South Central Alaska Shipwrecks ( D )

D L CO. NO. VII (1916)     The 72 ton scow D L Co No VII was wrecked at the Bering River August of 1916.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 11 N 144 15 W  Chart 16723

                Source : H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 269

 

DASHING WAVE (1891)     The 106 foot wood schooner Dashing Wave stranded and was lost Saturday April 15, 1891 at 3:00 p.m. at Coal Bay.  The vessel had left Sand Point earlier that day with eight crew and 120 tons of general merchandise and was bound for Isatok.  Conditions at the time of the casualty are listed as “Thick snowstorm and strong currents.”  “Storm, gale, snowing, heavy seas, daylight.” No crew were lost, but the Dashing Wave and her cargo were.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  55 22 N 161 22 W  Chart 16551

                Comment : Most publications put this wreck in Coal Harbor on Unga Island. I charted it across Unga Passage on the mainland in Coal Bay. Many early accounts have the loss listed in the Bering Sea which I am guessing is where they were headed. WG

                Additional Information : Length 106, Breadth 27, Depth 9.9, Tonnage 141.46, Built 1867 Eureka California, Registered San Francisco, ON 6546, Master F M Gaffney of San Francisco, Owner W C Lynde of San Francisco, Vessel Value $8,000, Cargo Value $5,000, Vessel Insurance $7,000, Cargo Insurance $4,000

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report filed at San Francisco June 3, 1891 by Gaffney

 

DELAWARE (1931)     The 32 ton gas screw Delaware struck a submerged object Sunday June 14, 1931 at 6:15 p.m. and sank.  The casualty occurred 18 miles north of the Barren Islands while on a trip from Daylight Harbor in Shuyak Strait to Seldovia.  The Delaware had 4 crew aboard and 4.5 tons of cargo including barreled salt, ballast and tools.  The following is an account given in the Casualty Report filed by master John McKnab August 1, 1931:

                “Moderate easterly breeze, foggy, daylight.”  “About 18 miles north from Barren Isl. Entrance to Cook Inlet…Struck submerged object.  Submerged object broke through hull.”  “After striking this object the vessel leaked faster than we could pump.  We abandoned her in a sinking condition at 7:20 p.m.  At the rate the water was coming in she could not have floated longer than ½ hour.  Owing to fog we did not see her sink but the air tank and skylight hatch were picked up on the beach in Kamishak Bay 8 days later.”

                The Delaware, valued at $5,000 and her cargo were lost but the crew survived.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  58 55 30 N 152 15 W  Chart 16013

                Additional Information : Tonnage 32 Gross 25 Net, Age 14 years, Registered Seward, ON 214941, Owner Herring Bay Packing of Seldovia, Last Port Daylight Harbor June 14, Destination Seldovia, Insurance unknown

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed at Seward August 1, 1931

 

DELPHINE (1903)     The launch Delphine was lost at Karluk in 1903.  The Delphine was valued at $900 with cargo.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 34 10 N 154 27 30 W  Chart 16580

                Sources : 1. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg94, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaska Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

DEMOCRAT (1931)     The 34 ton wooden gas screw Democrat was lost August 12, 1931 while engaged in deep sea fisheries.  The crew of six survived but the Democrat, valued at $18,000 and her 28,000 lb. cargo of halibut, valued at $2,240.00 were lost.  The following is an account of the loss detailed in the Casualty Report filed master Henry Arntzen on August 19th:

                “NW breeze foggy and rough.”  “Iniskin Shoal (hit here)…hit submerged reef.”  “After hitting the rocks on the morning of the 11th, about 6 a.m. we were stranded until high tide took us off, at which time we pumped her out and gave her the once over and decided that she was seaworthy and then started across Cooks Inlet, looking for smoother water and a place to finish our trip; and arriving at the Inlet, about 6 P.M. that night, we set our gear and then anchored for the night and on the next day, the 12th, we started setting and hauling our gear for several hours, with all hands on deck, when without any warning the engine stopped from the water which she had taken on and which was the first warning we had that she was again leaking badly and, of course, with the engine stopped we had no way of using the power pumps but kept the hand or deck pump going but without avail; and, of course, with the engine stopped, we had no way of running for a haven or of beaching her.” “Foundered N.W. Yukon Island”

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 31 30 N 151 29 30 W  Chart 16645

                Additional Information : Tonnage 34 Gross 27 Net, Built 1918, Registered Ketchikan, ON 215922, Last Port Kodiak August 6, Vessel Insurance $12,000, Cargo Insurance $2,240

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed August 19, 1931 at Ketchikan

 

DIOMEDES HERMAN (1882)     The 12.86 ton schooner Diomedes Herman drug anchor in a strong easterly gale November 13, 1882 in Chernabura Harbor in the Shumagin Islands.  The vessel was blown against a steep bluff which tore a hole in her side.  The Diomedes Herman was given up as a complete loss but her cargo of provisions, dry goods and firewood was salvaged.  The two passengers and two crew survived the wreck.  The vessel was valued at $600 and her cargo at $1,000.  She had departed Belkovski October 30 for Chernabura Island.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  54 47 N 159 33 W  Chart 16011

                Comment : There is no harbor on Churnabura Island

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaska Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

DIRECTOR (1924)     The 18 ton wooden gas screw Director ran aground during a storm at 10:00 p.m. March 2, 1924 and was lost.  The crew of 4 had departed Cordova the day before for deep sea fisheries.  Captain George Walley gives this account in the wreck report filed March 6 :

                “Strong gale; dark night; snowing.  Wind 80 miles hr. S. E.”  “Were sounding, last depth 20 fathoms, struck before knew where I was.”  “Between Shelter Bay and Bear Point”  “Ran aground in snow storm; heavy sea; blowing SE gale…Storm continuing, broke up.”

                “Ga. S Waif stood by 3/4/24 but vessel breaking up….Abandoning wreck, recovering what gear possible.”

                The Director was valued at $3,000 and her stores and fuel at $800; both lost no insurance.  The crew survived the accident.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 26 N 146 39 W  Chart 16709

                Comment : There are many Bear Capes and Shelter Bays but the only two I could find near each other were on the west end of Hinchinbrook Island.  W      

                Additional Information : Tonnage 18 Gross 12 Net, Built 1911, Registered at Seattle and Ketchikan, ON 207129, Owner A Soriana of Prince Rupert

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed at Cordova March 6, 1924

 

DISCOVERY (1903)     The 209 ton wood steamer Discovery is “supposed to have been lost during the night of November 1, 1903.”  The vessel departed Yakutat November 1, 1903 with about 14 passengers and about 16 crew.  She was never heard from again.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed at Port Townsend, Washington by B Hasting, President of the Discovery Transportation Company who owned the Discovery:

                “Supposed to be between Yakutat and Cross Sound.”   “Supposed to have foundered.  Heavy gale from ENE with southeast & southwest cross sea running. Wind 60 mi.; dark night”

                “Revenue Cutter Rush was sent from Sitka after some weeks, but found no tidings.  Since then report comes of Indians finding hull of vessel.  This has not been confirmed.  Parties coming from Cape Yakataga to Kayak, in November report finding doors, windows, and broken parts of steamers house on beach, also life preservers marked Str Discovery.  This is same way the Discovery life preservers were marked.”

                “We are convinced the Discovery is lost with all hands on board.  The exact time and how the accident occurred will never be known.”

                According to the wreck report, along with the Discovery an estimated 30 passengers and crew were lost including J W McGrath, Charles Mokler, Ed Nord, Guy Trolford, Ed Van Dice, R Price, Christ Judson, — Shady, A Dergin, William Dangerfield, Albert R Cassell, Robert Carlson, — Hans; Joe Birry and wife, Captain Seabery and George PowellThe Discovery was valued at $24,000 at the time of the loss and was insured for $12,000.

                Other reports of the fate of the Discovery claim that all but one of the passengers who had started with the vessel at Nome, had quit the trip at Unga and Kodiak claiming that the Discovery was not seaworthy.  The remaining 26 persons aboard, mostly crew, were lost with the vessel somewhere between Middleton Island and Cross Sound. One report from a claimed survivor has the vessel striking an iceberg at Cross Sound.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 32 30 N 139 51 30 W  Chart 16760

                Additional Information : Tonnage 209 Gross 111 Net, Length 90, Built 1889, Registered  Port Townsend Washington, ON 157263, Master M R Walters of Port Townsend, Last Port Yakutat November 1, 1903, Destination Port Townsend via Cross Sound

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report January 22, 1904, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaska Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

DISCOVERER (1929)     The oil screw Discoverer stranded 12 miles SW of Gore Point April 5, 1929. 

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 12 N 150 57 30 W  Chart 16645

                Sources : 1. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg403, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaska Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

DISCOVERER (1932)     The diesel screw schooner Discoverer was wrecked at Ninilchik December 5, 1932.  The vessel was built at Seabeck in 1914 and was captained by Heinie Berger.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 03 N 151 40 W  Chart 16661

                Sources : 1. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg419, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaska Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

DORA B (1900)     The small schooner Dora B broke her towline April 15, 1900 while being towed by the steamer Excelsior. They were at the entrance to Lituya Bay when the line parted and the Dora B was never heard from again.  There were four crewmen aboard and a load of supplies bound for Lituya Bay miners.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  58 36 45 N 137 39 30 W  Chart 16760

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaska Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *