Week 31 in Alaska Maritime History July 30 – Aug 5

By Captain Warren Good

 

July 30, 1956  The 30 foot troller Linda swamped and sank. No one knew what happened to the vessel until a message in a bottle was found off of Yakutat in the Gulf of Alaska a full year later. The message came from the only occupant of the Linda, 16 year old Orville Rude, son of the owner. He had been taking his father’s boat to Inian Pass from Elfin Cove to fish when the vessel swamped.

August 1, 1969  Canadian halibut fishing vessel B C Clipper exploded and sank off of Twoheaded Island near Kodiak. Five crewmembers were rescued but three were lost. A liquid gas line from the galley freezer broke and caused the initial explosion when the gas was ignited by the galley stove. Winston Tucker and his son Clarence Tucker, both of Vancouver were lost along with Charles Stanley of New Westminster. Five survivors were rescued by the fishing vessel Peggy Jo.

August 3, 1966  the Columbia Wards Fishery Company cannery, four buildings and about 50 stored fishing vessels were destroyed by fire 10 miles north of Naknek on the Kvichak River. The buildings had not been used for canning since 1958. They were primarily used to store gillnet vessels for the North Star Fish Company and Alaska Fish Company.

August 3, 1888 the Young Phoenix, Mary&Susan, Ino, Fleetwing and Jane Grey became trapped in ice and lost. The crews were rescued by the United States Revenue Cutter Bear.

 

About captaingood

Captain Warren Good is the owner and administrator of this website and the author of the book ALASKA SHIPWRECKS. He spent much of the 1970’s, 1980’s and 1990’s involved in the fisheries of Alaska. His home base was Kodiak where he made himself available as a cook, deck boss, engineer or skipper. His fishing experiences ranged from Prince William Sound to Norton Sound working on boats out of Kodiak and Dutch Harbor. King crab, tanner crab, opilio crab, shrimp, pollock, cod, sole, halibut and salmon were a few of the fisheries Captain Good was involved in. He achieved his Inspected Master Captain’s License in 1988 from the United States Coast Guard. In the late 1970’s after losing several close friends to shipwrecks, Captain Good began researching other shipwrecks that had taken place along the vast coastal regions of Alaska. He has retired to Florida, but his Alaska Shipwreck research is ongoing. This site is a forum for that effort.

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