Week 30 in Alaska Maritime History July 23 – July 29

Summer is a relatively calm time of year and shipwrecks are less frequent. Small boat accidents are more common and tragically sometimes multiple family members are involved. Such was the case July 25, 1976 when the 34 foot wooden gasoline powered salmon troller Miller’s Bay disappeared near Noyes Island with three family members aboard, including Robert West (31), his wife Judy (30) and their 14 year old daughter Brenda.

The number of fires increases during the summer with the increased number of small vessels active in recreation and fisheries. The maritime community is also plagued with similar tragedies when canneries and packing plants are lost to a similar fate. Several lost during week 30 are as follows:

July 25, 1921 the Libby McNeil and Libby salmon cannery at Kenai was destroyed by fire with an estimated loss of $300,000.

July 26, 1924 the Alaska Sanitary Packing Company cannery at Wrangell was destroyed by fire. The loss was estimated to be $200,000.

July 28, 1916 the Nakat cannery near Ketchikan owned by the Humes Interest was destroyed by fire. Only a few hundred cases of salmon had been packed.

About captaingood

Captain Warren Good is the owner and administrator of this website and the author of the book ALASKA SHIPWRECKS. He spent much of the 1970's, 1980's and 1990's involved in the fisheries of Alaska. His home base was Kodiak where he made himself available as a cook, deck boss, engineer or skipper. His fishing experiences ranged from Prince William Sound to Norton Sound working on boats out of Kodiak and Dutch Harbor. King crab, tanner crab, opilio crab, shrimp, pollock, cod, sole, halibut and salmon were a few of the fisheries Captain Good was involved in. He achieved his Inspected Master Captain's License in 1988 from the United States Coast Guard. In the late 1970's after losing several close friends to shipwrecks, Captain Good began researching other shipwrecks that had taken place along the vast coastal regions of Alaska. He has retired to Florida, but his Alaska Shipwreck research is ongoing. This site is a forum for that effort.
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