South Central Alaska Shipwrecks ( H )

H I C #4 (1929)     The 27 ton wooden scow H I C #4 broke her tow line while being towed from Yakutat to Dangerous River at 2:00 a.m. Tuesday September 3, 1929.  She drifted onto the Dangerous River Bar and was wrecked by the pounding waves of a heavy SE gale.  There was no one aboard and no cargo, but the H I C #4, valued at $984 was completely wrecked.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska 59 20 55 N 139 18 W  Chart 16016

                Additional Information : Tonnage 27, Built 1919, Registered Juneau and Seattle, ON 167643, Master F Svenson of Seattle, Owner Libby McNeil & Libby of Seattle, Last Port Yakutat September 2nd

                Source : U S Customs Report of Casualty filed by Svenson October 17, 1929 in Seattle

 

H L TIERNAN (1882)     The 153 ton two masted schooner H L Tiernan was lost in 1882 in the Shumagin Islands.  The vessel was owned by Lynde and Hough of San Francisco and valued at $17,000 with cargo at the time of the loss.  The H L Tiernan was part of the cod fishing fleet.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  55 10 N 160 W  Chart 16540

                Sources : 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. Pacific Cod Fisheries (1916)

 

HAMMOND (1907)     The 41 foot wooden gas screw steamer Hammond burned off Storey Island August 22, 1907.

“The engine of the steamer backfired, igniting oil in bilges.  Crew was unable to smother the fire.  The master took a small boat and rowed one and one half miles for a larger boat to rescue the passengers and engineer.  Meanwhile, the vessel drifted ashore.  Six passengers were saved, but the engineer was found dead.”

The Hammond’s home port was Seattle and service was inland towing.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 43 30 N 147 25 W  Chart 16713

                Additional Information : Length 41, Breadth 9.6, Depth 4.5, Built Portland Oregon 1901, Tonnage 14 Gross 10 Net, Registered Seattle, ON 96582

                Source : Alaska Packers Association Records 1741-1939 Microfilm 1982

 

HAROLD BLEKUM (1917)     The 192 ton wooden schooner Harold Blekum drifted ashore, stranded and was lost in Ugak Bay just after midnight March 4, 1917.  The vessel departed Kodiak February 27th bound for Seattle with a crew of eight and 100 tons of cargo including empty gasoline drums.  They had lost both of their anchors the day before.  Weather at the time was reported to be calm clear night with heavy swell and snow squalls.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 48 N 154 04 W  Chart 16580

                Comment : Vessel originally Ruby A Cousins

                Additional Information : Tonnage 192 Gross 185 Net, Age 34 years, Registered San Francisco, ON 110554, Master W O Kahlmeister of Seattle, Owner D F Erskine of San Francisco, Vessel Value $15,000, Cargo Value $1,500, Insurance unknown

                Source : U S Custom Report of Casualty March 19, 1917 by Kahlmeister

 

HAWK (1935)     The 5 ton gas screw Hawk was lost in a storm at Chignik May 22, 1935.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  56 18 N 156 158 24 W  Chart 16566

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

HAYDN BROWN (1912)     The 162 foot 864 ton bark Haydn Brown was lost on the southern tip of Montague Island at 8:00 p.m. Sunday May 18, 1912.  The vessel departed Akutan May 3, 1912 bound for Seattle via Gypsum with 30 tons of coal, six crew and two stowaways.  The bark had been reduced to a barge and was being towed by the tug Pioneer.  They encountered a storm off of Cape Saint Elias and the Pioneer cut the Haydn Brown loose.  The barge drifted for two days with the tug in pursuit, piling up on the rocks at the south end of Montague May 18th.  Two crew of the barge made it to shore, one found by local natives and the other by the lighthouse tender Armeria.  Only one of those two survived; one August Palmer.  The other six aboard the barge perished including the two stowaways. The 1502 ton Armeria also went on the rocks and was lost in the rescue attempt.  Her crew of 36 plus the single survivor of the Haydn Brown were rescued by the steamship Admiral Sampson.  (See Armeria)  Lost with the Haydn Brown were master A Peterson of Oakland California, S Martin, C Westerlund, Chris Jensen, Kowahara and the two stowaways, names unknown.

                Mapping and Location :  Southcentral Alaska  59 48 N 147 55 W  Chart 16701

                Additional Information : Length 162, Breadth 34.9, Depth 19.8 Built Newburyport Mass, Tonnage 864 Gross 769 Net, Registered Seattle, ON 95434, Owner Coastwise Steamship and Barge Co of Seattle, Vessel Value $7,500, Cargo Value $240, Vessel Insurance $2,500, Cargo Insurance none

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report filed May 23, 1912 at Puget Sound by James Griffith and Sons Managing Owners, 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 211

 

HELEN (1894)     The 46 foot 28 ton wooden schooner Helen lost her rudder, began leaking and stranded near Yakutat Bay (near Mt St Elias) at 2 p.m. Thursday May 3, 1894.  The vessel had left Sitka April 7th with a crew of 14 and a hunting outfit worth $2,500.  The wreck report filed by the vessel’s owner Henry Strong of Seattle puts the loss to the Helen and her cargo as “whole”.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 41 30 N 140 18 15 W  Chart 16016

                Comment : This vessel has another wreck report on file for a small amount of damage done in a stranding that occurred May 22, 1898 at Unalaska with a different owner and master; strong proof that the Helen was salvaged

                Additional Information : Length 45.6, Breadth 17.2, Depth 6.5, Built 1892 Seattle, Tonnage 27.82, Registered Port Townsend Washington, ON 96165, Master Ed Simpson of Seattle, Vessel Value $3,500, Vessel Insurance $3,000, Cargo Insurance $2,000

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report filed May 14, 1894 by Strong

 

HELEN (1913)     Two men were lost aboard the launch Helen in Galena Bay January 24, 1913 when a line fouled in the prop in rough seas.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 55 20 N 146 37 W  Chart 16708

                Source :   Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)  

 

HELEN BLUM (1893)     The 66 ton Schooner Helen Blum was lost with all hands in 1893 between Chirikof and Kodiak Islands.  The following is an excerpt from the Victoria Daily Colonist July 18, 1893:

                “The steamer Queen, which arrived down from Alaska with a large excursion party, last evening, brings word that quantities of wreckage picked up to the westward of the Alaska Peninsula have been positively identified as belonging to the San Francisco schooner Helen Blum and that vessel, carrying twenty six of a crew, has now been given up as lost with all hands aboard.”

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska Unknown Chart 16580

                Comment : The two sources here are in conflict for location.  WG

                Sources : 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. The Victoria Daily Colonist July 18, 1893

 

HERO (1896)     The 8.8 ton 31 foot schooner Hero struck a rock and was lost about July 30, 1896 in the Barren Islands.  The two person crew was on a trip from Wood Island to Seldoria C. I. when the wreck occurred.  Gus Bernhardt, master of the Hero reported that fog and a strong breeze from the SE were the conditions at the time of the casualty.  He and the other crewman made it to safety but the Hero, valued at $1,000 was a total loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  67 48 N 152 15 W  Chart 16606

                Comment : Probably going from the settlement at Woody Island to the one at Seldovia. WG

                Additional Informaton : Length 31, Breadth 12, Depth 4.9, Tonnage 8.8, Built 1892 in Seattle, Kodiak (St. Paul), ON 96153, Owner Wm. C Greenfield and John W Smith, Cargo none

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report filed September 23, 1896 by Greenfield in the Alaska Collection District.

 

HIGHLAND QUEEN (1915)     The small schooner Highland Queen was lost April 20, 1915 in the Shumagin Islands

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  55 10 N 160 W  Chart 16011

                Source : The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 258

 

HILLSIDE II (1929)     The 34 ton wooden gas screw Hillside II lost her rudder and foundered 65 miles west of Ocean Cape at 2:30 p.m. November 12, 1929.  The following are statements taken from the report of casualty filed by Ragnar Jensen, master of the vessel:

                “Rough sea…rudder was disabled by heavy sea.”  “Pumps would not keep down water and stopped engine.  Set flare to call aid.  Oil screw Middleton 223,523 came to our aid and took off crew.”  “Crew then taken to Petersburg, Alaska the home port of the Middleton.”  “Vessel foundered…total loss”

                The value of the Hillside II was listed as $14,000 with $10,000 insured.  She had seven crew and no cargo and was travelling from LaTouche to Ketchikan.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 32 30 N  139 51 30 W  Chart 16016

                Additional Information : Tonnage 34 Gross 23 Net, Age 12 years, Registered Seward, ON 215379, Owner Utopian Fisheries of Seward

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed November 15, 1929 at Petersburg

 

HUENEME (1897)     The 142 foot 347 ton wooden schooner Hueneme was wrecked at Cape Khituk, Unimak Island at 10:45 p.m. September 7, 1897. The vessel departed Seattle August 15 with 9 crew, two passengers and 600 tons of cargo bound for Saint Michael.  The cargo consisted of lumber, materials and a steam launch; the lumber and materials for building two river steamers and a barge. The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by Charles Peterson, master of the Hueneme:

                “Dark, thick fog, with rain.  Heavy SE squalls….Struck a rock during thick weather heavy squalls.”  “Vessel began to break up as soon as she struck a rock, turned bow in and went higher every breaker, and soon went to pieces.”  “Assistance was rendered by the U S steamers Richard Rush and Grant, and steamer Dora.  The latter picked up Captain and four men at sea.”  “Total loss”

                The crew and passengers all survived but the Hueneme, valued at $20,000 and her cargo valued at $12,500 were lost.  At the time of the wreck report the insurance was unknown.  The Hueneme was under charter of the North American Transportation and Trading Company.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  54 24 15 N 164 47 30 W  Chart  16520

                Additional Informaton : Length 142.3, Breadth 34.2, Depth 10.7, Built 1877 at Port Ludlow Washington, Tonnage 346.77 Net, Master Chas. Peterson of San Francisco, Owner W G Hall of San Francisco, Last Port Seattle August 15, 1897, Destination Saint Michael

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report file at Puget Sound by Peterson September 29, 1897, 2. Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914 (1966)

 

HUNTER (1917)     The 63 ton gas screw Hunter struck a rock and sank in four minutes near Foggy Cape,  Sutwik Island August 30, 1917.  The vessel was travelling from Chignik to Kodiak.  No lives were lost but the Hunter sank, along with a full load of codfish.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  56 32 N 156 58 W  Chart 16568

                Sources : 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 292

 

HYAK (1916)     The launch Hyak was lost along with a group of other launches in a strong wind storm at Ellamar January 22, 1916.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 53 45 N 146 42 30 W  Chart 16700

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

HYAK (1936)     The Hyak struck the rocks off of Kinklik coming from the Hobo Bay Mine and was lost with cargo.  The crew made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 50 55 N 147 37 30 W  Chart 16700

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

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