South Central Alaska Shipwrecks ( L )

L J PERRY (1904)     The 41 ton 77 foot wooden steamer L J Perry was blown onto the beach and lost at 10:30 a.m. Sunday October 23, 1904.  The vessel had departed “Catella” October 16, 1904 with five crewmen aboard bound for Kayak.  Their cargo consisted of 21 tons of general merchandise worth $2,000.  The following are statements made by T D Corlew of “Catella”, owner and master of the L J Perry:

                “Blown on beach on Kayak Island.”  “Wind blowing from 60 to 80 miles an hour, daylight.”  “Put out third anchor and run ahead full speed for 6 hours before striking the beach.  Nothing broke.”  “All boats in harbor came ashore as the Perry did.  Nothing could live in it.  There was no possible show to save her from going ashore as I had out 3 anchors and no ropes or chains broke and she could not steam against the wind if I had have cut the anchor lines.”

                Corlew lists the value of the L J Perry at $1,500, a total loss with no insurance on the vessel.  Much of the cargo was salvaged, and the $800 worth that was lost was insured.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 59 45 N 144 22 10 W  Chart 16723

                Comment : From Katalla to Kayak both villages now abandoned.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 41, Length 77, Breadth 16.6, Depth 5.1, Built 1875 Port Gamble WA, Registered Valdez, ON 140117

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report filed November 1, 1904

 

LAURA MAY (1901)     The 234 ton 122 foot three masted wooden schooner Laura May stranded in the Kvishak River in Bristol Bay at 12 midnight Monday August 12, 1901.  The vessel was being towed by the steamer Fram and had a cargo of 800 barrels or 90 tons of salted salmon worth $4,800.  The Laura May had departed San Francisco April 18, 1901 bound for Bristol Bay with a crew of 23.  Peter Johnson of Alameda is listed as master.  The crew escaped to safety and the cargo was salvaged.  The Laura May, valued at $6,000 became a total loss with no insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  58 N 158 W  Chart 16006

                Comment : Long and Lat come from Wreck Report and are probably not correct as this would put the wreck well outside of the river in deep water. WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 234, Length 121.6, Breadth 32.6, Depth 9.5, Built 1876 Coos Bay Oregon, Owner Ferdinand Gee M.O. of Oakland

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report filed by Peter Johnson, Master October 11, 1901

 

LENA (1912)     Two crewmen were lost December 7, 1912 when the launch Lena was lost between Galena and Jack Bays off of Grassy Island.  The captain was rescued.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 55 20 N 147 37 W  Chart 16707

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

LESNOY (1904)     The 8 ton wooden schooner Lesnoy wrecked at Wosnesenski Island  in the Shumagin Islands at 10:30 p.m. December 27, 1904.  The vessel had departed Pirate Cove December 25, 1904 bound for Pauloff Bay with 2 aboard.  John E Jackson of Pauloff Bay was the master and owner of the vessel and recounted the following in the wreck report:

                “Total wreck…NW. end Wossnessiuski Island (Shumagin Island) Alaska…Stranding…NW Gale, being also iced up…Hurricane, dark…Impossible to have been avoided.”  “Would have foundered at sea if had not drifted ashore.”

                Mapping and Location  : Southcentral Alaska  55 11 N 161 22 W  Chart 16011

                Additional Information : Tonnage 8 Gross 7 Net, Length 35, Breadth 9.8, Depth 3.8, Built 1892 Karluk, Registered Kodiak, ON 141254, Vessel Value $700, Insurance none

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report filed July 1, 1907

 

LETTIE (1902)      The schooner Lettie was lost at Port Moller April 21, 1902.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  55 59 30 N 160 34 30 W  Chart 16363

                Source : The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 84

 

LIBBY (1932)     The 8 ton wooden gas screw Libby broke loose from her moorings in a storm and foundered at 9 a.m. Sunday August 7, 1932 near Ekuk.  No one was aboard at the time.  F Swensson, General Superintendent for owners Libby, McNeill and Libby gave the following accounting in the casualty report:

            “Vessel was placed at mooring in Nushagak River outside of Libby, McNeill & Libby Ekuk Cannery August 5, 1932.  A heavy southeast storm came up during the night and vessel broached to on the ebb tide and foundered.”  “On account of heavy wind and sea no assistance could be rendered.”

                The Libby was valued at $4,000 with no cargo and was listed as a total loss.  She was insured for $2,000.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  58 49 N 158 33 30 W  Charts 16006&16322

                Additional Information : Tonnage 8 Gross 5 Net, Age 21 years, Registered Seattle, ON 208464, Master P J Hansen of Seattle

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed in Seattle September 30, 1932

 

LIBBY MCNEILL & LIBBY No 2 (1935)     The 28 ton scow Libby McNeill & Libby No 2 was driven ashore and broke up at 2:00 a.m. Friday August 2, 1935.  The following are statements from the casualty report filed by F Swenson, General Superintendant for the owners:

                “East Foreland, Cook Inlet…Stranding.”  “Heavy southwest gale…40 Southwest wind…Vessel was anchored.”  “Vessel was anchored at Salamato Beach, Cook Inlet, Alaska, awaiting to receive salmon from Salamato salmon trap when gale sprung up and vessel drifted to the beach at East Foreland, stranded and was pounded to pieces by the heavy seas.”

                The No 2 was valued at $1,800 at the time of the tragedy and was fully insured.  She had Departed Kenai August 1, 1935 bound for Salamato.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 43 N 151 24 W  Chart 16660

                Additional Information : Tonnage 28, Age 23 years, Registered Seattle, ON 164756, Owners Libby McNeil & Libby of Seattle

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty September 4, 1935 at Seattle

 

LIBBY MCNEILL & LIBBY No 9 (1932)     The 14 ton wooden scow Libby McNeil & Libby No 9 was washed ashore in a gale and lost at 6:00 a.m. August 3, 1932 on Salamato Beach in Cook Inlet.  The following are comments from the casualty report filed by F Swanson, General Superintendant for the Owners:

                “Salamato Beach, Cook Inlet, Alaska…Stranding.”  “Heavy SW gale…40 Southwest gale heavy sea morning…Vessel was anchored…Mooring broke.”  “Vessel was anchored in vicinity of Salamato salmon fish trap when heavy S.W. gale struck vessel and broke the mooring causing the vessel to go on beach where it was pounded by heavy seas and resulted in total loss.”

                The No 9 was valued at $924 at the time of the loss and had no insurance.  Her last port was Kenai with a destination of Salamato.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 37 15 N 151 20 30 W  Chart 16660                              

                Comment : Salamatof Tanaina Indian Village now abandoned.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 14.12 Net, Age 20 years, Registered Seattle, ON 165168, Owner Libby McNeil & Libby of Seattle, Master D W Branch

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty October 25, 1932 filed at Seattle

 

LINA K (1924)     The 10 ton gas screw Lina K was consumed by fire while out of commission at Aiaktalik Island at 9:00 p.m. November 26, 1924.  No one was aboard at the time of the casualty.  The vessel was owned and operated by Matrona Kaguyak of Aiaktalik and valued at $3,000.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  56 42 N 154 03 W  Chart 16580

                Additional Information : Tonnage 10 Gross 7 Net, Age 14 years, Registered Seward, ON 207692, Insurance none

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty December 30, 1924 at Kodiak

 

LINCOLN (1896)     The two masted schooner Lincoln departed Seattle March 7, 1896 with a party of miners bound for Cook Inlet and was never seen again.  A severe storm was reported in the Gulf of Alaska the first week of April by the vessels Bertha and William J Bryant which almost succumbed to the hurricane force weather.  It is presumed that the Lincoln was overcome by the same storm.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska Unknown

                Sources : 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg7, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

LINEA L (1909)     The 13 ton 37 foot wooden schooner Linea L foundered on the beach at Portage Bay at 7:00 p.m. October 9, 1909.  A strong NE gale was given as the cause of the casualty by master and owner Nels Peterson of Kodiak.  The Linea L had left Kodiak  August 6th bound for “Arkerprin Bay” with 3 crewmen on board.  The crew made it to safety and assistance was rendered by the natives at Portage Bay.  The Linea L was a total loss and had a value of $1,500.  There was no cargo and no insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska 57 30 N 156 02 N  Chart 16570 & 16013

                Comment : Arkerprin Bay destination probably Agripina Bay just to the SW.  May be the wreck marked on Chart 16013 in Portage Bay on west side beach. WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 13 Net, Built 1907 Kodiak, Length 36.6, Breadth 12.3, Depth 4.0, Registered Kodiak, ON 203934

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report of November 20, 1909 by Nels Peterson

 

LITTLE GLORY (1937)     The 50 ton wooden gas screw Little Glory ran aground in the dark and foundered in False Pass at 2:30 a.m. August 17, 1937.  The vessel departed Naknek August 14th at 6:00 a.m. bound for King Cove.  There were nine crewmen aboard including master E R Simpson of Seattle and no cargo.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Heavy southwest wind, dark night.”  “False Pass, St Catherine’s Cove, Alaska…foundering.”  “Darkness, ran aground…Had no opportunity to salvage because of the pounding of the sea.  P E Marris Co,’s boat Gas Screw Bobby (assisted) but was unable to accomplish anything towards saving the vessel because of her breaking up.”  “I was unable to file a report until reaching Bellingham.”

                The Little Glory had a reported value of $5,000 which was a total loss.  She was insured for $4194.13.  All nine crewmen survived.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska 55 01 N 163 30 W  Chart 16535

                Additional Information : Tonnage 50 Gross 40 Net, Built 1912, Registered Seattle, ON 209959, Owner Pacific American Fisheries of Bellingham Washington,

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty September 7, 1937 by Simpson at Bellingham

 

LIZZIE WILLIAMS (1889)     The 790 ton 159 foot wooden bark Lizzie Williams struck a shoal and was lost on Tugidak Island at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday April 22, 1889.  The vessel departed San Francisco March 28, 1889 bound for Kodiak Island.  She was carrying 82 passengers, 14 crewmen and a 1,100 ton cannery outfit and supplies worth $57,000.  75 of the passengers were Chinese cannery workers.  The steamers Al-Ki and Elsie aided in the rescue of passengers and crew, all who survived.  The Lizzie Williams, worth $16,000 and her valuable cargo were total losses.  Conditions at the time were a five mile an hour wind, moderate weather, a heavy sea and daylight.  Some of the cargo was recovered.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  56 30 N 154 40 W  Chart 16580

                Additional Information : Tonnage 790, Length 159.4, Breadth 33.5, Depth 20.2, Built 1868 Portland ME, Registered San Francisco, ON 15519, Master T G Cushman of San Francisco, Owner Kodiak Packing Co of San Francisco, Vessel Insurance $14,000, Cargo Insurance $56, 195

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report filed at San Francisco by Cushman July 11, 1889

 

LOOKOUT (1886)     The 67 ton 80 foot wooden schooner Lookout stranded and was lost after going ashore on Sanak Island in a thick fog at 11:00 p.m. Thursday June 3, 1886.  There was a watch on deck of the Lookout with a moderate breeze and thick fog when the tragedy occurred.  The vessel had departed San Francisco May 1, 1886 on a hunting voyage to the North Pacific with 15 crewmen aboard.  The crew made it to safety, but the Lookout, valued at $9,000 was a total loss.  She had no cargo aboard. 

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  54 25 N 162 40 W  Chart 16520

                Comment : There is a shipwreck marked on the chart on the rocks just south of Sanak Is. as well as a Lookout Point on Caton Island just to the east.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 66.71, Length 80.1, Breadth 18.5, Depth 8.3, Built 1884 San Francisco, Registered San Francisco, ON 140731, Master Peter Faggney, Owners Peter Faggney and Jno. W Dollard of San Francisco, Vessel Insurance $4,500

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report August 12, 1886 at San Francisco by Dollard

 

LOUISA DOWNS (1868)     The 11 ton schooner Louisa Downs drifted into Dry Bay November 22, 1868 went ashore and wrecked.  Her masts had been cut away in a gale to save the vessel.  The Louisa Downs had departed Sitka October 13, 1868 bound for Hoonah, other villages of Icy Strait, Cross Sound and the Gulf of Alaska on a hunting and trading expedition.  She had three crewmen and a cargo of trade goods and furs.  After the wreck, the crew of the Louisa Downs found canoes at a deserted Native village in Dry Bay.  They loaded their furs and trade goods in them and made their way west to another Native village, arriving on December 7, 1868.  There the local Natives confiscated their possessions but took care of the three through the winter.  In the spring they were transported to Cross Sound, arriving in Sitka June 23, 1869. 

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 08 N 138 25 W  Chart 16016

                Sources : 1. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1961) Pg 170, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

LOUISIANA (1939)     The 33 ton gas screw fishing vessel Louisiana stranded and was lost at the head of Pavlof Bay at 3:00 p.m. Wednesday July 19, 1939.  The vessel struck a reef at the head of Pavlof Bay as they were leaving for King Cove.  Conditions were a gentle easterly breeze and fog.  The five aboard made it to safety, but the Louisiana was a total loss.  The gas screw Umala tried to pull the Louisiana off of the reef but was unable.  Several attempts were made to float the vessel but weather and tide conditions did not permit salvage operations.  Axel Samuelson, owner and master of the Louisiana wrote the vessel off as a total loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska 55 20 N 161 38 W  Chart 16551

                Additional Information : Tonnage 33, Age 24 years, Registered Ketchikan, ON 213146, Vessel Value $2,000, Cargo none, Vessel Insurance none

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty February 3, 1940 at Ketchikan by Samuelson

 

LUCILE (1908)     The full rigged 1,402 ton 200 foot wooden ship Lucile broke a pin in a mooring swivel and drifted onto the sand spit at the entrance to the Ugashik River at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday August 19, 1908.  The vessel was in port about to sail for San Francisco when the disaster occurred.  There were 70 crew and 80 Japanese cannery laborers aboard.  The Lucile was laden with 1557 tons of canned and salt salmon valued at $160,000.  The vessel was valued at $20,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed in San Francisco:

                “Sand spit entrance of Ugashik River.  Moorings carried away; drifted ashore.”  “Pin in mooring swivel broke.  Strong wind, sea smooth at time of swivel breaking.”  “Set sails. S.S. Lehem came to assistance, and towed on ship for about 4 hours.  But wind increased to a gale, and tide running 6’ per hour with same direction of wind caused ship to go higher up on sand flat.”  “As the tide was rising, nothing xould be done, the rise and fall of the tide being about 18 feet at mouth of river where vessel lies.”

                The Lucile and her cargo were reported as total losses.  The crew and passengers survived.  Insurance on the vessel was $2,500 and her cargo $100,000.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 30 N 157 37 W  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 1402 Gross 1297 Net, Built 1874 Freeport ME, Length 200, Breadth 40, Depth 23.9, Registration San Francisco, ON 140031, Master J P McInnis of San Francisco, Owner Frank B Peterson of San Francisco

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report September 11, 1911 by Owners

 

LUELLA (1869)     The schooner Luella was driven ashore during a gale and lost in May 10, 1869.  The vessel departed Sitka March 28 got caught in a gale and capsized.  She was driven ashore and completely wrecked in the Barren Islands.  The vessel was owned by Costello and Malowinski of Victoria. 

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  67 48 N 152 15 W  Chart 16606

                Sources : 1. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1961) Pg 180, 2. BOEMRE Shipwreck Database (2011)

 

 

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