South Central Alaska Shipwrecks ( S )

S #2 (1918)     The 54 ton wooden barge S #2 was lost between Kodiak and Chignik March 1, 1918.  The vessel was under tow when she iced down, the tow line parted and she foundered.  She was carrying 11,000 pounds, 10 drums of distillates, valued at $275.  The S #2 had a value of $5,000.  There was no insurance on the vessel or her cargo.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  Unknown

                Additional Information : Tonnage 54 Gross and Net, Built 1918 at Seattle WA, Registered Seattle, ON 167153, Master H Knudsen, Owner Sockeye Salmon Co of Seattle, Last Port Seattle February 14, 1914, Destination Morzhovia Bay, Alaska

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty March 17, 1919 at Seattle by N B Doue for Frank W Doue Co, Agent

 

SADIE F CALLER (1891)     The 413 ton 132 foot wooden schooner Sadie F Caller stranded and was lost near Chignik at 2 p.m. Saturday May 2, 1891.  The vessel departed San Francisco April 11, 1891 bound for Chignik Bay, Alaska.  She had 158 passengers and 10 officers and crew.  Her passengers were cannery workers.  Her 450 ton cargo was a salmon canning outfit valued at $50,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “Entrance of Chignik Bay Harbor”  “56 50 N Lat, 156 W Long”  “Stranded on bar, owing to change of channel”  “Strong breeze, clear weather, rough sea”  “Str. Polar Bear towed the vessel to beach about 2 hours after casualty”

                The Sadie F Caller had a value of $16,000 at the time of the disaster and was reported a total loss.  Loss to the cargo was reported at $40,000.  Insurance on the vessel was $9,000 and there was $45,000 of coverage on the cargo.  H W McCurdy mentions an effort to salvage cargo from the Sadie F Caller was attempted in 1913 in 60 feet of water.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  56 18 N 158 24 W  Chart 16566

                Comment : Lattitude and Longitude given on wreck report wrong.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 413.81 Gross 393.25 Net, Length 131.9, Breadth 31.5, Depth 15.1, Built 1873 at Essex MA, SL JMDQ, Registered San Francisco, ON 115162, Master John C Young of San Francisco, Owner A B Peterson MO of San Francisco

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report October 5, 1891 by J C Young at San Francisco, 2. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pgs 229-30

 

SAINT ANDREW (1934)     The 40 ton 54 foot wooden fishing vessel Saint Andrew stranded and was lost the night of October 9, 1934 in Unga Bay.  The vessel departed Mist Harbor on her way to Unga with eight on board.  Lost with the Saint Andrew were crewmen Ed. Heince, master Jalmar Hirvir and 3 of her 6 passengers.  The Saint Andrew was valued at $6,750 with damages estimated at $4,200.  She was insured for $4,200.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  55 11 N 160 30 10 W  Chart 16553

                Comment : Probably Delarof Harbor.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 40 Gross 27 Net, Length 54.3, Breadth 15.8, Depth 7, Built 1920 at Gig Harbor WA, Horsepower 50, Registered Ketchikan, ON 219841, Master J Hirvir of Mist Harbor, Owner Associated Fishermen of Alaska, Seattle

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty October 25, 1934 at Seattle by M Jaseplison, secretary for Associated Fishermen of Alaska, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1934) Pgs 542-3

 

SAINT FRANCIS (1917)     The 1,898 ton 231 foot wooden ship Saint Francis stranded and was lost on Unimak Island at 2:15 a.m. Monday May 14, 1917.  The vessel departed San Francisco April 21, 1917 bound for Kvichak, Bristol Bay with a crew of 17.  She was carrying a 1,500 ton cargo of general merchandise and cannery supplies valued at $150,000.  The following are comments taken from the casualty report filed by J A Rosengren, master of the Saint Francis:

                “At night and dark, fresh SW, dark and misty, moderate”  “1 mile south Middle Point, Unimak Island, Alaska”  “STRANDING”  “Missed tack, in veering vessel went ashore”  “Unable to do anything, dropped one anchor but too late to do anything”  “St. s. Norwood and St. s. Goliah stood by and rescued people from ship, and took all on board”  “Total loss”

                The Saint Francis had a value of $75,000 and was a total loss along with her cargo.  Both were insured for an unknown amount.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  54 29 N 164 54 30 W  Chart 16520

                Comment : Middle Point now called Sennett Point.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 1,898 Gross 1,757 Net, Length 231.4, Breadth 41.8, Depth 17.7, Built 1882 at Bath ME, Registered San Francisco, ON 115835, SL JWBF, Master J A Rosengren of Seattle, Owner Alaska Fisherman’s Packing Company of San Francisco

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty May 15, 1916 by J A Rosengren, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Pg 65

 

SAINT GEORGE (1881)     The 100.41 ton schooner Saint George wrecked on a rock near Kodiak on Wednesday April 27, 1881.  The vessel had departed Kodiak bound for English Bay and Nutchick with 3 passengers and 7 crewmen aboard.  She was carrying $9,000 worth of general merchandise as cargo.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by John Wessels, master of the Saint George:

                “Struck unknown sunken rock off Twin Rocks”  “Stove large hole in bottom, causing her to fill and be unmanageable”  “Schooner Pauline Collins towed her to Long Island”  “The rock apparently unknown by anyone seems to be very pointed rock over which we would have passed had it not been dead low tide”

                The Saint George had a value of $12,000.  Both the vessel and her cargo are listed as nearly total losses.   The Saint George was insured for $10,000 and her cargo for the same amount.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 50 05 N 152 18 45 W  Chart 16580

                Comment : Probably hit Hutchinson Reef near Hanin Rocks which used to be called the Twins,  just north of Kodiak.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 100.41, Built 1878 at San Francisco CA, SL JTBM, Registered San Francisco, ON 15607, Master John Wessels of San Francisco, Owner Alaska Commercial Company of San Francisco

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report April 30, 1881 by Wessels at Kodiak

 

SAINT KATHERINE (1917)     The 1,201 ton 202 foot wooden bark Saint Katherine “grounded and broke her back” at Ugashik May 14, 1917.  The vessel was raised late that summer and repaired.  Evidence of the wreck may still be on site and of interest.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska 57 30 45 N 157 23 45 W  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 1,201 Gross 1090 Net, Length 202.8, Breadth 39.3, Depth 19.1, Built 1890 at Bath ME, SL KHPV, Registered San Francisco, ON 116362

                Sources : 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pgs 293-4, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1918) Pg 58

 

SAINT PAUL (1884)     The 13.92 ton schooner Saint Paul was driven ashore and lost “Near Nikolaisosk settlement, Alas. 10 miles N of Belkopsky” on April 28, 1884.  The vessel departed Belkofski bound for Kodiak with two aboard.  A northeast gale caused the vessel to lose her anchors and be driven ashore.  The schooner’s papers were lost with the vessel.  There were two crewmen aboard who made it to safety.  The Saint Paul had a value of $1,800 and her cargo of provisions was worth $400.  Both the vessel and cargo were total losses.  There was no insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  55 14 N 161 26 W  Chart 16549

                Comment : Nikolaief Settlement was in Dushkin Lagoon in Volcano Bay 11 miles NNE of Belkofski. WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 13.92, Age 7 years, Registered Kodiak, ON 115679, Master and owner Paul Pauloff of Kodiak

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report June 17, 1884 by Pauloff at Kodiak

 

SAINT PAUL (1907)     The 48 ton 63 foot wooden schooner Saint Paul was blown ashore and lost in the Semidi Islands at 5 p.m. October 6, 1907.  The vessel departed Kodiak September 22, 1907 bound for Chowiet Island with 9 crewmen aboard.  The vessel was carrying 30 tons of merchandise valued at $2,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by Andy Anderson, master of the Saint Paul:

                “ West side of Chowiet Island, Alas.”  “Heavy wind blowing, high seas”  “Anchor chains parted, blew ashore”  “Northwest gale, high seas running, getting dark, and cloudy”  “Both anchors down”  “Total loss”

                The Saint Paul had a value of $2,000 and was a total loss along with her cargo.  There were no lives lost in the disaster.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral  56 02 N 156 42 W  Chart 16013 (Inset)

                Additional Information : Tonnage 48 Gross 46 Net, Length 63.5, Breadth 20, Depth 4, Built 1890 at Benicia CA, Registered Kodiak, ON 116316, Master Andy Anderson of Kodiak, Owner Alaska Commercial Company of San Francisco

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report November 13, 1907 at Unalaska

 

SAKETTS HARBOR (1926)     The 10,488 ton steel hulled electric screw steam vessel Saketts Harbor foundered and became a total loss off Anchorage February of 1926.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  61 13 05 N 149 53 30 W  Chart 16660

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992) Pg 47

 

SALMO (1925)     Fire completely destroyed the 14 ton 36 foot fishing vessel Salmo near the Kasilof River at 5 p.m. Monday September28, 1925.  The vessel departed Kenai at 3:00 p.m. that day bound for Seldovia and way ports.  There were six passengers and three crewmen aboard.  The Salmo was also carrying 1 ½ tons of miscellaneous merchandise valued at $500.   The following are excerpts from the casualty report submitted by T O Perry, master and owner of the Salmo:

                “Mouth of Kasilof River, Alaska”  “Light wind off shore”  “Gasoline explosion and fire”  “Started in after cabin presumably from leak in gasoline feed pipe”  “Used two Pyrene fire extinguishers without effect”  “Watchman at cannery came with small boat to take everyone off”  “Vessel completely destroyed by fire”  “Total Loss”

                The Salmo had a value of $2,500 which was a total loss along with cargo.  There were no lives lost.  Neither the Salmo nor her cargo was insured.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 23 15 N 151 17 45 W  Chart 16660

                Additional Information : Tonnage 14 Gross 9 Net, Length 36, Breadth 11.9, Depth 3.4, Built 1910 at Seattle WA, Registered Seward, ON 207531, Master and owner T O Perry of Seldovia

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty October 10, 1925 at Seward, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1925) Pgs 488-9

 

SALVATOR (1935)     The 467 ton 160 foot four masted schooner Salvator stranded and was lost in Seldovia Bay in 1935.  The Salvator operated as a fishing and salmon packing vessel with 8 crewmen out of Seward and Seldovia. 

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 27 45 N 151 43 30 W  Chart 16645

                Additional Information : Tonnage 467 Gross 385 Net, Length 160, Breadth 36, Depth 11, Built 1890 at Eureka CA, SL KNXL, Owner Axel Anderson of Seldovia, Registered Seward, ON 116364

                Sources : 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1934) Pgs 656-7

 

SAN JUAN #1 (1919)     The barge San Juan #1 was lost in the Gulf of Alaska in 1919

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska Unknown

                Sources : 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 312, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

SAN JUAN #3 (1920)     The 24 ton wooden deck scow San Juan #3 foundered in the Gulf of Alaska at 5 a.m. Thursday March 11, 1920.  The vessel departed March 10th from Port Althorp bound for Unakwik Inlet in Prince William Sound.  The master of the San Juan #3 was aboard the tug towing the scow.  The following are statements taken from the casualty report submitted by I D Nordyke, master:

                “About 6 miles off shore Lat. 59 11 N Long. 139 05 W”  “Wind about 4, coming daylight, cross swell”  “FOUNDERED”  “Scows not recaulked since built and not sheeted on bottom”  “Stood by 7 hours, then wind and sea increasing and scow drifting inshore, had to leave”  “Two men in shallow 14 ft. skiff did not take any water when sent alongside scow.  Too heavy swell to handle both scows with one foundered”  “total loss”

                The San Juan #3 had a 10 ton deck load of cannery supplies worth $1,690.  The scow was valued at $1,000.  Both scow and cargo were total losses.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 11 N 139 05 W  Chart 16016

                Comment : These coordinates put the wreck offshore between Dangerous River and Dry Bay.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 24, Built 1915, Registered Friday Harbor WA, ON 165976, Master I D Nordyke of Friday Harbor WA, Owner San Juan Canning Company of Friday Harbor WA

                Source : U S C G Report of Casualty April 11, 1920 at Juneau

 

SAN MARCO (1923)     The 30 ton 50 foot gas screw fishing vessel San Marco stranded and was lost at Kanak Island December 9, 1923.  No lives were lost from the crew of 8.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral  Alaska  60 08 N 144 21 W  Chart 16723

                Comment : This vessel was salvaged and lost again in 1938 (see).  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 30 Gross 20 Net, Length 49.8, Breadth 14.4, Depth 6.3, IHP 40, Built 1915 at Dockton WA, Home Port Tacoma WA, ON 213320

                Sources : 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1923) Pg 272, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1924) Pg 438

 

SAN MARCO (1938)     The 30 ton 50 foot wooden gas screw San Marco broke her moorings and stranded on a reef at 4 a.m. Friday February 4, 1938 near Seldovia.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report submitted by Jack Anderson, master and owner of the San Marco:

                “Broke mooring cable, drug anchor, Seldovia, Alaska”  “Northwest gale, night, dark”  “San Marco was moored after a cable about 800 pound weight, also a 150 pound anchor.  With a fathom of line and 8 fathom of chain.  Was anchored at about 2 fathoms of water at low tide.  Northwest gale broke cable and she drug her anchor and landed on a reef, across from Seldovia”

                The San Marco had a value of $3,500 and was a total loss.  She was insured for $3,000.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 26 15 N 151 42 30 W  Chart 16640

                Additional Information : Tonnage 30 Gross 20 Net, Length 49.8, Breadth 14.4, Depth 6.3, IHP 40, Built 1915 at Dockton WA, Registered Cordova, ON 213320, Master and owner John(Jack) Conrad Anderson of Seldovia

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty March 9, 1938 at Cordova by Anderson, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1938) Pg 270

 

SARATOGA (1908)     The 2,820 ton 298 foot iron steam ship Saratoga stranded and was lost in Prince William Sound at 2:28 p.m. Friday March 20, 1908.  The vessel departed Valdez that morning at 12:01 bound for Cordova.  There were 78 officers and crewmen aboard and 300 tons of copper ore and general merchandise.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report submitted by L J Schage, master of the Saratoga:

                “Southwest end of Busby Island, Prince William Sound, Alaska’  “Snowstorm”  “Stranded”  “Strong breeze, daylight, moderate sea, heavy snowstorm”  “Reversed engine”  “Run out anchor and tried to heavy ship off”  “S S Elsie took off passengers”

                The Saratoga had a value of $200,000 of which the loss was listed as “probably total”.  The cargo had a value of $7,000 of which $5,000 was reported lost.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 53 30 N 146 42 W  Chart 16708

                Comment : The 47 foot wooden schooner Olga is lost in 1909 while doing salvage work on the Saratoga the following year.  In 1910 the 335 foot iron steam ship Olympia is lost on adjacent Bligh Reef.  In 1989 the Exxon Valdez fetched up hard aground in the same location creating one of the largest oil spills in U S history.

                Additional Information : Tonnage 2,820 Gross 1973 Net, Length 298, Breadth 38.6, Depth 23.5, Built 1878 at Chester PA, Ex Port Valdez, SL JTDP, Decks 2, Masts 3, Registered Port Townsend WA, ON 115630, Master L J Schage of Seattle, Owner Alaska Steamship Company of Seattle (purchased from Northwestern Steamship Company and renamed in 1906)

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report March 23, 1908, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1907) Pg 31, 3. Alaska Steam (1984) Pg 43

 

SATSUMA MARU (1907)     The Japanese sealing schooner Satsuma Maru broke her anchor cable in a gale and was driven ashore and lost at Point Manby November 5, 1907.  The captain and 8 men made their way to Yakutat for help while the 11 other survivors stayed at the wreck site below the Malaspina Glacier.  They were rescued the following year by the cutter Thetis.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 41 30 N 140 18 15 W  Chart 16016

                Sources : 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 137

 

SCANDIA (1920)     The 116 ton 91 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Scandia (Skandia)  stranded on the north end of Montague Island at 8:45 p.m. March 19, 1920.  The vessel departed Ketchikan March 16, 1920 bound for deep sea fishing with 17 crewmembers.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by A Mornas, master of the Scandia:

                “Stranding”  “Snow storm and tides”  “Moderate breeze, 15 knot, dark”  “Ran off Middle Point 10 minutes before changing course”  “Reason we were on northern side of Montague was to make a quick run to Latouche, having sick man aboard who needed prompt medical attention.  Picked up Zaikof Point and Middle Point and were trying to pick up Montague in order to shape course for Smith Island Light”  “Gas boat Sunset, Capt. Hofstad took sick man to Latouche, and also message to get oil drums to float boat.  Could not get drums but returned later after storm had put vessel in such shape she could not be taken off”

                The Scandia had a value of $35,000 and damage was reported at $15,000.  She had a 55 ton cargo of stores, ice, bait and oil valued at $2,500 which was a total loss.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 20 40 N 147 W  Chart 16700

                Comment : The Scandia was salvaged and then lost again in 1927.  Evidence of this earlier disaster may still be on site and of interest.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 116 Gross 79 Net, Length 90.8, Breadth 19.8, Depth 9.3, Built 1913 at Seattle, Registered Seattle, ON 211919, IHP 140, Master A Mornas of Seattle, Owner National Independent Fisheries Corp. of Seattle, Insurance unknown

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty March 23, 1920 at Cordova, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1920) Pg 320

 

SCANDIA (1927)     The 116 ton 91 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Scandia stranded and was lost near Kodiak at 11:58 p.m. February 23, 1927.  The vessel departed Seward bound for Kodiak with 15 crewmen aboard and $300 worth of ice and frozen herring.  The following are statements taken from the casualty report submitted by O O Hvatum, part owner and master of the Scandia:

                “Wind 25-30 miles, dark about midnight”  “Had lookout on forecastle, tried to locate buoy with searchlight”  “Outer rocks, entrance to Kodiak”  “Stranding”  “Bell buoy on reef adrift and snow thick with NE wind”  “(assistance) from Capt. Stone on Duncan 1”  “Capt. Wm. Stone showed remarkable presence of mind in going inside reef in passage only about 200 yards wide and standing by until we all got on board his boat.  As we lost two of our three dories in the breakers we had to make two trips to land all of the men on the Duncan.  By that time a strong gale was blowing with danger of the Duncan having the same fate as the Scandia”  “TOTAL LOSS”

                The Scandia had a value of $45,000 which was a total loss along with her cargo.  The vessel was insured for $19,000.  Thanks to the efforts of the crew of the Duncan 1, there was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 49 45 N 152 18 W  Chart 16595

                Comment : Possibly hit the same rocks at the northern entrance to Kodiak that the 100 ton schooner St George hit in 1881 and the 90 foot Marten in 1975.  The Scandia (Skandia) had serious damage done to her when she struck a rock and stranded on the north end of Montague Island March 19, 1920.  Her crew was assisted by the gas screw Sunset.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 116 Gross 79 Net, Length 90.8, Breadth 19.8, Depth 9.3, Built 1913 at Seattle, Registered Ketchikan, ON 211919, IHP 140, Master O O Hvatum of Seattle, Owners O O Hvatum and Egill Eriksen of Ketchikan

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty March 14, 1927 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1926) Pgs 494-5

 

SEA BIRD (1929) SC     The 41 ton 51 foot wooden oil screw halibut schooner Sea Bird was destroyed in a gale near Cape St Elias at 10 p.m. Monday November 11, 1929.  The vessel was returning from the fishing banks to Juneau, where they had departed on November 5th.  The Sea Bird had a 15 ton load of fresh halibut on board valued at $3,500. Two of the seven crewmen were lost in the disaster.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report submitted by H M Reitan, master of the Sea Bird:

                “Estimate a 90 mile gale blowing a northeasterly, sea extremely rough, dark”  “35 miles east of Cape St Elias, Alaska”  “Sea carried away pilot house and other deck structures in heavy gale carrying away two members of crew.  Remainder of crew managed to reach Wingham Id., Prince Wm. Sound with what remained of vessel on November 14, 1929”  “Gale came up suddenly, the barometer not giving any previous warning.  During accident pump was disabled, bailed water out of hold for six hours straight”  “After vessel reached Wingham Id., shelter was given the members of crew by a fox farmer.  Vessel was anchored in harbor & on Nov. 20th another heavy gale blew vessel ashore.”  “U S Coast Guard Cutter Unalga reached Wingate Is. on Nov. 27th and took members of crew to Juneau, Alaska”  “The Sea Bird was not equipped with radio”  “Believe will be total loss”

                Lost with the Sea Bird and her cargo were crewmen Louis Dyb and Elias Dyb.  The vessel had a value of $22,000.  She was insured for $16,000 with no insurance for the cargo.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 54 N 144 36 W  Chart 16013s

                Additional Information : Tonnage 41 Gross 28 Net, Length 51.6, Breadth 16.1, Depth 8.3, Built 1928 at Tacoma WA, IHP 90, Registered Seattle, ON 227223, Master H M Reitan of Seattle, Owner Kveite Fish Company of Seattle

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty November 30, 1929 at Juneau, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) Pgs 494-5

 

SEA OTTER (1786)     The 100 ton two masted British snow Sea Otter disappeared from Snug Harbor Cove in September of 1786.  She was purchased by “a society of investors in Bengal” headed by Captain John Mears, January 20, 1786 along with the 200 ton vessel Nootka (also snow rigged). The vessels were to be used for fur trading on the northwest coast of America.  The Sea Otter was commanded by William Tipping, a lieutenant in the Royal English Navy.  The Nootka was commanded by Captain John Meares also a lieutenant in the Royal English Navy.  After parting ways with the Nootka February 20, 1786 in Calcutta, the Sea Otter was off to Malacca with trade goods (opium).  The Sea Otter arrived in Prince William Sound in September.  She was scheduled to meet with the Nootka in Snug Harbor Cove.  The Nootka arrived at the rendezvous site September 20, 1786, but the Sea Otter had already departed.  The Sea Otter is reported to have met with the vessels Captain Cook and Experiment earlier in September in Prince William Sound.  She then departed for Cooks River (Cook Inlet) and nothing has been heard of her since.  The Sea Otter was lost with all hands.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 45 N 146 39 W  Chart 16700

                Sources : 1. Meares Voyages (1791) London, 2. The European Magazine and London Review (November 1788) Pg 332-4 New Fur Trade

 

SEA RANGER (1893)     273 ton 106 foot wooden bark Sea Ranger stranded and was lost near Kayak Island at 9 a.m. May 26, 1893.  The vessel departed San Francisco March 23, 1893 bound for Kodiak, Bristol Bay and the Arctic Ocean.  She had a crew of 40 on board and 30 tons of whale oil and bone when the disaster occurred.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by Charles H Foley, master of the Sea Ranger:

                “3 miles W of Kayak Island, Alaska”  “Stranded on ledge not on chart”  “Attempting to get close to land to bury one of the crew”  “Moderate breeze, slight swell, morning”  “Impossible to do anything after striking”  “We were totally unprepared for accident of any kind.  On chart showed 20 fathoms of water within one mile of beach and no rocks or ledges in that vicinity”

                The Sea Ranger had a value of $25,000 and her cargo between $10,000 and $15,000.  Both the vessel and her cargo were total losses.  James McKee was the crewman that the crew was attempting to bury. 

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 56 N 144 23 W  Chart 16723

                Comment : Sea Ranger Reef is now on the Chart NNW of Cape St Elias off Kayak Island.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 273.12 Gross 259.46 Net, Length 106.8, Breadth 27.3, Depth 16.3, Built 1856 at Rochester MA, SL HRBQ, Registered San Francisco, ON 22612, Master Charles H Foley of New Bedford MA, Owner Robert W Bartlett of New Bedford MA, Insurance Unknown

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report June 6, 1893 at Sitka by Foley, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1892) Pg 236, 3. The Victoria Colonist June 17, 1893 (Page 7) Loss of the Sea Ranger, 4. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1895) Pg 413

 

SERVIA (1907)     The 1,866 ton 234 foot wooden bark Servia was blown onto the beach at Karluk and destroyed at 2 p.m. November 6, 1907.  The vessel departed San Francisco August 23, 1907 bound for Karluk with 20 officers and crew aboard.  The vessel was anchored off of Karluk taking on the last of the year’s salmon canning production.  Her cargo at the time of the disaster was 1,450 tons of cases of canned salmon worth $170,000.  A strong northeasterly gale broke the two anchor chains of the Servia and forced her onto the shore at Julia Foard Point.  The vessel began breaking up immediately.  Some of the crew were taken aboard Alaska Packers Association cannery tenders and some swam for their lives.  17 of the crew survived.  Lost were Gust Headland (35) of Sweden, Louis Huron (27) and Olof Fenning (30).  The Servia had a value of $35,000 and was a total loss along with her cargo of canned salmon.  The vessel was insured for $3,000 and her cargo for $160,000.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 34 10 N 154 27 30 W  Charts 16580, 16599

                Comment : Julia Foard Point is a local name of the point of land near Karluk where the 446 ton 136 foot bark Julia Foard was lost in 1888.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 1,866 Gross, 1,736 Net, Length 234.1, Breadth 41.1, Depth 18.1, Built 1883 at Bath ME, SL KCBH, Registered San Francisco, ON 115972, Master Andrew Aas of San Francisco, Owner Henry Nelson MO of San Francisco

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report at San Francisco, 2. Salmon From Kodiak (1986) Pg 203, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1907) Pg 134

 

SEVENTY-SIX (1895)     The 38 ton 60 foot schooner Seventy Six departed Wooded (Woody) Island December 11, 1895 with seven crewmen aboard bound for Kayak Island on a trading voyage.  The vessel disappeared with all hands. 

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  Unknown

                Additional Information : Tonnage 38.11 Gross 36.22 Net, Length 60, Breadth 21, Depth 5, Built 1876 at Mayhew Landing CA, Registered Kodiak, ON 115475

                Sources : 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. Salmon from Kodiak (1986) Pg 6, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1895) Pg 183

 

SHAMROCK (1929)     The 13 ton 38 foot wooden gas screw Shamrock stranded and was lost near Ninilchik April 22, 1929.  The vessel departed Seldovia the day before bound for Ninilchik with two persons aboard and no cargo.  The following are statements taken from the casualty report filed by W R Harris, master and owner:

                “About two miles southerly from Ninilchik”  “Force of wind about 50 miles” “Stormy weather and rough sea”  “Bad weather, strong N W wind and strong ebbing tide”  “Stranding”  “Engine run at full speed.  Anchors thrown out and everything possible done to avoid disaster”  “No assistance rendered”  “Total loss”

                The Shamrock had a value of $3,400 and was a total loss.  There was $1,600 worth of insurance on the vessel.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 02 N 151 42 W  Chart 16661

                Additional Information : Tonnage 13 Gross 9 Net, Length 38.5, Breadth 11.9, Depth 4.6, Built 1912 at Tacoma WA, IHP 27, Registered Juneau, ON 209578, Master and owner W R Harris of Seldovia

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty May 28, 1929 at Seldovia, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) Pgs 500-501

 

SHARK (1915)     Fire destroyed the 19 ton 47 foot gas screw fishing vessel Shark at Seldovia October 29, 1915.  The two persons aboard made it to safety, but the Shark was a complete loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 26 15 N 151 42 30 W  Chart 16640

                Additional Information : Tonnage 19 Gross 13 Net, Length 46.7,Breadth 11.9, Depth 4.8, IHP 30, Built 1910 At Port Orchard WA, Registered Port Townsend WA, ON 217995

                Sources : Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Vessels Reported Lost Pg 421, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1915) Pg 311

 

SHINKOKU MARU (1923)     The steamer Shinkoku Maru was lost November 26, 1923 off Montague Island.  The vessel was on a voyage from Yokahama, Japan to Portland, Oregon when she became disabled in the Aleutians with a broken tail shaft.  She was taken in tow by the tug Humaconna.  They encountered a furious gale off of Montague Island and the Shinkoku Maru had to be cut loose.  She was blown onto the rocks and became a complete loss.  All but one of the crew survived escaping to the shore.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 10 N 147 15 W  Chart 16700

                Sources : 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 343

 

SINTRAM (1915)     The 1,656 ton 215 foot wooden ship Sintram stranded and was lost near the Egegik River at 1:30 a.m. May 2, 1915.  The vessel departed from San Francisco bound for Naknek, Bristol Bay, Alaska.  There were 105 cannery hands and 74 officers and crewmen aboard.  The Sintram was also carrying 1,400 tons of salmon cannery supplies including tin plate, cans, shooks, etc.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “About 7 miles north and west of Egegik river, Alaska”  “Stranding”  “Foggy and thick weather”  “Light wind, dark and rainy, choppy sea”  “Had taken soundings and found an average of 17 fms. water”  “Steamer Kadiak, belonging to the Alaska Packers Assn. took off crew and landed them at Nakuck”  “Steamer Kadiak took off crew and some part of provisions the day following the stranding.  Subsequently the Company got ashore nearly all cargo but in damaged condition”

                The Sintram had a value of $20,000 and became a total loss.  Her cargo had a value of $68,000 and was about 50% lost or damaged.  No lives were lost in the disaster.  The Sintram had vessel insurance for $5,000 and cargo insurance for $55,000.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  58 12 N 157 24 W  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 1,656 Gross 1,495 Net, Length 215.4, Breadth 42.9, 24.2, SL JSQD, Built 1877 Freeport ME, Registered San Francisco, ON 115575, Master Oskar Anderson of Oakland CA

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty by Ferd. C Peterson for owners at San Francisco, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S ( 1914) Pg 81

 

SPENCER F BAIRD (1890)     The 7.91 ton 32 foot wooden schooner Spencer F Baird stranded and was lost near Sankin Island at 10:30 p.m. Sunday August 17, 1890.  The vessel departed Pauloff Harbor, Sanak Island that day bound for Tigalda Island with her master and one seaman aboard.  They were carrying 2 ½ tons of provisions and mining tools.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “Moderate gale, rough, dark”  “2 ½ miles east of Sankin Island”  “Stranding”  “Making a harbor in thick weather”  “Out of reckoning, mistook a low place between two bluffs for entrance to harbor”  “Total loss”

                The Spencer F Baird was worth $700 and her cargo $350.  Both were total losses with no insurance.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  54 58 30 N 163 16 20 W  Chart 16535

                Additional Information : Tonnage 7.91 Gross 7.53 Net, Length 31.8, Breadth 10, Depth 4.4, Built 1885 at Port Ludlow WA, Registered San Francisco, ON 116043, Master Harry Martin of San Francisco, Owner The McCollam Fishing and Trading Company of San Francisco

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report November 17, 1890 at San Francisco by George Tasheira, Manager, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1888) Pg 236

 

STANDARD (1917)     The 1,534 ton 212 foot wooden ship Standard stranded and was lost at 8:30 a.m. Monday May 14, 1917 at Cape Constantine.  The vessel departed San Francisco April 9, 1917 bound for the Libby McNeil & Libby Ekuk Cannery in Bristol Bay.  There were 162 passengers and 15 crewmen aboard.  The Standard was also carrying 2,707,349 pounds of cannery supplies valued at $88,880.00.  The cause of the casualty is listed as “heavy storm”.  Passengers and crew of the vessel were rescued by the steamers George F Haller and North Star.  The Standard had a value of $20,000 and was a total loss along with her cargo.  There was no insurance on the vessel but the cargo was fully insured.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  58 23 39 N 158 53 30 W  Charts 16006, 16322

                Comment : Possibly hit the Sterling Shoal off Cape Constantine, named for the 208 foot wooden ship Sterling lost there in 1898.  On this same day, May 14, 1917,  the 231 wooden ship Saint Francis was lost at Unimak Island.  She was also carrying workers and supplies for the Libby McNeil & Libby Locanock Cannery at Kvichak in Bristol Bay. WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 1,534 Gross 1,461 Net, Length 212, Breadth 40.2, 24.5, Built 1878 at Phippsburg ME, Registered San Francisco, ON 115634, SL JTFB, Master Captain S Christiansen of San Francisco, Owner Libby McNeil & Libby of San Francisco

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty June 27, 1917 by D W Brauch, Agent, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Pg 69

 

STANLEY (1910)     The 355 ton 143 foot wooden schooner Stanley stranded and was lost on Sanak Island March 28, 1910.  Four of her crew of eight perished in the disaster.  The vessel departed San Francisco October 17, 1909 bound for Pauloff (Pavlof), Sanak, Alaska, via Pirate Cove.  She was carrying 150 tons of salt, lumber and provisions.  The Stanley stranded at the entrance to Pavlof Harbor on Sanak Island during a gale and became a total loss along with her cargo.  The four crewmen lost were Captain B Koehler, mate F Bauers, second mate P Williams and cook P W Herman.  The Stanley had a value of $15,000 and her cargo $1,000.  The vessel was insured for $12,500 and there was no insurance on the cargo.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  54 27 40 N 162 41 30 W  Chart 16547

                Additional Information : Tonnage 355 Gross 253 Net, Length 143.3, Breadth 32.2, Depth 10.7, Built 1900 at Fairhaven CA, SL KPRQ, Registered San Francisco, ON 116497, Master B Koehler of Alameda CA, Owner Union Fish Co of San Francisco

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report May 2, 1910 at San Francisco by C P Overton, VP and Mgr. for Union Fish Company

 

STAR OF RUSSIA (1905)     The 1,981 ton 275 foot iron ship Star of Russia stranded in the fog on a sand beach on the northwestern end of Chirikof Island in August of 1905.  There were 280 passengers and 19 crewmen aboard.  The Star of Russia also had a cargo of 28,514 cases of canned salmon on board.  The vessel was floated after eight days and towed to Alitak Cannery.  There the passengers and cargo were removed, and the vessel sent on to San Francisco for repairs on August 26, 1905.  Damage to the vessel was $20,000 and her cargo $36,000.  Evidence of the wreck may still be on site and of interest.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  55 50 N 155 37 W  Chart 16580

                Additional Information : Tonnage 1,981 Gross 1,898 Net, Length 275.5, Breadth 42.2, Depth 24.2, Built 1874 at Belfast Ireland, SL KQCR, Registered San Francisco, ON 116977, Master Captain K Lindberg, Owner Alaska Packers Association

                Sources : 1. Salmon From Kodiak (1986) Pg 210, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1905) Pg 159

 

STERLING (1898)     The 1,731 ton 208 foot wooden ship Sterling stranded and was lost near Cape Constantine at 6 a.m. Friday May 20, 1898.  The vessel departed San Francisco April 27, 1898 on her way to Bristol Bay.  There were 150 Chinese cannery workers and 25 officers and crewmen aboard.  She was also carrying a $50,517 cargo of cannery supplies.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by C O Anderson, master of the Sterling:

                “SW by S from Cape Constantine, Alaska. Distance 10 miles”  “Struck a shoal not marked on chart”  “Stranded”  “Gentle breeze, clear weather, rough sea, daylight”

                The Sterling had a value of $25,400 and was a total loss along with her cargo.  All passengers and crew made it to safety.  The vessel had no insurance but her cargo was fully insured.  The shoal where the wooden ship Sterling was lost now bears her name.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  58 18 N 158 53 W  Chart 16322

                Additional Information : Tonnage 1,731.62 Gross 1,636.4 Net, Length 208.4, Breadth 42.7, Depth 17.8, Built 1873 at Bath ME, SL JMCB, Registered San Francisco. ON 115155, Master C O Anderson of San Francisco, Owner Alaska Packers Association of San Francisco

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report June 20, 1898 at San Francisco

 

STIKINE CHIEF (1898)     The British stern wheel steamer Stikine Chief was lost off of Yakutat August 1, 1898.  The vessel was in tow of the steam ship Fastnet, as was the British steamer Mono.  Both vessels broke free and were lost.  The Mono was lost in Clarence Strait and the Stikine Chief in the Gulf of Alaska.  The master of the Mono, in a letter to the Collector of Customs in British Columbia after she was wrecked, attributed some of the loss to the substandard tow lines used by the Fastnet.  Whatever the case, both vessel broke free and were lost. The wreckage of the Stikine Chief was found August 5, 1898 by the Dora.  The Stikine Chief encountered rough weather travelling between Cross Point and Kodiak and went to pieces off of Yakutat.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 40 N 140 W Chart 16016

                Sources : 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 41, 2. U S Customs Wreck Report at Port Wrangel and attached letter July 25, 1898 from the master of the Mono

 

SUNSET (1930)     The 35 ton 56 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sunset stranded and was lost in Litnik Bay at 10 p.m. September 1, 1930.  The vessel departed Perenosa Bay on Afognak Island that day and was headed to Uyak Bay with three crewmen and 15 tons of silver salmon worth $750.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Dangerous Rock, Litnik Bay, Afognak Island”  “Stranding”  “Misjudged distance to shore”  “Calm, dark and foggy”  “Stopped and listened for 5 minutes before stranded, then reduced speed to 3 miles pr. hour”  “No chance to refloat vessel as tide was ebbing when tide came in vessel swamped.  Then we secured the services from the gas screw Crescent, who succeeded in getting off about 2000 salmon”

                The Sunset was worth $6,500 and was a total loss.  2/3 of her cargo of fresh salmon was salvaged.  The vessel was fully insured.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  58 01 30 N 152 44 W  Chart 16594

                Additional Information : Tonnage 35 Gross 24 Net, Length 56.3, Breadth 16, Depth 6.4, Built 1912 at Tacoma WA, Registered Juneau, ON 209948, Master Robert Schulee of Afognak, Owner Ottar Hofstad of Juneau

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty February 9, 1931 at Juneau, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1930) Pgs 520-1

 

SUSITNA (1915)     The 11 ton 45 foot gas screw Susitna stranded and was lost on the south end of  Kalgin Island in Cook Inlet November 12, 1915.  There were three persons aboard at the time of the disaster.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 28 N 151 55 W  Chart 16660

                Additional Information : Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Length 45.6, Breadth 8.6, Depth 2.4, Service passenger, IHP 12, Built 1908 at Tyonek, Registered Juneau, ON 208923

                Sources : 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Vessels Reported Lost Pg 421, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1915) Pg 316, 3. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 258

 

SV NIKOLAI (1764)      The Russian vessel Sv Nikolai was destroyed by Aleuts in Isanotski Strait between December of 1763 and January of 1764.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  54 49 30 N 163 23 W  Chart 16535

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

SV OLGA (1804)     The small single masted single deck Russian vessel Sv Olga was wrecked and became a total loss at Yakutat in 1804.  Later Baranov had the wreck destroyed with salvos of canon fire to celebrate the conclusion of peace with the natives.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 33 N 139 44 W  Chart 16016

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

SWIFTSURE (1921)     The 32 ton 54 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Swiftsure foundered in a storm 50 miles off of Yakutat October 5-6, 1921.  The crew of 6 fishermen perished with the Swiftsure.  Lost were K R Skotheim, John Skotheim, Gust Bogen, Ole Astad, John Johnson and Andrew Thompson.  The vessel departed Ketchikan and was fishing the Yakutat fishing banks when the disaster occurred.  The Swiftsure had a value of $8,000 and was insured for $4,500.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 40 N 140 W  Chart 16016

                Additional Information : Tonnage 32 Gross 22 Net, Length 54, Breadth 17.4, Depth 6.7, IHP 60, Built 1912 at Seattle, Registered Seattle, ON 209942

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty at Seattle, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1921) Pg 335

 

2 Responses to South Central Alaska Shipwrecks ( S )

  1. Ed Zehrung says:

    My Uncle Harlan Zehrung was lost on the Sun Beam in 1966 off of Kodiak…It went down in a January storm and was never found. I didn’t find your report on this wreck but I saw another site that quoted from yours about the loss.
    I grew up in Kenai in the 50’s and 60’s and have a retreat home on the beach in Kenai now…10 years ago I bought an old ship anchor from Bob Schmidt who was a set netter on Kalifornski Beach starting in 1950. He said he found the anchor at a shipwreck just off of the mouth of the Kenai River before the earthquake of 1964 the ship used to be visible at real low tides. He said it was from a floating cannery that burned in the mouth of the Kenai River in the late 1800’s or early 1900’sand washed out of the river and up on the beach 2 miles south of the Kenai River mouth. I am trying to verify info to trace my anchor. Can you help?

    • captaingood says:

      The Sun Beam is listed in the A to Z section of this website. RIP Harlan Zehrung. There have been many dozens of shipwrecks in the area near the Kenai River dating all the way back to the Russian occupation. If you could give me an idea how large the anchor is, maybe I could narrow down the possibilities. Stories about the origin of an artifact are sometimes exaggerated or distorted to effect their value in a sale. The only vessel fires I have found so far were at the Kasilof River Mouth just south of the Kenai. Those vessels were between 30 and 133 feet. You need an anchor specialist. If you find one please let me know. Do you have a rough idea of the age of the anchor from its shape? My first thought was the Salmo which has a rock named after it just outside of the Kenai River Mouth. She was a 36 foot vessel built in 1910 that burned at the mouth of the Kasilof in 1925. The anchor would most likely be from 1910.

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