South Central Alaska Shipwrecks ( A )

 

ACTIVE  (1892)     On Wednesday, August 31, 1892, at 4 a.m., the American schooner Active became a total loss in Marosco Bay, Cold Harbor.  She departed Sand Point July 9th on a hunting and fishing venture, with her owner operator George Ball at the helm.  None of her crew of eight were lost, but the vessel, valued at $2,000, and a 20 ton fishing and hunting outfit, also valued at $2,000 were.  The stormy weather which produced a strong gale and rough seas, combined with the darkness of the hour are listed as the cause of the stranding.  The casualty was reported at the San Francisco Collection District on October 25th by George Ball.

                Mapping and Location :  Southcentral Alaska  54 59 N 162 28 W  Chart 16540, 16549

                Comment:  This is possibly Cold Bay which was called Morozovski Bay on early charts

                Additional Information : Tonnage 14.3, Length 41.2, Breadth 15.5, Depth 4.2, Built Bolinas, CA 1862, Construction wood, Registration San Francisco, ON 1191, Insurance none.

                Source : H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966), Pg 330

AGRAM (1923)     On October 12, 1923 at 8:45 am the American wooden gas screw cannery tender Agram was washed ashore and became a total wreck on a beach between Chinik Bay and Amakdedori Native Village.  She had been anchored in 10 fathoms of water with her captain, A K Thompson of Tacoma and two other crew aboard with “a very high sea running together with worst wind and storm ever witnessed in Cook Inlet.”  The following are also excerpts from the accident report filed at Juneau on February 15, 1924: 

“Wind, high seas, rain and sleet.  Constant sounding all night, anchored in 10 fathoms of water, line broke, put second anchor out (250#) also broke away and drifted on beach.”  “This storm seems to be the worst that any living natives in Alaska know anything about.  The native village of Amukadorey was entirely wiped out of existence, and the oldest residents say that nothing like this was ever heard of before, and that they think that there is not a gas boat in Alaska that would have withstood this storm.”

The vessel was valued at $8,000 at the time of the wreck, but only insured for $4,000.  There was no cargo.  H W McCurdy reports that “Her crew and passengers reached shore where they subsisted on clams and porcupines until a rescue vessel reached them.”

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska 59 16 N 154 07 W  Chart 16648

                Additional Information : Tonnage 22 Gross 18 Net, Built 1913, Registration Juneau, ON 211812, Owner Cook Inlet Packing Company, Last Port Seldovia October 11th 12:30 am, Destination Iniskine Bay.

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report, 2. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 344.

 

AHRNKLINT (1922)     On Thursday September 14, 1922 at 5:30 p.m. the wooden gas screw Ahrnklint lost power while heading out of the Acqua (?) River and stranded in bad weather becoming a total loss.  The accident occurred about one half mile west of the river entrance during a strong easterly wind.  Not only was the vessel, valued at $8,000 lost, but her cargo of 13,800 pounds of salmon, valued at $200 was lost as well.  The captain, a Mr. Megeard of Arlington, Washington tried to head the vessel clear of the beach but had lost steerage along with the engines.  An accident report was filed on November 22, 1922 at Collection District 30, Seattle, Washington, by F. Svensson for Libby McNeill and Libby, the owners.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 54 N 139 35 W  Chart 16761

                Comments : There is no Acqua or Aqua River, but there is an Agua Dulce Stream two miles east of Point Latouche, approximate to the vessel’s destination, which is where I have mapped this wreck site. WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 64 Gross 33 Net, Age 12 years, Registration Seattle, O.N. 207391, Destination Yakutat, Crew 4, Vessel insurance $8,000, Cargo insurance none.

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report 2. Dictionary of Alaska Place Names (1967) Pg 51

 

ALASKA (1928)     On February 19, 1928 at 4:30 a.m. the American wood schooner Alaska became disoriented in the fog, stranded on a reef between Kaguyak and the Geese Islands on the south end of Kodiak Island and became a total loss.  She had left her home port of Ketchikan on February 13 bound for sea fisheries with 10 crew and no cargo, except for $200 worth of bait and ice.  Her Master, Conrad Patterson of Seattle, along with the other 9 crew aboard made it to safety.  The vessel, valued at $28,000, was lost.  A wreck report was filed at Collection District 31 Port of Ketchikan by the vessel’s Master on May 7, 1928

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  56 45 N 153 45 W  Chart 16580

                Additional Information : Tonnage 67 Gross 54 Net, Power Diesel, Built 1913 Seattle, ON 211016

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ALBATROSS (1892)     At 6:30 on the morning of August 20, 1892, while trying to enter Lituya Bay in bad weather, the wood schooner Albatross went on the rocks and broke up.  She was carrying two crew and five tons of provisions and stores (valued at $800) bound for Lituya Bay.  According to the wreck report filed at Sitka on October 15, 1892 by her master and owner, Eric Anland of Juneau, “very strong ebb tide and failure of wind at critical time…fine breeze and fine weather…good daylight but this being a difficult harbor to make and the wind dying out at the time, we had to choose between the beach or drifting in the breakers.”

                “Crew walked to Yakutat and was taken to Sitka by mail steamer Salmo.”

                The vessel left Juneau on August 13, 1892 and wrecked inside Harbor Point, Lituya Bay.  The damage to the vessel (valued at $800) is reported as total, but the damage to the cargo is listed as only $100 of the $800 worth on board.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  58 37 N 137 39 W  Chart 16762

                Additional Information : Tonnage 7.22 Gross 6.8 Net, Length 31.1, Breadth 11, Depth 3.4, Built 1884 Seattle, Registration Juneau, ON 106317

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ALBERT WALKER (1893)     On Saturday September 23, 1893 the American wood schooner Albert Walker of 44 tons burden left Kodiak, Alaska bound for Lange Island, but at 5:00 p.m. “missed stays and drifted on the rocks”, at “NNE point several miles from Kodiak.”  In the wreck report filed by the co-owner, Julius Christiansen, remarks as follows:

                “At 5:00 p.m. wind became light, vessel missed staid, striking the rocks and carrying away rudder and centerboard.  Lowered the anchors and run out kedge.  Heavy swells.  At 8:00 p.m. vessel was unsafe to remain by and all hands left her.”

                The vessel’s value was listed as $4,400 with no cargo and 8 tons ballast.

                Mapping and location : Southcentral Alaska  57 50 N 152 20 W  Chart 16580

                Comment : Lange Island mentioned is probably Long Island just northeast of Kodiak. WG

                Additional Information : Vessel rebuilt in 1883, Registration San Francisco March 25, 1891, ON 94, Master Charles Avery of Kodiak, Owners Julius & Lawrence Christiansen, Crew 5, Loss total, Insurance $4,000.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ALDEN (1938)     On Monday October 24, 1938 during a 60 mile an hour gale eight miles west of Dry Bay, Alaska and eight miles offshore, the clutch of the wooden oil screw Alden became disabled and the vessel became adrift with her master, Tom Thompson of Seattle and seven other crew aboard.  They had left Thumb Bay on October 21, and were traveling south for Seattle with the gas screw Christine when the incident occurred.  The following are remarks from the wreck report filed by Tom Thompson on October 25, 1938:

                “After clutch became disabled, batteries tipped over and it was impossible to get steerage way; Christine unable to tow vessel Alden in weather prevailing.”

                “60 mile gale, heavy choppy sea, breakers washing over vessel, disabled in trough of sea.”

                “…Christine took off crew; when last seen Alden was drifting toward beach.”

                The report indicates that there was no cargo aboard, but the vessel herself, worth $15,000, was a total loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 07 N 139 W  Chart 16760

                Additional Information : Tonnage 47 Gross 36 Net, Built 1926, Registration Cordova, ON 225644, Owner Alden Boat Co. Latouche, Alaska.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ALECTO (1922)     At 2:00 a.m. on September 29, 1922 on a trip from Juneau to Seldovia, the diesel screw launch Alecto experienced engine trouble due to water in her fuel tank and stranded ¼ mile west of Ocean Cape Light near Yakutat.  The one person aboard made it to safety, but the cargo of three tons of merchandise and oil (valued at $450) was a total loss.  The vessel herself (valued at $1,100) was only a $625 loss as the engine was salvaged after the stranding and breakup.  The following are remarks from the wreck report filed November 11, 1922 at Seldovia by her master and owner:

                “Ocean Cape near Yakutat, Alaska about 1:30 a.m. oil in tank I was running on gave out.  I turned on oil from another tank but engine quit running…too much water in tank…boat drifted about fifteen minutes then I put anchor over with 12 fathoms of line and on bottom vessel drifted about fifteen minutes more while I was below decks trying to get water out of tank so as to start engine.  When brought up on her anchor, line parted and vessel went ashore stern first at nearly low tide.  Three days later on October 2 engine was saved after vessel pounded over rocks for about 1/8 of a mile, by help of Billy Gray and some natives of Yakutat.”

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 33 N 139 50 W  Chart 16760

                Additional Information : Vessel Construction wood sloop, Tonnage 8.92 Gross 6 Net, Age 29 years, Registration Juneau, ON 197137, Owner T.O. Perry of Seldovia, Master same, Last sailing Juneau September 24, 1922.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ALEUTIAN (1929)     At 5:29 a.m. May 26, 1929 the American Steamship Aleutian struck a rock in mid channel off of the south end of Amook Island in Uyak Bay and sank.  One crew, rumored to have gone below deck to retrieve his good luck horseshoe, was lost.  The vessel (valued at one million dollars) was a total loss, as was her cargo of 115 tons of general merchandise and three cars of copper ore.  The 39 passengers and remaining 114 crew were rescued.  The following are statements from the wreck report filed July 29, 1929 at Collection District 10, New York, by the Mechanical Superintendent of the Alaska Steamship Company, the owners:

                “Struck rock in mid channel off south end of Amook Island, Uyak Bay, and sank.”

                “Small gas boat took a few of the passengers to Larson Bay where cannery tender was employed to go back to scene of wreck and take all others to Larson Bay.”

                “Vessel struck rock…going about 14 knots.  Filled very rapidly and sank in between seven and ten minutes.  Everybody was taken off with the exception of one member of crew who went back to his room and was never seen again.”

                “USS Surveyer came to Larson Bay and took all survivors to Seward, Alaska.”

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 25 30 N 153 50 30 W  Chart 16580

                Comments : This wreck has recently been located and dive tours are being offered.

                Additional Information : Tonnage 5708 Gross 3510 Net, Built 1898, Registration New York, ON 96435, Master J G Nord of Seattle, Last Port Zachar Bay, Destination Uyak Bay.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

                Photo : 1928 Postcard Menu

 

 

 

ALEXANDER (1892)     At 3:30 a.m. Tuesday April 12, 1892 the American whaling brig. Alexander stranded on a reef on the NW end of Saint Paul in the Pribiloff Islands.  The wreck is reported to have happened on a breezy, thick, heavy, dark night due to a miscalculation in tides.  The vessel (valued at $21,000) had no cargo as it was outbound from Honolulu on a whaling voyage, having departed March 17, 1892 with 29 crew aboard.  “All were saved, but being destitute were cared for by the Northern Commercial Company until removed to Unalaska by Revenue Cutter Bear.”

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 10 N 170 25 W  Chart 16011

                Additional Information : Tonnage 128.88, Built 1886 at Cambridge Maryland, Registration San Francisco, ON 106416, Master W T Shorey of San Francisco, Owner John A Magee of San Francisco, Length 87 feet, Breadth 25 feet, Depth 10 feet.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ALEXANDER (1906)     On August 18, 1906 the steam whaling bark Alexander was wrecked at Chugak while bound for a whaling voyage.  She was built in New York in 1855 as the Astoria and previously operated under Russian ownership in the North Pacific prior to the purchase of Alaska by the United States.

Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  58 40 N 152 30 W

                Comment : Safeguard the Gateways maps this wreck at Shuyak Island which is where I have mapped it.

                Additional Information : Tonnage 294, Owner Liebes and Co.

                Sources : 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pgs 128-9, 2. Safeguard the Gateways of Alaska (1918)

 

ALEXANDER (1925)     On the night of December 1, 1925 during a severe storm at Seldovia, the vessel Alexander drug anchor and became a total loss.  The master and owner, J R Smith of Seldovia and one other crewman aboard escaped unharmed.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 26 N 151 42 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 13 Gross, Age 15 years, Registration Seattle, ON 204301, Vessel value $1,000, Cargo none.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report filed at Seattle by H W Achison on October 21, 1926

 

ALEXANDRA (1897)     At 1:00 p.m. on December 22, 1897 during a stormy NW gale the American wood schooner Alexandra drug anchor and became a total loss.  The casualty occurred at Goose Island (one of the Geese Islands at the SW end of Kodiak Island) where the vessel had been out of commission for two years.  The three crew responsible for the vessel escaped without injury.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  56 42 N 154 07 W

                Comments : H W McCurdy has this wreck listed the same day the same place one year later with 10 men lost.  Goose Island is more commonly called Iaiktalik.

                Additional Information : Tonnage 7.66, Registration Kodiak, ON 106422, Owner and Master A C Brown of Kodiak, Value $800, Length 35.6, Breadth 11.3, Depth 4.1, Built 1886 at Kodiak.

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report 2. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 41

 

ALFE (1929)     At about 1:00 a.m. on March 6, 1929 the gas screw Alfe broke her moorings at Steve Gee anchorage in Yakutat Bay and was a total wreck when found the following morning.  J Frank Wright of Anacortes, Washington, who filed the wreck report in Seattle on October 21 of the same year, says the vessel was scheduled to sail the day of March 6th with Jens Hansen as master and four other crew, bound for Dry Bay.  The casualty is reported to have happened at Point Carrew, Yakutat Bay completely destroying the $3,000 vessel.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 33 30 N 139 50 15 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 11 Gross 9 Net, Age 11 years, Registration Seattle, ON 216439, Insurance $2,000, Cargo none.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ALICE (1894)     At 3:00 a.m. on July 10, 1894 the wooden schooner rigged vessel Alice parted her hawser in a heavy south westerly sea and drifted ashore at Anchor Point.  The master and crew of the schooner Ettie assisted the three crew of the Alice, but she became a total loss none the less.  She had departed Sitka, with her master John D Boland of Seattle at the helm, on June 13th bound for Cook Inlet with a stop at Kodiak.  No lives were lost but the vessel, valued at $1,200, was.  There was no cargo on board at the time.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 46 45 N 151 49 50 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 13.2, Built 1888 Seattle, Registration Sitka, ON 106576, Owner George W Torrey, Length 34.5, Breadth 13.3, Depth 4.9

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ALICE (1936)     In 1936 the 31 ton fishing steamer Alice burned while on the ways at Bristol Bay and became a total loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska

                Source : The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 449

 

ALICE B (1929)     In March of 1929 the halibut schooner Alice B was driven ashore at West Bay and lost.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska 60 54 N 146 47 W

                Comment : The only West Bay listed in the Dictionary of Alaska Place Names is West Bay Cove, which is where I have mapped this wreck. WG

                Sources : 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 403 2. Dictionary of Alaska Place Names (1967) Pg 1034

 

ALICE COOK (1931)     At 1:00 in the morning on Tuesday November 17, 1931 the American wood schooner Alice Cook caught fire outside Johnstone Point in Prince William Sound and became a total loss. The vessel with her crew of nine men was on a fishing trip, and was reported to be travelling from Sawmill Bay to Cordova when fire broke out.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed at Cordova on November 18 by her master, P Kruse of Seattle:

                “Fire…thought to have been caused by short in electrical system.”

                “Investigated at once and found fire too far advanced to be able to check.  Unable to get to pumps.  Tender Francis came along side to assist with pumps to no avail.  Vessel was then beached and crew taken aboard Francis and brought to Cordova, Alaska.”

                “Tender and crews stood by wreck until they had made sure that the hulk would not drift out to sea and thereby becoming a menace to navigation.  Two anchors now holding remaining portion to the beach.”

                The vessel valued at $10,000 and her 250 ton cargo of fishing gear, salt fish, salt, and supplies, valued at $12,000 were both a total loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 28 N 146 37 W

                Comments : H W McCurdy mentions this wreck happening in Cook Inlet while the vessel was being used as a fish saltery. WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 782 Gross722 Net, Age 40 years, Registration Cordova, ON 106899, Owner Kalgin Packing Co of Cordova, Vessel Insurance $5,000, Cargo Insurance $12,000

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report 2. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 412

 

ALICE M (1904)     During December of 1904, while on a trip from Juneau to Kayak, the wood schooner Alice M ran on a sand bar in the dark of the night during a southeast gale and was lost.  Her master, D E Wallace of Juneau, was attempting to run behind Kanuck Island for safety when the casualty occurred.  The three passengers and three crew escaped to safety, but the vessel, valued at $350, and the 11 tons of merchandise aboard, valued at about $1,000, were lost.  After the persons aboard had reached safety, …”the tide took the boat to sea and it sunk.”

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 08 N 144 21 W

                Comment : There is no Kanuck Island but Kanak Island in Controller Bay fits the location given in the wreck report as approximate to Kayak, and is reasonably good anchorage during a southeasterly gale. WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 13, Built 1892 in Port Angeles Washington, Registration Juneau, ON 106992, Owners William Crocker and John Davidson of Kayak, Length 45.3, Breadth 12.5, Depth 4.4

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report 2. Dictionary of Alaska Place Names (1967) Pgs 492&504

 

ALLEN A (1919)     On the morning of April 3, 1919, while moored at Baranoff, Unga Island, the three masted schooner Allen A broke her lines during a hurricane and was thrown 30 feet up on the beach, becoming a constructive total loss.  What cargo was aboard was discharged except for salt which accounted for an additional $900 loss.  The schooner at the time was valued at $20,000 according to A Greenbaum of Alaska Codfish Company, the managing owner, who filed the accident report at San Francisco on June 17.

Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  55 14 30 N 160 32 55 W

                Comments : According to H W McCurdy, the Allen A “…was sold following her stranding in Alaskan waters and rebuilt by Liebes & Company of San Francisco as the whaling and fur trading vessel Fox.”

                Additional Information : Tonnage 342 Gross 266 Net, Age 31 years, Registration San Francisco, ON 106521, Master Louis Hanson of San Francisco, Last sailing November 2, 1918 from San Francisco, Crew 9.

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.

 

ALOHA (1901)     In 1901 the steamer Aloha became a total loss at the S.E. tip of Hinchinbrook Island.  The vessel was 445 Gross tons, 216 Net tons and valued at $50,000. 

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 13 N 146 40 W

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaska Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

ALPHA (1889)     At 6:00 pm on August 31, 1889 the wood schooner Alpha lost her bulwarks and stanchions five miles east of Cape Fairweather in a 70 mile an hour wind and was beached at Yakutat.  She had departed Yakutat on the 17th of August and was bound for Sitka with nine passengers and five crew and a cargo of furs and seal skins.  The damage to the vessel, valued at $1,500, was said to be $600, and the damage to the two tons of cargo, valued at $1,400, was reported to be $300.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed on September 17, 1889 by her master, Charles Hamill of Providence, R.I.:

                “5 miles east of Cape Fairweather….loss of bulwarks and stanchions….on port side by heavy sea, also some ropes and canoe.”

                “Wind 70 miles per hour, heavy rain, and dark cloudy weather.  Vessel hove to on port tack under a close reefed mainsail, wind S.E. with a heavy confused sea.”

                “Schooner shipping considerable water, gale lasting from August 31 at 6 a.m. until August 31 at 6 p.m.  Put back to Yakatut and remained until September 5 when Revenue Cutter Rush took our passengers and crew, and Captain Shepard took a look at the schooner and we concluded to beach her., as it would be impossible to tow her to Sitka.  Put all of the cargo on board the Rush.”

                According to Shipwrecks of the Alaska Shelf and Shore, “On September 5, 1890, the Active left Sitka with new sails and rigging for the Alpha.  The Active encountered a gale and went ashore and returned to Sitka without ever reaching the Alpha.”

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 33 N 139 44 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 26.28, Built 1867 at Westport Oregon, Registration Sitka, ON 105761, Owner Jeff J Kuchun of Sitka, Length 52.6, Breadth 18.4, Depth 4.6.

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaska Shelf and Shore (1992) Pg 17

 

ALPHA (1919)     It was reported on June 30, 1919 by O W Anderson, cashier for Alaska Seafood Company that the American gas screw Alpha foundered at the point north of the Alaska Seafood Cannery in a severe storm in the spring of 1919.  The following is an excerpt from the wreck report:

                “This vessel is now owned and operated by the Alaska Sea Food Co., who took over the assets of the Old Alaska Sea Food Company and in its wrecked condition was among the other assets.  This boat has been in a wrecked condition since the spring of 1917, until the spring of 1919, when it was overhauled and made seaworthy again.  According to all information available, this boat was anchored and no one on it at the time it was wrecked.”

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 33 N 145 45 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 9 Gross 7 Net, Built 1911, Registration Cordova and Juneau, ON 209042, Master Wm Fogelstedt of Cordova, Vessel Value $3,000, Vessel Damage $1,500

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ALTA (1907)     On November 28, 1907 the wood sloop Alta was forced ashore by ice at Smoky Point in the entrance to Ugashik Bay.  The following is a recollection by her master and owner, A Grosvold of Sand Point, found in the accident report filed June 27, 1908:

                “…left by master to an anchor in lagoon at Ugashik.  During the night a pack of ice came down and screwed her up on the beach and crushed her cabin in, and there was no show to get anything out of her before this spring.  Now there is nothing left of her.  Her documents were aboard and certificate was lost along with the vessel.”

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 36 45 N 157 41 15 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 5.5, Age 11 years, Registration Juneau, ON 107290, Vessel value $650, Cargo ballast.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ALTON (1898)     On May 27, 1898 the 84 ton schooner Alton was lost in a gale near the mouth of Cook Inlet.  She was leaving Cook Inlet bound for Tacoma with a crew of five.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska 59 05 N 152 10 W

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaska Shelf and Shore (1992) Pg 21

 

ANGLO SAXON (1905)     On November 4, 1905 the wood gas screw steamer Anglo Saxon stranded at Chiniak on Kodiak Island and the two men on board were lost. 

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 37 N 152 10 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 14 Gross 9 Net, Length 46, Breadth 11, Depth 4.1, Built 1900 at New Whatcomb Washington, Service Inland Towing, Home Port Port Townsend Washington, ON 107566

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ANITA (1898)     The steamer Anita was reported lost during 1898 in Cook Inlet and was valued at $1,000 with cargo.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  59 05 N 152 30 W

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaska Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

ANNA (1901)     At 6:30 in the morning on Sunday March 3, 1901 the American schooner Anna was blown ashore and wrecked during a strong northeasterly storm at Company Harbor on the western end of Sannak Island.  Harry Huhs, the vessel’s master, reported the winds at daybreak were at about 70 miles an hour, and even with two anchors out he was unable to prevent the vessel from drifting ashore.  The Anna had departed Unga on February 9th with a crew of 8, and at the time of the casualty had 180 tons of codfish aboard, valued at $20,000.  All crew were saved, but the vessel, valued at $12,000 and her cargo were a total loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  54 29 N 162 49 W

                Comments : H W McCurdy has this wreck in 1902, and says “The two masted codfishing schooner Anna, built in San Francisco in 1881 for Honolulu trade of J D Spreckels and operated in the Bering Sea fishery since 1898, was wrecked on the fishing grounds, a total loss of $18,000.

                Additional Information : Tonnage 227, Built 1881 in San Francisco, Registration San Francisco, ON 105987, Owner Pacific Marine Supply of San Francisco, Insurance $9,000, Length 117, Breadth 29.5, Depth 10.6.

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 84

 

ANNIE MAY (1895)     The wood launch Annie May became a total loss including $1,300 worth of cargo in 1895 at Cape Karluk.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  57 35 10 N 154 30 50 W

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaska Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

ARMERIA (1912)     In the middle of May, 1920,  the 1,502 ton United States Lighthouse Service Tender Armeria became stranded on the rocks near Cape Hinchinbrook.  She was attempting to rescue the barge Haydn Brown but ended up a casualty herself.  The crew of 36 were rescued by the steamer Admiral Sampson.  The vessel, valued at $344,000, became a total loss.  Some of the $70,000 cargo of coal, buoys and supplies for area lighthouses was salvaged.

Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 14 N 146 39 W

                Comment : It is reported that divers have discovered this wreck.

                Sources : 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 211  2. Safeguard the Gateways of Alaska (1918) Map.

 

ARNOLD (1915)     On July 31, 1915 the gas screw fishing boat Arnold was reported a total loss at Anchorage.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  61 13 05 N 149 53 30 W

                Source : The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 258

 

ASTROLABE yawl (1786)     During the voyage of exploration and scientific circumnavigation of the globe by French explorer LaPerouse in the vessels Astrolabe and Boussole, a small yawl was launched and subsequently lost with 11 crew at the mouth of Lituya Bay along the NE coast of the Gulf of Alaska in 1786.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  58 36 45 N 137 39 30 W

                Source : Shipwrecks and Disasters at Sea (1856)

 

AVOS (1808)     The Russian Company tender Avos was lost in 1808 in Bay of Islands on her way from  Kodiak to Sitka.

                Mapping and Location : Southcentral Alaska  60 24 N 147 37 W

                Comments : I have mapped this wreck at Bay of Isles on Knight Island because out of the several possibilities for “Bay of Islands”, this anchorage is one commonly used as a safe haven by small vessels during storms in the Gulf of Alaska and the Avos was travelling between Kodiak and Sitka through the area.  There is good holding ground in the south and west arms but caution is required to enter because of many rocks and pinnacles.  It didn’t get its official name until 100 years after this casualty occurred but locals called it the Bay of Islands or Bay of Isles for many years.

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaska Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

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