Unknown or Uncharted Alaska Shipwrecks ( M )

M M MORRILL (1903)     The 43 ton sealing schooner M M Morill  foundered June 30, 1903 along with the schooner James G Swan along the coast of Alaska.  The vessel was built in Seattle in 1894.  The crew is reported to have survived.

                Mapping and Location : Unknown

                Sources : 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 94, 2. BOEMRE Shipwreck Database (2011)

 

MABLE LANE (1898)     The river steamer Mable Lane was lost in the Bering Sea July 17, 1898.  She had departed Dutch Harbor bound for St Michael under tow of the vessel South Portland.  The Mabel Lane’s tow line parted in a gale and she filled and sank.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska Unknown

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MARTHA WILKES (1910)     The 67 ton 80 foot schooner Martha Wilkes stranded and was lost at Cape Bering, Siberia the evening of Saturday August 13, 1910.  The vessel departed Anadyr, Siberia August 11th bound for Nome.  There were three crewmen aboard and 1,000 lbs. of furs and skins valued at $600.  The cause of the disaster is attributed to foggy weather, a strong SE wind and heavy seas.  Natives rescued the crew of the Martha Wilkes on August 14, 1910.  The vessel and her cargo were total losses with no insurance.  The Martha W Wilkes was valued at $5,000 at the time of the tragedy.            

                Mapping and Location : Siberia

                Additional Information : Tonnage 67, Length 80, Breadth 17, Depth 6.5, Built 1898 Seattle, Master C B Owen of St Michael, Owner Owen & Johnson of St Michael

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report September 21, 1910 by C B Owen at Nome

 

MARY GRAY (1906)     The schooner Mary Gray was lost in a storm in Dolphin Island Bay in 1906 along with schooners Lila and Olivia. The three vessels are mistakenly listed on Alaska shipwrecks lists since as early as 1914.  All three were in fact lost off the coast of Alabama in the hurricane that made landfall south of Mobile September 27, 1906.

                Mapping and Location : Unknown – Error in Location

                Sources : 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 128 & Pg 269, 2. Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route, Washington Historical Quarterly (1916) Pgs 21-37, 3. Historic Shipwrecks and Magnetic Anomalies of the Northern Gulf of Mexico (1989) Pg H-17

 

MARY H THOMAS (1894)     The 94 ton trading schooner Mary H Thomas was lost in the Bering Sea in 1894.  She was valued at $8,500 at the time of the disaster.

                Mapping and Location : Unknown

                Sources : 1. Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route (1916) Pg 32, 2. 19th Century Commercial Shipping Losses, The Northern Mariner April 2006 Pg 66

 

MARY SACHS (1917)     The 30 ton 60 foot twin screw schooner Mary Sachs became frozen in the ice at Collinson Point near the Alaska Canada Border while owned by the Stefansson  Arctic Expedition in late 1913.  She never returned south but spent the next several winters hauled up on the beach and used as a camp shelter.  She ended up wrecked and scavenged in 1917 on Banks Island near Cape Kellett. Remnants of the vessels engine and other large metal parts are still evident.  Several local landmarks bear the name of the Mary Sachs including Mary Sachs Harbour and Mary Sachs Creek.

                Mapping and Location : Northwest Territories, Canada

                Sources : 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 230, 2. The Story of the Canadian Arctic Expedition 1913-1918 David Gray (2003) Canadian Museum of Civilization

 

MATINEE (1898)     The 37 ton schooner Matinee was lost in the Aleutian Island with all hands in 1898.

                Mapping and Location : Southwest Alaska Unknown

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MERCURY (1879)     The 311 ton wooden whaling bark Mercury was frozen in the ice and abandoned near Herald Island, Siberia October 24, 1879.  The vessel sailed out of San Francisco with a crew of 37 and the Captain’s Wife.  The following are excerpts from the Wreck Report filed at New Bedford, Mass in 1880:

                “Arctic Ocean.  Frozen in ice in mid-ocean and abandoned.”  “No sea; fair weather, no wind.”  “Bk Helen Mar rescued entire crew.  Disaster unavoidable; caught in the pommage ice and frozen in; captain, officers and crew all landed at San Francisco.”

                The Mercury was listed with a value of “$16,000 & bal. of outfits”.  Her cargo of oil and whalebone were listed with a value of $40,000.  Both the Mercury and her cargo were total losses.

                Mapping and Location : Siberia

                Additional Information : Tonnage 311, Age 57 Years, Registered New Bedford MA, ON 17558, Master Stephen Hickmott, Vessel Insurance $14,000, Cargo Insurance none, Agents Wm. Phillips & Son, New Bedford

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report filed at New Bedford by Agents Wm. Phillips & Son

 

MEXICAN (1851)     The 226 ton whaling ship Mexican was lost in the Arctic in 1851.  She departed New Bedford May 31, 1848 bound for whaling in the Arctic.  She was valued at $22,000 with her cargo of whale oil and bone at the time of the disaster.

                Mapping and Location : Northern Alaska Unknown

                Sources : 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route Andrews (1916) Pg 31

 

MIDAS (1898)     The British bark Midas was lost with all hands in 1898 in the North Pacific.  She departed Nagasaki, Japan some time near February 14, 1898 bound for the west coast of the United States and was never seen again.  The bark Willscott and the Puritan were caught in a terrific storm following the same route from the Orient at the same time.  The Willscott was dismasted and put into port in distress at San Francisco.  The normal time at sea from the Orient to West coast ports was 24 to 36 days.  The San Francisco Call reported her still missing on April 19, 1898, 65 days after the Midas left Nagasaki.

                Mapping and Location : Unknown

                Sources : 1. The San Francisco Call April 19, 1898 Where is the Bark Midas? Pg 20, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MILDRED ROBINSON (1931)     The gas boat Mildred Robinson was lost at Madeline Point in 1931.

                Mapping and Location : Alaska Unknown

                SourceThe H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 413

 

MOUNT WOLLASTON (1879)     The 325 ton wooden bark Mount Wollaston was lost at Herald Island off the Siberian Coast October 10, 1879 with all hands.  She hailed out of New Bedford, Massachusetts and was valued at $32,000 at the time of the disaster.  This vessel had been caught in the ice and abandoned during the whaling season of 1876 but was salvaged in 1877 and put back into the whaling trade.  Her cargo when lost was reported to be 300 barrels of whale oil and 4,500 lbs. of whale bone valued at $18,000.

                Mapping and Location : Siberia

                Sources : 1. Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914 Microcopy 641 (1966), 2. APA Records Microfilm (1982), 3. The Northern Mariner 19th Century Commercial Shipping Losses (2006) Pg 64

 

 

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