South East Alaska Shipwrecks ( T )

TACOMA (1918) SE     The 11 ton 35 foot gas screw fishing vessel Tacoma stranded and was lost in Metlakatla Harbor at 4:00 a.m. December 16, 1918.  The vessel was out of commission and anchored in the harbor with no one aboard when the disaster occurred.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by Ed Atkinson, master and owner of the Tacoma:

                “Heavy SE gale, high seas, dark”  “Metlakatla Harbor, Alaska”  “broke loose from anchorage”  “Stranding”  “Vessel broke loose from anchorage and stranded on reef in harbor.  When found, was broken to pieces”  “total loss”

                The Tacoma had a value of $2,400 and was a total loss with no insurance.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 07 45 N 131 34 30 W  Chart 17434

                Additional Information : Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Length 35.7, Breadth 11.8, Depth 3.9, IHP 16, Built 1909 at Tacoma WA, Registered Ketchikan, ON 206242, Master and owner Ed Atkinson of Metlakatla

                Sources : 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty December 20, 1918 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1918) Pg 319

 

TAGALAK (1931)     Fire destroyed the 71 ton 65 foot oil screw fishing vessel Tagalak in Sukkwan Strait at 11:00 p.m. Thursday September 10, 1931.  The vessel departed Waterfall September 8, 1931 with six crewmen aboard to take in traps from Cordova Bay.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report submitted by J Hansen, master and part owner of the Tagalak:

                “2 miles S E of Hydaburg, Alaska in Sukkwan Strait”  “Moderate westerly wind”  “Boat caught fire in engine room supposedly from crossed electric wires”  “When fire discovered all fire extinguishers used also blocked engine room in attempt to smother fire”  “Within three minutes after smoke was discovered the entire boat was in flames.  It went so fast that the crew barely saved life of Capt. Hansen, who was fighting the fire.  The Tagalak had a trap and pile driver in tow at time of accident”  “Had tender Frederick C standing by for two days with man at wreck waiting instructions from insurance company”  “Total loss”

                The Tagalak had a value of $55,000 and was a total loss.  She was insured for $37,000.  There was no cargo aboard the vessel.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 12 20 N 132 49 28 W  Chart 17400

                Additional Information : Tonnage 71 Gross 48 Net, Length 65.3, Breadth 18.1, Depth 9.1, IHP 180, Built 1928 at Tacoma WA, Registered Ketchikan, ON 227707, Owner J Hansen of Seattle, Owners J Hansen and P M Hansen of Seattle

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty September 13, 1931 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1931) Pgs 520-1

 

TAKU II (1937)     Fire destroyed the 14 ton 52 foot wooden gas screw Taku II at Ketchikan at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday August 11, 1937.  There were two persons aboard the vessel when the disaster took place.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by Margaret P Noyes, owner of the Taku II:

                “Standard Oil Company Dock, Ketchikan, Alaska”  “Fire and Explosion”  “Engineer, Clarence Crawford was filling fuel tanks with gasoline when explosion occurred.  He was burned about hands, face and arms and received a cut near his left eye, severity of the injury is not as yet determined”  “Standard Oil Company Employees, Ketchikan City Fire Truck and Fire Boat (assisted)”  “All available fire equipment used”  “Total loss”

                The Taku II had a value of $2,500 which was a total loss.  She was carrying no cargo.  Her insurance was in the amount of $1,500.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 20 30 N 131 38 45 W  Chart 17420

                Additional Information : Tonnage 14 Gross 10 Net, Length 52, Breadth 11.3, Depth 4.9, Built 1910 at Seattle, Registered Ketchikan, Master John R Riggs of Ketchikan, Owner Margaret P Noyes of Ketchikan

                Sources : 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty August 12, 1937, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1937) Pg 296

 

TAKU NO 5 (1923)     The 19 ton scow Taku No 5 was blown ashore in high winds and broke up in Taku Harbor, Taku Inlet at 10:00 a.m. Friday September 28, 1923.  The wreckage of the vessel was hauled onto the beach and fired to avoid further damage.  The Taku No 5 had a value of $1,500 at the time of the loss and was not carrying cargo.  No one was aboard the scow.  The vessel was a total loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  58 03 30 N 134 02 W  Chart 17300

                Additional Information : Tonnage 19, Built 1919 at Taku Harbor, Registered Juneau, ON 167616, Master C F Ahues, Owner Libby, McNeil & Libby, Insurance unknown

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty October 1, 1923 by Ahues at Juneau, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1923) Pg 417

 

TATOOSH (1938)     The 31 ton 50 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Tatoosh struck a navigational dolphin and foundered in Wrangell Narrows at 7 a.m. Tuesday September 27, 1938.  The vessel departed Juneau September 16th bound for the fishing banks of Area 3, and was on her way to Prince Rupert, B.C.  There were seven crewmen aboard when the disaster occurred.  The following statements are from the casualty report submitted by Kristian Martinsen, master and owner of the Tatoosh:

                “Dense fog and heavy tide”  “100 yard approximately from black dolphin south of red dolphin No 3, Wrangell Narrows”  “Struck dolphin No 8 and foundered”  “Calm, dense fog, no sea, heavy tide current, at night, dark”  “Master jumped from dolphin to stern in effort to put a line on the dolphin but ship was sinking too fast”  “Ship held against dolphin by force of tide current, no possible chance to work her by either way.  Force of current bore her down on side away from dolphin, soon filling engine room and forecastle.  Ship went down by head, and drifted away from dolphin with stern about two feet out of water, then finally sank in about seven fathoms water.  All aboard ship climbed on dolphin.”  “Oil screw Recovery picked the master and crew off the dolphin and took them to Petersburg, Alaska”

                The Tatoosh had a value of $10,000.  She had a cargo of 25,000 pounds of fresh halibut aboard valued at $2,000 and halibut fishing gear worth $1,500.  The vessel and her cargo were total losses.  There was no insurance on the vessel, but her cargo was insured for eight cents per pound.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  56 31 N 132 55 W  Chart 17375

                Additional Information : Tonnage 31 Gross 21 Net, Length 50.4, Breadth 14.3, Depth 7.8, Built 1917 at Seattle WA, IHP 60, Registered Ketchikan, ON 215345, Master and owner Kristian Martinsen of Seattle

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty October 1, 1938 at Petersburg, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1937) Pg 296

 

TEDDY (1914)     The 12 ton 38 foot wooden gas screw Teddy stranded and sank in Nichols Bay at 6:30 p.m. Friday November 20, 1914.  The vessel departed Sulzer that day bound for Ketchikan with two persons aboard.  There was no cargo.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by A L Hubbard, master and owner of the Teddy:

                “ Heavy S E Gale, night, snowing”  “Upper part of Nichols Bay, S E Alaska.  Drifted on reef, filled and sank”  “Stranded”  “Drifted on reef and sank”

                The Teddy was valued at $3,200 at the time of the disaster.  She was insured for $1,500.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  54 41 30 N 132 04 45 W  Chart 17420

                Additional Information : Tonnage 12 Gross 8 Net, Length 38.5, Breadth 8.5, Depth 2.8, Built 1904 at Ketchikan, Registered Ketchikan, ON 200982, Master A L Hubbard of Ketchikan, Owners Hubbard & Williams of Ketchikan

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty November 30, 1914, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1914) Pg 306

 

TERESA (1930)     The 8 ton 30 foot wooden fishing vessel Teresa foundered near Khaz Head at 2 p.m. Friday November 21, 1930.  The vessel departed Sitka November 12, 1920 bound for Lisianski Inlet with 3 passengers and 1 crewman aboard.  The vessel had no cargo.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report submitted by Hugo W Frederickson, master and owner of the Teresa:

                “Phil’s (Piehle) Passage, Khaz Head”  “High wind, severe storm”  “Ignition trouble and storm”  “Foundering”  “Tried sails and anchors but anchor lines chafed and parted”  “Passengers and master stayed on rock 42 hours until rescued by Estebeth”  “Total loss”

                The Teresa had a value of $2,000 which was a total loss.  There was no insurance on the vessel.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  57 31 45 N 136 01 W  Chart 17322

                Additional Information : Tonnage 8 Gross 5 Net, Length 30, Breadth 10.5, Depth 3.8, Built 1910 at Colby WA, HP 10, Master and Owner Hugo W Frederickson of Sitka

                Souces : U S C G Report of Casualty November 11, 1930 at Sitka, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1930) Pgs 526-7

 

THREE TWINS (1927)     The 10 ton 34 foot wooden gas screw 3 Twins foundered near Prince of Wales Island at 2:00 p.m. January 5, 1927.  Two of the three persons aboard perished in the disaster.  The vessel departed Ketchikan and was bound for Kendrick Bay.  The following information comes from the casualty report much of which came from the Ketchikan Chronicle from the day after the tragedy; details given by the only survivor, Tom Berry:

                “Coast of Prince of Wales Island opposite Ketchikan”  “Heavy sea, very cold, in day time”  “Open hatch and loss of skiff, cover blew off and seas filled boat”  “Foundering”  “Owner of boat was in engine room because of engine trouble when boat sank”  “Total Loss” 

                Lost with the 3 Twins were master and owner, T H Voss, and crewman Gus Swenson.  The vessel had a value of $1,500.  She had 2,500 pounds of cargo including coal, $50 worth of groceries for camp and some boom chain on deck.  All was lost with no insurance for the vessel or her cargo.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  54 51 15 N 131 58 W  Chart 17420

                Additional Information : Tonnage 10 Gross 7 Net, Length 33.8, Breadth 9.6, Depth 4.6, HP 20, Built 1911 at Seattle WA, Registered Ketchikan, ON 208607, Master and owner T H Voss of Ketchikan

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty March 11, 1927 by Mrs. Anne Voss at Ketchikan, 2.  Merchant Vessels of the U S (1926) Pgs 520-1

 

TOPSY D (1928)     The 9 ton 33 foot wooden fishing vessel Topsy D stranded and was lost at Point Amelius at 2:30 p.m. Saturday January 7, 1928.  The vessel was coming from Wrangell on her way to Louise Cove with two persons aboard; the master and engineer.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by Emil Meldahl, master and owner of the Topsy D:

                “Heavy southerly gale, weather was cloudy and rainy, dark”  “On Point Amelius, Alaska, close to Beauclaire Light”  “Stranded”  “Broke moorings and drifted on the rocks”  “Could do nothing as the engine was not strong enough to make any headway with the vessel”  “The reason the wreck was not reported before is that we were trying to salve the vessel and thought possibly she could be repaired, but when we got her off we found she was a complete wreck”  “TOTAL LOSS”

                The Topsy D had a value of $600, was not carrying cargo, and had no insurance.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  56 12 N 133 54 15 W  Chart 17360

                Additional Information : Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 33, Breadth 9.7, Depth 3.6, Horsepower 14, Built 1907 at Seattle WA, Registered Wrangell, ON 213927, Master and Owner Emil Meldahl of Wrangell

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty March 24, 1928 at Wrangell, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1927) Pgs 506-7

 

TOWNSEND (1900)     The 450 ton 125 foot wooden steamer Townsend stranded and was lost near Haines Mission at 4 p.m. Tuesday January 16, 1900.  The vessel departed Skagway that day bound for Haines Mission with 8 passengers and 20 crewmen aboard.  They were no carrying cargo.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report file by W McKenzie, master of the Townsend:

                “Point of land midway between Haines Mission and Battery Point”  “Stranding”  “Boilers failed and engines stopped”  “In heavy sea vessel drifted on point”  “Gale from north, moderate sea, weather clear”  “No time to take any measures; was ashore in 15 minutes”  “No assistance rendered.  Crew and passengers landed through surf In boats”  “Anchors were let go as soon as engines failed, but could find no bottom until vessel was on the rocks; January 21 vessel had disappeared from sight”  “Total loss”

                The Townsend had a value of $70,000 and was a total loss with no insurance.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  59 12 30 N 135 21 40 W  Chart 17300, 17317

                Additional Information : Tonnage 450 Gross 240 Net, Length 125, Breadth 27, Depth 19, Built 1884 at Astoria OR, SL KCVB, Master W McKenzie of San Francisco, Owner Charles D Lane of San Francisco

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report at Seattle February 7, 1900

 

TRUTH (1928)     The 15 ton 46 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Truth broke loose from her moorings in a storm and foundered in Nichols Passage at 11 p.m. Sunday December 1, 1928.  The Truth had departed Metlakatla November 29th and was bound for Dall Island.  The crew of three was not aboard when the vessel broke free.  It was very dark with a 50 mile an hour wind and heavy seas.  The Truth had a value of $2,600 with no cargo and was a total loss with no insurance.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 05 N 131 42 W  Chart 17420

                Additional Information : Tonnage 15 Gross 13 Net, Length 45.8, Breadth 11.6, Depth 4.1, Built 1910 at Ketchikan, HP 20, Registered Ketchikan, ON 207757, Master and owner Ed Atkinson of Metlakatla

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty January 14, 1929 by Atkinson at Portland OR, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) Pgs 526-7

 

TWIN B (1930)     Fire destroyed the 9 ton 40 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Twin B at 8:00 p.m. Tuesday July 29, 1930 at Port Althorp.  The vessel was departing Port Althorp bound for floating trap three at Hill Island with three crewmen aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Port Althorp, Alaska”  “Caught fire, believe engine backfired”  “Good clear weather, daylight”  “Trap watchman in Dory and 50 h.p. Diesel Boat Hero from cannery (assisted)”  “Total loss”

                The Twin B had a value of $10,000 and was a total loss.  She also had 32,000 pounds of fresh fish aboard worth $500 which was also a total loss.  The vessel was insured for $5,000 and there was no cargo insurance. No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  58 07 55 N 136 19 50 W  Chart 16016

                Additional Information : Tonnage 9 Gross 7 Net, Length 40, Breadth 11.9, Depth 3.7, Built 1919 at Port Althorp, HP 18, Registered Ketchikan, ON 219140, Master Walter Karkainen of Poulsbo WA, Owner Alaska Pacific Salmon Corp of Seattle WA

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty August 30, 1930 by Lester Ogre, Attorney in fact for Alaska Pacific Salmon, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1930) Pg 536-7

 

 

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