Alaska Shipwrecks (U)

ABBREVIATIONS:  AluminumALBritish ColumbiaBCCentralCFiberglassFRPFishing VesselFVIndicated Horse PowerIHPLongliner-LLMotor VesselMVNorthNOfficial NumberONRevenue Cutter ServiceRCSSchoonerSchSignal LettersSLSouth CentralSCSoutheastSESouthwestSWSteel oil screwSOSSteam ShipSSUnknownUUnited States ArmyUSAUnited States Coast GuardUSCGUnited States NavyUSNWestcentralWCWood gas screwWGSWood oil screwWOS

U F 21 (1966)     The 17 ton 34 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel U F 21 was consumed by fire December 11, 1966 at Port Lions.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 52 N 152 53 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 15 Net, Length 34.2, Breadth 12.1, Depth 5, Built 1961 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 141, Owner Fred Sullivan, Registered Juneau, ON 261410

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 712, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1176

 

U F 22 (1977)     Remains of the 34 foot oil screw fishing vessel UF 22 were found by the fishing vessel Columbia on Aiaktalik Beach near the south end of Kodiak Island March 2, 1978.  The vessel and her two person crew went missing October 22, 1977.  The U F 22 was owned by Charles and R L Taylor.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 42 N 154 03 W   Chart 16580

                Source: Unofficial Wreck List

 

U F NO 2 (1964)     The 9 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel U F No 2 was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Kodiak.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 30.1, Breadth 11, Depth 3.9, Built 1944 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 100, Owner Moses Malutin, Registered Juneau, ON 245741

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 686, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

U-S-1 (1948)     The 91 ton 71 foot wooden scow U-S-1 foundered at Naknek anchorage in Bristol Bay on June 9, 1948.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 43 40 N 157 00 45 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 91 Gross and Net, Length 71.6, Breadth 24.5, Depth 5.8, Built 1946 at Seattle WA, Owner Alaska Packers Association, Registered Juneau, ON 176653

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1949) Pg 559, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1950) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 928

 

UGASHIK THREE (1955)     The 33 ton 49 foot steel gas screw fishing vessel Ugashik Three burned July 20, 1955 on the Ugashik River near Ugashik.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 30 45 N 157 23 45 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 33 Gross 22 Net, Length 49.1, Breadth 14, Depth 5.6, Built 1944 at Newport FL, Former Name LCM-3-C-49099 (U S N), Horsepower 105, Owner L G Wingard Packing Company, Registered Juneau, ON 263927

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) Pg 531, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 745

 

UMIAKS (1900)     Captain Walter S Milner of the schooner Alice reported the loss of “three omiaks with more than 100 Indians aboard” during the great storm of September 12, 1900.  The following is taken from an account in the San Francisco Call:

                “Just previous to the big storm at Nome, the Alice left the exposed coast and made a run for Port Clarence…At Port Clarence, Captain Milner found that five omiaks of Indians, each holding thirty-five or forty persons, had left Kings Island for the mainland.  One arrived at Teller City while the Alice was there and another landed farther up.  Both reported that the other three boats, containing more than one hundred Indians, had gone down.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 58 N 168 05 W   Chart 16006

                Source: The San Francisco Call (October 24, 1900) “Picks Up Two Shipwrecked Crews On Bleak Shores Of The Arctic” Pg 2

 

UMNAK NATIVE (1933)     The 49 ton 59 foot wooden oil screw Umnak Native stranded and was lost on Umnak Island the evening of Tuesday January 24, 1933.  The vessel departed Unalaska January 19, 1933 bound for Atka.  There were 10 passengers and 5 crewmen aboard.  All 10 passengers and the master of the vessel perished in the disaster.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Strong gale, boat stranded at 7 0’clock p.m.”  “Inanudak Bay, Umnak Island”  “Engine failed and anchor chain parted”

                The Umnak Native was a total loss.  Lost with her were skipper John Stankus, his wife Olga Stankus and an infant child, Vern Shasibnikoff a Russian priest from Umnak, Andrew M Nelson, Mike P Tutiakoff, John Galaktianoff, Stephan Krukof, Stephan Bezezekof, Matfey Pobvorof, Andrebik S Krukof, and George A Krukof.  The Umnak Native was also carrying $3,815 worth of furs and general merchandise.  The vessel had a value of $12,000 which was a total loss along with her cargo.  The vessel was not insured but the cargo was fully insured.  Eleven lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 18 N 168 25 W   Chart 16011

                Comment: A news article from the period mentions that Bishop Antonin, the ranking Bishop of the Russian Orthodox Church in Alaska was lost in this disaster. Also 100 blue fox pups were mentioned as being on board.

                Additional Information: Tonnage 49 Gross 33 Net, Length 59.2, Breadth 16.5, Depth 7.8, Built 1929 at Seattle WA, HP 75, Registered Juneau, ON 228207, Master John Stankus of Unalaska, Owner Umnak Native Community of Umnak

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty May 20, 1933 at Unalaska by Larry Stepetin, Seaman, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1932) Pgs 556-7, 3. San Diego Evening Tribune (February 13, 1933) “13 Die on Ship in Storm as Trio Saved” Page Nine

UNCLE JOHN (1926)     The 26 ton 46 foot wooden gas screw Uncle John stranded and was lost in Dry Bay at 10 p.m. Saturday April 3, 1926.  The vessel departed Petersburg April 29, 1926 bound for Cordova with four crewmen aboard.  She was carrying eight tons of cannery supplies valued at $1,100.  The following are statements from the casualty report filed by Ludvig Torgersen, master of the Uncle John:

                “Sand Bar at entrance of Dry Bay, Alaska”  “Stranding”  “Heavy weather on outside, making for shelter of Dry Bay”  “Pitch dark, sand storm due to off shore wind from Dry Bay”  “Reversed engine and made repeated attempts to get free from bar.  This proved impossible on account of heavy seas and high wind.  The vessel soon began to founder”  “Heavy weather at sea made it compulsory that we seek shelter.  We were approaching the entrance of Dry Bay and in attempt to reach the entrance drew too close in to shore and struck on the bar”

                The Uncle John had a value of $5,000 and was a total loss, as was her cargo.  The vessel was insured for $4,800 and her cargo $1,100.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 08 N 138 25 W   Chart 16760

                Additional Information: Tonnage 26 Gross 18 Net, Length 46.5, Breadth 13.6, Depth 6, Built 1914 at Anacortes WA, HP 40, Registered Seattle, Service freight, ON 211925, Master Ludvig Torgersen of Seattle, Owner Moore Packing Company of Portland OR

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty April 20, 1926 at Cordova, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1925) Pgs 522-3

UNCLE SAM (1912)     The 24 ton 45 foot gas steam screw Uncle Sam stranded and was lost in Seward Harbor December 7, 1912.  There was no one aboard at the time of the stranding and no lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 06 30 N 149 26 30 W   Chart 16682

                Additional Information: Tonnage 24 Gross 16 Net, Length 45, Breadth 13, Depth 4.6, Built 1882 at Seattle, Home Port Kodiak, ON 201189

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1914) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 430, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1913) Pg 312

UNCLE SAM (1958)     The 25 ton 43 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Uncle Sam foundered July 14, 1958 at the north end of Kalgin Island in Cook Inlet.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 28 N 151 55 W   Chart 16660

                Additional Information: Tonnage 25 Gross 21 Net, Length 43.6, Breadth 13.3, Depth 4.1, Built 1942 at Seattle WA, Former Name C-B330 (U S N), Horsepower 285, SL WB4040, Owner Paul Whiteman, Registered Juneau, ON 253527

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) Pg 560, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 803

 

UNDAUNTED (1894)     The 68 ton 61 foot wooden schooner Undaunted stranded and was lost off Kayak Island at 1:30 a.m. Wednesday March 7, 1894.  The Undaunted departed Kodiak February 22, 1894 on a seal hunting trip with 15 persons aboard.  The vessel became entrapped in the ice off Kayak Island and crushed to bits.  The crew was forced to abandon the Undaunted and seek shelter on an ice floe where they survived for 28 days.  They managed to escape the ice on a small boat patched together from the wreckage of the Undaunted.  They made their way to Port Etches in Prince William Sound where they were taken aboard the steamer Kodiak on April 4, 1894 and transported to Kodiak Village.  No lives were lost.  The Undaunted had a value of $3,000 and had a burden of 40 tons including ballast.  Her cargo was a hunting outfit worth $1,500.  The vessel was a total loss as was most of the hunting outfit.  The vessel was insured for $2,000 and the cargo had no insurance.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 56 N 144 23 W   Chart 16723

                Comment: The wreck report gives the location as “60 08 12 N south end of Kayak Island Cove ESE” which makes the wreck likely off the village of Kayak between Wingham Island and Kayak Island.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 68.18 Gross 64.8 Net, Length 61, Breadth 22.4, Depth 7.0, Built 1873 at Davenport Landing CA, Registered Kodiak, ON 25201, Master H B Larsen of Kodiak, Owner H B Larsen and H C Cope of Kodiak

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1893) Pg251, 3. Victoria Daily Colonist (May 19, 1894) “On a Sea of Ice” Pg 5

UNDINE (1933)     The 9 ton 33 foot wooden gas screw Undine broke loose from her mooring and broke up on shore in Green Bay at 6:30 p.m. Monday December 18, 1933.  The vessel was at anchor with no one aboard and no cargo when the disaster occurred.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Green Bay, Alaska”  “Stranding”  “Mooring line pulled out forward butts vessel drifted ashore and broke up”  “Heavy gale”  “Vessel moored alongside Barge Griffon

                The Undine had a value of $1,000 and was a total loss.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 09 15 N 134 16 35 W   Chart 17315

                Comment: Probably Green Cove, 11 miles SE of Juneau.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 33.1, Breadth 12.2, Depth 3.5, Built 1910 at Bay Center, WA, HP 20, Registered Seattle, ON 207892, Master R Clithero of Seattle, Owner Norton Clapp of Tacoma

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty December 26, 1933 at Juneau by Agent of Owner, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1933) Pgs 578-0

UNGA (1999)     The 37 foot wooden longline halibut fishing vessel Unga was consumed by an engine room fire May 13, 1999 near Sand Point.  The only person on board made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 20 15 N 160 30 W   Chart 16553

                Additional Information: ON 291272, Built 1963

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

UNILUCO (1929)     Fire destroyed the 17 ton 37 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Uniluco near Gravina Island at 2 p.m. January 21, 1929.  The vessel departed Ketchikan that day “cruising for logs” with only her master aboard and no cargo.  The following are statements from the casualty report submitted by Richard Thompson, master of the Uniluco:

                “Calm and clear”  “Black Point, Gravina Island”  “Backfiring of engine”  “Tried to put out fire with Pyrenes”  “After backfiring of engine vessel caught fire in engine room, and after using fire extinguisher found that the fire could not be put out, was forced to abandon vessel”  “Total Loss”

                The Uniluco was valued at $5,000 and became a total loss.  She was insured for $2,500.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 02 15 N 132 05 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 15 Net, Length 37.5, Breadth 11.8, Depth 5.5, HP 24, Built 1911 at Burton WA, Registered Ketchikan, ON 213648, Owner G F Heckman of Ketchikan

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty January 22, 1929 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) Pgs 528-9

UNIMAK (1976)     The fishing vessel Unimak was consumed by fire and lost December 15, 1976 in the Bering Sea.

                Mapping and Location: Alaska Unknown

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

UNIMAK (1988)     The 56 foot longline fishing vessel Unimak capsized and sank April 16, 1988 in Icy Bay.  The four persons aboard escaped to a life raft and were rescued six hours later.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 55 N 141 33 W   Chart 16013

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

UNION (1914)     The 8 ton 38 foot gas screw Union departed Lituya Bay for Dixon Harbor December 28, 1913 and hasn’t been heard from since.  The trip should have taken 5 hours.  The vessel was on the mail run between Juneau and Yakutat.  Captain W B Germain and William Stratton were lost with the Union.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 20 15 N 136 52 W   Chart 16760

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 5 Net, Length 38, Breadth 8, Depth 3.5, Built 1902 at Juneau, Registered Juneau, ON 25356

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1915) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 425, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1914) Pg 314, 3. BOEMRE Shipwreck List (2011)

UNITY (1917)     The 17 ton 39 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Unity was blown ashore and lost on Douglas Island at 2 a.m. Monday December 10, 1917.  The vessel departed Juneau December 9th bound for Excursion Inlet with 4 crewmen aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by Olaf Jacobson, master of the Unity:

                “Snowstorm, dark, about 25 miles (wind)”  “Outer Point, NW end Douglas Island, Alaska”  “Stranded, gale”  “Anchored in storm, driven ashore”  “Put out 2 anchors but wouldn’t hold”  “Vessel broke up immediately”

                The Unity was worth $1,500 and became a total loss with no insurance.  There was no cargo aboard.  No lives were lost in the disaster.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 18 05 N 134 41 15 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 11 Net, Length 39.5, Breadth 12.8, Depth 4, IHP 20, Built 1911 at Seattle WA, Registered Seattle, ON 208880, Master Olaf Jacobson of Excursion Inlet, Owner Astoria & Puget Sound Canning Company of Excursion Inlet

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty December 12, 1917 at Juneau, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Pg 318

UNIVERSE (1923)     The 39 ton 59 foot gas screw fishing vessel Universe stranded and was lost at Kanak Island at 7:20 a.m. Sunday December 9, 1923.  The vessel departed Cordova December 8th at 11:45 a.m. bound for Seattle, Washington with a crew of 7 men.  There was no cargo aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by Pete Lubetich, owner of the Universe:

                “Sand bar west side Kanak Island”  “Stranding”  “Went ashore in snow storm and heavy sea”  “Master says strong wind”  “Master says attempted to anchor and back out of sand”  “The owner was not on boat, but received statement from master”  “Total loss from present advice”

                The Universe had a value of $10,000 and was reported a total loss.  The vessel had $10,000 in insurance.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 08 N 144 21 W   Chart 16723

                Comment: This vessel was salvaged, put back into service and lost again in 1927.  Evidence of this wreck may still be on site and of interest.  The 50 foot vessel San Marco was lost with the Universe.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 39 Gross 30 Net, Length 59.2, Breadth 14.6, Depth 7, IHP 65, Built 1920 at Port Orchard WA, Registered Seattle, ON 220225, Master Timothy Collins of Cordova, Owner Pete Lubetich of Seattle

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty January 5, 1924 at Seattle, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1923) Pg 292

UNIVERSE (1927)     The 39 ton 59 foot gas screw fishing vessel Universe stranded and was lost on Chirikof Island at 11 p.m. November 19, 1927.  The vessel departed Kodiak November 11th bound for Chirikof Island with 4 crewmen aboard.  She had 10 tons of general merchandise cargo on board valued at $2,000.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “East side Chirikof Island”  “Blown ashore”  “Stranding”  “Gale, iced down”  “Hove to under lee of island for three days before being blown ashore”  “S S Starr picked crew up”  “TOTAL LOSS”

                The Universe had a value of $10,000 at the time of the disaster and was a total loss along with her cargo.  The vessel was insured for $8,000 and the cargo was fully insured.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 50 N 155 37 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 39 Gross 30 Net, Length 59.2, Breadth 14.6, Depth 7, IHP 65, Built 1920 at Port Orchard WA, Registered Seward, ON 220225, Master Roy Lynch of Kodiak, Owner Irving W Bonbright of New York City

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty March 23, 1928 at Seward by Karl Armstrong, Managing Owner, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1927) Pgs 512-513

UNKNOWN 2 MASTED VESSEL (1762)     An abandoned 2 masted foreign island ship is mentioned in a report by the Cossack Savin T Ponomarev and the promyshlennik Stephan G Glotov dated September 12, 1762 concerning their discovery of new islands in the Aleutian Chain.  The inhabitants of Unalaska and Umnak reported seeing the vessel on Chikhmil Island.

                Mapping and Location: Unknown South Central or Southwest Alaska

                Source: Russian Penetration of the North Pacific Ocean 1700-1797 (1988) Pg 222

UNKNOWN JAPANESE JUNK AND UNKNOWN RUSSIAN VESSEL (1784)     The following is an excerpt from a letter written February 26, 1791 to Count Aleksandr R Vorontsov by Kyrill Laksman detailing the plight of Japanese castaways rescued in the Aleutians by Russian Promyshlenniks:

                “On December 13, 1783, seventeen Japanese men sailed out from the town of Shiroko to trade in the capitol city of Yedo.  At the halfway point of their voyage they, like many similar vessels, stopped to spend the night in Semioda Bay.  During a violent windstorm another vessel hit them and broke off their rudder.  Without the rudder they had to cut the mast, and thus they drifted at the mercy of the waves for more than seven months, drifting in various directions.  At last on July 20, 1784 they came to the Aleutian Island of Amisachka where they dropped anchor and went ashore in a small boat.  They found seven Aleut men there who were hunting wild geese.  The Aleuts invited the five Japanese into their earthen iurts and gave them cooked goose and fish to eat.  Toward evening Russian promyshlenniks came to the island from a vessel which had been wrecked on the island, a vessel which belonged to the Totma merchant, Khodilov.  The Russians went to the Japanese vessel and spent the night in a cabin on shore, but during the night there was a storm at sea and the anchor broke away on some sharp rocks underwater.  The ship was cast adrift and then was wrecked on the coast.  Thus, deprived of their last hope, the men had to remain on that island for three years and a month, during which time the Russian promyshlenniks used planks from their wrecked vessel, and the remains of the Japanese vessel, which had been built of redwood and camphor, to build a new vessel.  In September of 1787 they took the remaining nine Japanese men with them to Nizhnekamchatsk ostrog.  Seven of the Japanese had died while they were on the Aleutian Island, and an eighth was killed during a storm at sea”

                There are multiple historic references to a wrecked Japanese junk in the Rat Islands of the Aleutians in the early 1780’s.  All attribute the presence of rats and the name of the islands to the wreck.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   51 48 N 178 19 E   Chart 16011

                Comment: I have taken the liberty of charting this wreck at Rat Island.  The original landing was likely at Amchitka Island.  WG

                Source: Russian Penetration of the North Pacific Ocean 1700-1797 (1988) Pg 401-412

UNKNOWN RUSSIAN VESSEL (1803)     Wreckage from an unknown possibly Russian vessel washed up on the shores of Montague Island April 10, 1803.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 10 N 147 15 W   Chart 16700

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN JAPANESE VESSEL (1805)     An unknown Japanese vessel wrecked in 1805 outside of present day Sitka.  The survivors were given temporary residence on Japonski Island by the Russian inhabitants of the area.  The name of the Island derives from the Japanese presence there.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 135 22 W   Chart 17320

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN RUSSIAN BAIDARA (1830)     A Russian baidara was wrecked in heavy weather near Kodiak Island, February 10, 1830.  The vessel was travelling from Kodiak to Alexandrovsk Redoubt.  20 persons were lost in the disaster. Wreckage washed ashore near Crane Bay (Duck Bay?).

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   Unknown

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN RUSSIAN GUNBOAT (1840)?     Several unsubstantiated reports have persisted of an unknown Russian vessel, possibly a three masted Russian gunboat that was lost at the entrance to Thomas Bay or the north end of Sergius Narrows or Midway Reef in the vicinity of Fairway Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central or Southeast Alaska Unknown

                Source: The BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

UNKNOWN BRITISH VESSEL (1847)     A large unknown British vessel was wrecked on the southwest coast of Saint Paul Island in 1847 as it was coming in to anchor off Zapadni Point.  The name English Bay derives from this wreck.

                Mapping and Location:  Southwest Alaska   57 08 30 N 170 18 30 W   Chart 16382

                Source: Dictionary of Alaska Place Names (1967) English Bay Pg 315

UNKNOWN JUNK (1851)     An unknown Japanese junk was lost on Atka Island in 1851.  Only three of those aboard survived the wreck.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 07 N 174 30 W   Chart 16012

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN JAPANESE VESSEL (1862)     In September of 1862 and unknown Japanese vessel, possibly a junk, wrecked at Attu Island.  Of the 12 crewmen, 9 were lost in the disaster.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 55 N 172 55 E   Chart 16012

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN SCHOONER (1869)     An unknown schooner was lost on Barren Island in 1869.

                Mapping and Location: South Central or Southeast Alaska Unknown

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN JUNK (1869)     An unknown junk washed up on Adak Island in April of 1869.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   51 45 N 176 45 W   Chart 16012

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN SCHOONER (1870)     An unknown schooner was wrecked in 1870 near Wrangell Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 16 N 132 12 W   Chart 17360

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN JUNK (1871)     An unknown junk wrecked at Attu Island in 1871.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 55 N 172 55 E   Chart 16012

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN JAPANESE VESSEL (1872)     An unknown Japanese vessel wrecked at Adak in 1872.

Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   51 45 N 176 45 W   Chart 16012

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN VESSEL (1888)     “…at the end of the season (1888) over 100 cases of salmon labeled Kodiak Packing Company washed ashore at the south end of Alitak Bay interspersed with pieces of a vessel.”

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 50 N 154 17 W   Chart 16580

                Source: Salmon from Kodiak (1986) Pg 143

UNKNOWN COLUMBIA RIVER BOAT (1897)     An unknown Columbia River Boat was lost in Berners Bay in August of 1897.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 43 N 135 W   Chart 17300

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN STEAM BARGE (1898)     An unknown steam barge was lost with all hands near Cape Sarichef.  Wreckage was found on a beach nearby.  The steamer Garonne found a life ring on a voyage from Saint Michael.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 35 50 N 164 55 30 W   Chart 16011

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN SCHOONER (1898)     An unknown capsized schooner was spotted by the schooner Victoria between Kodiak and the Shumagin Islands in 1898.  The vessel was drifting; all hands presumed lost.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   Unknown

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN BARGE (1898)     An unknown barge was lost in the Bering Sea in 1898.

                Mapping and Location: South Central or West Central Unknown

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN NILE RIVER STEAMER (1898)     An unknown Nile River Steamer was lost in the North Pacific in 1898.

                Mapping and Location: Unknown

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN STEAMER SCOW (1898)     An unknown steamer scow was lost at Dixon Entrance January 31, 1898.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 30 N 133 W   Chart 16016

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN IRON BARGE (1898)     An iron barge used for hauling ore was driven ashore and wrecked near Skagway February 21, 1898.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   59 27 30 N 135 18 45 W   Chart 17300

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN STEEL BARGE (1898)     A steel barge broke loose from her tow and foundered at sea June 28, 1898.  The vessel, owned by Empire Transportation, was travelling from Seattle to Saint Michael.  The barge was valued at $15,000 and was a total loss.

                Mapping and Location: Unknown Alaska

                Source: The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 41

UNKNOWN SLOOP (1898)     An unknown sloop was lost near Sunrise City in September of 1898.  The vessel was travelling to points in Cook Inlet and was heavily loaded with passengers and freight.  The sloop was swamped in a tidal bore.  Seven Copper River Miners and two crewmen were lost in the disaster.  The only survivor was the captain’s dog.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 53 30 N 149 25 30 W   Chart 16660

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN SMALL RIVER STEAMER (1898)     An unknown small river steamer was lost overboard in heavy weather from the bark Rufus E Wood in 1898 or 1899.  The bark was on her way north to Saint Michael.

                Mapping and Location: Unknown Alaska

                Source: The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 41

UNKNOWN VESSEL (1900)     An unknown vessel was lost February 2, 1900 in Alaska.

                Mapping and Location: Unknown Alaska

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN  FISHING SLOOP (1904)     A fishing sloop with no apparent name was discovered capsized in Chatham Strait July 22, 1904 with the bodies of two men lashed to it.  Identification found on the men revealed they were Charles Thumberg of Medford, Oregon and J Malone.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 134 32 W   Chart 16016

Source: The Anaconda Montana Standard (July 26, 1904) “Bodies of Two Found on Overturned Sloop” Front Page

UNKNOWN NAME HOUSE SCOW (1908)    A house scow was crushed by ice at the mouth of the Alsek River in March of 1908.  Lost with the vessel were provisions and personal gear.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 08 N 138 25 W   Chart 16016

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN JAPANESE SEALER (1909)     An unknown Japanese seal hunting vessel was lost in 1909 in the Pribilof Islands.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   57 N 170 W   Chart 16011

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN SCOW (1909)     An unknown scow went adrift from Hinchinbrook Lighthouse and wrecked on Montague Island in September of 1909.  The vessel was salvaged by Natives.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 10 N 147 15 W   Chart 16700

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN POWER LAUNCH (1915)     An unknown named power launch was lost on Glacier Island December 7, 1915.  The vessel had come from College Fjord and was on her way to Valdez when she grounded on the rocks.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 53 N 147 11 W   Chart 16700

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNKNOWN MAIL BOAT (1928)     An unknown gas screw mail boat was lost in 1928 at the mouth of Shoup Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   61 07 15 N 146 35 30 W   Chart 16700

                Comment: This may be the Marylee, lost at the mouth of Shoup Bay late in 1927.  WG

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

UNUK (1929)     The 12 ton 36 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Unuk collided with the gas screw vessel Confidence near Channel Island Light at 11:30 p.m. Sunday July 28, 1929.  The Unuk had departed Ketchikan and was headed for the fishing grounds with four crewmen aboard.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by Henry Denny, master and owner of the Unuk:

                “About 1 mile north Channel Island Light, near Ketchikan, Alaska”  “No wind, smooth sea, dark”  “Collision, gas screw Confidence of Ketchikan”  “Saw Confidence approaching on port.  Blew no whistle as everything looked clear to pass on port”  “All of a sudden Confidence turned to his port and before I could get away he struck Unuk on port”  “After collision Confidence immediately put lines on vessel and towed Unuk into Wards Cove, Alaska”  “Total loss”

                The Unuk had a value of $2,500 and was a total loss.  She had no cargo aboard.  There was no insurance on the vessel.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 24 30 N 131 43 30 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 8 Net, Length 35.8, Breadth 10.9, Depth 3.7, Built 1912 at Saxman, HP 16, Registered Ketchikan, ON 210448

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty August 1, 1929 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1929) Pgs 540-1

URAGIO MARU (1943)     The 3,110 ton Japanese cargo ship Uragio Maru was sunk by U S aircraft April 4, 1943 in Kiska Harbor.  The vessel had been badly damaged and four crewmembers killed in an American attack December 31, 1942.  January 4, 1943 a violent storm destroyed the cargo ship further and the Uragio Maru was abandoned.  The U S bombing raid of April 4, 1943 was the end of the Uragio Maru.  The hulk of the vessel is still on site.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   51 58 N 177 34 E   Chart 16012

                Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. Pacificwrecks.com (2013) “Urajio Maru (Uragio Maru)”

 

URAL (1994)     The 41 foot fishing vessel Ural flooded, capsized and was lost September 14, 1994 at Kennedy Entrance.  Two crewmembers were picked up by another fishing vessel and a third by a U S Coast Guard rescue swimmer.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 N 151 50 W   Chart 16013

                Additional Information: ON 585905

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

URANIA (1876)     The 80 ton schooner Urania departed Kodiak December 29, 1875 bound for San Francisco and was never seen again.  13 persons and a load of furs were lost along with the vessel.  On board were Captain Thomas K Lee, his Wife and 2 year old son, passengers Luke Sheerar, R L Williams, C Haretonoff, D Shirpser, Emil Shirpser and a crew of six.

                Mapping and Location: Unknown

                Comment: An 1877 article in the Japan Weekly Mail states the passengers and crewmembers of the Urania went missing in December of 1875 and were found on a remote south sea island in 1877.  WG

                Sources: 1. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1961 reprint) Pg 246, 2. The Japan Weekly Mail (November 17, 1877) “Correspondence” Pg 1045, 3. The Daily Morning Call (San Francisco July 7, 1876) “The Missing Schooner Urania, 4. The Weekly Bulletin (San Francisco June 14, 1877) “The Lost Schooner Urania

USSONA (1956)     The 16 ton 43 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Ussona was consumed by fire November 19, 1956 at Deer Island in Ernest Sound.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 02 N 132 01 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 16 Gross 7 Net, Length 42.9, Breadth 12.2, Depth 5.2, Built 1918 at Raymond WA, Horsepower 140, Owner S Laland Daniels, Registered Astoria OR, ON 216420

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 536, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 758

 

UYAK (1909)     The 22 ton 55 foot wooden steam screw Uyak stranded and was lost on Kodiak Island the morning of September 13, 1909.  The vessel had departed Uyak Bay bound for Karluk with 2 persons aboard when the disaster occurred.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “Walcott Rock, Kodiak Island, Alaska”  “Stranding”  “Misjudgment in distance offshore.  Extreme low tide, and tide carried her too close to shore”  “Early morning, S S Shelikof and lighters tried to assist her in getting off, but they were unsuccessful”  “Complete wreck”

                The Uyak had a value of $10,000 and was a complete loss with no insurance.  She was not carrying cargo.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 40 15 N 154 11 45 W   Chart 16598

                Comment: Probably Wolcott Reef named for where the schooner Wolcott was lost January 31, 1900

                Additional Information: Tonnage 22 Gross 12 Net, Length 55, Breadth 13, Depth 5.8, Service Tow, HP 80, Built 1901 at Alameda CA, Registered Seattle WA, ON 25336, Master Markin Olsen of Seattle, Owner Northwestern Fisheries Company of Seattle

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report November 15, 1909 at Seattle by C H Bushman, General Supt., Northwestern Fisheries Co.

UYAK (1981)     The 60 foot fishing vessel Uyak sank February 24, 1981 off of Humpback Rock in Chiniak Bay near Kodiak.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 42 30 N 152 15 W   Chart 16580

                Source: Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak)

 

UYAK II (1987)     The 112 foot trawler Uyak II foundered November 5, 1987 off of the south end of Kodiak Island.  Four of her six crewmembers were lost including Gregory D Klinkenburg (29) of Kodiak, Rogerio N Jamie (32) of Anchor Point, Donald Brand (44) of Tacoma WA and Hee K “Charlie” Im (37) of Gardena CA.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 20 N 153 22 W   Chart 16013

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

11 Responses to Alaska Shipwrecks (U)

  1. Neil Newlun says:

    I was 14 years old and on a hunting trip when The Ussona burned in 1956.

    • captaingood says:

      Thanks for posting Neil. If you can tell the story of the fire or have any pictures, I can always use first hand knowledge. This site is still under construction and will be for many months. The more information I can post on here the more likely people won’t repeat mistakes and vulnerabilities.

  2. galen cook says:

    captain:

    do you have any knowledge or information about the F/V Universe? It sank near Seattle in 1983, after coming back from Alaska. All hands lost except for one.
    Thank you.

    • captaingood says:

      The Universe was a 50 foot purse seiner that capsized and sank off of Port Madison November 7, 1983. The skipper, Tom O’Donnell and two others were lost. Dave McCue of Seattle was the only survivor.

  3. Paul says:

    I just googled Uyak II out of interest as I worked on this vessel in the port of Seattle in 87. So sad to read this info. I still remember Greg and Don. Really nice guys. I wanted to go with the boat but couldn’t as I had no green card (I’m British). The loss was just 2 months after she left Seattle by the looks of it. We were refitting a winch. The work took longer than planned. No sea trials were conducted, she had to go straight to Alaska. How awful.

    • captaingood says:

      That was a sad time around Kodiak. The Nordfjord had disappeared coming up from Seattle only a month or two before the loss of the Uyak II. I was working in the trawl fleet around Kodiak at the time and remember well. We were loosing dozens of boats a year back then. I am still looking for explanations for many of them.

  4. Jeff says:

    I was on the Goldrush when the Uyak II sank off Barnabus Cape. We picked up two survivors from the liferaft and looked for 24 hours for the others with no good outcome.

  5. Vern Bjornstad says:

    Unimak 1976, caught fire but was not lost. It was towed to Seattle and rebuilt. I worked on it crabbing in 1978 with a new house and was on it several times after that. Heard that it did burn up out of King Cove way later and was a complete loss.

    • captaingood says:

      Thanks for the update, Vern. I will do some follow up research and edit my books and posts accordingly. Do you remember about what length the Unimak was and if she was wood or steel? There were three Unimaks fishing in Alaska back then, an 83 footer, a 48 footer and a 36 footer. Those are waterline lengths, so the length over all may be much more. I have very little information to go on. If you were crabbing, you were probably on the big wood one owned by Ehrling Bendixsen.

  6. Capt. Chris Gundersen says:

    Known Vern since grade school(Graduated from Ballard with him, 1970). As far as I remember, his Unimak was the bigger one, which he fished crab with, tendered too I think. Pretty sure it was a wood scow type vessel. I fished shrimp for Bendixsen in South Bend WA. around the same time.

    • Vern Bjornstad says:

      The F/V Unimak was a 86 ft power scow owned by Bendiksen and fished in Ak for crab in Dutch Harbor for Eastpoint Seafoods and went to Bristol Bay for salmon to Queen Fisheries on the Nushagak River in the summer. Bendiksen had a fleet of tenders and I worked on a few of them notably the Boxer in the 80’s. Other boats he had were the Dugong, Dorothea, Erling Jr.

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