South Central Alaska Shipwrecks ( T )

TACOMA (1918) SC     The 1,738 ton 222 foot wooden ship Tacoma was crushed by ice and foundered in Bristol Bay May 19, 1918.  The vessel departed San Francisco April 10, 1918 bound for the Nushagak River in Bristol Bay.  There were 151 salmon cannery employees and 21 officers and crewmen aboard the Tacoma.  She was also carrying 1,373 tons of salmon cannery supplies valued at $50,324.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report submitted by William Sorensen, master of the Tacoma:

                “Lat. 57’ 53” N Long. 158’ 04” W”  “Foundering”  “Crushed in ice pack”  “Wind moderate, thick fog, no sea”  “Total loss”

                The Tacoma, valued at $165,000 was a total loss with no insurance.  All passengers and crew were removed to safety.  The cargo was also a complete loss, but was insured for $37,939.15.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 43 30 N 157 41 30 W  Chart 16006

                Comment : Cape Greig is the nearest point of land to the coordinates given.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 1,738 Gross 1,671 Net, Length 222.2, Breadth 41, Depth 17.7, Built 1881 at Bath ME, SL JVKC, Registered San Francisco, ON 145257, Master William Sorensen of Alameda CA, Owner Alaska Packers Association of San Francisco

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty September 18, 1918 at San Francisco, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1918) Pg 63

 

TEMPEST (1909)     H W McCurdy lists the propeller steamer Tempest lost at Perry Island in Prince William Sound in 1909.  Merchant Vessels of the U S lists the propeller steamer Tempest lost at Parry Island, Parry Sound, Ontario, Canada June 28, 1909. 

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska 60 43 N 147 55 W  Chart 16700

                Comment : I have charted the former but am inclined to believe the latter.  WG

                Sources : 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 169, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1909) Pg 392

 

THERESE (1897)     The 74 ton 78 foot wooden schooner Therese was lost in Cold Bay (Puale Bay) at 1:00 p.m. Saturday April 17, 1897.  The vessel departed San Francisco March 20, 1897 and Kodiak April 12, 1897 expecting to return to Kodiak.  There were 7 passengers and 6 crewmen aboard.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by J P Ryan, master of the Therese:

                “Cold Bay, mainland, Lat 57 43 N, Long 155 28 W, Shelikof Strait”  “Strong SE gale, heavy sea”  “Stranded”  “Sails blew away”  “Vessel dragging ashore, slipped cables and put to sea.  Sails all lost”  “Total loss”

                The passengers and crew all made it to safety, but the Therese was a total loss.  She had aboard about 10 tons of general merchandise.  The vessel was valued at $3,000.  The value of the cargo and amount of insurance was not known.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 41 N 155 29 W  Chart 16575

                Comment : Puale Bay often referred to as Cold Bay because of the strong cold winds blowing through a deep ravine from Becharof Lake.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 74.45 Gross 70.76 Net, Length 77.8, Breadth 25.2, Depth 7.5, Built 1869 at California City CA, Registered San Francisco, ON 24789, Master J P Ryan of San Francisco, Owner J C ued of Oakland CA

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report May 4, 1897 at Kodiak, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1896) Pg 187, 3. Dictionary of Alaska Place Names (1971) Puale Bay Pg 781, 4. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 24

 

THREE SAINTS (1796)     The Russian vessel Three Saints (Trisviatitalia) was lost at Kamishak in 1796.  An unsuccessful attempt was made to repair the vessel.  She was burned in 1798 to retrieve the iron hardware.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 07 30 N 154 15 W  Chart 16640

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

TILLAMOOK (1900)     The 265 ton 126 foot wooden steam screw schooner Tillamook stranded and was lost near Kodiak at 5:00 p.m. Thursday November 29, 1900.  The vessel departed Unalaska November 5, 1900 bound for Seattle, Washington and way ports with 9 passengers and 19 officers and crewmen aboard.  She had no cargo.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “North end of Wood Island Reef, Alaska”  “Stranding”  “Miscalculation of location of reef”  “Moderate NW wind, sea smooth, starlight”  “Two pilots, Captain and Second Officer were on watch at the time of striking reef”

                The Tillamook had a value of $30,000 and was a total loss.  All passengers and crewmen made it to safety.  H W McCurdy reports this vessel was on a mail run.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 47 N 152 20 W  Chart 16580

                Additional Information : Tonnage 265 Gross 215 Net, Length 126.8, Breadth 33.8, Depth 9.9, Built 1887 at San Francisco, Registered San Francisco, ON 145448, SL KDRH, Master H M Hughes of San Francisco, Owner Swayne and Hoyt of Alameda CA, Insurance unknown

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report December 7, 1900 at Kodiak, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1900) Pg 303, 3. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 63

 

TINEA (1920)     The gas screw Tinea was lost in Cook Inlet in July of 1920.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral  59 05 N 152 30 W  Chart 16013

                Source : The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 313

 

TORRENT (1868)     The 576 ton wooden bark Torrent struck a reef and foundered in a storm July 15, 1868.   The Torrent was one of two American military sailing ships used to carry men and supplies to the newly acquired Alaska Territory to protect American interests.  She stranded and was lost in English Bay (Port Graham), Cook Inlet.  There was no loss of life.  This wreck site has been located and preliminary exploration begun in 2007.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 21 15 N 151 56 W  Charts 16640, 16646

                Comment : This is an historically significant wreck site and is being considered for the National Register of Historic Places.  State and Federal Archeological studies are forthcoming.  WG

                Sources : 1. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1895) Pg 170, 2. Wikipedia Torrent 2012

 

TOTEM (1921)     The 12 ton 46 foot gas screw passenger vessel Totem went missing from Katalla December 24, 1921.  There were three persons aboard.  An eye witness, Hardy Trefsgar, said he saw the vessel sink off of Yakutat January 7, 1922.  The Totem and the three men aboard were never found.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska Chart 60 12 N 144 31 W  Chart 16016

                Additional Information : Tonnage 12 Gross 8 Net, Length 46, Breadth 11.5, Depth 3.6, Built 1907 at Seattle WA, Registered Cordova, ON 204313, Owner King Salmon Fisheries Company

                Sources : 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1925) Vessels Lost Pg 838, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1921) Pg 340, 3. Captain Lloyd H “Kinky” Bayers Collection (1898-1967) Cordova Pg 48

 

TRIO (1927)     Fire destroyed the 28 ton 46 foot wooden fishing vessel Trio in Kachemak Bay at 10:30 p.m. December 21, 1927.  The vessel was at anchor with two persons aboard when the disaster occurred.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Lagoon near Halibut Cove, Kachemak, Alaska”  “Fire, origin unknown”  “Clear and calm”  “Used hand fire extinguisher, but explosion scattered fire so that it was impossible to remain on board.”  “Cannery crew ashore did everything possible to extinguish flames but unavailing, so vessel was towed ashore and beached”  “Vessels documents lost in fire”  “TOTAL LOSS”

                The Trio had a value of $5,000 and was a total loss. There was no cargo aboard.  The vessel was insured for $5,000.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 35 15 N 151 11 W  Chart 16647

                Additional Information : Tonnage 28 Gross 19 Net, Length 46.4, Breadth 14.2, Depth 5.9, Built 1914 at Tacoma WA, HP 40, Registered Seward, ON 211996, Master L Bainter of Halibut Cove, Owner Enterprise Packing Company of LaTouche AK

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty January 9, 1928 by H B Bystad President and General Manager Enterprise Packing, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1927) Pgs 508-9

 

TWINS (1930)     The 11 ton 36 foot gas screw Twins was lost at 6 p.m. May 11, 1930 near Montague Island.  The vessel departed Cordova May 11 bound for Cape Hinchinbrook with three persons aboard.  William Johnson was lost in the disaster.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report file by James Dinneen, master and owner of the Twins:

                “Montague Island, 10 miles below Wooded island”  “Got capsized in going ashore and could not return to look after vessel”  “When going ashore from the Twins with my son and William Johnson, our skiff was capsized and we were all thrown into the water.  We succeeded in getting Johnson on to the upturned skiff but he evidently died of heart failure while we were making shore.”  “Drifted ashore from anchorage”  “Vessel was anchored but only with light anchors; intended to return to vessel but could not get back to it” 

                The Twins had a value of $2,000 and was a total loss.  There was no insurance and no cargo aboard.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 52 N 147 23 W  Chart 16700

Additional Information : Tonnage 11 Gross 9 Net, Length 35.9, Breadth 9.5, Depth 4.3, HP 40, Built 1922 at Cordova, Registered Juneau, ON 227988, Master and owner James Dinneen of Cordova

Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty June 14, 1930 at Cordova, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1929) Pgs 538-9

 

TWO FATS (1935)     The 8 ton 32 foot wooden gas screw Two Fats stranded in Seward Harbor and was lost at 3:30 a.m. September 28, 1935.  The vessel had been tied up but the heavy wind and seas pulled the bite out of her deck and the Two Fats washed onto the beach.  Wind was force 9 with heavy surf at the time of the disaster.  The Two Fats had a value of $1,200 and was a total loss.  There was no cargo aboard.  There was no insurance on the vessel.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 06 30 N 149 26 30 W  Chart 16680

                Additional Information : Tonnage 8 Gross 6 Net, Length 32.2, Breadth 7.1, Depth 4.0, Built 1918 at Seattle WA, Registered Seward, ON 217544, Master and part owner L E Williams MD, Owners L E Williams MD and Dr A D Haverstock of Seward

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty October 15, 1935 at Seward, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1934) Pgs 178-9

 

TYCONDA (1915)     The 186 ton 104 foot stern paddle wheel passenger steamer Tyconda burned at Anchorage October 8, 1915.  The ten persons aboard made it to safety but the Tyconda was a total loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  61 13 05 N 149 53 30 W  Chart 16660

                Additional Information : Tonnage 186 Gross 117 Net, Length 104.3, Breadth 21.9, Depth 4.3, Built 1901 at Tacoma WA, IHP 130, Registered Wrangell, ON 145889

                Sources : 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1915) Pg 184, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Vessels Lost Pg 420

 

 

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