South Central Alaska Shipwrecks ( M )

MACRAY (1938)     The 86 ton wooden tug Macray was blown ashore in a storm and lost at 9:00 p.m. Sunday October 16, 1938.  The vessel departed Cordova at 4:30 P.M. October 13th bound for Petersburg with six crewmen aboard towing a scow.  The following are statements from the casualty report made my Clyde Dell, master of the Macray:

                “While laying in Controller Bay holding a scow on 600’ of towline with the Macray anchored in 8 fathoms of water with a 400 lb. anchor and 60 fathoms of chain.  This anchor was backed up by a 800 lb. anchor on 200’ of 7/8 inch wire rope fast to cargo winch on forecastle head.  At approx. 8:00 P.M. Oct. 16th , 135 Meridian time, a hurricane struck of approx. 90 mi. per hour.  The engine was immediately started full ahead.  The wind was of such force that glass was blown out of windows and heavy seas were rolling over forecastle head and bulwarks.  Fifteen min. later the scow was cut adrift with ship still going full speed ahead and the auxiliary pumps were running to keep hull pumped out due to water coming in thru broken out windows above engine room and thru hatch which had covers ripped off by terrific force.  The ship was forced backward onto S.E. end of Kanak Island at approx. 9:00 P.M., 135 meridian time.  The hull and superstructure were badly pounded and broken up by the force of the seas.  At approx. 10:30 P.M. Oct. 17th the wind had died  down to approx. 60 mile gale and at approx. 2:00 A.M the one remaining life boat was launched at low water and the crew of six men got thru the surf to the S.E. end of Kanak Island.”  “Crew taken off beach at 10:00 A.M. Oct. 18, 1938 by USCG Cutter Morris.”

                The Macray was valued at $25,000 at the time of the loss and had no cargo or insurance.  Nothing is mentioned in the wreck report about the scow that was cut loose or whether it was carrying any cargo.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 08 N 144 21 W  Chart 16723

                Additional Information : Tonnage 86 Gross 49 Net, Age 16 years, Registered Seattle, ON 222149, Master Clyde Dell of Sedro-Wooley WA, Owner Puget Sound Bridge and Dredging Co of Seattle

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty October 20, 1938 at Cordova

 

MANHATTAN (1917)     The 291 ton steel hulled halibut steamer Mahhattan struck an uncharted rock off Lituya Bay and was lost at 2:00 a.m. Thursday November 15, 1917.  The Manhattan departed Vancouver, B.C. October 29, 1917 on a fishing venture with 34 crewmen aboard.  The vessel came across the stranded and abandoned wreck of the Al-Ki on Novewmber 1st near Point Augusta.  The crew looted the vessel, taking whatever they could find of value.  They then proceeded to the halibut fishing grounds of the Gulf of Alaska.  By the time of the disaster, they had caught 80,000 lbs. of fresh fish worth $12,000.  While heading to Cape Spencer with their newly caught load of halibut, John Kolseth of Vancouver, master of the Manhattan, lost his bearings in a gale and thick snowstorm and stranded the Manhattan off Lituya Bay.  The crew abandoned ship in dories but were unable to land because of an enraged brown bear that pursued them through the surf.  Thirty hours after the stranding they spotted the Mariposa passing and managed to attract their attention by burning an oilskin coat.  They were rescued and taken to Juneau where they were promptly arrested for looting the Al-ki.  The Mariposa had been the vessel that had rescued the crew of the Al-ki as well as those of the Manhattan.  When the crew of the Mariposa heard that the crew of the Manhattan had looted the Al-Ki they radioed ahead to the authorities.  Charges against the crew of the Manhattan were soon dropped as all of the evidence had gone down with the Manhattan somewhere near Lituya Bay. 

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  58 36 45 N 137 39 30 W  Chart 16760

                Additional : The Mariposa sank several days later, November 18, 1917, near Point Baker.  Trappers reported finding the boiler of the Manhattan on the beach at Lituya Bay in 1932 but it was soon buried by moving sands.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 291 Gross 134 Net, Age 12 years, Registered Portland ME, ON 202845, Owner New England Fish Co of Boston, Vessel Value $100,000 (Book Value $50,000), Vessel Insurance none, Cargo Insurance none

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty January 9, 1918 at Portland ME by Benjamin Thompson, clerk for New England Fish, 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 294, 3. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MARATHON (1925)     The 25 ton gas screw Marathon drug anchor and stranded in Kodiak at 11 a.m. November 17, 1925.  The vessel was moored in the harbor until a 45 mile an hour SW gale forced her onto the beach “about 500 feet west of Erskine’s Dock”.  The two aboard the Marathon attempted to get an anchor out but were too late.  The Ga. S. Pronto also attempted to render assistance but the Marathon had drifted onto the reef.  The engine of the Marathon was salvaged but the hull was damaged beyond repair.  The Marathon was valued at $2,500 and had no insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W  Chart 16580

                Additional Information : Tonnage 25 Gross 17 Net, Age 15 years, Registered Seward, ON 209474, Master Charles Gilbert of Ouzinkie, Owner John E Gilchrist of South Bend OR

                Source : U S C G Report of Casualty February 18, 1926 by J E King, Agent at Kodiak

 

MARGARET (1921)     An explosion and fire destroyed the 55 ton gas screw Margaret at the oil dock at Katalla at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday July 6, 1921.  The three crewmen aboard all suffered burns but survived the disaster.  The Margaret was being filled with “distillate oil” at the time, having loaded seven tons or $500 worth.  The crew had loaded oil many times before and could find to cause for the explosion.  About a dozen company men helped fight the blaze, but the Margaret became a total loss.  She was valued at $42,385 and had $25,000 worth of insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 12 N 144 31 W  Chart 16723

                Additional Information : Tonnage 55 Gross 37 Net, Built 1920, Registration Ketchikan, ON 220614, Master B H Durkee of Katalla, Owner Bering River Coal Co of Seattle

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty August 22, 1921 by Durkee at Juneau

 

MARGERY (1905)     The 10 ton 35 foot wooden schooner Margery was washed ashore in a westerly gale on the east side of Sanborn Harbor at 3 a.m. November 7, 1905.  The vessel departed Sand Point the day before bound for Sanborn Harbor with two aboard.  They had two anchors with 30 and 45 fathoms of chain out, but the chains parted in the heavy westerly gale.  Both crewmen survived, but the Margery, valued at $400 was a total loss and had no insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska 55 10 N 160 04 W  Chart 16553

                Comment : There is a notation on the Wreck Report under the signature of Potter that says Eagle Harbor, Nagai Island which is one bay over from Sanborn Harbor.  This vessel is listed as Marjory or Marjorie in other wreck lists.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 10, Length 35, Breadth 11, Depth 3.7, Built 1889 in Seattle, Registered Unalaska, ON 92309, Master and Owner John Potter of Sand Point, Cargo ballast

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report July 27, 1907 by Potter at Unalaska

 

MARGUERITE (1936)     The 19 ton gas screw Marguerite exploded and caught fire at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday July 8, 1936 while docked at Snug Harbor.  The three crewmen escaped but the Marguerite was cut adrift and sank.  She was valued at $2,000 and was a total loss with no insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 15 N 147 43 W  Chart 16701

                Comments : I put this wreck on Knight Island but it could be a different Snug Harbor.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 19 Gross 13 Net, Built 1915, Registered Seward, ON 213371, Master E J Fribrock of Seattle, Owner Snug Harbor Packing Company of Seattle

                Source : U S C G Report of Casualty July 29, 1936 by Fribrock at Seward

 

MARION (1906)     The 235 ton 123 foot wooden cod fishing schooner Marion foundered at Sanak at 8:40 p.m. April 11, 1906.  The vessel departed San Francisco March 18, 1906 with 8 crewman bound for Sanak.  The vessel was carrying 200 tons of food and fishing supplies worth $5,000.  The following are from the wreck report filed in San Francisco by A G Ames, Manager Owner:

                “Sanak, Alaska.”  “Fresh breeze NE, swell, 8:40 p.m., snow squall.”  “Mistaken position.” “Let go both anchors”  “Foundering.”  “Total loss.”

                The report lists the vessel and cargo as total losses.  The Marion was valued at $8,000 and insured for $6,000.  Her cargo was insured for $4,400.  The crew survived the disaster.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  54 29 54 N 162 48 40 W  Chart 16547

                Additional Information : Tonnage 235 Gross 223 Net, Length 123, Breadth 31.8, Depth 10.3, Built 1882 San Francisco, Registered San Francisco, ON 91487, Master F W Haus of San Francisco, Owner Alaska Codfish Co of San Francisco

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report June 8, 1906 at San Francisco

 

MARMOT (1931)     A fire of unknown origin destroyed the 44 ton wooden fishing vessel Marmot at 9:00 p.m. Wednesday August 12, 1931.  The vessel with her crew of 7 was fishing for halibut 10 miles east of Two Headed Island near Kodiak Island when the tragedy occurred.  The following are statements taken from the casualty report filed by master and half owner Arne Larson of Ketchikan:

                “Brisk westerly wind, dark, cloudy.”  “Fire”  “On discovery of fire, engineer went into engine room and discharged 2 ½ gallon “Foamite” extinguisher, but was driven back by smoke and flames.”  “After engineer was driven from engine room, all doors, companionways and ventilators were closed and sealed in the hope that the flames would be smothered.  Two dories were launched and stood by until flames burst thru the deck.  As vessel was apparently doomed, crew in the two dories started for land.  Harry Venema had been ailing for some time before the fire but had stated that it was not necessary to see a doctor.  Apparently the stress of the fire and the exposure to the dory was too much for him.  He died in the dory on the morning of August 13th, 1931.”

                The Marmot was valued at $18,000 at the time of the disaster.  Her cargo of 30,000 lbs. of freshly caught halibut was valued at $2,000.  Both the vessel and her cargo were total losses.  The Marmot was insured for $16,000 and her cargo insured for $2,000.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  56 54 N 153 35 W  Chart 16580

                Additional Information : Tonnage 44 Gross 30 Net, Age 6 years, Registered Ketchikan, ON 225318, Owners Arne Larson and C Hansen of Ketchikan, Last Port Ketchikan August 1, 1931

                Source : U S C G Report of Casualty August 17, 1931 at Seward

 

MARTHA (1924)     The 23 ton wooden schooner Martha broke an anchor fluke in a heavy northwesterly storm and washed ashore on a reef on the E S E entrance to Catons Harbor at 6:00 a.m. April 27, 1924.  The Martha had been towed to Catons Harbor and anchored by the schooner Louise.  No one was able to get to the Martha in the northwesterly blizzard and snow storm before she washed up on the reef and was broken up by the seas.  The Martha had 17 ½ tons of fish salt worth $112.75 aboard, which were lost along with the vessel which was valued at $1,000 at the time of the tragedy.  Neither the Martha nor her cargo was insured.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  54 24 N 162 32 W  Chart 16547

                Additional Information : Tonnage 23.3 Gross 14.71 Net, Age 19 years, Registered San Francisco, ON 204220, Owner Union Fish Co of San Francisco, Last Port towed from Pauloff Harbor

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty November 3, 1924 by G Schmidt, Agent

 

MARTHA (1939)     The 30 ton oil screw Martha stranded and was lost at Walrus Island near Nelson Lagoon at 10:00 a.m. Thursday October 19, 1939.  The vessel departed Unalaska October 14th bound for Bristol Bay with four crewmen aboard.  The rudder was carried away in a storm causing the stranding.  The four crewmen managed to escape but the Martha was a total loss.  The vessel was valued at $7,500 of which $6,000 was insured.  There was no cargo.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  56 01 40 N 160 50 W  Chart 16363

                Additional Information : Tonnage 30 Gross 16 Net, Built 1917, Registered Cordova, ON 215539, Master Donald Pickard of Unalaska, Owner F Schroder of San Francisco

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty December 12, 1939 by Schroder at Unalaska

 

MARTHA W TUFT (1907)     The 173 ton 105 foot wooden schooner Martha W Tuft stranded and was lost at the Katalla River during the night of October 5, 1907.  A strong storm washed the vessel up onto the sand spit at the mouth of the river.  The crew of seven was rescued from the rigging.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 12 N 144 31 W  Chart 16723

                Additional Information : Tonnage 173 Gross 164 Net, Length 105, Breadth 29.8, Depth 8.6, Built 1876 at Eureka California, Registered Seattle, ON 90924, Vessel Value with cargo $14,000

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report, 2. The San Francisco Call October 15, 1907 Pg 11

 

MARY AND IDA (1904)     The 110 foot wooden cod fishing schooner Mary and Ida drug anchor, stranded and was lost at Unga Island at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday February 23, 1904.  The vessel was anchored just off the codfish station at Unga Island when the disaster occurred.  A violent hurricane force storm with 90 mile an hour NW winds and rough seas stranded the Mary and Ida.  She was carrying 78,000 fish or 200 tons of salted codfish valued at $12,000.  The Mary and Ida was valued at $7,000 and became a total loss along with her cargo.  The crew of 8 was helped to safety by the employees of the codfish station and all survived.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  55 11 N 160 30 10 W  Chart 16553

                Comment : H W McCurdy (Pg 94) has this vessel lost in the Bering Sea February 28, 1904. WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 174 Net, Built 1882 at San Francisco, Length 110.2, Breadth 29.4, Depth 9.7, Registered San Francisco, ON 91524, Master M Ipsen of San Francisco, Owner Pacific Marine Supply Co of San Francisco, Last Port Sand Point February 8, 1904, Destination San Francisco, Vessel Insurance $7,000, Cargo Insurance $10,000

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report March 30, 1904 by Ipsen

 

MARY ANN (1905)     The 96 ton 88 foot wooden cod fishing schooner Mary Ann stranded and was lost at Unga at 11:45 a.m. Monday November 13, 1905.  She had sailed from Seattle September 19, 1905 on a fishing trip to the North Pacific with ten crewmen aboard.  At the time of the disaster she was carrying 85 tons of salt and salt codfish worth $3,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by John Russel, master and owner of the Mary Ann:

                “In the outer harbor of Unga, Alaska…Hurricane from the NE…In day time, heavy sea and strong undertow.  Barometer 27.85, lowest in history of Alaska.”  “Had 2 anchors out, 35 fathoms chain on 515# anchor, 8 fathoms chain and 70 fathoms hawser on 613# anchor.  7 fathoms water where anchored.”  “Port anchor broke shank 6 in. from crown of anchor; then began to drift and left go third anchor with 65 fathoms chain.  But wind increasing and vessel diving badly and dragging all the time, and 11:48 a.m. struck her stern on a rock.  The next sea she struck under her cabin, and the next 4 feet forward of the main mast, and that broke her back.  She began to fill with water, so let go cables and let her drive up on the shore.  2:40 p.m. we got on shore ourselves.”  “Total loss”

                The crew all survived the disaster, but the Mary Ann, valued at $5,000 and her cargo were lost.  The vessel was insured for $2,500 and her cargo for $2,000.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  55 11 N 160 30 10 W  Chart 16553

                Additional Information : Tonnage 96.18 Net, Length 88.3, Breadth 19.8, Depth 9.8, Built 1852 Philadelphia PA, Registered Seattle, ON 17438, Owner and Master John Fussel of Ballard WA

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report April 2, 1906 by John Fussel

 

MARY C FISHER (1931)     The 12 ton two masted vessel Mary C Fisher foundered and sank in a storm in the Shelikof Strait at 12:10 p.m. Friday August 28, 1931.  Owner and master Cliff Sumerlin of Cordova and two others had departed Kodiak the evening of August 24th.  They were bound for Dutch Harbor and Unalaska.  They were carrying a ton of coal and six tons of grocery supplies, fishing gear and gasoline valued at $900.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “3 miles E Cape Kubugukli Shelikof Strait Pnei. Alaska.”  “Wind 60 mile gale sweeping mist and rain.  High tide, heavy broken cross seas running, midday.”  “S.E. storm that swung sharply to So. West causing heavy cross seas that swept deck, damaged vessel, and filled it.”  “Took every measure possible to save vessel until last minute of hope.”  “Foundered and sank.”  “Two seamen, Names George Tapper and Olaf Hansen and myself worked along coast in open skiff for 7 days to reach Kanatak.  Our eats were pilot bread and coffee only.  Made report of foundered vessel to Captain Anderson on S.S. Starr

                The Mary C Fisher was valued at $5,500 at the time of the tragedy.  There was no insurance on the vessel or her cargo.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 53 50 N  155 03 35 W  Chart 16580

                Additional Information : Tonnage 12 Gross 8 Net, Age 4 years 3 months, Registered Juneau, ON 226258, Vessel and Cargo loss total

                Source : U S C G Report of Casualty March 4, 1932 at Cordova by Sumerlin

 

MARY ELLEN (1890)     The 77 ton Canadian schooner Mary Ellen was wrecked on a reef at Sand Point July 23, 1890.  The wreck was sold for $150.  The purchaser raised the Mary Ellen and sold her at a big advance to Jacobson of Victoria.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  55 20 15 N 160 30 W  Chart 16553

                Sources : 1. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1895) Pg 435, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MARY G (1933)     The gas screw Mary G was lost in 1933 on Shumagin Island.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  55 10 N 160 W  Chart 16011

                Comment : There is a Shumagin Shoal and Shumagin Islands but no Shumagin Island.  WG

                Sources : 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 425, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MARY WOOD (1894)     The schooner Mary Wood stranded and was lost near Kodiak January 18, 1894.  The vessel was valued at $800 with cargo at the time of the disaster.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W  Chart 16580

                Source : Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route (1916) Pg 35

 

MARYLAND (1928)     The 29 ton wooden gas screw Maryland stranded and was lost near Ocean Cape at 8:45 p.m. December 15, 1928. The crew of four departed Cordova December 11th bound for Seattle.  The vessel had three tons or $125 worth of gasoline listed as its only cargo.  The following are statements taken from the casualty report filed by Carl Johnson, master of the Maryland:

                “5 ½ miles east of Ocean light Cape.”  “Easterly and south easterly gales, very dark.”  “Snow storm and very dark and weak light, could not get bearing.”  “Stranded.”  “Could do nothing…No assistance rendered as it was all we could do to save ourselves.”  “Total loss.”

                The Maryland was valued at $4,000 and became a total loss with no insurance.  The crew made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 32 30 N 139 51 30 W  Chart 16016

                Additional Information : Tonnage 29 Gross 20 Net, Built 1918, Registered Tacoma WA, ON 209980, Master Carl Johnson of Tacoma, Owner Joseph Johnson of Tacoma

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty January 2, 1929 at Juneau by Carl Johnson

 

MARY LEE (1927)     The 11 ton wooden gas screw Mary Lee was lost at the entrance to Shoup Bay the evening of November 9, 1927.  The vessel departed Valdez bound for Shoup Bay, only a few miles distant, and never reached her destination.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “The Mary Lee left Valdez at about 4 o’clock in the evening of November 9, 1927 with Harry Balgrave as a passenger and with supplies for the Lealey-Daivs mine at Shoup Bay.  Nothing further was heard from them until Monday, the 14th, when Robert Schraeder, one of the men employed at the mine came to town to learn why the supplies had not been sent down.  The U.S. Marshal wired Gov. Parks for authority to send out a search party and upon receiving such authority a boat was sent out.  Later on another party found the boat and the body of Harry Balgrave.  Efforts to raise the boat had to be abandoned owing to a severe storm.  After the storm subsided it was found that the boat had entirely disappeared evidently having slipped off into deep water.”  “Calm moonlight”  “Ran onto rock; slipped off into deep water at high tide.”  “Inside entrance to Shoup Bay.”  “Total Loss”

                Lost with the Mary Lee were her master Al de Hart and passenger Harry Balgrave.  The Mary Lee was valued at $2,000 and was carrying camp supplies. 

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  61 07 15 N 146 35 30 W  Chart 16707

                Additional Information : Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Built 1914, Registered Juneau, ON 212040, Owner and master Al de Hart of Latouche, Cargo value unknown, Insurance unknown

                Source : U S C G Report of Casualty January 12, 1928 by C J Todd, admin. of estate of Al de Hart

 

MAYFLOWER (1905)     The 14 ton 35 foot wooden schooner Mayflower was stranded and lost at “Chignik Bay, Kalsinsia Reef” at 9 p.m. Saturday November 4, 1905.  The vessel departed Kodiak November 1st with three aboard bound for “Kaguyak” with a cargo of 5 tons of general merchandise worth $1,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “High wind and rain, sea rough, very dark, lost bearings and struck reef.”  “Trying to get in Bay to get anchored.”  “Stranding”  “Lat. 56-30 Long 158-30 West of the Semendi Islands.”  “Most of cargo was brought ashore but badly damaged by water.  Some of the gear saved, schooner abandoned.”

                The Mayflower was valued at $325 and became a total loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 41 10 N 152 17 30 W  Chart 16593

                Comment : There is conflicting information on this wreck report making it possible for the Mayflower to have been lost in Chignik Bay on the mainland or in Chiniak Bay near Kodiak.  Kalsin Reef in Chiniak Bay looks more logical.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 14 Gross 8 Net, Built 1891 at Tacoma WA, Length 34.6, Breadth 12.4, Depth 4.4, Registered Port Townsend, ON 92305, Master and Owner William Paul Panoloff of Kodiak, Insurance none

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report November 12, 1905 by Panoloff

 

MERCURY (1900)     The 1050 ton 193 foot wooden ship Mercury sprung a leak and was beached on Unimak Island at 12 noon August 12, 1900.  The vessel departed Nome August 3rd with seven crewmen and no cargo aboard.  They were bound for Seattle.  The crew escaped to safety, but the Mercury was a total loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  54 45 N 165 W  Chart 16520

                Additional Information : Tonnage 1050, Length 193, Breadth 39, Depth 22.2, Built 1851 at NY NY, Registered Seattle, ON 16948, Master Frank Anderson of San Francisco, Owner Pacific Clipper Line of Seattle

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report September 8, 1900 at Puget Sound by Anderson

 

MERMAID (1913)     The launch Mermaid was lost in Valdez Narrows January 24, 1913 with two aboard.  Charles Rua, owner of the mine at Rua Bay on Knight Island was lost.  Charles Lindquist was rescued by Natives in a bidarka.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  61 03 15 N 146 40 30 W  Chart 16707

                Sources : 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. BOEMRE Shipwreck Lists (2011) Pg 111

 

MEROM (1900)     The 1,158 ton 179 foot wooden bark Merom stranded and was lost in the Karluk Harbor at 3 p.m. Saturday October 6, 1900.  The vessel departed San Francisco August 29, 1900 bound for Karluk with 16 crewmen.  One crewman, 34 year old William Booke from Germany was lost in the stranding.  The Merom had 500 tons of cargo including 12,574 cases of canned salmon worth $50,000 on board at the time of the disaster.  The Merom, valued at $14,000, and her cargo were listed as total losses.  The vessel was owned by Alaska Packers Association of San Francisco and had no insurance.  A Peterson, master of the Merom, attributed the losses to a “severe storm”.  Conditions at the time were listed as a strong gale, clear weather and high seas.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 34 10 N 154 27 30 W  Chart 16598

                Additional Information : Tonnage 1158 Net, Length 179.2, Breadth 37.6, Depth 23.9, Built 1870 at Phippsburg ME, Registered San Francisco, ON 90070, Master A Peterson of Oakland

                Comment : This may be the same master A Peterson of Oakland that is lost with the bark Hadn Brown in 1912 on Montague Island

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report November 7, 1900 by Peterson in San Francisco.

 

METEOR (1907)     The launch Meteor was lost on Kayak Island July of 1907

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 56 N 144 23 W  Chart 16723

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MIAMI (1906)     The 82 ton 72 foot wooden steam tug Miami stranded on a sand bar and was lost at 2:55 a.m. Sunday June 10, 1906 near Kvichak.  The vessel left Tacoma Washington in April of 1904 with seven crewmen bound for Bristol Bay.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by the master of the Miami, John A Horgen of Seattle:

                “Thick fog, calm, smooth.”  “On Sand Bar 14 miles above mouth of Kvichak River, Alaska…Stranded.”  “Grounded on Sand Bar, sprung a leak.”  “Pumps started, bailed with buckets.”

                The Miami was valued at $10,000 at the time of the loss.  The damage to the vessel was reported as $10,000.  She was not carrying cargo.  The crew made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  61 20 N 161 28 W  Chart 16323

                Additional Information : Tonnage 81.77 Gross 52.7 Net, Length 71.6, Breadth 18.5, Depth 6.9, Service fish, Built 1898 Tillamook OR, Registered Tacoma WA, ON 92845, Owner Union Packing Co of Tacoma, Insurance unknown

                Comment : Some reports put the value of the loss of the Miami at $25,000.  WG

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report September 11, 1906 by Horgen at Puget Sound

 

MINNEAPOLIS (1927)     The single masted 20 ton wooden gas screw Minneapolis foundered in a storm in Cook Inlet at 3:00 a.m. Sunday October 16, 1927.  The vessel departed Seldovia October 12, 1927 bound for Halibut Cove with 6 crewmen aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by the master of the Minneapolis, Arne Vegen of Seldovia:

                “Halibut Cove, Alaska”  “Storm and bad weather, due to gale blowing from the NW down Cooks Inlet, Alaska.”  “Gale from the NW; NW storm, heavy sea, 3 a.m. snow storm and dark.  Every precaution taken to save ship and attempt made to beach vessel.  This was a failure as ship sunk before we could beach her.”  “TOTAL LOSS”

                The crew of the Minneapolis had 12 tons or 200 bbls. of herring aboard and a seine on deck when the disaster occurred.  They all managed to get to safety, but the vessel and her cargo were lost.  The value of the Minneapolis was $2,500 and her cargo $5,000.  There was no insurance.

                Mapping and Location :  Southcentral Alaska  59 37 N 151 14 W  Chart 16640

                Additional Information : Tonnage 20 Gross 13 Net, Built 1909, Registered Tacoma WA, ON 206833, Owner Peter Carlson of Tacoma WA

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty January 10, 1928 at Seldovia by Vegen

 

MIZPAH (1910)     The 70 ton gas powered schooner Mizpah caught fire and burned after an explosion aboard May 25, 1910 at Kvichak.  The schooner had been converted to gas power in 1902.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  58 58 N 156 56 W  Chart 16006

                Sources : 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 180, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MONROE (1931)     The 34 ton wooden oil screw Monroe drug anchor, stranded and was lost at 2 a.m. March 21, 1931 at the south end of Wingham Island.  The Monroe departed Seward February 24, 1931 with two aboard bound for Juneau.  She had a cargo of salt, barrels and tierces weighing 20 tons, worth $1,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by O P Brown of Seattle WA, master of the Monroe:

                “Reef at S E Point of Wingam Is.”  “75 mile wind, dark, snowing and sleeting.”  “Dragging of anchors in heavy gale”  “Stranding”  “Started engine, wheel turned about two minutes when the vessel struck and then went dead.”  “Two men clung to wreckage to daylight then went ashore to Fox Island camp.”  “Total loss”

                The crew survived the disaster, but the Monroe, valued at $10,000 was a total loss as was her cargo. 

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 59 45 N 144 22 10 W  Chart 16723

                Additional Information : Tonnage 34 Gross 28 Net, Built 1894, Registered Juneau, ON 157393, Owner M B Dahl of Tacoma WA, Vessel Insurance unknown, Cargo Insurance $1,000

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty April 21, 1931 at Cordova

 

MONTANA (1885)     The 628 ton wooden bark Montana stranded and was lost on the “New Shagak” River at 11 a.m. Thursday June 11, 1885.  The vessel departed San Francisco April 27, 1885 with 23 crewmen and 73 passengers bound for the “New Shagak” River.  She was carrying a 500 ton cargo of “General Merchandise” valued at $30,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by John Stenberg, master of the Montana:

                “New Shagak River, Alaska; 58.59 N, 159 West…Stranded.”  “Error of Pilot”  “Gentle breeze; misty weather…no sea.”  “The vessel was in charge of an Esquimaux pilot who was unable to explain the channel, the consequence being that the vessel went ashore and became a total loss.”

                The wreck report goes on to report that there was no loss of life.  The Montana was valued at $12,000 and was a total loss.  It was not known at the time how much of the cargo was lost.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 02 30 N 158 27 30 W  Chart 16322

                Comment : I have charted this wreck at Dillingham on the Nushagak River as the longitude and latitude on the wreck report would put it inland, southwest of there.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 628 Gross 596 Net, Built 1864, Registered San Francisco, ON 17316, Master John Stenberg of San Francisco, Owner Chas. Nutsen of San Francisco

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report November 2, 1885 at San Francisco

 

MORENGEN (1922)     The 25 ton gas screw fishing vessel Morengen was lost with all hands November of 1922 between Cape Spencer and Yakutat.  The vessel departed Sitka October 19, 1922 bound for the Yakutat fishing banks with 6 crewmen aboard.  The Morengen had about 9 tons of ice and bait aboard when she left port.  She was last seen by the gas boat Caroline steering eastward of Yakutat.  Lost with the Morengen were master Hans Walderhaug of Petersburg, Jack Refenes, Carl Hagan, Charley Peterson, Olaf Vallum and one other.  No wreckage was found.  The Morengen was valued at $6,000 and had no insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 33 N 139 44 W  Chart 16016

                Additional Information : Tonnage 25 Gross 17 Net, Built 1914, Registered Juneau, ON 212011, Owners Hans Walderhaug, Fred Sorensen of Seattle and L Peterson of Sitka

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty February 24, 1923 by S T Peterson ½ owner

 

MYRTLE (1932)   The 9 ton wooden gas screw Myrtle stranded and was lost a mile south of East Foreland at 11:30 a.m. August 6, 1932.  E Sandvik, master and owner, was the only one aboard at the time of the disaster.  He had departed Swanson Creek in Cook Inlet and was bound for Kenai and Seldovia.  The cargo aboard the Myrtle was 2 ½ tons of canned salmon valued at $500.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “1 mile south of East Foreland, Alaska.”  “From gentle breeze of S.W. at 9 a.m. increasing to storm in the afternoon.”  “Stranding occurred about 1 hr. and 15 min. before low water at which time wind had increased to strong breeze with moderate ground swell.  Ebb current somewhat offset ground swell for a distance of approximately 4 miles south of East Foreland.  Flood current set ground swell in to beach with full force of wind and current.”  “Rowed out kedge anchor with 40 fms of line.  No other boat near by at time of stranding.”  “Libby McNeill & Libby cannery tenders Indiana and Flyer offered assistance but came too late and could not be accepted.”  “Total loss of hull”

                The Myrtle had a value of $3,000 at the time of the loss.  Much of the cargo was salvaged.  There was no insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 43 N 151 24 W  Chart 16662

                Additional Information : Tonnage 9 Gross 7 Net, Age 5 years, Registered Seward, ON 227866,Master and owner E Sandvik of Seldovia

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty September 12, 1932 by Sandvik

 

MYRTLE H (1926)     The 23 ton wooden gas screw Myrtle H foundered near Hinchinbrook Island at 10:30 p.m. Saturday July 23, 1926.  The vessel departed Cordova bound for Cape Hinchinbrook Lighthouse with two aboard and was on a return trip when the disaster occurred.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “2 miles from Boswell Bay on Hinchinbrook Island”  “Foundering”  “Strong breeze with heavy swell”  “First we had engine trouble, the engine stopping; boat drifting on bar, and dropped anchor to keep from going aground; at this time boat was in shallow water; Heavy ground swell lifted boat and it settled down on the anchor; the fluke of the anchor going thru the hull about amidships; boat filled up with water and Henderson and deckhand took to skiff; rowed ashore; took another went out and stood by; tried to drag Myrtle H up on beach but did not have power enough; owing to strong tied vessel dragged anchor approximately half mile seawards; boat then in breakers where she was battered to pieces and totally destroyed.  Was returning from Cape Hinchinbrook Lighthouse when accident happenend.”

                The Myrtle H was valued at $6,000 at the time of the disaster.  The crew made it to safety but the vessel was a total loss.  There was no cargo aboard

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 24 N 146 08 W  Chart 16709

                Additional Information : Tonnage 23 Gross 21 Net, Age 9 years, Registered Juneau, ON 215923, Master R B Eisner of Cordova, Owner O W Henderson of Cordova, Vessel Insurance $4,000

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty July 24, 1926 at Cordova by O W Henderson

 

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