South East Alaska Shipwrecks ( C )

CAESAR (1908)     The 36 foot gas screw fishing vessel Caesar struck a rock and was lost at Port Frederick in Icy Strait on August 14, 1908.  The crew of three captained by J G Rowe of Juneau survived the wreck and salvaged the 16 tons of fish on board worth $200.  The Caesar, valued at $9,000, had damage  estimated at $8,150.  There was no insurance on the vessel or its cargo.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  58 13 N 135 30 W  Chart 17300

                Comment : This vessel (same ON) was damaged again July 17, 1939 indicating that it was salvaged from this earlier wreck. WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 10 Gross 8 Net, Construction wood, Built 1902 at Ballard, Registration Juneau, ON 127657, Owner Mrs. Ella Rowe of Juneau

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report filed by J G Rowe August 17, 1908

 

 

CALIFORNIA (1910)     The steamer California was wrecked at Ward Cove in September of 1910.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  55 24 30 N 131 43 30 W  Chart 17428

                Comment : The steamer Princess appears to have been lost at the same time. WG

                Source : The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 180

 

CANADA (1898)     The American wood bark Canada was lost in a heavy northeasterly gale at Skagway February 19, 1898.  Around 2:00 p.m. she broke her moorings and went adrift with $14,000 worth of lumber, some hay and grain, and four horses aboard.  “When in danger tug from shore tried to help her, but could not.  Capt. got sails up but could not avoid going ashore.  When she went ashore Capt. fastened to tree with lines and cables and as she could not stay on account of sea breaking over her and listing badly, went back to Skagway with crew.  Was below zero and blowing hard.  She broke adrift and went down near Haines Mission ashore.  From there …Tug Coleman towed her into Skagway and she went on beach there, and is there now.”

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  59 27 30 N 135 18 45 W  Chart 17317

                Additional Information : Tonnage 1190.58 Gross 1144.66 Net, Length 176.6, Breadth 36.8, Depth 23.6, Built at Bath Maine in 1859, Registered Port Townsend, ON 5305, Master Fred C Andrews of Tacoma, Owner Walter Oaker of Tacoma, Vessel Value $12,000, Cargo Value $14,000, Vessel Insurance none, Cargo fully insured

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report of April 14, 1898, 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 40

 

CAPELA (1909)     The American gas screw Capela was lost Wednesday evening, December 29, 1909 along with two crewmen.  She was being towed by the gas screw Neptune with owner and master N Parsons at the helm.  The Neptune lost power in a heavy northerly wind and both vessels drifted onto the lee shore on northeast Vank Island in Stikine Straits.  Seaman Charles Hicks drowned at the stranding and master and owner of the Capela, H Appeldorn died from exposure and exhaustion soon after reaching land.  The Capela was a total loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  56 29 N 132 38 W  Chart 17382

                Additional Information : Tonnage 12 Gross 8 Net, Length 33.3, Breadth 12, Depth 5.7, Built 1896 at Edwards Washington, Registration Wrangel, ON 127152, Last Port Wrangel December 29, Destination Petersburg, Vessel Value $400

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report file January 18, 1910 by F E Brownson, Deputy Collector, Wrangel after an inquest held at Wrangel by U S Commissioner

 

CARITA (1906)     The vessel Carita is reported to have been lost in 1906 in Tongass Narrows near Ketchikan.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  55 20 30 N 131 38 45 W  Charts 17428, 17430

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaska Shelf and Shore

 

CARMEN (1931)     At 7:15 p.m. Tuesday September 15, 1931 the wood gas screw Carmen experienced a back-fire from her engine and was set ablaze along with her 10 ton cargo of shingles. She was a half mile south of the Dupont Powder Company Warehouse in Gastineau Channel when fire consumed the vessel. Her crew of three, including owner operator M E Lane, managed to escape unharmed.  They had left Petersburg earlier that day bound for Juneau. The U S Bureau of Fisheries Service boat Brant and oil screw Woodrow were nearby but no aid could be rendered.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  58 16 N 134 20 W  Chart 17315

                Additional Information : Tonnage 35 Gross 28 Net, Built 1913, Registration Ketchikan, ON 211042, Vessel Value $8,500, Cargo Value $280, Vessel Insurance $6,000, Cargo Insurance $280, Weather calm and dark.

                Source : U S Coast Guard Casualty Report filed at Juneau September 16, 1931 by M E Lane.

 

CAROLINE (1937)     The wood gas screw Caroline experienced an engine failure and stranded at Point Arden at 11:30 a.m. on Saturday November 27, 1937.  The seas pounded her until she broke in two.  Her crew of four managed to escape to shore where they were rescued four days later by the Alaska Game Commission Patrol Boat Seal.  The Caroline became a total loss but her ton and a half cargo of fishing gear, valued at $800, was salvaged with the help of the oil screw vessel Explorer.  The Caroline was valued at $1,500 and had no insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  58 09 30 N 134 10 30 W  Chart 17315

                Additional Information : Tonnage 8 Gross 5 Net, Built 1927, Registration Petersburg, ON 231736, Master Olaf Aase of Juneau, Owner Chris Knutsen of Petersburg, Last Port Taku Harbor November 27, Bound for Juneau.

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed at Juneau January 18, 1938 by Olaf Aase.

 

CHACON (1936)     The 80 foot passenger and mail motor vessel Chacon stranded on a rock and sank in Zimovia Strait in 1936.  The eight passengers and six crew escaped in a life boat and were later picked up.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  56 13 N 132 20 W  Chart 17385

                Additional Information : Built 1912, Registration Ketchikan

                Source : The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 449

 

CHANCE (1930)     An engine backfire caused the blaze that destroyed the 16 ton gas screw Chance at 1:00 in the morning September 24, 1930.  Pat Hollywood was alone taking the vessel from Juneau to Sitka for owner N H Schmolck of Ketchikan.  “Was passing Marmion Island when vessel commenced burning.  Flames too hot to admit fighting.  Went ashore in small boat and came to town to report.  Hull is now lying above high water between Marmion Island and Douglas Island.”

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  58 12 N 134 15 W  Chart 17315

                Additional Information : Tonnage 16 Gross 13 Net, Built 1929, Registration Ketchikan, ON 220811, Vessel Value $5,000, Cargo none, Vessel Insurance $4,400, Weather clear and calm

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed September 24, 1930 by master Pat Hollywood

 

CHARGER (1909)     It was midnight on Sunday October 10, 1909 when the 203 foot 1334 ton wood scow barge Charger began having problems.  She had taken on a load of 2,250 tons of copper ore and sprung a leak.  She was beached in Karta Bay to prevent foundering.  “…as pumps not able to gain, tug Tyee ordered at 9:30 p.m. to tow vessel to shallow water; owing to rocky nature of coast it was difficult in darkness to find good ground.  At 9 a.m. 11th Oct. vessel fell over on her side.  Water covered her to forehatch.”  Both the vessel and her cargo were reported as total losses.  The crew of six escaped without harm.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  55 34 15 N 132 34 W  Chart 17426

                Additional Information : Length 203.2, Breadth 39.8, Depth 24, Built in Boston in 1874, ON 125236, Master J Haust of Seattle, Owner Coastwise Steamship & Barge, Departed Seattle October 2  for Ketchikan, Vessel Value $22,500, Cargo Value $19,000, Vessel Insurance $5,500, Cargo Insurance $19,000

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report filed at Ketchikan October 12, 1909 by I Griffiths, President Coastwise Steamship and Barge Co

 

CHATHAM (1938)     The 650 ton wood schooner Chatham caught fire while loading fertilizer at Wards Cove near Ketchikan and was virtually destroyed August 31, 1938.  Second engineer George Bennett and fireman John Morrison suffered minor burns in the blaze.  Most of the vessel’s cargo was salvaged.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  55 24 30 N 131 43 30 W  Charts 17428 17430

                Additional Information : Owner Alaska Transportation Co, Built as the Johan Paulson and later became the Evelyn Berg.

                Source : The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pgs 465, 113

 

CHESTER L (1930)     The wood gas screw Chester L caught fire at 3 p.m. Monday December 15, 1930 and became a total loss.  C B Wyatt of Wrangell was the only one aboard and attempted to douse the flames by cutting a hole in her bow.  He then towed the vessel to the beach 6 miles southeast of Boss Island where she sank.  He was able to salvage some of the stores on board.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  56 30 N 134 12 W  Chart 17376

                Additional Information : Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Built 1926, Registration Wrangell, ON 225925, Owner Alfred Cramer and M W Wyatt of Wrangell, Vessel Value $3,000, Cargo none, Insurance none

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed at Wrangell January 10, 1931 by C B Wyatt

 

CHILKAT (1837)     The schooner Chilkat was lost off of Cape Edgecumbe with all hands January of 1837.  Wreckage of the vessel and her cargo of furs was found strewn along the cape and on Saint Lazaria Island where she had been beached during a storm.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  56 59 N 135 42 W  Chart 17325

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

CHILKAT (1907)     The Chilkat was listed as a total loss at Chilkoot Inlet near Haines in 1907.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  59 N 135 13 W  Chart 17317

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

CITY OF ANACORTES (1933)     The gas powered vessel City Of Anacortes was wrecked in Portland Canal (near the Alaska Canada Border) on May 8, 1933.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 02 N 130 12 W  Chart 17427

                Source : The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 425

 

CITY OF ASTORIA (1898)     The 72 foot wooden towing steamer City of Astoria hit a submerged rock at 4:30 in the morning August 3, 1898 “near Sullivans Islanda about 250 feet off the point marked Taiya Sahnka”.  She had sailed from the port of Dyea (Skagway) bound for Taiya Sahnka (Lynn Canal) with no cargo towing a barge when the accident occurred.  Soon after the vessel stranded a wind came up preventing anything from being done.  “After rough weather set in the boat rolled off the rock into deeper water and sank.”  The wreck report filed by E W Johnston, a manager for the Pacific Clipper Line, said that Chart 8303 which was being used at the time of the casualty did not have the rock or reef marked. He noted that chart 8300 did. He also noted that the vessel had not been raised at the time of the accident report filing and would become a total loss if not raised soon. The casualty report was filed August 25, 1898.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  58 33 N 135 19 W  Chart 17317

                Additional Information : Tonnage 56.47 Gross 29.64 Net, Age 8 years, Registered Seattle, Master E H Bragdon, Owner Warren C Stetson of Seattle ½, Passengers none, Crew 5 (none lost), Vessel Value $7,000, Vessel Insurance $5,000, Length 72 feet, breadth 16.5 feet, depth 5 feet, HP 50, Built 1889 East Portland, Oregon

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

CITY OF SITKA (1898)     The small two masted schooner City Of Sitka foundered and was lost with her crew of three March 8, 1898 off of Cape Ommaney.  She was on a voyage from Sitka to Wrangell when the casualty occurred. 

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  56 10 N 134 40 20 W  Chart 17320

                Source : The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 40

 

CLAM (1937)     An explosion and fire destroyed the wood gas screw Clam at the mouth of Very Inlet on Sunday December 12, 1937 at 9:30 in the morning.  Charles Cooper, the master of the vessel remarked in the wreck report he filed February 2, 1938 “After fire I was stranded on the beach where I had a cabin and I was unable to come into Ketchikan to report the accident until this date.”  The Clam was owned by J T Bumgarner and valued at $1,000 at the time of the loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  54 58 45 N 130 55 30 W  Chart 17434

                Additional Information : Tonnage 12 Gross 8 Net, Age 30 years, Registered Ketchikan, ON 203913, Last Port Ketchikan Dec 6, 1937, Destination Very Inlet, Crew of One

                Source : Report of Casualty filed at Collection District 31 Ketchikan 

 

CLARA (1927)     The wooden gas screw fishing vessel Clara broke her anchor chain in a heavy blow in Puffin Bay, Baranof Island at 11 a.m. October 14, 1927.  Olaf Haram, master and owner of the vessel and the only one aboard, attempted to get the engine started but the Clara’s prop fouled in the kelp near shore.  He mentions in the wreck report filed at Ketchikan October24, 1927 that the winds were the worst he had seen in years, “probably 75 miles per hour.”  The Clara piled up on the beach and was destroyed.  Haram narrowly escaped with his life.  The vessel was valued at $3,000 at the time and insured for $2,000.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  56 15 30 N 134 48 W  Chart 17320

                Additional Information : Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Age 18 years, Registered Ketchikan, ON 206384, Last Port Port Conclusion October 12, 1927 bound for fishing grounds

                Source : Treasury Dept U S Coast Guard Report Of Casualty October 24, 1927

 

CLARA BLANCHE (1930)     The wooden gas screw purse seiner Clara Blanche was destroyed by a fire of unknown origin which started at 7 p.m. Friday July 11th, 1930 in port at Tyee.  The crew of four escaped, but the Clara Blanche valued at $2,000 became a total loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  57 02 30 N 134 32 30 W  Chart 17360

                Additional Information : Tonnage 15 Gross 10 Net, Built 1914, Registration Ketchikan, ON 212035, Master Henry Davis of Ketchikan, Owner Sebastian Stuart Fish Co, Insurance $2,000

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty July 21, 1930 by H A Seephames, VP of SSFC

 

CLARA NEVADA (1898)     February 5, 1898 between 9 and 10 p.m. the 388 ton wooden passenger steamer Clara Nevada struck Eldred Reef in Lynn Canal, stranded and caught fire.  Because of the 90 mile an hour gale and snowstorm that evening, the vessel was unable to launch lifeboats.  Two men saw her burning from eight miles away.  The crew was estimated to be about 42 souls and passengers estimated at 30 to 40 souls, all of whom were lost.  The Clara Nevada had left Seattle January 27 bound for Skagway and Dyea.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  58 58 15 N 135 13 10 W  Chart 17317

                Comment : Pacific Coastal Liners reports this vessel came up 10 years later in another ferocious storm with most of the dead still aboard. 

                Additional Informaton : Length 154 feet, breadth 24.7 feet, Depth 11.8 feet, Built Camden NJ in 1872, Registered Seattle, ON 127222, Master C H Lewis of Portland Oregon, Owner P and A T Co of Seattle, Vessel Value $90,000, Vessel Insurance $20,000

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report filed by H P McGuire President of P and A T Co April 25, 1898, 2. Pacific Coastal Liners (1959) Pg 172

 

CLARE (1915)     It was 4 p.m. Tuesday November 9, 1915 when a missing electrode caused the engine to stop aboard the wooden fishing vessel Clare.  An anchor was put out near Wedge Island but it dragged in the stormy weather.  The Clare stranded and pounded to pieces in a gale but the crew of two escaped.  According to the wreck report filed November 18th by her master, M E Lane, the vessel was valued at $1,500 and her cargo of 6,000 pounds of canned and salt fish was valued at $450; both lost.  Lane did not know if the Clare was insured.  The last port was listed as Dolomi November 9th, 1915 with a destination of Ketchikan.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 08 45 N 131 57 45 W  Chart 17420

                Comment : The wreck report calls this vessel Clare of Juneau. H W McCurdy Pg 258 spells the vessel Claire

                Additional Information : Tonnage 5, Age 5 years, Registered Ketchikan, ON 200186, Owner Eng. Weise Inc of Seattle

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty November 18, 1915

 

COASTER (1929)     It was Tuesday January 22, 1929 when the wooden gas screw Coaster exploded and was destroyed by fire six miles west of Tenakee Springs.  The three man crew had been unloading the 2,000 pounds of camp supplies when the casualty occurred.  The following is an accounting given by a native crewmember:

                “The accident occurred whilst anchored in Tenakee Alaska.  The stern of the boat swung in to the beach and became fast.  When the tide went out about three feet of bilge water ran through to the forecastle causing oil from the bilge to float on the surface to ignite and so burned the hull to the water’s edge.  Nothing was saved but the engine which is of course spoilt owing to it being submerged at high water”

                The vessel’s master James Kasko gave the following description in the wreck report filed at Juneau February 2, 1929:

                “was unloading supplies and camp equipment.  Tide was falling and Coaster swung with Tide and grounded by stern, all bilge water ran to the bow and ignited from a stove in the forecastle.  I was in Pilot House and was blown overboard, balance of crew also blown overboard.”

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  57 46 50 N 135 13 W  Chart 17320

                Additional Information : Tonnage 14 Gross 10 Net, Built 1908, Registered Seattle, ON 205602, Owner F J Wettrick of Seattle, Vessel Value $2,200, Cargo Value $250, Insurance unknown

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed at Juneau February 2, 1929

 

COASTY (1929)     A shipwreck report was filed in Seattle March 19, 1929 by the owners of the above vessel Coaster (J T Tenneson and F J Wettrick) using the name Coasty.

 

COLORADO (1901)     Monday, April 22, 1901 the 983 ton wooden barge Colorado was in tow of the British steam tug Pilot commanded by a Captain Cutter when at 5:15 p.m. the Colorado stranded on a reef in Wrangel Narrows opposite Anchor Point.  According to the master of the Colorado, F C Andrews, about 225 tons of the 1098 tons of sulphurite concentrates were lost, which at the time were worth about $12,000.   The barge, valued at $8,000 became a total loss as well.  Captain Cutter cited the cause of the accident as an out of place buoy.  He says in the wreck report “stranded owing to Red Buoy at Spruce Pt being 300 yards west of correct position.”  They had left Juneau April 20th bound for Tacoma, Washington.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  56 38 15 N 132 55 35 W  Chart 17375

                Additional Information : Tonnage 983, Built 1864 at Boston, Registered San Francisco, ON 4227, Owner R Dunsmain Sons of San Francisco, Crew 7 none lost, Vessel Value $8,000, Cargo Value $40,000, Insurance none.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report filed June 16, 1901 by F C Andrews

 

COLUMBIA (1898)     It was Friday November 4, 1898 at 7 p.m. when the towline parted on the 170 foot wooden bark Columbia which was under tow of the tug Wallowa.  The two were near Port Simpson and Prince of Wales Island, having departed Skagway bound for Seattle with a cargo of 100 tons of general merchandise.  Owing to the severe sea and gale the Wallowa was unable to retrieve the Columbia and she drifted and washed ashore on Prince of Wales Island.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska 54 53 45 N 132 29 30 W  Chart 17433

                Additional Information : Tonnage 900 Net, Length 169.5 feet, Breadth 37 feet, Depth 21.4 feet, Built 1846 NY NY, Registration Seattle, ON 4842, Master J H Clifford of Seattle, Owner Pacific Clipper Line of Seattle, Crew 7 none lost, Vessel Value $10,000, Cargo Value $4,000, Insurance none.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report filed by Master Clifford November 22, 1898 at Seattle

 

COLUMBIA (1904)     It was a dark night Wednesday November 30, 1904 with a heavy gale blowing when at 2:00 a.m. the 60 foot wooden schooner Columbia was driven ashore at McLeods Bay on Montague Island.  The four man crew was able to salvage the 5 tons/$500 worth of provisions aboard, but the Columbia, valued at $1,000 was a total loss with no insurance. 

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  59 53 N 147 15 W  Chart 16701

                Comment : I have charted this wreck at McLeod Harbor on Montague…WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 41, Length 60, Breadth 17.7, Depth 7.2, Built 1893 in Seattle, Registered Valdez, ON 126941, Master/Owner T W Doherty of Valdez

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report filed at Valdez by Doherty January 30, 1905

 

COLUSA (1899)     The bark Colusa ran up on the rocks in Sitka Sound during a storm December 12, 1899.  She was valued at $20,000 with cargo at the time of the loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  57 N 135 30 W  Chart 17326

                Source : The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 52

 

COMRADE (1928)     The wooden gas screw Comrade was driven ashore in a storm at one in the morning December 22, 1928 at Lung Island at the south end of Duncan Canal.  When the vessel grounded, a lantern was tipped causing an explosion and fire which destroyed the Comrade, valued at $2,500.  The crew of two escaped injury but their provisions of a ton of coal and clothing worth $500 was lost along with the vessel.  There was no insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  56 30 45 N 130 04 15 W  Chart 17360

                Additional Information : Tonnage 9 Gross 7 Net, Built in 1916, Registered Petersburg, ON 217257, Master James W Rhodes of Petersburg, Owner C Hoogandorn of Petersburg

                Source : U S Coast Guard Casualty Report filed at Petersburg by Hogandorn December 24, 1928

 

COMUS (1908)     The five ton Schooner Comus was wrecked in Lynn Canal near Berners Bay October 30, 1908 outbound from Skagway.  The Comus was valued at $2,500 with cargo

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  58 43 N 135 W  Chart 17316

                Sources : 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 156, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaska Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

CONSTANCE (1927)     The gas screw Constance stranded on an uncharted rock at the entrance to Last Chance Harbor, Gambier Bay at 9 p.m. Wednesday October 24, 1927.  Captain Selmer Jacobson of Juneau was seeking shelter from strong SE winds when he hit the rock.  The 1,000 pound cargo of $500 worth of groceries and hardware became a total loss but Jacobson was later able to tow the wrecked vessel to Gambier Bay Cannery and salvage the engine.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  57 28 N 133 55 W  Chart 16362

                Additional Information : Tonnage 15 Gross 10 Net, Age 18 years, Registered Juneau, ON 207072, Master/Owner Selmer Jacobson of Juneau, Insurance none

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed at Juneau October 31, 1927

 

CORA (1924)     The wooden gas screw Cora was destroyed by fire at Point Ward Cannery Sunday October 12, 1924 at 12:30 p.m.  The blaze was reported to have been caused by an engine backfire.  The following is a quote from the remarks section of the wreck report: 

                “Used salt water to drown fire as Pyrene extinguishers aboard were unfit for service.”

“Vessel Burned to water’s edge.  Engine cylinders and manifold cracked.  Hulk was later towed by G S Monoghan to lagoon at Anan Creek and there beached.”

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  56 10 55 N 131 53 10 W  Chart 17385

                Additional Information : Tonnage 13 Gross 10 Net, Built 1917, Registered Seattle, ON 214807, Owner Point Warde Packing Co of Seattle, Crew 3 all survived, Vessel Value $3,000, Insurance none

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed at Wrangell December 18, 1924

 

CORONA (1929)     The wooden gas schooner Corona was destroyed by fire August 26, 1929 15 miles WSW of Noyes Island. The fire was discovered at 12:15 p.m. while the eleven man crew was endeavoring to catch halibut.  The wreck report states as follows:

                “Dories had just been launched for second set, Engineer smelt something burning, got as far as cabin but could not get to engine room on account of flames, explosion occurred and engineer burned on legs, arm and face, blowing overalls off of body and other clothes afire.”

                “Fought fire with water, unable to control, started to explode & forced to take to dories.”

                “Ga S Tordenskold arrived too late to assist in putting out fire but carried crew to Steamboat Bay, Alaska, from thence to Craig, Alaska by New England Fish Company’s vessel Chinnook.”

                The vessels master and owner, John Courage of Seattle valued the Corona at $23,000 and her 2,500 lbs. of fresh halibut at $250, both lost.  The crew all survived.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 30 N 133 40 W  Chart 17400

                Additional Information :  Tonnage 36 Gross 19 Net, Age 19 years, Registered Seattle, ON 207806, Last Port Ketchikan August 21, Vessel Insurance $10,000, Cargo Insurance none

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed August 30, 1929 at Ketchikan by Courage

 

CORSON (1913)     The motor vessel Corson was lost at Ketchikan August 10, 1913.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 20 30 N 131 38 45 W  Chart 17430

                Source : The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 231

 

COTTAGE CITY (1902)     The steamship Cottage City was reported lost September 7, 1902 at Etolin Island. She was valued at $50,000 with cargo at the time of the casualty.  Later accounts have the vessel salvaged.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  56 06 N 132 21 W  Chart   17385

                Comment : A vessel of the same name is mentioned in 1911 in H W McCurdy Pgs 194-5.                SourceThe H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 84

 

CROSS SOUND (1933)     Darkness and a shifting river bar are listed as the causes of the stranding and loss of the wooden gas screw Cross Sound.  The casualty occurred at 8:00 p.m. October 19, 1923 near Francis Anchorage in Farragut Bay.  The following are excerpts are from the wreck report filed by Carl Venelstad October 30, 1933:

                “strong NE breeze, dark and cloudy.”  “Proceeding at moderate speed and keeping lookout.”  “stranded and foundered”  “Capt Malver on the Diesel boat Urania tried to raise the vessel but was unsuccessful on account of the depth of water, about 6 fathoms and too much sand.”

                The Cross Sound had departed Petersburg October 10th with two aboard on a fishing, hunting and prospecting trip and was valued at $3,000 at the time of the loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  57 09 N 133 10 W  Chart 17367

                Additional Information : Tonnage 7.53 Gross 6 Net, Age 16 years, Registered Juneau, ON 214790, Crew 2 none lost, Insurance none

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed at Petersburg October 30, 1933

 

CURACAO (1913)     The 241 foot iron steam schooner Curacao struck an uncharted rock 1.5 miles WSW of Culebra Island Tonowak Bay and was lost 7:20 a.m. Saturday June 21, 1913.  The Curacao had 39 passengers and 51 crew all of whom were transported from the wreck by the USCG SS Gedney to Ketchikan soon after the stranding.  The Curacao, valued at $200,000 was listed as a total loss as a result of the wreck.  She was also carrying 1200 tons of cargo listed as general merchandise. 

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska 55 39 20 N 133 28 10 W  Chart 17404

                Comments : The location of this wreck is on the reef with its name.  There is a casualty report filed in Ketchikan June of 1930 by this vessel which firmly evidences the Curacao’s salvage.

                Additional Information:  Length 241.3, Breadth 38, Depth 16.3, Tonnage 1503 Gross 895 Net, HP 1,170, Built 1895 Philadelphia, Registered NY, ON 127113, Master William Thompson of Seattle, Owner The Pacific Coast Company Seattle, Last Port Craig June 21st, Destination Heceta Island Swifts Cannery, Vessel Insurance $153,500

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report filed at New York and San Francisco Sept 13, 1913

 

 

 

 

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