Alaska Shipwrecks (W)

ABBREVIATIONS:  AluminumALBritish ColumbiaBCCentralCFiberglassFRPFishing VesselFVIndicated Horse PowerIHPLongliner-LLMotor VesselMVNorthNOfficial NumberONRevenue Cutter ServiceRCSSchoonerSchSignal LettersSLSouth CentralSCSoutheastSESouthwestSWSteel oil screwSOSSteam ShipSSUnknownUUnited States ArmyUSAUnited States Coast GuardUSCGUnited States NavyUSNWestcentralWCWood gas screwWGSWood oil screwWOS

W A FARNSWORTH (1877)     The 432 ton bark W A Farnsworth was lost off Point Barrow September 15, 1877.  The following is from an 1877 Boston Herald interview of Charles Hamill, a mate from the W A Farnsworth, describing the loss:

                “…From Point Barrow, the W A Farnsworth steered southwest along by the land, with ice scattering and light.  At midnight, September 15th, about 50 miles east of Cape Lisburn, she ran into a piece of ice while wearing, stove her bow, and sank in 20 minutes.  All hands took to the boats, and got clear of the vessel just before she rolled over and went down, all but the tips of her yards, which were left just out of the water.  At daylight the crew got on the bark Thomas Pope. And three hours afterward spoke the Dawn, of San Francisco, which took on board Captain Keenan, Mr. Hamill and one boat’s crew from the W A Farnsworth, and arrived at San Francisco September 26th….”

                Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   68 53 N 166 13 W   Chart 16005

                Sources: 1. Alaska File of the U S Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914 “Arctic Losses 1868-1888”, 2. Boston Herald (November 17, 1877) “Tidings from the Fleet in the Northern Oceans”

W F MARCH (1881)     The 95.92 ton schooner W F March was blown onto the beach and lost in Golovnin Bay at 1:30 a.m. Monday August 15, 1881.  The vessel departed San Francisco May 5, 1881 with 17 persons aboard including her crew and a party of 10 miners.  The vessel was carrying 35 tons of ballast, provisions, ore and mining tools.  The W F March was blown ashore and wrecked after dragging anchor in a heavy gale.  The vessel had a value of $7,000 and her cargo $400; both total losses.  The W F March was insured for $5,500.  The crewmen and miners all survived the disaster.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 24 N 163 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 95.92, Built 1875, Registered San Francisco CA, ON 80521, Master William Gallagher of San Francisco, Owner Joshua Hendy of San Francisco

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report October 24, 1881 at San Francisco by William Gallagher, 2. Reply of the Alaska Commercial Company to the charges of Governor Alfred P Swineford, of Alaska, against the company in his annual report for the year 1887 Pgs 88-90

W H DIMOND (1914)     The 390 ton 155 foot wooden cod fishing schooner W H Dimond stranded and was lost in the Shumagin Islands at 11:00 a.m. February 3, 1914.  The vessel departed San Francisco January 8, 1914 bound for Unga, Alaska with 10 crewmen and 12 fishermen aboard.  She was carrying a 500 ton cargo of general merchandise, coal and salt.  She also had a 26 foot gas screw boat on her deck.  The following are excerpts from wreck reports filed at Seward and San Francisco:

                “Stranded”  “Foggy weather”  “Light SE wind, medium sea running and dusk, dropped two anchors”  “Vessel anchored off Bird Island, 60 miles from Unga, Shumagin Island Group, Alaska”  “Wind increased to a hurricane, chains parted and vessel thrown against rocks.  Next morning nothing left but wood and pieces of timber and provisions that were washed ashore”

                The W H Dimond had a value of $12,000 and her cargo was worth between $9,000 and $12,000.  Both the vessel and her cargo were total losses.  The vessel was insured for $10,000 and her cargo $7,500.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 49 N 159 46 W   Chart 16011

                Comment: The masters wreck report has only 10 crewmen aboard at the time of the casualty and the owners wreck report says there were 22 persons aboard.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 390 Gross 376 Net, Length 155, Breadth 35.5, Depth 11.7, Built 1881 at San Francisco, SL JVDN, Registered San Francisco CA, ON 80803, Master Charles W Prellberg of Redwood City CA, Owner Alaska Codfish Company

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report March 21, 1914 at Seward by Charles Prellberg, 2. U S Customs Wreck Report April 6, 1924 at San Francisco by C D Bunker, Attorney-in-fact for Alaska Codfish Company, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1913) Pg 95

W H MEYER (1895)     The 256.5 ton 122 foot wooden brig W H Meyer stranded and was lost at 1 a.m. Wednesday July 17, 1895 at Port Clarence.  The vessel departed Saint Lawrence Island for Port Clarence July 10, 1895 with 12 crewmen and 3 passengers aboard.  She was carrying 300 tons of coal and general merchandise.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by A P Hanson, master of the W H Meyer:

                “Port Clarence Harbor, Alaska Territory”  “Stranded”  “Gale, caused vessel to drag anchors”  “Moderate gale, rainy weather, rough sea, dark”

                The W H Meyer had a value of $10,000 and was a total loss.  She was insured for $8,000.  There was no loss of life.  Some of the crew was taken aboard the Revenue Cutter Bear.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   65 12 N 166 45 W   Chart 16005

                Comment: The Revenue Cutter Service reported the wreck at the Reindeer Station near Port Clarence Harbor.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 256.5, Length 122.6, Breadth 31.5, Depth 10.4, Built 1869 at San Francisco CA, SL JGMP, Registered San Francisco, ON 80046, Master A P Hanson of San Francisco, Owner James McKenna of Alameda CA

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report September 17, 1895 at San Francisco, 2. Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914  “Microcopy 641-Roll 4”

W H WOOD (1879)     The schooner W H Wood was driven ashore near Unga and became a total loss October 30, 1879.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 11 N 160 30 10 W   Chart 16011

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

W K MERWIN (1899)     The Yukon River stern wheel steamer W K Merwin was pounded to pieces on the beach near Nome in late 1899 and early 1900 after two seasons on the Yukon River.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   64 30 N 165 25 W   Chart 16006

                Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914

Monashka Bay on Kodiak Island

Monashka Bay on Kodiak Island

WAFICO NO 2 (1952)     The 7 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Wafico No 2 stranded and was lost December 18, 1952 in Monashka Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 50 N 152 25 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 5 Net, Length 30.6, Breadth 9.3, Depth 4.1, Built 1940 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 85, Owner Washington Fish and Oyster Company, Registered Juneau, ON 239468

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 591, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 750

 

WAFICO NO 8 (1946)     The 8 ton 31 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Waifco No 8 was consumed by fire June 18, 1946 in Halibut Bay on the southwest end of Kodiak Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 23 N 154 43 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 5 Net, Length 30.9, Breadth 10, Depth 3.7, Built 1942 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 92, Owner Washington Fish & Oyster Company, Registered Juneau, ON 241643

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1946) Pg 507, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1947) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 824

 

WAFICO NO 9 (1964)     The 8 ton 31 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Wafico No 9 was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Ouzinkie.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 55 30 N 152 29 50 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 5 Net, Length 31, Breadth 10, Depth 3.8, Built 1942 at Seattle, Horsepower 92, Owner William M Boskofski, Registered Juneau, ON 241644

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 733, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1177

 

WAFICO NO 12 (1964)     The 9 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Wafico No 12 was reported missing out of Port William in the Good Friday earthquake of March 27, 1964.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 29 30 N 152 35 W   Chart 16604

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 30, Breadth 11, Depth 3.9, Built 1944 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 115, SL WF4932, Owner William C Golley, Registered Juneau, ON 245553

                Sources: 1.Unofficial Wreck List, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 706

 

WAFICO NO 22 (1956)     The 16 ton 35 foot steel gas screw fishing vessel Wafico No 22 foundered May 20, 1956 near Cape Saint Elias.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 54 N 144 36 W   Chart 16013

                Additional Information: Tonnage 16 Gross 13 Net, Length 34.9, Breadth 12, Depth 5.2, Built 1949 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 141, Owner Washington Fish & Oyster Company, Registered Seattle, ON 258596

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 551, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 758

 

WAIF (1924)     The 25 ton 56 foot wooden gas screw Waif foundered in Cordova Bay at 6 a.m. November 3, 1924.  The vessel had departed out of Cordova to pick up coal from the Shinkoku Maru, and was on a return trip with two persons aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Salmo Point, Cordova Bay”  “Hit rocky point, foundered”  “Vessel proper a total loss, part of machinery and equipment salvaged.  Hull now in state of decay on beach, a total loss”

                The value of the Waif was estimated at $7,500 and her cargo of coal $150.  Both were total losses.  Insurance was not mentioned on the casualty report.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 37 N 145 46 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: Tonnage 25 Gross 17 Net, Length 56, Breadth 12.6, Depth 6.4, Built 1909 at Seattle WA, IHP 37, Registered Juneau, ON 206519, Master and owner Charles A Matthews

                Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty at Cordova

WAKAMIYA MARU (1794)     The Japanese vessel Wakamiya Maru out of Sendai, Japan, was broken up by waves while at anchor in Unalga Pass, Biorka Island in 1794.  15 survivors of the wreck were brought to Unalaska and then taken to Okhotsk by Russians.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   53 58 N 166 14 W   Chart 16011

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

WALRUS (1906)     Fire destroyed the 9 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw Walrus in Tongass Narrows at 1:30 a.m. Thursday September 6, 1906.  The vessel departed Bell Island September 5th on her way to Ketchikan with six passengers aboard.  The sole crewman was master and owner E W Gurney of Ketchikan.  The Walrus had 600 pounds of cargo on deck consisting of two stoves and two gas tanks.  Lost in the disaster were 6 year old Miss Emma McKay and 15 year old Miss Emma McKay.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Off East Clump Tongass Narrows”  “Light wind, cloudy night”  “Explosion of lantern”  “Fire”  “Caused by explosion, no measures could be taken”  “One passenger and myself launched lifeboat and took all except 2 passengers, of which were burned to death.  The 2 passengers lost were cut off by flames and could not be reached”

                The Walrus had a value of $2,500 and her cargo $43 both of which were total losses.  There was no insurance.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 20 42 N 131 41 15 W   Chart 17428

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 30, Breadth 9.5, Depth 3.1, IHP 10, Built 1904 at Ketchikan, Registered Ketchikan, ON 201124

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report September 6, 1906 by Gurney, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1906) Pg 318

WALRUS (1953)     The 21 ton 41 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Walrus was consumed by fire September 27, 1953 at Lincoln Rock in Clarence Strait.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 03 25 N 132 41 50 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 21 Gross 17 Net, Length 41, Breadth 11.5, Depth 6, Built 1926 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 85, SL WB7298, Owner George Mackie, Registered Ketchikan, ON 225596

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 592, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 750

 

WALTER A EARLE (1895)     The 71 ton Canadian sealing schooner Walter A Earle was lost with all hands off of Cape Saint Elias during the Great Easter Gale of 1895 that occurred on April 14th.  The vessel was out of Victoria, British Columbia and hunting seals off of Icy Bay.  The Earle attempted to weather the storm along with the schooners Favorite and Libby, but lost her rudder and capsized.  32 men perished in the disaster, including captain Louis Magnuson, mate Henry Buhrm, seamen William J Douglas, W H Wyman, and Adolf E Shute, cook B Berner, and 26 Native Americans, twelve of whom were Songhees from Victoria, five from Sooke, six from Beecher Bay, two from Metchosin and one from Cowichan.  The rudderless overturned hull of the Walter A Earle drifted into Afognak Bay several weeks later.  Many of the deceased crewmen were found within the hull and buried at Kodiak.  The sealing schooner C G White was lost in the same storm along with 11 crewmen.  The survivors of that disaster, off of the south end of Kodiak, were brought to Woody Island near Kodiak and cared for.

                Mapping and Location:  South Central Alaska   58 02 30 N 152 45 W   Chart 16580

                Comment: I have charted this wreck at Afognak Bay, as that was the final resting place of the hull.  Evidence of the disaster may be found anywhere from Pamplona Spur outside of Icy Bay, where the vessel overturned, to Afognak Bay where her drift ended.  WG

                Sources: 1. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1895) Pg 451, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

WALWORTH (1968)     The oil screw Walworth was consumed by fire August 5, 1968 off of Sumner Strait.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 53 N 133 59 W   Chart 16016

            Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

WALYANA (2001)     The 28 foot gillnet vessel Walyana took a rogue wave, capsized and sank May 15, 2001 near the Copper River Delta.  All three crewmembers made it to shore and were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 25 N 145 W   Chart 16013

                Source: U S C G District 17 News Release (May 16, 2001) “Coast Guard rescues three Homer fishermen”

 

WANDA (1939)     Fire destroyed the 14 ton wooden gas screw fishing vessel Wanda at 2:00 p.m. August 21, 1939.  The vessel was tied at the dock at Dayville, Alaska when the disaster occurred.  The only one aboard was a mechanic working on the engine.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by A S Day, master and owner of the Wanda:

                “Dock at Dayville, Alaska”  “Vessel caught fire from engine”  “Spark ignited gasoline in bilge”  “Attempts made by several persons to extinguish the blaze”  “Mechanic went aboard to test engine.  Spark from starting switch ignited gasoline, burning him somewhat about the face.  Vessel cast loose from other boats and then towed to beach across from cannery where it burned completely”  “Complete loss”

                The Wanda had a value of $5,000 and was a complete loss.  She was not carrying  cargo.  Insurance was in the amount of $3,000.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 05 N 146 21 W   Chart 16707

                Comment: Dayville now called Fort Liscum.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross, Length 38, Breadth 11.9, Depth 4.1, Built 1938 at Dayville, Registered Cordova, ON 237728

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty April 23, 1940 at Cordova, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1939) Pg 305

WANDERER (1991)     The 34 foot longline fishing vessel Wanderer sank while at anchor May 30, 1991 in Stephens Passage near Juneau.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 18 15 N 134 24 30 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: ON 228410

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

WANDERER (1999)     The 75 foot wooden salmon fishing vessel Wanderer grounded and sank in 80- fathoms of water July 13, 1999 in Lynn Canal.  The master of the vessel fell asleep at the helm causing the disaster.  All three crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessel Riptide.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 10 N 134 58 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: ON 234141, Built 1935

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

WANICK (1919)     The 18 ton 49 foot gas screw towing vessel Wanick stranded and was lost at Lost Harbor August 10, 1919.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   54 13 45 N 165 36 30 W   Chart 16520

                Comment: Lost Harbor was the site of a sulphur mine in the 1920’s.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 18 Gross 12 Net, Length 48.9, Breadth 11.9, Depth 5.2,  HP 45, Built 1914 at Burton WA, Registered Seattle, ON 212076

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1922) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 453, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1919) Pg 340, 3. Dictionary of Alaska Place Names (1971) “Lost Harbor” Pg 597

WANITA (1953)     The 32 ton 44 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Wanita burned November 9, 1953 at the mouth of Red Bay on the north end of Prince of Wales Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 20 N 133 18 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 32 Gross 25 Net, Length 44, Breadth 14, Depth 6.2, Built 1947 at Petersburg, Horsepower 165, SL WH5064, Owner Leon W Hasbrouck, Registered Wrangell, ON 252319

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 594, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 750

 

WARDS COVE (1929)     Fire destroyed the 34 ton 58 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Wards Cove in Clover Pass at 12:30 p.m. Monday December 30, 1929.  The vessel departed Ketchikan that day bound for Neets Bay with two persons aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report submitted by A W Brindle, master and managing owner of the Wards Cove:

                “Clover Pass, opposite Hump Island, SE Alaska”  “Fire”  “Back-fire from engine”  “Used fire extinguisher”  “I was draining the carburetor to remove water and the engine had stopped.  Then restarted engine and it began to miss again.  I opened cock and was draining out more water, and engine back-fired and ignited gas”

                The Wards Cove had a value of $9,000 and was a total loss.  She was insured for $6,000.  There was no cargo.  The two aboard made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 30 N 131 45 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 34 Gross 23 Net, Length 58.1, Breadth 15, Depth 6.7, HP 50, Built 1916 at Tacoma WA, Registered Ketchikan, ON 213916, Master R W Brindle of Ketchikan, Owner Wards Cove Packing Company

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty December 31, 1929 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1929) Pgs 554-5

WARRIGAL (1946)     The 9 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Warrigal stranded and was lost April 26, 1946 at the southwest end of Chichagof Pass.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 21 N 132 28 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 30.8, Breadth 8.2, Depth 4.3, Built 1907 at Norfolk VA, Former Name No. S-110 (U S N), Horsepower 20, Owner Leon L Bylington, Registered Seattle WA, ON 227036

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1948) Pg 546, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1949) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 912

 

WARRIOR (1965)     The 7 ton 34 foot wooden oil screw Warrior was destroyed by a storm during July of 1965 at Saint Michael.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   63 29 N 162 02 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 5 Net, Length 34.2, Breadth 10.2, Depth 3.9, Built 1905 at Black Diamond CA, Service freight, Horsepower 100, SL WE8701, Owner Northland Commercial Company, Registered Juneau, ON 204935

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 737, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1177

 

WASHINGTON (1851)     The ship Washington was lost at Pitt’s Island in 1851.  Her value at the time of the disaster was $25,000 with cargo.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 10 N 135 40 W   Chart 17320

                Comment: I have charted this wreck at Kruzof Island, which was named Pitt Island by Captain Nathanial Portlock in 1787.   The Island was later called Sitka Island, Croose Island, Edgecumb Island, Kruzow Island and finally Kruzof Island.

                Sources: 1. Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route (1916) Pg 31, 2. Dictionary of Alaska Place Names (1971) “Kruzof Island” Pg 546

WASHINGTON (1870-71)     The bark Washington was blown ashore and lost at Kasilof in Cook Inlet in 1870 or 1871.  The vessel was out of Sydney, Australia and had a value of $50,000 with cargo at the time of the loss.  She had come to the area to catch and salt fish.  Timbers were salvaged from the wreck and a large whaleboat was constructed to continue fishing.  A hired craft was used to take the catch to market.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 23 15 N 151 17 45 W   Chart 16662

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

WASHINGTON (1915)     The 708 ton 180 foot wooden sloop barge Washington stranded and was lost off Kayak Island at 3:30 p.m. October 10, 1915.  The vessel departed Port Townsend, Washington loaded with 100,000 feet of lumber bound for Cordova.  She was being towed by the tug Pioneer.  There were 6 crewmen and one stowaway aboard the barge.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by O Beaton, master of the tug Pioneer:

                “Fresh southeast, sea rough”  “144’10” Long.W. 59’48” Lat. N.”  “Waterlogged”  “Pumping by crew of barge”  “Was in tow of tug Pioneer.  Barge stranded on west side of Kayak Island, two miles north of Cape St Elias and is breaking up”  “Total loss”

                The Washington was valued at $5,000 and her cargo $10,350.  Both were reported total losses.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 48 N 144 10 W   Chart 16723

                Comment: Probably stranded on the south side of Sea Ranger Reef.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 708 Gross 674 Net, Length 180, Breadth 42, Depth 14, Built 1898 at Portland OR, Registered Tacoma WA, ON 203793, Owner Alaska Barge Company of Tacoma, Insurance unknown

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty October 21, 1915 at Juneau, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1915) Pg 80

WASHINGTON (1922)     The 36 ton 54 foot wooden gas screw fishing schooner Washington stranded and was lost near Cape Suckling at 3:50 a.m. November 11, 1922.  The vessel departed Ketchikan October 24th bound for sea fisheries with 7 crewmen aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by Oswald Olsen, master of the Washington:

                “18 miles east of Cape Suckling, Alaska”  “Gale of NW wind, dark night”  “Stranded”  “Total loss”

                The Washington was valued at $10,000 and was a complete loss.  She was loaded with 25,000 pounds of fresh halibut worth $4,000 which was also lost.  The vessel was insured for $3,000.  There was no insurance on the cargo.  No lives were lost in the disaster.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 59 30 N 143 53 W   Chart 16016

                Additional Information: Tonnage 36 Gross 24 Net, Length 54, Breadth 16.2, Depth 7.4, IHP 50, Built 1910 at Seattle, Registered Seattle WA, ON 208111, Master Oswald Olsen of Seattle, Owner Erling Olsen of Poulsbo WA

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty December 8, 1922, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1922) Pg 349

WASHINGTON (1951)     The 18 ton 44 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Washington foundered September 28, 1951 off of Douglas Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 15 30 N 134 16 30 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 18 Gross 15 Net, Length 44.6, Breadth 12.1, Depth 5.3, Built 1919 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 148, Owner R L Barber, Registered Seattle, ON 218103

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 596, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 747

 

WASHINGTON MAIL (1956)     The 7,943 ton 468 foot steel steam ship Washington Mail broke in two and sank in a storm March 3, 1956 in the Gulf of Alaska.  There were 57 crewmen and 9 passengers aboard travelling from Seattle to the Orient.  No lives were lost. Pictures taken by the passengers and the story can be found in the March 26, 1956 issue of Life Magazine.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska

                Additional Information: Tonnage 7,943 Gross 4,672 Net, Length 468.5, Breadth 69.6, Depth 29.5, Built 1945 at Pascagoula MS, Former Name Sea Tarpon, Service freight, Horsepower 8,500, SL KTST, Owner American Mail Line, Registered Seattle WA, ON 247323

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 554, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 758, 3. Life Magazine (March 26, 1956) “A Ship’s Violent End” Pgs 47-50

 

WASMUTH (1942)     The 314 foot Navy minesweeper Wasmuth (DMS-15/DD-338) sank after two of the ships depth charges broke loose in a gale, fell overboard and exploded beneath the ship’s fantail December 29, 1942 approximately 35 miles off of Scotch Cap.  All 122 officers and enlisted men as well as two passengers were saved by the tanker Ramapo (AO-12).

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 24 15 N 164 47 30 W   Chart 16011

                Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. Wikipedia.org (2013) “USS Wasmuth DD-338

 

WASP (1913)     The 17 ton 42 foot gas screw trading schooner Wasp stranded and was abandoned near Cape Avinof August 25, 1913.  The vessel departed Nunivak Island with 4 crewmen and 2 passengers.  The passengers and crew survived for five days in a dory without food or water before reaching Saint Michael.  The Wasp was badly damaged by ice in the fall, drug anchor in a storm and sank near the mouth of the Kuskokwim River.  No lives were lost in the disaster.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   59 50 N 164 05 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 11 Net, Length 42.2, Breadth 15.2, Depth 3.8, Service Freight, Built 1911 at Unalakleet, Registered Saint Michael, ON 209051

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1913) Pg 322, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1914) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 430, 3. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 230

WASP (1922)     The 13 ton 38 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Wasp stranded and was lost at Metlakatla at 1:30 a.m. February 14, 1922.  The vessel broke loose from the dock in an 80 mile an hour northeasterly wind and broke up on the beach.  The Wasp had a value of $4,000 which was a total loss.  There was no insurance.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 07 45 N 131 34 30 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 9 Net, Length 38.6, Breadth 12, Depth 3.2, Built 1915 at Moira Sound, IHP 20, Registered Ketchikan, ON 213507

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty July 5, 1922 by Frank M Williams, Agent, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1922) Pg 349

WA WA (1943)     The 9 ton 34 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Wa Wa foundered April 6, 1943 at Chatham.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 30 50 N 134 55 30 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 34.1, Breadth 10.4, Depth 4.7, Built 1917 at Seattle, Horsepower 13 (Brake), Owner Holly Evans, Registered Ketchikan, ON 215426

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1944) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 757, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1943) Pg 314

 

WAYWARD WIND (1988)     The 86 foot crab fishing vessel Wayward Wind flooded and foundered January 18, 1988 approximately 9 miles south of Tugidak Island.  Four of her six crewmen were lost including owner operator William “Red” Nietupski (45) of Port Williams, James C Baglien (47) of Kodiak, Michael Descloux (46) of Kodiak and David Descloux (39) of Kodiak.  An improperly dogged hatch on a pumping crab tank was said to be a probable cause.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 30 N 154 40 W   Chart 16580

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 3. Crewmember recollection. (WG)

 

WEBSTER (1890)     The vessel Webster was lost at Atka Island in 1890.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 07 N 174 30 W   Chart 16012

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore 1992

WEBSTER NO IV (1941)     The 39 ton 50 foot wooden scow Webster No IV stranded and was lost September 25, 1941 200 yards from the entrance to Dear Harbor about a mile NE of Cape Cross.  The two persons aboard the scow made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 56 30 N 136 33 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 39 Gross and Net, Length 50.3, Breadth 19.1, Depth 4.8, Built 1922 at Seattle WA, Owner Kalle Rastikalnen, Registered Sitka, ON 168360

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1942) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 512, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1941) Pg 425

 

WELCOME (1961)     The 21 ton 42 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Welcome stranded and was lost July 15, 1961 at Gambier Bay, Admiralty Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 28 N 133 55 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 21 Gross 14 Net, Length 42.3, Breadth 13.6, Depth 5.6,Built 1913 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 85, SL WB7416, Owner Alexander Bryant, Registered Ketchikan, ON 211863

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) Pg 609, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 905

 

WESCO NO 1 (1963)     The 17 ton 35 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Wesco No 1 foundered December 18, 1963 off of Perry Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 43 N 147 55 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: Tonnage 17 Gross 13 Net, Length 35.4, Breadth 12, Depth 5, Built 1947 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 140, SL WB4384, Owner Mickey Eleshansky, Registered Juneau, ON 251771

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 713, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

WESLEY (1994)     The 42 foot longline halibut fishing vessel Wesley flooded and sank  September 14, 1994 in Frederick Sound 30 miles northwest of Petersburg.  Only one of the two crewmembers survived. Skipper Martha Mullen (31) of Petersburg was lost when she became trapped in the wheelhouse wearing her survival suit as the vessel rolled over and sank.  A second crew member was rescued by a nearby fishing vessel.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 50 N 134 25 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: ON 233747

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013), 3. Daily Sitka Sentinel (September 15, 1994) “Weather Takes Toll in Halibut Opening” Pg 1, 4. Witness Account from Alaska Fishermen RIP (Facebook)

 

WEST CAPE (1964)     The 10 ton 29 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel West Cape was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 on Kodiak Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 7 Net, Length 29.6, Breadth 11.1, Depth 4.3, Built 1945 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 64, SL WS8684, Owner Kadiak Fisheries Company, Registered Ketchikan, ON 275618

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 714, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

WEST POINT (1921)     The 19 ton 44 foot gas screw fishing vessel West Point broke loose from the dock at Quadra Cannery and foundered October 28, 1921.  The vessel departed Ketchikan October 1, 1921 bound for Boca de Quadra with one person aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty reports:

                “Heavy gale, rough sea, dark”  “Strong gale, heavy chop, dark and heavy rain squall”  “Moored to dock with heavy lines”  “Broke adrift in a gale of wind”  “Went adrift at midnight, no one on board, started out after her as soon as possible”  “Foundered in 130 fathoms 8 miles from Quadra Cannery”

                The West Point had a value of $2,970 and was only insured for fire.  There was no cargo and no lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 04 N 131 01 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 19 Gross 17 Net, Length  44, Breadth 11.3, Depth 5.2, IHP 50, Built 1915 at Seattle WA, Registered Seattle, ON 213233, Master none (laid up for Winter), Owner Booth Fisheries Company of Seattle

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty November 15, 1921 at Seattle by Frank B Poul Co. Inc. Agents, 2. U S C G Report of Casualty October 31, 1921 at Ketchikan by R Pringle, Master, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1921) Pg 351

WEST WIND (1993)     The 152 foot tender West Wind flooded and sank July 27, 1993 in Orca Bay while tendering in Prince William Sound.  The four persons aboard were rescued.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 36 N 146 36 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: ON 284347

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

WESTERLY (1994)     The 65 foot crab fishing vessel Westerly capsized and sank February 15, 1994 in southern part of Glacier Bay just south of Strawberry Island.  Unstable stacked crab pots shifted causing the vessel to flood from the stern and roll over.  The Westerly sank in 37 fathoms of water.  All three crewmembers were rescued by another fishing vessel.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 31 N 136 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: ON 507754. Built 1967

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

WESTERN (1952)     The 9 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Western was consumed by fire September 25, 1952 in Canoe Passage at the south end of Etolin Island.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 59 N 132 12 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 30.3, Breadth 11.2, Depth 4.2, Built 1939 at Bellingham WA, Horsepower 140, Owner Frank Young, Registered Wrangell, ON 238799

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 599, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 750

 

WESTERN (1961)     The 25 ton 41 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Western foundered March 1, 1961 near Russian Harbor at the southern end of Kodiak Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 44 N 154 05 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 25 Gross 17 Net, Length 41.5, Breadth 13.7, Depth 6.8, Built 1945 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 140, SL WC9513, Owner Dave Murphy, Registered Juneau, ON 247550

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) Pg 667, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 933

 

WESTERN (1975)     The shrimper Western disappeared in the Gulf of Alaska between Pelican and Kodiak December 7, 1975.  Lost with the vessel were Clifford Huddleston, Carl Pedersen and Vernon Pound.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   Unknown

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011) “December 7, 1975”

 

WESTERN CLIPPER (1964)     The 125 ton 78 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Western Clipper stranded and was lost February 17, 1964 on the beach at Atka.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   52 12 N 174 12 W   Chart 16012

                Additional Information: Tonnage 125 Gross 63 Net, Length 78.7, Breadth 22.1, Depth 10.2, Built 1939 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 240, SL WB4400, Owner Trans-Pacific Fishing and Packing Company, Registered Seattle, ON 238723

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 714, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

WESTERN SALVOR (1973)     The logging barge Western Salvor broke loose from a tug in rough weather and broke apart in the surf December 4, 1973 on the south shore of Kruzof Island west of Sitka.  The barge was carrying a million board feet of saw logs.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 10 N 135 40 W   Chart 17320

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

WESTERN SEA (1985)     The 58 foot seiner Western Sea was lost with all hands August 19, 1985 in Marmot Bay 25 miles northeast of Kodiak.  Parts of the vessel were found east of Long Island including the vessels pilot house and a life preserver.  The six crewmen lost were owner Jerald Bouchard (58) of Coupeville WA, Peter Barry (20) of New Hampshire , Chris McLain (24) of Idaho Falls ID, Steward Darling (25) of Bremerton WA, Chris Hofer (27) of Fort Collins CO and Bill Posey (24) of Anchorage.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 46 N 152 17 W   Chart 16580

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 3. Oregonian (August 25, 1985) “Coast Guard suspends Alaska search for missing boaters” Pg C2

 

WESTERN SHORE (1886)     The sloop Western Shore was lost in Bristol Bay in 1886.  The vessel was valued at $100,000 with cargo.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 N 162W   Chart 16006

                Source: Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route (1916) Pg 32

WESTERN STAR (1898)     The 718 ton 176 foot wooden river steamer Western Star ran up on a reef in Katmai Bay and was lost at about 1:00 a.m. June 28, 1898.  The vessel departed Seattle June 1, 1898 headed for Saint Michael with 16 crewmen and no cargo aboard.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report submitted by Robert Moran, owner of the Western Star:

                “Katmai Bay, in Shelikof Strait near Kodiak Island, Alaska”  “Lost ground tackle in severe storm”  “Course of wind estimated at 60 miles per hour, rough sea, dark night”  “Blowed on rock reef”  “As soon as the vessel went adrift the tug Resolute went to her assistance, but she landed on a reef before the tug could reach her”  “Total loss”

                The Western Star was valued at $46,000 and was a total loss.  She was insured for $40,000.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 58 N 154 57 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 718.68 Gross 409.106 Net, Length 176.1, Breadth 35.4, Depth 5.9, Built 1898 at Seattle WA, Registered Port Townsend WA, ON 81603, Master N Hodgson of Seattle, Owner Robert Moran of Seattle

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report at Puget Sound Collection District September 29, 1898

 

WESTERN STAR (2001)     The 65 foot codfish trawler Western Star was consumed by fire and lost February 18, 2001. The vessel was 19 miles southeast of Caton Island with four persons aboard when an engine room fire forced them to evacuate the vessel. There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 23 30 N 162 25 30 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: Tonnage 177 Gross 129 Net, Length 65, Built 1979, ON 612319, SL WCL2155

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Maritime Information Exchange (2016), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

WESTERN SUN (1954)     The 79 ton 68 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Western Sun stranded and was lost December 12, 1954 near the mouth of Kah Sheets Bay at the south end of Duncan Canal.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 31 N 133 06 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 79 Gross 54 Net, Length 68.7, Breadth 19.3, Depth 8.6, Built 1937 at Tacoma WA, Crew 11, Horsepower 135, SL WU4413, Owner Alfred Howe, Registered Seattle, ON 236198

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 600, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 741

 

WESTPORT (1936)     The 116 ton 88 foot whaling steamer Westport ran aground at Akutan Island and was lost at 8:45 p.m. Monday September 14, 1936.  The vessel departed Akutan September 13, 1936 bound for the whaling grounds in the Bering Sea with 12 officers and crewmen aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Fresh easterly wind, mist, heavy sea and gale blowing, night was coming on”  “Gunner was with Captain on Bridge as a lookout”  “Vessel ran aground reef”  “Reef Bight, Akutan Island, Alaska”  “Coast Guard cutter Daphne picked up crew and brought them to Akutan Whaling Station.  Coast Guard Cutter Chelan brought crew to Seattle”  “Total loss”

                The Westport had a value of $59,000 and was a total loss.  The Westport was insured for $25,000.  There was no cargo aboard.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   54 07 45 N 166 06 W   Chart 16520

                Additional Information: Tonnage 116 Gross 59 Net, Length 88, Breadth 19, Depth 11.5, Built 1912 at Seattle WA, IHP 350, Registered Seattle, ON 209877, Master Captain N Schroeder of Seattle, Owner American Pacific Whaling Company of Bellevue WA

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty October 13, 1936 at Seattle by Johanna B Olson, Accountant for American Pacific Whaling Company, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1936) Pgs 174-5

WESTPRO (1982)     The 189 foot fish processor Westpro caught fire at the dock in Seward May 25, 1982.  Toxic fumes drifted into the town causing the evacuation of 1,000 residents.  The burning Westpro was towed away from the dock and eventually sunk in the Gulf of Alaska.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   Unknown

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

F/V Westward stranded February 16, 2008 U S Coast Guard Photo

F/V Westward stranded February 16, 2008
U S Coast Guard Photo

WESTWARD (2008)     The 82 foot wooden fishing vessel Westward stranded and sank February 16, 2008 in the vicinity of Point Ildefonso on the southwest side of Prince of Wales Island west of Klawock.  Both crewmembers were rescued by another fishing vessel in the area.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 34 10 N 133 15 45 W   Chart 17400

                Comment: This vessel was subsequently refloated and taken to Craig.  WG

                Source: U S Coast Guard News Release (February 20, 2008) “Fishing Vessel Aground; Coast Guard Working to Mitigate Pollution”

 

WHIRL POINT (1992)     The 32 foot salmon seiner Whirl Point took four or five large waves, flooded and sank July 14, 1992 near Ikatan Point.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 46 30 N 163 11 W   Chart 16520

                Additional Information: ON 284705

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

WHISTLER (1968)     The diesel screw Whistler was destroyed by a tidal wave August 20, 1968 off of Kokinhenik Bar on the Copper River Delta.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 14 N 145 09 W   Chart 16723

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

WHITE BEAR (1917)     The 10 ton 39 foot wooden oil screw passenger vessel White Bear became frozen in the ice and lost in Pastol Bay at 1 p.m. Thursday November 1, 1917.  There were three crewmen and one passenger aboard at the time of the disaster.  The vessel had departed Solomon October 28, 1917 and was headed for Nome.  The White Bear had a half ton of cargo valued at $19,000 including general merchandise, U S Mail and $18,000 worth of gold dust.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report submitted by J P Heikkila, master and owner of the White Bear:

                “North wind and blizzard morning at 3:30 and dark”  “20 miles due west of Point Romanof, Pastol Bay”  “Slush ice became so thick that vessel could not be operated and in a few hours she was frozen in fast”  “Frozen in and fast in ice”  “The oil froze in engine and we could do nothing to assist vessel”  “The U S Coast Guard departed from Nome in search of the vessel and after being out two days returned, after running into solid ice”  “A search party was sent out from Saint Michael, Alaska.  Two men were sent to open up wireless station at Kotlik and three men were sent to South Fork of Yukon and they met and assisted us at Pitmatalic by furnishing food and clothing”

                The White Bear had a value of $1,800 and was a total loss with no insurance.  All but $400 worth of the cargo was salvaged.  There was no insurance.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   63 12 N 162 50 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 7 Net, Length 39, Breadth 11.9, Depth 3.7, IHP 60, Built 1917 at Nome, Registered Nome, ON 215628, Master and Owner J P Keikkila of Nome

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty August 8, 1918 at Nome, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1918) Pg 334

WHITE BEAR (1934)     The 27 ton 45 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel White Bear struck a rock and foundered near Killisnoo Island Monday January 1, 1934.  The vessel departed Killisnoo with two persons aboard and was travelling to Hood Bay.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Northwest wind, sea rough”  “Snowstorm”  “Going less than half speed”  “2 ½ miles SE of Killisnoo Island, Alaska”  “Struck a rock and sank”  “Vessel sank in 35 fathoms”  “(assistance rendered by) Al. Frish Boat and 3153”

                The White Bear was a total loss.  The vessel was not carrying cargo.  No lives were lost in the disaster.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 28 15 N 134 36 W   Chart 17320

                Additional Information: Tonnage 27 Gross 18 Net, Length 45.3, Breadth 14.1, Depth, 5.6, Built 1912 at Tacoma WA, HP 30, Registered Juneau, ON 210637, Master Fred Hucker of Hood Bay, Owner Hood Bay Canning Company of Seattle WA

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty February 10, 1934 at Juneau, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1933) Pgs600-1

WHITE CAP (1961)     The 31 ton 44 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel White Cap burned April 25, 1961 near Fox Island in the Aleutians.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   Unknown

                Additional Information: Tonnage 31 Gross 21 Net, Length 44, Breadth 13.5, Depth 7.9, Built 1948 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 165, SL WB7848, Owner William Wesley Bones, Registered Portland OR, ON 255486

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) Pg 612, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1962) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 905

 

WHITE GULL (1983)     The fishing vessel White Gull disappeared with three people on board January 25, 1983 between Pelican and Yakutat.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 57 30 N 136 13 30 W   Chart 17300

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

WHITE STAR (1931)     The halibut schooner White Star exploded and burned off of Tatoosh Island April 23, 1931.  The crew of five was able to row to Neah (Naha) Bay to safety.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 31 N 131 50 W   Chart 17420

                Source: Juneau Empire (April 24, 1931) Pg 8

 

WHITELAW (1898)     The 363 ton 145 foot passenger freight steamer Whitelaw burned while at anchor in Skagway Harbor March 4, 1898.  The vessel was out of San Francisco and in use by the British Steamship and Yukon Gold Dredging Company.  The freight, cargo and machinery were salvaged.  The Whitelaw had a value of $75,000 with cargo and the vessel was a total loss.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   59 27 30 N 135 18 45 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 363.14 Gross 210.46 Net, Length 145, Breadth 32, Depth 12, NHP 75, IHP 250, SL KMQL, Built 1896 at Alameda CA, Registered San Francisco CA, ON 81537

                Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 40, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1897) Pg 304

WHITNEY (1973)     The crab fishing vessel Whitney foundered and sank in rough weather October 17, 1973 approximately 20 miles west southwest of Cape Alitak off of the southwest coast of Kodiak Island.  The vessel settled in 30 fathoms of water.  All crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessel Lourie Lynn.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   56 50 40 N 154 18 W   Chart 16580

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

WICKLOW (1987)     The 28 foot gillnet fishing vessel Wicklow was blown ashore and destroyed by a freak 70 mile an hour wind October 1, 1987 in Astrolabe Bay.  Both crewmembers were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 22 30 N 136 54 30 W   Chart 17300

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

WIDE LOAD (1986)     The bowpicker Wide Load capsized after striking some rocks May 23, 1986 near the Copper River Delta.  The vessel’s towline to the fishing vessel Mary Dee had snapped at ebb tide and the Wide Load washed up on a sand bar.  Both crewmembers were later rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 25 N 145 W   Chart 16013

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

WIDGEON (1964)     The 10 ton 29 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Widgeon was destroyed by a tidal wave March 27, 1964 at Kodiak.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 9 Net, Length 29.4, Breadth 11.7, Depth 3.4, Built 1951 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 145, SL WD7205, Owner Charles H Harmon, Registered Juneau, ON 261975

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 718, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

WILD BILL (1956)     The 8 ton 29 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Wild Bill burned September 17, 1956 in Ernest Sound.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 11 N 132 18 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 6 Net, Length 29.4, Breadth 9.6, Depth 4.3, Built 1928 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 125, SL WE9864, Owner Harold Nosh, Registered Juneau, ON 227411

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) Pg 569, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 779

 

WILD CANARY (1984)     The 28 foot inboard/outboard cabin cruiser Wild Canary sank July 23, 1984 in Chatham Strait north of Port Alexander.  Bellevue, Washington businessman Herbert Clausing, owner and operator of the vessel, was lost in the disaster.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 14 30 N 134 38 50 W   Chart 17320

                Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. The Seattle Times (July 25, 1984) “Search for man is cut back” Pg A 16

 

WILD DOG (1978)     The 18 ton oil screw Wild Dog foundered September 6, 1978 off of Cape Ugak.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   Unknown

                Comment: Probably Cape Ugat.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 18 Gross, Built 1978, ON 593449

                Source: Merchant Vessels of the U S (1979) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2244

 

WILD GAZELLE (1883)     The 114.48 ton wooden cod fishing schooner Wild Gazelle stranded and was lost near Korovin Island at 8:00 p.m. Tuesday September 4, 1883.  The vessel departed San Francisco August 15, 1883 bound for the Shumagin Islands with six crewmen and two passengers aboard.  She was carrying a 100 ton cargo of salt, provisions and a fishing outfit valued at $3,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed in San Francisco:

                “Darkness, thick fog, strong current”  “Suddenly calm, moderate swell, very dark”  “Entered Gorman Strait about 5 p.m. with good breeze and light fog.  At 6 p.m. wind died out and thick fog set in.  Strong tide and set of seas put vessel to leeward, and she went ashore as above”  “Stranded”  “Unknown reef on Koronsky (Korovin) Island”  “Good lookouts kept, all hands on deck.  Lead kept going”  “A fishing schooner and two hunting boats landed a portion of cargo”  “Total loss”

                The Wild Gazelle had a value of $8,000 which was a total loss.  Part of her cargo was salvaged in damaged condition and sold for $300.  The vessel was insured for $7,000.  Her cargo was insured for $2,000.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   55 26 N 160 15 W   Charts 16011, 16553

                Additional Information: Tonnage 114.48, Built 1866 at Kennebunk ME, Registered San Francisco CA, ON 26745, SL JBGV, Master Henry A Cobb of San Francisco, Owner Mrs. Christy A McCollum of San Francisco

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report October 2, 1883 at San Francisco by George Tashena, Agent

WILDWOOD (1889)     The 1,056.09 ton 199 foot wooden bark Wildwood stranded and was lost in the Nushagak River at 8 p.m. Friday August 9, 1889.  The vessel departed San Francisco April 17, 1889 bound for Nushagak, Bristol Bay, Alaska with 21 crewmen aboard.  She was departing the area with the summers catch from the cannery when the disaster occurred.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed at San Francisco:

                “2 miles south of Harkanock, Alaska”  “Stranding”  “Shoal water”  “Calm, clear, daylight”  “Anchors dropped”  “total loss”

                The Wildwood had a value of $20,000 and was a total loss.  The cargo of 990 tons of canned salmon had a value of $151,000 of which $76,000 was lost.  The vessel was insured for $12,500 and her cargo for $151,000.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 03 N 158 23 W   Charts 16006, 16322

                Additional Information: Tonnage 1,056.09, Length 198.8, Breadth 40, Depth 20.8, Built 1871 at Port Madison WA, SL JKVP, Registered San Francisco CA, ON 80214, Master E L Colson of San Francisco, Owner Bristol Bay Canning Company of San Francisco

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report July 7, 1890 by W B Bradford, Managing Owner

WILL H ISOM (1902)     The 983 ton 184 foot steam stern wheel paddle wheeler Will H Isom was forced ashore with two barges in tow and lost at Point Romanof August 20, 1902.  The vessel, the barges and cargo were all a total loss.  The vessel was valued at $35,000 with cargo at the time of the loss.  The hulk of the Will H Isom ended up at Saint Michael where it rotted on the beach.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   63 12 N 162 50 W   Chart 16006

                Comment: I have charted this wreck at Point Romanof as there still may be evidence of the wreck on site and of interest.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 983 Gross 619 Net, Length 183.8, Breadth 36.5, Depth 5.6, Service inland passenger, Crew 30, Built 1901 at Ballard WA, Registered Seattle, ON 81758

                Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 84, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1902) Pg 318

WILHAUL TOO            (1990)     The 92 foot steel fish tender Wilhaul Too sank in heavy seas while traveling with a hole in her hull September 14, 1990 in Ugashik Bay.  All seven crewmembers were rescued by the vessel Mizuho Ace.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 35 N 157 42 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: ON 612535, Year Built 1979

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

WILLARD AINSWORTH (1899)     The 42 ton 64 foot wooden schooner Willard Ainsworth washed ashore in a gale and was lost on Chamisso Island at 2:00 a.m. Sunday July 2, 1899.  The vessel departed Port Clarence July 9, 1898 bound for Kotzebue Sound with 10 crewmen on board.  The only cargo was 4 tons of coal worth $40.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by Bern Olsen, master of the Willard Ainsworth:

                “Kotzebue Sound, Chamisso Island”  “Stranded on Island”  “Had vessel ashore to avoid ice in winter.  When we launched her, she was driven ashore and disabled by SE gale which broke keel and stem”  “Strong SE gale, daylight, heavy swell.  She was driven ashore on hard beach”  “Had all anchors and cables out but gale drove vessel ashore”  “2 or 3 men living on the island rendered what help they could”  “Vessel is laying on beach and I believe a total loss”

                The Willard Ainsworth had a value of $4,000 and was a total loss.  Her cargo of coal was salvaged.  Neither the vessel nor her cargo was insured.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska 66 13 N 161 50 W   Chart 16005

                Additional Information: Tonnage 42 Gross 40 Net, Length 63.8, Breadth 18.3, Depth 6.7, Built 1892 at Seattle WA, Registered Portland OR, ON 81362, Master Bern’t Olsen of Portland OR, Owner Artic Trading and Mining Company of Portland OR

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report November 16, 1899 at Portland, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1899) Pg 191

WILLARD B (1948)     The 64 ton 73 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Willard B stranded and was lost August 29, 1948 in Lisianski Strait two miles north of Pelican City.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 57 30 N 136 13 30 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: Tonnage 64 Gross 44 Net, Length 73.3, Breadth 17.8, Depth 7.3, Built 1913 at Port Blakely WA, Crew 7, Horsepower 150, SL WLEO, Owner Hans Peterson, Registered Seattle WA, ON 210982

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1950) Pg 588, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1951) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 939

 

WILLIAM AND JOHN (1905)     The schooner William and John became a total loss at Cape Saint Elias in 1905.  The vessel was valued at $2,000 with cargo at the time of the loss.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   59 54 N 144 36 W   Charts 16016, 16723

                Sources: 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 115, 2. Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route (1916) Pg 32

WILLIAM BAYLIES (1908)     The 380 ton 118 foot steam screw whaling bark William Baylies was crushed in the ice and lost off Aniva Bay, Siberia, May 15, 1908.  The vessel carried a crew of 43.  No lives were lost.  The vessel was valued at $50,000 with cargo at the time of the loss.

                Mapping and Location: Siberia

                Addititonal Information : Tonnage 380 Gross 291 Net, Length 118.5, Breadth 28, Depth 16.5, Built 1886 at Bath ME, SL KDMJ, Registered New Bedford MA, ON 81128

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1907) Pg 212, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1908) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 383, 3. Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route (1916) Pg 33

WILLIAM BURNETT (1955)     The 20 ton 48 foot wooden gas screw William Burnett was consumed by fire April 22, 1955 in Koffman Cove.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 01 N 132 50 W   Chart 17360

                Comment: Must be Coffman Cove.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 20 Gross 14 Net, Length 48.6, Breadth 14.1, Depth 4.3, Built 1927 at Seattle WA, Service tow, Horsepower 200, SL WC2755, Owner William H Bessner, Registered Bellingham WA, ON 226831

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) Pg 558, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 745

 

WILLIAM H ALLEN (1878)     The 157 ton brig William H Allen was stove in by ice and sank at Cape Smyth August 2, 1878.  The vessel was out of Honolulu on an Arctic trading voyage.

                Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   71 17 35 N 156 47 15 W   Chart 16003

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

WILLIAM LEWIS (1891)     The 463 ton 134 foot steam bark William Lewis stranded and was lost at Point Barrow at 7 o’clock p.m. Saturday October 3, 1891.  The vessel departed San Francisco December 20, 1890 on an Arctic Ocean whaling voyage with 45 crewmen.  Her cargo at the time of the disaster was 26,000 pounds of whale oil and bone valued at $30,000.  The William Lewis had a value of $50,000.  The vessel ran ashore in a gale and snowstorm, piling up on a snow covered sand spit at Point Barrow.  The captain mistook the spit for slush ice.  The crew and most of the cargo were rescued by the steamers Belvedere and Navarch.  On March 20, 1892 the William Lewis was accidently burned by salvers.  The vessel was insured for $30,000.  The cargo had no insurance; all but $5,000 worth was salvaged.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   71 23 29 N 156 28 30 W   Chart 16003

                Additional Information: Tonnage 463 Gross 332.24 Net, Length 134, Breadth 30, Depth 16.5, NHP 250, Built 1888 at Bath ME, SL KFHW, Registered New Bedford MA, ON 81194, Master Albert C Sherman of New Bedford, Owner William Lewis of New Bedford

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report December 16, 1891 at New Bedford MA by William Lewis per Agent, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

WILLIAM ROTCH (1871)     The 290 ton wooden bark William Rotch was lost in the ice around Point Barrow September 14, 1871.  She was forced ashore by ice and abandoned south of Wainwright Inlet.  The William Rotch was out of New Bedford, Massachusetts on a whaling voyage.  Her last port was Honolulu.  Her value at the time of the disaster was $43,000.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Northern Alaska   70 36 N 160 W   Chart 16005

                Sources: 1. Harper’s Weekly (December 2, 1871) “Destruction of the Arctic Whaling Fleet”, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

WILMA G (1944)     The 8 ton 29 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Wilma G foundered in 1944 off Montague Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 10 N 147 15 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 6 Net, Length 29.6, Breadth 9.3, Depth 4, Built 1931 at Cordova, Horsepower 116, Owner Louis J Anderson, Registered Juneau, ON 242582

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1945) Pg 354, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1946) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 807

 

WINABOB (1954)     The 22 ton 39 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Winabob foundered July 10, 1954 southwest of Kalgin Island in Cook Inlet.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 28 N 151 55 W   Chart 16660

                Additional Information: Tonnage 22 Gross 15 Net, Length 39.6, Breadth 12.2, Depth 7, Built 1947 at Tacoma WA, Horsepower 110, SL WD4289, Owner Ted R Bristow, Registered Juneau, ON 252658

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) Pg 562, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 745

 

WIND DANCE (1977)     The sailing vessel Wind Dance sank off of the coast of Seward October 14, 1977.  The Alaska Marine Highway Ferry Tustamena assisted those aboard the Wind Dance.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 06 30 N 149 26 30 W   Chart 16680

                Source : BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

WIND SONG (1990)     The 50 foot fiberglass crab fishing vessel Wind Song grounded and was lost September 16, 1990 on Wingham Island.  All four crewmembers were hoisted onto a U S Coast Guard Helicopter.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 01 N 144 23 W   Chart 16013

                Additional Information: ON 544272, Built 1972

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

WINDBIRD (1964)     The 11 ton 37 foot wooden gas screw yacht Windbird was reported lost at Kodiak in the Good Friday earthquake of March 27, 1964.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 10 Net, Length 37.3, Breadth 11.4, Depth 5.9, Built 1939 at Doty WA, Horsepower 23, Owner A Holmes Johnson, Registered Juneau, ON 263667

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Wreck List, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 722

 

WINDSONG (1991)     The 33 foot fishing vessel Windsong went adrift, flooded and sank June 5, 1991 west of Cape Spencer.  All three crewmembers were rescued from a life raft.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 12 45 N 136 39 30 W   Chart 17300

                Additional Information: ON 684488

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

WINDWARD (1999)     The 41 foot wooden longline halibut fishing vessel Windward struck a rock, flooded and sank May 17, 1999 in Nichols Bay, 50 miles southwest of Ketchikan.  Both crewmembers donned survival suits and abandoned ship to a life raft.  They were rescued by a U S Coast Guard Helicopter and transported to Ketchikan.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 41 30 N 132 04 45 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: ON 274279

                Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

WINDY BAY (2001)     The 166 foot fish tender Windy Bay struck Olsen Rock while her operator was off of the bridge and sank in 1000 feet of water August 4, 2001 near Olsen Island in Prince William Sound.  All five crewmembers were rescued by vessels who responded to their distress.  The wreck site is only six miles west of where the fishing vessel Vanguard sank only days before.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 52 15 N 147 33 30 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: ON 917066

                Source: A D E C Incident Report (August 4, 2001) “F/V Windy Bay

 

WINDY SEA (1987)     The 32 foot seiner/crabber/longliner Windy Sea sank December 31, 1987 off of Kodiak.  The crew abandoned ship.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 47 20 N 152 24 10 W   Chart 16580

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

WINDY SEA (1988)     The 32 foot vessel Windy Sea sank August 8, 1988 near Spruce Island.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 55 N 152 25 W   Chart 16580

                Source: Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak)

 

WINGFOOT (1964)     The 8 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Wingfoot was consumed by fire March 23, 1964 at Aarons Creek.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 21 N 131 59 W   Chart 17360

                Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 6 Net, Length 30.3, Breadth 9.2, Depth 4.7, Built 1924 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 105, SL WC7714, Owner Edgar E Duncan, Registered Wrangell, ON 223843

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1964) Pg 723, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1006

 

WINIFRED (1895)     The 15 ton wooden schooner Winifred stranded and was lost toward Cape Fairweather from Lituya Bay in November of 1895.  Hans N Jenson of Sitka, master and owner of the Winifred, died in the mountains while trying to make his way to Sitka.  The Winifred had a value of $400.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   58 48 30 N 137 56 45 W   Chart 16016

                Comment: This vessel is missing from merchant vessel lists after 1875.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 15 Gross 14.45 Net, Built 1869, Registered Sitka, ON 80072

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report November 18, 1895 at Sitka by George Moore Acting Coll., 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1875) Pg 351

WINIFRED (1947)     The 13 ton 37 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Winifred was consumed by fire June 14, 1947 at Uganik.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 46 N 153 24 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 10 Net, Length 37, Breadth 12.8, Depth 3.9, Built 1917 at Anacortes WA, Horsepower 20, Owner Uganik Fisheries Inc., Registered Juneau, ON 214768

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1948) Pg 562, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1949) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 912

 

WINNIE (1913)     The 12 ton 40 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Winnie stranded near Metlakatla November 9, 1913.  The vessel had departed Metlakatla with two persons aboard.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by Charles Brendible, master and owner of the Winnie:

                “On island 1 1/3 miles west of Metlakatla”  “Stranded”  “Anchor lines being out”  “Dark stormy night and rough seas”  “The casualty happened sometime in the night unknown to any one, therefore no measures could be taken to avoid the casualty”

                The Winnie was only seven months old and had an estimated value of $2,800.  Damage to the vessel was reported as “not less than $500”.  There was no insurance.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 07 45 N 131 34 30 W   Chart 17420

                Comment: This vessel was salvaged and put back into service.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 9 Net, Length 40, Breadth 11.7, Depth 3.5, IHP 20, Built 1913 at Metlakatla, Registered Ketchikan, ON 211057, Master and owner Charles Bendible of Metlakatla

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report November 20, 1913 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1913) Pg 328

WINNIE (1926)     The gas screw Winnie was lost June 20, 1926 at Excursion Inlet.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 25 N 135 26 W   Chart 17300

                Comment: This is probably the 12 ton 40 foot Winnie first wrecked in 1913 at Metlakatla.  WG

                Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

WINTERHAWK (1990)     The 95 foot fishing vessel Winterhawk flooded from the bow and sank November 25, 1990 in a severe storm in the Bering Sea.  All five crewmembers were rescued from a life raft.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   Unknown

                Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

WINTERWIND (1981)     The 43 foot fishing vessel Winterwind began taking on water, floated into the towline of a barge and sank when the barge ran her over August 7, 1981 ten miles off of Clam Gulch in Cook Inlet.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 14 30 N 151 24 W   Chart 16640

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

WINTHROP (1909)     The 14 ton 37 foot wooden gas screw Winthrop stranded and was lost on Nunivak Island October 31, 1909.  The vessel departed Saint Michael October 17, 1909 with two crewmen aboard bound for Nelson Island.  They were carrying a 20 ton cargo of general merchandise valued at $2,500.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report submitted by I Albert Lee, master and owner of the Winthrop:

                “High wind and ice, stormy”  “Nunivak Island, Alaska”  “Stranding”  “Adverse winds”  “Anchors put overboard, but vessel drifted ashore”

                The Winthrop had a value of $2,500 and was a total loss along with her cargo.  There was no insurance.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Westcentral Alaska   60 N 166 W   Chart 16006

                Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 9 Net, Length 36.9, Breadth 12.5, Depth 4.4, Built 1903 at Saint Michael, Service freight, Registered Saint Michael, ON 200280, Master and owner I Albert Lee of Saint Michael

                Source: U S Customs Wreck Report July 19, 1910 at Saint Michael

WIZARD (1952)     The 60 ton 65 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Wizard stranded and was lost July 22, 1952 on Fossil Beach between Narrow Cape and Pasagshak Beach in Uyak Bay, Kodiak Island.  The vessel was later pulled off of the beach using 55 gallon drums below deck to keep her afloat.  While being towed back to Kodiak, the deck gave way and the vessel sunk near the outer buoy of Womans Bay.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   57 43 N 152 31 W   Chart 16580

                Additional Information: Tonnage 60 Gross 49 Net, Length 65.6, Breadth 16.8, Depth 8.6, Built 1924 at Seattle WA, Crew 11, Horsepower 110, Owner Kory A Kakdestad, Registered Seattle, ON 223599

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1952) Pg 612, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1953-1954) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 747, 3. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

WOLCOTT (1900)     The 247 ton 131 foot wooden steam schooner Wolcott stranded and was lost near Rocky Point at 10:50 p.m. Wednesday January 31, 1900.  The vessel departed Unga January 29, 1900 bound for Sitka with 17 crewmen and 7 passengers aboard.  The Wolcott was carrying about 70 pounds of gold bullion valued at $13,357.26.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “Rocky Point, 7 miles WSW from Uyak Bay, Kodiak Island, Alaska”  “Struck a sunken rock”  “Out of reckoning”  “Strong NE at times, clear, heavy swell at times, at night, star light”  “After vessel struck, was obliged to run on beach”

                The Wolcott had a value of $15,000 and was a total loss.  The gold bullion and all those aboard made it to safety.  The vessel had insurance in the amount of $12,500.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska 57 40 15 N 154 11 45 W   Chart 16598

                Comment: The Wolcott was formerly the USRC Oliver Wolcott.  The reef where the Wolcott struck now bears her name.  The 55 foot wooden steamer Uyak stranded and was lost on the same reef in September of 1909.  Others followed.  WG

                Additional Information: Tonnage 247 Gross 148 Net, Length 131.5, Breadth 23.5, Depth 14.3, Built 1873 at San Francisco CA, Registered San Francisco, ON 81558, Master S F Snow of Alameda CA, Owner Pacific Steam Whaling Company of San Francisco

                Sources: 1. U S Customs Wreck Report at San Francisco, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1899) Pg 307

 

WONDER GIRL (1959)     The 16 ton 35 foot steel gas screw fishing vessel Wonder Girl foundered August 26, 1959 near False Pass.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   54 51 15 N 163 24 20 W   Chart 16011

                Additional Information: Tonnage 16 Gross 11 Net, Length 35, Breadth 12.3, Depth 4.7, Built 1948 at Perth Amboy NJ, Horsepower 82, SL WJ9947, Owner Carl E Moses, Registered Juneau, ON 276537

                Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 606, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1960) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 826

 

WOOD DUCK  (1981)     The trawler Wood Duck sank February 13, 1981 in the area of Union Bay.  One person was lost in the disaster.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 46 N 132 13 W   Chart 17420

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

WORDEN (1943)     The 341 foot Navy destroyer Worden struck a pinnacle and sank January 12, 1943 south of Kirilof Point on Amchitka Island.  The vessel was shoved by the current onto a pinnacle which punctured her hull and flooded the engine room.  Powerless the destroyer began breaking up on the rocky shore.  14 of 189 crewmembers perished in the 20 foot seas and 36 degree waters while attempting to abandon ship.

                Mapping and Location: Southwest Alaska   51 25 15 N 179 17 50 E   Charts 16012, 16440

                Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

WTB CO NO 7 (1937)     Fire destroyed the 488 ton 91 foot wooden scow WTB Co No 7 near Olga Straits at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday June 22, 1937.  The vessel was travelling from Appleton Cove to Olga Straits with one person aboard.  Her cargo was 5 tons of cans, crab traps and rope valued at $1,400.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Light westerly wind”  “Vessel destroyed by fire”  “Faulty stove pipe”  “Unable to do anything”  “Total loss”  “Assistance offered by Dave Hallick of Sitka, Alaska”

                The WTB Co No 7 had a value of $3,000 and was a total loss along with all cargo.  Neither was insured.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 11 N 135 27 W Chart 17320

Additional Information: Tonnage 488, Length 91, Breadth 34.6, Depth 7.6, Built 1910 at Seattle WA, Owner John P Nyquist of Seattle, Registered Juneau, ON 164293

Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty June 23, 1927 at Sitka by C L Durgan, Caretaker, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1936) Pgs 828-9

WTB CO NO 33 (1927)     The 733 ton 160 foot wooden scow WTB Co No 33 was blown ashore and lost near Wards Cove at 11:30 p.m. Saturday March 5, 1927.  The vessel was at anchor with no one aboard.  The following are statements taken from the casualty report filed at Juneau:

                “High wind”  “Cove near Wards Cove, Alaska”  “Vessel moored for winter between four pile dolphins which apparently were weakened by being eaten by teredos”  “Blown ashore”  “High wind carried dolphins away allowing vessel to drift ashore”  “TOTAL LOSS”

                The WTB Co No 33 had a value of $7,000 which was a total loss without insurance.  There was no cargo aboard.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 23 30 N 131 44 30 W   Chart 17420

                Additional Information: Tonnage 733, Length 160, Breadth 36.8, Depth 7, Built 1902 at Port Blakely WA, Service freight, Registered Juneau, ON 48693, Master A Wood of Seattle, Owner Libby McNeil & Libby of Taku Harbor

                Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty March 30, 1927 by C E Thies, Agent of Owner, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1926) Pgs 754-5

WTB CO NO 35 (1926)     The barge WTB Co No 35 was wrecked at Cape Hinchinbrook April 25, 1926.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 14 N 146 39 W   Chart 16700

                Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 375

WTB CO NO 55 (1926)     The 458 ton 153 foot wooden scow WTB Co No 55 parted her tow line and was washed ashore near Cape Hinchinbrook at 2:30 p.m. April 25, 1926.  The vessel had a 300 ton cargo of machinery, boilers, etc. valued at $100,000.  She had departed Seattle April 8, 1926 bound for Port Hobron on Kodiak Island being towed by the tug Forest T Crosby.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “6 miles north Cape Hinchinbrook, Alaska”  “Heavy north east gale caused two line to part.  Barge went ashore and broke up”  “About 80 miles (wind), heavy seas”  “Fair weather in morning; gale came suddenly.  Glass showed no indication”  “Tow line parted in heavy gale”  “No boats near, Tug Forest T Crosby had difficulty making shelter after the accident”  “Tug Forest T Crosby was towing barge WTB Co No 55 from Seattle to Port Hobron, Kodiak Island.  Barge loaded with machinery, etc., belonging to the North Pacific Sea Products Company”  “WTB Co No 55 and cargo Total Loss”

                The WTB Co No 55 had a value of $5,000.  The vessel and her cargo were a total loss.  The barge was not insured, but her cargo was insured for $55,000.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 14 N 146 39 W   Chart 16700

                Additional Information: Tonnage 458, Length 153, Breadth 39, Depth 9.9, Built 1915 at Portland OR, Registered Seattle WA, ON 167054, Master J E Peterson of Seattle, Owner Washington Tug & Barge Company of Seattle

                Sources: 1. U S C G Report of Casualty May 31, 1926 at Seattle by J C Brownfield, Manager, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1925) Pgs 748-9

WTB CO NO 58 (1926)    The barge WTB Co No 58 was wrecked at Cape Hinchinbrook April 25, 1926.

Mapping and Location: South Central Alaska   60 14 N 146 39 W   Chart 16700

Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 375

2 Responses to Alaska Shipwrecks (W)

  1. Bryce Donich says:

    Hello I recently fond a ship wreck on Big Fort Island it loos like it has been there since the 80’s if not longer it is called the Willapa Bay I would like to know the history behind it if possible no worries if you cant find anything thanks

    • captaingood says:

      The picture on the cover of my book on Amazon is from the same area, I think. Pete Thompson, a Kodiak fisherman, took the picture and thought it was from the southeast coast of Afognak in Izhut Bay. I haven’t seen anything about the Willapaw Bay but will look around some more and see if anything turns up. More information may help. Sometimes the name you see is the home port and not the actual vessel name. Also sometimes people rename vessels and fail to register the new name. There is usually an official number on the back of the last bulkhead before the transom on the stern of the vessel. It is usually in the lazarette if you have access to the wreck. You can shine a flashlight forward from the lazarette hatch and the number is usually there. Also I might have more luck if I knew whether the vessel is wood or steel and what the rough length is. Another possibility is that the vessel drifted in from outside of Alaska. I will check newspaper records from the past 30 or 40 years and see if anything turns up. If you want to email me a picture, that would be a help too. Thanks for your comment.

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