South Central Alaska Shipwrecks ( P )

P G #1 (1912)     The 33 ton wooden scow P G No 1 broke loose from her towing vessel and stranded on the rocks on Montague Island at 6 p.m. April 12, 1912.  Conditions at the time were “Heavy gale, light sea, daylight”.   Also lost from the tow were the P G #4 and P G #5.  The vessels had departed Anacortes, Washington March 28th, 1912 and were bound for Ketchikan with no cargo aboard.  The P G #1 was valued at $800 and had no insurance

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 10 N 147 15 W  Chart 16700

                Additional Information : Tonnage 33, Built 1912, Registered Port Townsend WA, ON 164720, Master W L Lippincott of Anacortes WA, Owner Fidalgo Island Packing Company of Anacortes WA

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report July 30 1912 at Puget Sound by Gus Hensler, Secy. For Fidalgo Island Packing

 

P G #4 (1912)     The 7 ton wooden scow P G No 4 broke loose from her towing vessel and stranded on the rocks on Montague Island at 6 p.m. April 12, 1912.  Conditions at the time were “Heavy gale, light sea, daylight”.   Also lost from the tow were the P G #1 and P G #5.  The vessels had departed Anacortes, Washington March 28th, 1912 and were bound for Ketchikan with no cargo aboard. The P G #4 was valued at $250 and had no insurance

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 10 N 147 15 W  Chart 16700

                Additional Information : Tonnage 33, Built 1912, Registered Port Townsend WA, ON 164720, Master W L Lippincott of Anacortes WA, Owner Fidalgo Island Packing Company of Anacortes WA

Source : U S Customs Wreck Report July 30 1912 at Puget Sound by Gus Hensler, Secy. For Fidalgo Island Packing

 

P G #5 (1912)     The7 ton wooden scow P G #5 broke loose from her towing vessel and stranded on the rocks on Montague Island at 6 p.m. April 12, 1912.  Conditions at the time were “Heavy gale, light sea, daylight”.   Also lost from the tow were the P G #1 and P G #4.  The vessels had departed Anacortes, Washington March 28th, 1912 and were bound for Ketchikan with no cargo aboard. The P G #5 was valued at $250 and had no insurance

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 10 N 147 15 W  Chart 16700

                Additional Information : Tonnage 33, Built 1912, Registered Port Townsend WA, ON 164720, Master W L Lippincott of Anacortes WA, Owner Fidalgo Island Packing Company of Anacortes WA

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report July 30 1912 at Puget Sound by Gus Hensler, Secy. For Fidalgo Island Packing

 

PANAMA (1930)     The 51 ton 69 foot fishing oil screw vessel Panama stranded and was lost near Marmot Island at 4:10 a.m. March 26, 1930.  The vessel departed Seattle March 18, 1930 bound for sea fisheries with nine crewmen aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by Henry Austrom, master and owner of the Panama:

                “Marmot Island, Alaska”  “Snow storm and very dark”  “N E wind, light, very dark”  “Vessel struck reef and heavy seas started to break her up; crew manned dories and we landed on Marmot Island.  The weather commenced to get very much worse and we were compelled to stay on the island for thirty-six hours, then got off in the dories and went to Usinkie (Ouzinkie) where the Str. Starr picked us up and took us to Kodiak.  At Kodiak we were taken aboard the Str. Admiral Watson.”

                The nine crewmen survived, but the Panama, valued at $30,000, was a total loss.  There was no cargo on board.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  58 13 N 151 50 W  Chart 16580

                Additional Information : Tonnage 51 Gross 35 Net, Length 68.7, Breadth 17.5, Depth 8.1, IHP 100, Built 1911 at Seattle, Registered Seattle, ON 209513

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty March 29, 1920 at Seward by Austrom, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1929) Pgs 462-3

 

PATTERSON (1938)     The 604 ton 168 foot wooden oil screw Patterson stranded and was lost 8 miles north of Cape Fairweather at 11:56 p.m. December 11, 1938.  The vessel departed Kodiak bound for Seattle with 20 tons of general merchandise aboard valued at $3,000 with a number of oil drums on deck.  There were 20 crewmen aboard of which two slipped overboard and were lost in the disaster.  Lost were G F Swanson and J Moore.  Conditions at the time were “dark, SE wind, and rough seas.”  The U S Coast Guard rendered assistance.  The Patterson was valued at $50,000 and was a total loss along with her cargo.  The vessel was fully insured.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  58 48 30 N 137 56 45 W  Chart 16760

                Comment : Formerly the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steam Ship Patterson.  Extensive salvage has been done since the wreck.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 604 Gross 416 Net, Length 168.1, Breadth 27.3, Depth 18.8, Built 1882 at Brooklyn NY, IHP 360,  Registered Seattle, ON 224220, Master H H Bune of Seattle, Owner Alaska Patterson Co of Seattle, Cargo Insurance unknown

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty December 24, 1938 by H H Bune at Juneau, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1936) Pgs 508-9

 

PAULINE COLLINS (1881)     The 70 ton fur trading schooner Pauline Collins stranded and was lost near Karluk on Thursday October 6, 1881.  She had departed St Paul Harbor, Kodiak and was bound for Karluk via Afognak and St Augustine with six crewmen and four passengers on board.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by H R Bowen, master of the Pauline Collins :

                “Karluk, North beach, Kadiak Island”  “Stranding”  “Sudden change of winds and mistaying of schooner”  “Natives of Karluk and crew recovering sails, anchors and chains”

                The Pauline Collins, valued at $7,000 was a total loss.  She was in ballast with no cargo.  The crew and passengers escaped to safety.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 34 10 N 154 27 30 W  Chart 16580

                Additional Information : Tonnage 69.33,  Age 6 years, Registration San Francisco, ON 150044, Owner Higgins and Collins of San Francisco, Vessel Insurance $6,000

                Comment : Captain Bowen escaped from this tragedy but was aboard the Seventy-Six in 1885 when it disappeared with all hands on a trip from Kodiak to Kayak Island.  WG

                Sources 1. U S Customs Wreck Report October 31, 1881 at St Paul (Kodiak) by Bowen, 2. Salmon From Kodiak (1986) Pgs 6, 203

 

PAVLOF (1916)     The 1,300  ton 196 foot wooden cannery steamer Pavlof stranded and was lost at “Little Tugidak Island” at 2:00 p.m. Wednesday February 17, 1916.  The vessel departed King Cove February 13, 1916 bound for Excursion Inlet.  There were 26 crewmen aboard and 100 tons of coal.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by W B Knight, master of the Pavlof:

                “North East gale thick snow and sleet”  “Struck uncharted rock”  “Little Tugidak Island, Alaska”  “Ship lost propeller on rock dragged and lost all anchors”  “S S Alameda tried to pull ship off but hawser parted and weather would not permit another attempt to float ship” 

                The Pavlof was valued at $30,000 and her cargo at $500; both were complete losses.  The crew survived.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  56 30 N 154 40 W  Chart 16580

Comment : Formerly steam ship A G Lindsay.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 1,300 Gross 1,733 Net, Length 196, Breadth 37, Depth 14.4, Built 1889 at Detroit MI, Registered Seattle, ON 106645

                Sources : 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty March 10, 1916 at Bellingham by Knight, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Pg 163

 

PEARL (1905)     The or 87 ton 96 foot ton cod fishing schooner Pearl disappeared with all hands after sailing from San Francisco December 7, 1904 bound for Sanak Island.  The vessel was lost with 8 crewmen and 28 fishermen on the way to the cod fishing grounds of Alaska.  Many months passed before the schooner John F Miller reported finding evidence of the wreck on the northeast reef of Caton Island near Sanak.  Lost with the Pearl were Captain Emil Soderholm, First Mate P Lunding, Second Mate M Tierney, Crewmen A G Bjornson, T Thompson, Hans Hulm, P Jugennsen, Cook Hans Spoilman, Fishermen F Hunt, William Spear, J Moran, John Lee, Thomas Barthie, Nels Johannsen, B Olsen, C Williams, F Berg, A Castleberg, E Englebrtschen, H Morgan, R McGrath, A Thorson, F Craft, Victor Carlson, M Michaelson, A Olsen, A Johannsen, O Miller, J Deeler, C Anderson, C Johnvera, R C Forester, M Jacobson, A Zillitz, Olof Olsen and George Femerling.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  54 23 30 N 162 25 30 W  Chart 16011

                Additional Information : Tonnage 87 Gross 83 Net, Length 95.5, Breadth 23, Depth 7.5, Built 1886 at Benecia CA, Registered San Francisco, ON 150367, Master Emil Soderholm, Owner Alaska Codfishing Company

                Sources : 1. Pacific Cod Fisheries (1915) Pg 108, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1904) Pg 139, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1906) Pg 384, 3. Spokane Daily Chronicle March 18, 1905 Schooner Pearl Probably Lost Pg 2, 4. Los Angeles Herald August 27, 1905 Discover Wreckage of Schooner Pearl Pg 2

 

PELICAN (1928)     The 20 ton 47 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Pelican stranded and was lost at the mouth of the Kaliakh River at 3:00 p.m. Thursday June 21, 1928.  The vessel departed Yakutat June 19th for the Kaliakh River with three crewmen aboard.  She was carrying a 7 ton cargo of fishing equipment and salt in barrels at the time of the disaster.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Eastern spit mouth Kaliakh River”  “No wind, sea calm, day time”  “Propeller became fouled from some unknown cause”  “Stranded”  “Put out two anchors, battened all hatches and doors, cleared all cargo”  “TOTAL LOSS”

                The crew of the Pelican made it to safety, but the vessel and her cargo were lost.  The Pelican had a value of $9,000 and her cargo $1,000.  The vessel was insured for $6,000.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 05 40 N 142 48 30 W  Chart 16016

                Additional Information : Tonnage 20 Gross 17 Net, Length 47.3, Breadth 13.0, Depth 5.3, Built 1917 at Seattle, Registered Juneau, ON 214756, Master Casper Norman of Juneau, Owner Nordby Supply Co of Seattle

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty filed at Ketchikan by C Norman, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1927) Pgs 446-7

 

PEP (1929)     The 10 ton 32 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Pep foundered at Sheep Bay at 4:45 p.m. Monday July 22, 1929.  The vessel departed Cordova at 3:00 that morning bound for Gravina Inlet with three crewman aboard.  The Pep had 2,000 pounds of fresh fish on board when the disaster occurred.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filled out by the master of the Pep, L M Isom:

                “Entrance to Sheep Bay”  “Broad daylight no sea and no weather”  “Flooded and foundered”  “Cause unknown”  “Crew picked up by Geo. Pittas”

                The Pep and her cargo were total losses.  The Pep was valued at $2,400 and her cargo of fresh fish at $100.  There was no insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 38 N 146 04 W  Chart 16700

                Additional Information : Tonnage 10 Gross 7 Net, Length 31.7, Breadth 9.6, Depth 4.4, Built 1918 at Anacortes WA, Registered Petersburg, ON 216628, Owners JS JE & M Isom

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty July 23, 1929 at Cordova by L N Isom, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1929) Pgs 466-7

 

PERSEVERANCE (1928)     The 18 ton 33 foot wooden gas screw Perseverance caught fire and was lost near Montague Island at 7:00 a.m. September 8, 1929.  The vessel departed Cordova with three crewmen aboard bound for Middleton Island.  Her cargo was listed as 1.5 tons of clothing, personal effects and food valued at $3,500.  The following are statements made by J P Ibach, master and owner of the Perseverance:

                “Near Nellie Martin River, on outside of Montague Isl.”  “Rough sea, blowing gale”  “Vessel’s gasoline tank broke loose from bow and broke connections, causing vessel to catch afire, burning completely”  “No one at hand, all 3 on boat left for shore arriving there safely in dory”

                The Perseverance was worth $1,000 at the time of the disaster and was a total loss along with her cargo.  There was no insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 55 N 147 30 W  Chart 16701

                Additional Information : Tonnage 18 Gross 12 Net, Length 33, Breadth 13, Depth 5.2, Built 1913 Seattle, IHP 30, Registered Juneau, ON 211294, Master and Owner J P Ibach of Lemesurier Island

                Sources : 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty March 19, 1929 at Juneau by J P Ibach, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) Pgs 461-2

 

PETROLEUM #1 (1903)     The 18 ton wooden scow Petroleum #1 foundered near Kayak Island at 3:00 p.m. Monday November 2, 1903.  The vessel departed Katalla that day bound for Kayak being towed by a power launch.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “Off shore from Kayak, Alaska”  “Heavy sea…E Gale”  “Scow broke from launch towing and foundered in heavy sea”  “Anchored, but would not hold”  “Foundering”  “Total loss”

                The Petroleum #1 had a value of $700 and had a 3 ton cargo of misc. merchandise with a value of $50.  There was no insurance on the vessel or cargo.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 56 N 144 23 W  Chart 16723

                Additional Information : Tonnage 18 Net, Built 1902 at Seattle, Registered Seattle, ON 54673, Master R J Mahoney of Katalla, Owner Alaska Petroleum & Coal Co. of Seattle

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report February 13, 1904 in Puget Sound by Clark Davis, Mgr. of Alaska Petroleum and Coal

 

PHOENIX (1799)     The three masted two decked 180 ton Russian frigate Phoenix was lost in a storm between May 21 and May 24, 1799 southeast of Kodiak Island with all hands.  88 crewmen and 2 passengers were lost including head of the Kodiak Mission Archimandrite Joseph and Lieutenant Joseph Shields.  Joseph Shields was an Englishman who was responsible for the construction of the Phoenix.  The vessel was the first built in Russian America and was constructed at Voskresenskaia Gavan, now know as Seward.  The Phoenix was travelling from Okhotsk carrying supplies for Russian outposts in Alaska.  Many suffered hardship as a result of the loss.  The cargo of the Phoenix was said to be worth over $500,000.  Wreckage washed ashore as far north as Shuyak Island and as far south as the Trinity Islands.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska 55 30 N 155 W  Chart 16580

                Comment : I have charted this wreck in the lower Shelikof Strait for lack of a better place.  WG

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

PHYLLIS S (1934)     The 46 ton 60 foot oil screw fishing vessel Phyllis S stranded in heavy fog on outer Left Cape on the night of Tuesday May 22, 1934.  The crew of three left Kodiak that day on a round trip to Shearwater Bay.  The vessel was valued at $9,000 at the time of the tragedy, and sustained $7,000 in damages.  There was no insurance.  The crew made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 15 30 N 152 57 W  Chart 16580

                Additional Information : Tonnage 46 Gross 31 Net, Length 59.7, Breadth 15.5, Depth 7.3, Built 1927 Paulsbo WA, Registered Seward, ON 226781, Master Herman Ponchene, Owner J E Shields of Seattle, Chartered by Kodiak Fisheries Co

                Source : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty by Herman Ponchene at Seward, 2. Merchant Vessels of the United States (1933) Pgs 492-3

 

PILGRIM (1931)     The 12 ton 35 foot wooden gas screw Pilgrim exploded and sank at 11:00 a.m. Thursday November 19, 1931 at “Malina Straits”.  The vessel departed Afognak that day with two persons aboard bound for “Adjoining beaches”.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Malina Straits”  “No severe wind”  “Engine backfired, igniting engine room”  “Engine functioned properly at start of trip.  After proceeding about 200 yards engine stopped.  When started again, engine backfired and engine room burst into flames.  An explosion of gas tank was feared, crew took to life boat.  When 100 feet from vessel gas tank did explode, blowing out port side of vessel, which filled and sank.”

                The Pilgrim was valued at $4,000 with no cargo.  She was insured for $3,500.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  58 00 30 N 152 46 W  Chart 16604

                Comment : Malina Straits probably local name for Raspberry Strait.  WG

                Additional Information:  Tonnage 12 Gross 9 Net, Length 35.2, Breadth 10.6, Depth 4.7, Built 1915 Seattle WA, Registered Seward, ON 213021, Master Charles W Pajoman of Afognak, Owners Charles W Pajoman and Roy Trout of Afognak

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty December 22, 1931 by Pajoman at Seward, 2. Merchant Vessels of the United States (1930) Pgs 468-9

 

PIONEER (1912)     The gas launch Pioneer sank in Port Wells July 18, 1912.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 48 N 148 14 W  Chart 16700

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

PIONEER (1927)     The 37 ton 61 foot wooden gas screw Pioneer stranded and was lost near Hinchinbrook Island about December 19, 1927.  Her two crewmen perished in the disaster.  They had departed Katalla that day bound for Cordova with a cargo of 27 tons of gasoline.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Strawberry Bar, Hinchinbrook Island”  “Stranding”  “Gale of wind, snowing and dark”  “Heavy snowstorm, dark, missed channel on account no lights or other markers”  “Pilot house washed ashore and part of stern counter only parts of the vessel that have been recovered.  Crew washed ashore drowned.  Both bodies had life preservers securely tied on.  Life boat found right side up with both oars, a lantern and other gear inside.  This report is made by owner on his arrival in Cordova from Seattle.  Information based on fact as far as the vessel is concerned.  Other information received from Salvage and searching parties”

                The two lost with the Pioneer were W Y Taylor and Harry Hark.  The Pioneer had a value of $20,000 and her cargo $1,260.  Half of the cargo was salvaged.  The Pioneer was insured for $5,500.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 24 N 146 03 W  Chart 16700

                Additional Information : Tonnage 37 Gross 25 Net, Length 60.8, Breadth 15, Depth 4.9, Built 1916 at Tacoma WA, Registered Juneau, ON 214277, Master W Y Taylor of Cordova, Owner W J Crocker of Cordova

                Sources : 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty February 24, 1928 by W J Crocker, 2. Merchant Vessels of the United States (1927) Pgs 450-1

 

PIRATE (1905)     The 20 ton 45 foot wooden scow schooner Pirate was lost in the Shumagin Islands at 2:00 p.m. Wednesday December 20, 1905.  The vessel departed Eagle Harbor December 10, 1905 bound for Pirate Cove with two persons on board.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “Red Bluff, Popoff Island, Alaska”  “Failed to weather a rocky point”  “Went on lee shore”  “Snow squall, daylight”  “Total loss”

                The Pirate was carrying 20 tons of salt codfish worth $1,000.  The crew managed to get to safety with half of the salt codfish.  The Pirate, which was valued at $500, was a total loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  55 17 30 N 160 26 30 W  Chart 16553

                Additional Information : Tonnage 20 Gross 17 Net, Length 45.4, Breadth 15.5, Depth 4.7, Built 1900 at San Francisco CA, Registered Unga, ON 150883, Master R Hoelke of Pirate Cove, Owner Union Fish Company of San Francisco

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report April 12, 1906 at San Francisco by Gashuia, Pres., Union Fish Company, 2. Merchant Vessels of the United States (1905) Pg 139

 

POLAR BEAR (1935)     The 162 ton 84 foot wooden oil screw Polar Bear stranded and was lost in Kupreanof Strait at 4:05 p.m. Friday July 19, 1935.  The vessel had departed Kodiak that day bound for Seattle with 10 crewmen aboard.  She was carrying a 55 ton cargo of fish and trading goods valued at $15,000.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed J H Petrich, mate of the Polar Bear:

                “Strong breeze; misty; poor visibility; choppy sea”  “West end Dry Spruce Island, Kupreanof Straits, S W Alaska”  “Stranded on rock”  “Error in navigation by mate”  “Engines reversed on striking”  “C G Cutter Aurora took crew off beach and transferred them to the C G Cutter Morris at Kodiak, which vessel transported crew to Seward, Alaska”  “Total Loss”

                The Polar Bear was valued at $65,000 and was a total loss along with her cargo.  The insurance was reported to be “blanket coverage” for the vessel and her cargo.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 57 20 N 153 02 30 W  Charts 16580, 16594

                Additional Information : Tonnage 162 Gross 130 Net, Length 83.6, Breadth 21.8, Depth 14.4, Built 1926 at Port Blakely WA, Registered Seward, ON 225956, Master C E Anderson of Seattle, Owner United Trading & Fishing Co of Seattle

                Source : U S C G Report of Casualty July 23, 1935 at Seward

 

PORTLAND (1910)     The 1,420 ton 192 foot steamer Portland stranded and was lost In Katalla Bay at 6:30 a.m. Saturday November 12, 1910.  The vessel was travelling between Juneau and Cordova with 30 passengers and 53 crewmen aboard.  She had a 300 ton cargo of general merchandise valued at $30,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “Katalla Bay; sunken rock off Palm Point”  “Light NE wind, moderate sea”  “After vessel struck she floated off and was beached on sandy beach”  “About 12 hours later vessel began to break up in surf”

                The Portland, valued at $90,000, became a total loss.  All passengers and crew made it to safety.  All but $15,000 worth of the cargo was salvaged. 

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 11 N 144 33 W  Chart 16723

                Additional Information : Tonnage 1,420 Gross 966 Net, Length 191.8, Breadth 36.1, Depth 20.2, Built 1885 at Bath ME, Registered Port Townsend WA, ON 95844,Master F S Moore of Seattle, Owner Alaska Coast Co of Seattle, Vessel Insurance $41,500, Cargo Insurance $16,000, Formerly the steam ship Haytien Republic

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report November 19, 1910 by F S Moore

 

PREMIER (1891)     The 308 ton 142 foot wooden 3 masted schooner Premier stranded in the Shumagin Islands at midnight on Monday  April 6, 1891.  There were 18 fishermen and 7 crewmen aboard on a trip from “Ocernoy, Alaska Ty.” to “Selinas River, Alaska Ty.”  The Premier was carrying about 350 tons of cannery supplies valued at $12,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by Peter Poulsen, master of the Premier:

                “Between Shumagin Islands (25 mi. N. of Cape John), Alaska”  “Snowstorm”  “35 or 40 knots per hour; thick; rough daylight”  “All precautions taken that could be taken, but when she struck the shore she soon filled with water”  “We stayed with the vessel about 24 hours, some stayed longer, and I then sold the wreck at public auction”  “Total loss”

                The Premier was valued at $16,000 and listed as a total loss along with her cargo.  The crewmen and fishermen, that were aboard, made it to safety.  The wrecked vessel was sold at auction for $150.  The purchasers were able to save the Premier and most of her cargo. 

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  55 10 N 160 W  Chart 16540

                Comment : The Premier was put back into service and sank again May 13, 1919 near Unimak Island.  I have included it in this compilation, as evidence of the 1891 wreck may still be on site and of interest.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 307.69 Gross 292.35 Net, Length 141.7, Breadth 33.4, Depth 10.8, Built 1876 at Port Ludlow WA, Registered San Francisco, ON 50087, SL JRVK, Master Peter Paulsen of San Francisco, Owner Jacob Grusen of Alameda CA, Vessel Insurance $16,000, Cargo Insurance $10,500

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report May 8, 1891 at Port Angeles WA, 2. Lewis & Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1895) Pg 394

 

PREMIER (1919)     The 307.69 ton 141.7 foot wooden schooner Premier stranded and was lost on Unimak Island at 1:30 a.m. Tuesday May 13, 1919.  The vessel departed Greys Harbor, Washington April 23, 1919 bound for Ugashik, Bristol Bay, Alaska.  There were 10 crewmen aboard including Otto Phillipsen, master of the Premier.  Her cargo was 426 tons of lumber and salt valued at $8,450.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “At Cape Lutke, Unimak Island, Alaska 18 miles to the east Scotch Cap LH”  “Stranding”  “Very thick weather, with contrary set of current”  “Heavy seas breaking over vessel”  “Master reports that he had run too far to heave to with contrary current”  “Our S S Kvichak stood by and removed crew, but seas breaking too badly to salvage cargo”  “Vessel commenced breaking up immediately”  “Total loss”

                The Premier was valued at $25,000.  She and her cargo were total losses.  There was no insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  54 29 10 N 164 20 15 W  Charts 16011, 16520

                Additional Information : Tonnage 307.69 Gross 292.35 Net, Length 141.7, Breadth 33.4, Depth 10.8, Built 1876 at Port Ludlow WA, Registered San Francisco, ON 50087, SL JRVK, Master Otto Phillipson of Alameda CA, Owner Alaska Packers Association of San Francisco

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty July 19, 1919 at San Francisco by A K Tichener, Vice President & General Supt., Alaska Packers Association

 

PRESIDENT (1923)     The 50 ton 72 foot wooden gas screw President was wrecked during a heavy storm while laid up in winter quarters at Graveyard Point in Bristol Bay, January 12, 1923.  The President was a fishing vessel valued at $12,000 at the time of the loss

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  58 52 N 157 01 W  Chart 16323

                Additional Information : Tonnage 50 Gross 34 Net, Length 72.2, Breadth 17.2, Depth 6.5, Built 1902 at Tacoma WA, Registered Tacoma WA, ON 93271

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty September 26, 1923 by C K Bowen for Owners Libby McNeill & Libby, 2. Merchant Vessels of the United States (1922) Pg 310

 

PRILIP (1924)     The 33 ton 53 foot wooden gas screw Prilip caught fire after striking a rock at 9:00 a.m. Friday July 18, 1924.  She departed Bidarka Point July 15, 1924 with 5 crewmen aboard bound for “Eshomy Bay”.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Eshomy Bay, Alaska”  “Stranding and later fire”  “No wind of any consequence; daylight”  “After vessel struck rock she was towed to shore and beached, where she later caught fire which at once became beyond control”  “Charterer of the vessel had her towed ashore and beached, intending to make repairs, but fire broke out before repairs started”  “Boat was left in charge of Engineer, and he was only member of crew present at the time of fire.  Master and agents of charterer had gone to commence to prepare for repairs, when fire occurred”

                The Prilip was valued at $12,500 and had about 12 tons of fish aboard valued at $250.  The vessel and her cargo were total losses.  Insurance on the Prilip was $10,000.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 28 30 N 147 58 30 W  Chart 16700

                Additional Information : Tonnage 33 Gross 26 Net, Length 52.6, Breadth 15.2, Depth 6.6, Built 1917 Gig Harbor WA, Registered Astoria OR, ON 214826, Master William Reynolds of Latouche, Owner Steve Kukura of Brookfield OR

                Sources : 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty November 20, 1924 by Chris Lacos, Engineer of Prilip, 2. Merchant Vessels of the United States (1924) Pg 255

 

PSB&D CO #8     The 247 ton freight scow PSB&D Co #8 stranded and was lost October 14, 1938 on Kanak Island in Controller Bay.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 08 N 144 21 W  Chart 16723

                Source : Merchant Vessels of the U S (1939) Vessels Lost Pg 513

 

PSB&D CO #11 (1939)     The 234.75 ton freight scow PSB&D Co #11 foundered between 10:00 and 12:00 p.m. September 27, 1939.  The vessel was being towed.  She had departed Cordova September 26, 1939 bound for Seward with no one aboard.  Her cargo was 60 tons of various machinery, valued at $15,500.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Towing scow”  “Light easterly swell”  “10 miles Southwest by South of Johnston Point”  “Foundering”  “Probably hit a deadhead”  “Looked three days for scow; also used airplane in search”  “Total loss”

                The PSB&D Co #11, valued at $4,000 was a total loss, along with the cargo on board. The vessel was insured for $4,000 and her cargo for $15,500.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 28 N 146 37 W  Chart 16700

                Additional Information : Tonnage 234.75, Age 16 years, Registered Seattle, ON 168718, Master Roy Hall of Arlington WA, Owner Puget Sound Bridge and Dredging Company of Seattle

                Source : U S C G Report of Casualty October 28, 1939 by Roy Hall

 

PURITAN (1918)     The 78 ton 81 foot gas screw fishing vessel Puritan stranded and was lost on Montague Island March 4, 1918.  All 17 crewmen made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 10 N 147 15 W  Chart 16700

                Additional Information : Tonnage 78 Gross 53 Net, Length 80.6, Breadth 20.2, Depth 9.1, IHP 125, Built 1911 at Tacoma WA, Registered Tacoma, ON209088

                Sources : 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1918) Loss of American Vessels Reported During Fiscal Year 1921 Pg 455, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1915) Pg 299

 

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