seas.  The Truth had a value of $2,600 with no cargo and was a total loss with no insurance.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 05 N 131 42 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 15 Gross 13 Net, Length 45.8, Breadth 11.6, Depth 4.1, Built 1910 at Ketchikan, HP 20, Registered Ketchikan, ON 207757, Master and owner Ed Atkinson of Metlakatla

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty January 14, 1929 by Atkinson at Portland OR, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) Pgs 526-7

Lands End Resort on the Homer Spit 1975

Lands End Resort on the Homer Spit 1975

TRYGVE (1953)     The 15 ton 38 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Trygve stranded and was lost November 2, 1953 on the beach of the Homer Spit on the Kenai Peninsula.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 37 N 151 27 W   Chart 16640

                Additional Information: Tonnage 15 Gross 12 Net, Length 38.5, Breadth 10.8, Depth 4.5, Built 1909 at Dockton WA, Horsepower 95, SL WB6864, Owner Dick Haltiner, Registered Wrangell, ON 206174

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 573, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 741

 

TUCK A HOE (1941)     The 39 ton 56 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Tuck A Hoe stranded and was lost at Palm Point near Katalla January 25, 1941.  All four crewmembers made it to shore.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   60 11 N 144 33 W   Chart 16723

                Additional Information: Tonnage 39 Gross 26 Net, Length 56.6, Breadth 14.6, Depth 6, Built 1915 at Ballard WA, Crew 4, Horsepower 55, Owner Joseph P Crock, Registered Seattle, ON 213766

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1944) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 757, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1943) Pg 301

 

TULA (1974)     The oil screw Tula stranded and was lost August 1, 1974 at Unga Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 15 N 160 40 W   Chart 16011

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TUM TUM (1933)     The 13 ton 36 foot wooden gas screw Tum Tum burned at Petersburg March 25, 1933.  The one person aboard made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 48 10 N 132 58 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 9 Net, Length 36, Breadth 12.2, Depth 4, Built 1922 at Totem Bay, Horsepower 32, Owner A W Willard, Registered Petersburg, ON 222470

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1933) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 991, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1932) Pgs 552-3

 

TUNDRA (1962)     The 13 ton 37 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Tundra was consumed by fire March 11, 1961 at Seward.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 06 30 N 149 26 30 W   Chart 16680

                Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 9 Net, Length 36.9, Breadth 11, Depth 5.1, Built 1924 at Tacoma WA, Former Name Ina J, Horsepower 90, Owner Eldon W Jacobsen, Registered Juneau, ON 223592

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) Pg 637, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 932

 

TURKSIB (1942)     The Russian freight steamship Turksib piled up on the shoals off of Seal Cape and wrecked at Scotch Cap November 21, 1942.  The vessel was traveling from Portland to Vladivostok with a cargo of food, military supplies and motor vehicles.  All 31 men and four women on board were rescued.  The Turksib eventually broke in two and became a total loss.  The salvage steamer Rescuer was also lost a month later in an attempt to salvage the Turksib.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 24 15 N 164 47 30 W   Chart 16011

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TURMOIL (2008)     The fishing vessel Turmoil was consumed by fire March 8, 2008 in Volcano Bay.  The vessel was traveling from King Cove to Belkofski Bay with three persons aboard when an EPIRB signal from the vessel was received by the U S Coast Guard.  An Urgent Marine Information Broadcast was issued and the Turmoil was soon spotted by a Penair flight.  The vessel was on fire in Volcano Bay and her three crewmen could be seen waving their arms on the beach.  They were quickly rescued by another vessel in the area.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 13 N 162 W   Chart 16011

                Source: U S C G Enforcement Report (March 8, 2008)

 

TUVA (1956)     The 55 ton 50 foot steel oil screw fishing vessel Tuva foundered October 10, 1956 approximately 30 miles from Cape Saint Elias.  Seas were heavy and winds at 40 to 60 miles an hour.  The vessel was transporting a cargo of 30 tons of explosives from Seattle to Kodiak for a construction project.  Lost with the Tuva were captain Julian Morrison, John Hoxie of Denver CO, Luther Yakoff of White Mountain and Sheldon Barnes of Seattle WA.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 54 N 144 36 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: Tonnage 55 Gross 37 Net, Length 49.9, Breadth 18, Depth 6.2, Built 1953 at Blaine WA, Horsepower 275, Owner Carl Berg, Registered Bellingham WA, ON 266347

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 533, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) “Vessels Subject to Removal” Pg 598, 3. Oregonian (October 14, 1956) “Calm Goodbye Voiced as Vessel Disappears” Pg 18

 

TWIN B (1930)     Fire destroyed the 9 ton 40 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Twin B at 8:00 p.m. Tuesday July 29, 1930 at Port Althorp.  The vessel was departing Port Althorp bound for floating trap three at Hill Island with three crewmen aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Port Althorp, Alaska”  “Caught fire, believe engine backfired”  “Good clear weather, daylight”  “Trap watchman in Dory and 50 h.p. Diesel Boat Hero from cannery (assisted)”  “Total loss”

                The Twin B had a value of $10,000 and was a total loss.  She also had 32,000 pounds of fresh fish aboard worth $500 which was also a total loss.  The vessel was insured for $5,000 and there was no cargo insurance. No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 07 55 N 136 19 50 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 7 Net, Length 40, Breadth 11.9, Depth 3.7, Built 1919 at Port Althorp, HP 18, Registered Ketchikan, ON 219140, Master Walter Karkainen of Poulsbo WA, Owner Alaska Pacific Salmon Corp of Seattle WA

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty August 30, 1930 by Lester Ogre, Attorney in fact for Alaska Pacific Salmon, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1930) Pg 536-7

TWINS (1928)     The 14 ton 42 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Twins was crushed by ice in winter quarters near Golovin at 4 p.m. Wednesday October 31, 1928.  The following is an accounting from the casualty report filed by Frank Preston, master and part owner of the Twins:

                “On beach at Golovin, Alaska”  “Close to Little Rocky Point about 5 miles SW of Golovin, Alaska”  “Crushed by ice piling on her”  “Vessel was pulled out on beach for winter and a storm broke up the new ice in the bay and piled it on until it completely crushed her and the waves then completely broke her up”  “Strong SE gale, heavy weather, daylight”  “No assistance rendered”  “The vessel was pulled out for winter and the owners were not near her and when the storm came up no one was there to look after her”

                The Twins had a value of $1,000 which was a total loss.  There was no insurance and no cargo aboard.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 33 N 163 02 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 7 Net, Length 40, Breadth 11.9, Depth 3.7, Built 1919 at Hoonah, HP 18, Registered Nome, ON 205769, Master and part owner Frank Preston of Nome, Owners Frank Preston and Harry Knudson

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty June 17, 1929 at Nome, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) Pgs 526-7

TWINS (1930)     The 11 ton 36 foot gas screw Twins was lost at 6 p.m. May 11, 1930 near Montague Island.  The vessel departed Cordova May 11 bound for Cape Hinchinbrook with three persons aboard.  William Johnson was lost in the disaster.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report file by James Dinneen, master and owner of the Twins:

                “Montague Island, 10 miles below Wooded island”  “Got capsized in going ashore and could not return to look after vessel”  “When going ashore from the Twins with my son and William Johnson, our skiff was capsized and we were all thrown into the water.  We succeeded in getting Johnson on to the upturned skiff but he evidently died of heart failure while we were making shore.”  “Drifted ashore from anchorage”  “Vessel was anchored but only with light anchors; intended to return to vessel but could not get back to it”

                The Twins had a value of $2,000 and was a total loss.  There was no insurance and no cargo aboard.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 52 N 147 23 W   Chart 16700

Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 9 Net, Length 35.9, Breadth 9.5, Depth 4.3, HP 40, Built 1922 at Cordova, Registered Juneau, ON 227988, Master and owner James Dinneen of Cordova

Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty June 14, 1930 at Cordova, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1929) Pgs 538-9

TWO BROTHERS (1894)     The 10.27 ton 36 foot wooden schooner Two Brothers stranded and was lost on Unalaska Island at 11 a.m. Monday August 20, 1894.  The vessel departed Unalaska August 12, 1894 bound for Atka with 5 crewmen aboard.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report submitted by James Ramsey, master and owner of the Two Brothers:

                “Unalaska Island, SE side Constantine Bay, Alaska”  “Gale, sails carried away”  “About 60 miles an hour, cloudy overcast, and very heavy sea”  “Carried sail and tried to beat to sea when sails carried away, drifted to lee shore”  “Stranded”

                The Two Brothers was valued at $1,000.  She was carrying 10 tons of ships stores worth $700.  The vessel was a total loss and $250 worth of the ships stores was lost.  There was no loss of life and no insurance.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 57 N 166 25 W   Chart 16520

                Additional Information: Tonnage 10.27, Length 36.3, Breadth 12.5, Depth 5.4, Built 1881 at Kodiak, Registered Sand Point, ON 145379, Master and owner James Ramsey of Unga

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report August 25, 1894 at Unalaska

TWO BROTHERS (1963)     The 24 ton 50 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Two Brothers foundered July 18, 1962 west of Karluk Reef in Prince William Sound.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 27 N 151 24 W   Chart 16660

                Additional Information: Tonnage 24 Gross 16 Net, Length 49.9, Breadth 13, Depth 4.9, Built 1920 at Brooklyn NY, Former Name No. 14732 (U S N), Horsepower 165, SL WP 4015, Owner Cecil O Seerberry, Registered San Francisco, ON 225170

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) Pg 638, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) “Vessels Subject to Removal” Pg 733

 

TWO FATS (1935)     The 8 ton 32 foot wooden gas screw Two Fats stranded in Seward Harbor and was lost at 3:30 a.m. September 28, 1935.  The vessel had been tied up but the heavy wind and seas pulled the bite out of her deck and the Two Fats washed onto the beach.  Wind was force 9 with heavy surf at the time of the disaster.  The Two Fats had a value of $1,200 and was a total loss.  There was no cargo aboard.  There was no insurance on the vessel.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 06 30 N 149 26 30 W   Chart 16680

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 6 Net, Length 32.2, Breadth 7.1, Depth 4.0, Built 1918 at Seattle WA, Registered Seward, ON 217544, Master and part owner L E Williams MD, Owners L E Williams MD and Dr A D Haverstock of Seward

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty October 15, 1935 at Seward, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1934) Pgs 178-9

TWO JOHNS (1965)     The 8 ton 28 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Two Johns was consumed by fire August 25, 1965 at Naknek.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 43 40 N 157 00 45 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 7 Net, Length 28.7, Breadth 10.3, Depth 4, Built 1960 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 165, SL WM8330, Owner Jean Mercurio, Registered Juneau, ON 281274

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 711, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1176

 

TYCONDA (1915)     The 186 ton 104 foot stern paddle wheel passenger steamer Tyconda burned at Anchorage October 8, 1915.  The ten persons aboard made it to safety but the Tyconda was a total loss.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   61 13 05 N 149 53 30 W   Chart 16660

                Additional Information: Tonnage 186 Gross 117 Net, Length 104.3, Breadth 21.9, Depth 4.3, Built 1901 at Tacoma WA, IHP 130, Registered Wrangell, ON 145889

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1915) Pg 184, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) “Vessels Lost” Pg 420

TYEE (1959)     The 16 ton 39 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Tyee burned July 18, 1959 at Anan Creek in Ernest Sound.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 10 50 N 131 53 05 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 16 Gross 11 Net, Length 39, Breadth 11.7, Depth 4.4, Built 1915 at Ketchikan, Horsepower 75, Owner Fidalgo Island Packing Company, Registered Ketchikan, ON 213224

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 571, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 826

 

TYEE (1991)     The 35 foot gillnet fishing vessel Tyee capsized and was lost July 16, 1991 off of Port Heiden in Bristol Bay.  The vessel had taken a large wave over the stern while crossing the bar in a gale.  There were two crewmembers aboard when the disaster occurred.  One was rescued by the fishing vessel Isle Royale and the other by the fishing vessel Shadowfax.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 55 N 158 41 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: ON 645780

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

TYEE SCOUT (1943)     The 23 ton 49 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Tyee Scout stranded and was lost August 3, 1943 at Lat. 58 00 20 N on her way to Cape Spencer.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 12 45 N 136 39 30 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: Tonnage 23 Gross 16 Net, Length 49.8, Breadth 12.9, Depth 5, Built 1924 at Puget Sound WA, Former Name, Horsepower 140, Owner Harry H Moore, Registered Sitka, ON 229092

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1947) Pg 510, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1948) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 862

 

TYKE (1965)     The gas screw Tyke was destroyed by a storm November 22, 1965 at Shakan Strait on the northwest coast of Prince of Wales Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 07 30 N 133 30 W   Chart 17360

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TYKE II (1986)     The fishing vessel Tyke II grounded and broke up in the surf March 4, 1986 near Rockwell Lighthouse in Sitka Sound.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 02 15 N 135 20 13   17327

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TYKE IV (1972)     The 9 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Tyke IV burned December 12, 1972 at Hoonah.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 06 30 N 135 26 30 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 7 Net, Length 30.2, Breadth 10.1, Depth 4.6, Built 1917 at Astoria OR, ON 278933

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 712, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1974) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1872

 

TYLENE (1985)     The fish tender Tylene sank July 24, 1985 in Trading Bay.  A plank had broken loose and the vessel’s pump failed.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 55 N 151 35 W   Chart 16660

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

TYPHOON (1945)     The 8 ton 31 foot wooden gas screw Typhoon stranded and was lost in South Inian Pass July 11, 1945.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 13 30 N 136 10 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 6 Net, Length 31, Breadth 10.9, Depth 5.7, Built 1916 at Seattle WA, Service misc., Horsepower 16, Owner Robert H Burns, Registered Juneau, ON 216474

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1945) Pg 338, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1946) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 807

 

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