South East Alaska Shipwrecks ( M )

MABEL A (1920)     The 32 ton gas screw fishing vessel Mabel A stranded and was lost at 7:00 a.m. Monday December 13, 1920 near “Noise Island”.  The vessel departed Ketchikan with three crewmen aboard bound for deep sea fisheries and had accumulated 2.5 tons of fish worth $700.  The engine of the Mabel A broke down during a “50 mile gale” allowing the vessel to wash onto an exposed part of “Noise Island”.  The gas screw Todd II stood by and got a line aboard, but that parted.  The Mabel A was reported to have broken up within two hours.  She was valued at $8,000.  The crew made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 30 N 133 40 W  Chart 17400

                Comment : Noise Island probably Noyes Island.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 32, Age 8 years, Registered Seattle, ON 209932, Master A Jensen of Paulsbo WA, Owner H C Hansen of Ballard WA, Vessel Insurance $4,000, Cargo insurance none

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty December 29, 1920 at Seattle by Jensen

 

MAGNHEL (1920)     The 9 ton single masted gas screw fishing vessel Maghnel broke a shaft and stranded at Cora Point on Coronation Island at 10 a.m. Friday March 5, 1920.  The vessel was pushed ashore by heavy NE weather.  They had departed Ketchikan the day before with a crew of three to work along the fishing bank of Coronation Island.  The master of the Magnhel, A Lindset of Seattle, made the following statements in his casualty report:

                “N.E. wind…Put out 2 anchors and rode 24 hours, when same dragged our cables parted, and vessel was washed ashore.  Crew went ashore after vessel was anchored.”  “On March 7, Ga.s. My Fancy passing was signaled and took master and crew to Shakan.”  “All ships papers were lost including manifest of vessel cleared for deep sea on March 4, 1920 from Ketchikan.” 

                The Magnhel was valued at $4,000 and became a total loss with no insurance.  She was owned by her master, A Lindset and his partner L Skogsaas.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 54 10 N 134 47 15 W  Chart 17400

                Additional Information : Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Built 1917, Registered Tacoma, ON 215118

                Source : USCG Report of Casualty March 14, 1920 at Wrangell by Lindset

 

MARGARET (1874)     The U S transport schooner Margaret was driven ashore in a heavy snowstorm near the village of Kake March 2, 1874.  The vessel departed Sitka February 16, 1874 with captain Harrison at the helm bound for the San Juan Islands of Washington.  All three crewmen found safety, but the Margaret was lost and her cargo pillaged by Natives.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  56 58 30 N 133 56 30 W  Chart 17368

                Sources : 1. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1961) Pg 222, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MARGARET (1937)     An explosion and fire destroyed the 9 ton wooden gas screw Margaret at the General Petroleum Dock at Ketchikan at 10:30 a.m. July 11, 1937.  The five crewmen escaped to safety, but the Margaret, valued at $4,000 was a total loss.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Calm, cloudy…smooth”  “Had filled starboard tank with 130 gallons of gas and had shifted to port tank and was about to take gas in that tank when an explosion occurred in port tank.  The explosion shattered port tank and caused gas to run out into bilge.  The engine room and pilot house caught afire immediately.  Attempted to put out fire, but fire could not be controlled.  Vessel was moved from oil dock and beached on Pennock Is. where she sank in about 10 or 15 ft. of water – with about 4 or 5 ft. of her mast visible above lower water.”  “Casualty occurred suddenly without warning – impossible to take measures to avoid it.”

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska 55 20 30 N 131 38 45 W  Chart 17428

                Additional Information : Tonnage 9 Net, Age 13 years, Registered Ketchikan, ON 224608, Master Charles Ryan of Metlakatla, Owner Amanda Ryan of Metlakatla

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty July 12, 1937 by Charles Ryan

 

MARIE (1919)     The gas screw Marie was lost September 25, 1919 at Sister Island.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  54 52 15 N 131 17 15 W  Chart 17434

                Comment : Could be a different Sister Island than the one I charted.  WG

                Sources : 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 312, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MARIECHEN (1906)     The 2521 ton 290 foot steel German steam ship Mariechen struck a rock I a snowstorm January 25, 1906 in False Bay, Chatham Straits.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “Disabled Dec. 25, 1905, deadlight in coal bunker sprung open, adrift until Jan. 25, 1906.”  “Unable to see on account of snow storm and lack of steam.”  “Struck rock in snowstorm.”  “No charts of this coast, compass frozen up”

                The Mariechen departed Seattle December 19, 1905 bound for Vladivostock, East Siberia.  She had a crew of 50 and a cargo of 5,000 tons of general merchandise worth $100,000.  The vessel herself was worth $250,000.  At the time the wreck report was filed by Rudolph Heldt, master of the Mariechen, the damage to the vessel and cargo had not been ascertained.  Later reports have the vessel salvaged and towed back to Seattle. 

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  57 58 N 134 55 W  Chart 17300

                Comment : Though the Mariechen may have been salvaged, there may be other evidence of this wreck on site.  That is why it is included in this compilation.”  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 2521, Length 289.6, Breadth 44.3, Depth 25.2, Built 1885 at Liverpool, England, Registered Hamburg Germany, ON 2521, Master Rudolph Heldt of Kiel Germany, Owner M Jabsen of Hamburg, Insurance unknown at the time of report

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report February 1, 1906, 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pgs 125&135

 

MARINA (1903)     The 5 ton 30 foot wooden sloop Marina struck a rock and was lost at 7:00 p.m. February 4, 1903.  Owner of the Marina, James Gordon and five passengers had departed Killisnoo and were bound for Hoonah when the disaster occurred.  They were loaded with $250 worth of camp supplies and potatoes.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “Wind strong, dark.”  “Stranded on a reef.”  “Probably Fisheries Point. (Chatham Strait) Alaska.”  “The vessel struck a rock; all goods were moved ashore.  Men went on board to wait for tide to rise.  Only one was seen again who spoke only a few words and died.”

                Lost were owner James Gordon, Grant Kadotk and Jim Teenduo.  The wreck report was signed by William M Carle, Minister of Gospel.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  57 47 30 N 134 42 35 W  Chart 17320

                Comment : Fishery Point is on the route that the vessel was taking.  Some wreck reports spell the vessel Mariana.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 5, Length 30, Breadth 8.5, Depth 3.0, Built 1891 at Tacoma WA, Registered Juneau, ON 92344, Insurance unknown

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report March 6, 1903 at Juneau

 

MARIPOSA (1917)     The 3158 ton Alaska Steamship Company steamer Mariposa struck a reef near Point Baker and was lost November 18, 1917.  The vessel was carrying 25,000 cases of salmon and 1,200 tons of copper ore as well as 265 passengers.  She had departed Anchorage and recently stopped at Shakan to load canned salmon.  It was shortly after her departure at 3:00 a.m. from Shakan that the Mariposa ran up on the reef.  The passengers were quickly evacuated.  Among the passengers aboard the Mariposa were shipwrecked crewmen from the Al-Ki, which was lost November 1st southwest of Juneau and shipwrecked crewmen from the Manhattan, which was lost November 15th in the Gulf of Alaska.  There were tensions between the two shipwrecked crews as the Manhattan crew had looted the wreck site of the Al-Ki before the Manhattan sank two weeks later.  Tourists were getting their money’s worth of adventure that the Alaska Steamship Company brochures promised.  They were seeing the wonder of Alaska, getting to mingle with two different shipwrecked Alaskan crews and finally becoming ship wreck victims themselves.  Six hours and 38 minutes after the stranding of the Mariposa, the vessel slid off into the deep carrying the valuable cargos with her.  The crew and passengers were taken aboard the Curacao, Ravalli and Jefferson and transported to safety.  The reef where the disaster occurred has been renamed Mariposa Reef.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  56 22 45 N 133 42 W  Chart 17378

                Sources : 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. Alaska Steam Alaska Geographic Quarterly Vol 11 No 4 (1984) Pg 64

 

MARTHA (1938)     The 11 ton wooden gas screw fishing vessel Martha foundered in Chilkat Inlet at 12:30 p.m. August 3, 1938.  Master George Kasko of Haines and one deck hand were aboard when the disaster occurred.  Their cargo was 36,000 pounds of fresh salmon.  The following are quotes from the casualty report:

                “Chilkat Inlet, 3 miles south of Letnikof Cove.”  “Force of wind strong; weather bad with heavy sea running; daylight.”  “Foundered…unable to stand strain of heavy seas.”  “Boat foundered suddenly; crew unable to take any measures to avoid casualty.”

                The Martha was valued at $2,000 and her cargo $1,500.  Vessel and cargo were listed as total losses with no insurance.  The two crewmen made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  59 10 40 N 135 24 10 W  Chart

                Additional Information : Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Built 1915, Registered Juneau, ON 213823, Owner Haines Packing Co of Seattle, Last Port Letnikof Cove, Destination Chilkoot Inlet

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty May 25, 1939 at Juneau by E M Brennan of Harris Packing Company

 

MARY (1885)     The 18 ton 48 foot wooden sloop Mary drifted ashore and was wrecked at 8 a.m. Sunday November 22, 1885 on Admiralty Island.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by Charles Green of Juneau, owner and master of the Mary:

                “North point of Admiralty Island, Alaska…Stranded.”  “Had three anchors out…Dragged anchors and drifted ashore…Strong gale and heavy sea.”  “Total wreck”

                The crew of three made it to safety, but the Mary, valued at $100 was lost.  There was neither cargo nor insurance.  The Mary had sailed from Juneau November 19th bound for Admiralty Island.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska 58 24 45 N 134 57 15 W  Chart 17300

                Comment : I charted this wreck at Pt Retreat, the northernmost point on Admiralty Island.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 18.26, Length 48.4, Breadth 14.3, Depth 4.6, Built 1884 at Wrangel, Registered Wrangel, ON 91744

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report November 20, 1886 at Juneau by Charles Green

 

MARY (1926)     The 10 ton wooden gas screw Mary collided with the gas screw Virginia E in Tongass Narrows at 3:00 a.m. Monday September 27, 1926.  She had departed Saxman that day bound for Chomly with four aboard.  The following are excerpts taken from the casualty report filed by Peter McKay, master of the Mary:

                “No wind; clear and calm; moonlight, slight haze.”  “In Tongass Narrows near Channel Is. Light…Collision Ga. S. Virginia E of Ketchikan.”  “Captain of Mary was unable to determine which side to pass Virginia E on.”  “I heard Virginia E blow one whistle but considered I was too close to pass on starboard so answered with two whistles and swung to port.  Both vessels were advancing too rapidly to avoid collision and I hit the Virginia E on the port side.  The bow of the Mary was badly smashed and she began to sink immediately.  The Virginia E put a rope under the Mary to keep her afloat and towed her ashore and then took my crew of three besides myself aboard and brought us to Saxman, Alaska.”

                The Mary was a total loss and had no insurance.  She was valued at $2,000 and with no cargo aboard.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 23 45 N 131 45 45 W  Chart 17428

                Additional Information : Tonnage 10 Gross 8 Net, Built 1913, Registered Ketchikan, ON 211056, Master Peter McKay of Ketchikan, Owner Charles T Johnson of Ketchikan

                Source : U S C G  Report of Casualty September 27, 1926 at Ketchikan

 

MARY G II (1931)     The 34 ton gas screw Mary G II caught fire and was lost on the NE coast of Prince of Wales Island at 10:30 a.m. November 24, 1931.  The vessel departed Ketchikan November 17th, 1931 with two aboard bound for the fishing grounds outside of Prince of Wales Island.  Master and owner of the Mary G II, Otto Bindpage, listed the following information in his casualty report:

                “Near Coffman Island at entrance to Lake Bay, Prince of Wales Island.”  “Raining and sky overcast light SW wind.”  “Caught fire from carbureter back firing.”  “Endeavored to put out fire with extinguishers.”  “Fire occurring in engine room got beyond control, master and crew were forced to take to skiff.”  “Total loss”

                Both Bindpage and his crewman escaped the disaster, but the Mary G II, valued at $10,600, was a total loss.  She was insured for $9,000.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  56 01 45 N 132 50 30 W  Chart 17360

                Additional Information : Tonnage : 34 Gross 23 Net, Built 1919, Registered Ketchikan, ON 218151, Cargo none

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty November 27, 1931 at Ketchikan

 

MARY L (1932)     The 8 ton wooden gas screw Mary L broke up on the beach near Wrangell at 10 p.m. Wednesday February 14, 1932.  The vessel was at anchor in the harbor with no one aboard before the tragedy.  The following are statements from the accident report made by master and owner Manuel Loftus of Wrangell:

                “Strong wind, rough sea, dark.”  “Anchor failed to hold.”  “Stranded on beach within ½ mile of Wrangell, Alaska.”  “No one on board and vessel was ashore and breaking up before the owner knew anything about it.”  “The anchor failed to hold and the vessel was driven on the beach and broken up by the waves.”

                The Mary L was valued at $800 with no cargo and no insurance.  The accident report is dated February 20, 1934.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  56 28 N 132 22 40 W  Chart 17384

                Additional Information : Tonnage 8 Gross 6 Net, Built 1911, Registered Wrangell, ON 232145

                Source : U S C G Report of Casualty February 20, 1934 by Loftus at Wrangell

 

MARY LOUISE (1937)     The 19 ton wooden gas screw Mary Louise was destroyed by a fire at 11:00 a.m. Wednesday May 26th, 1937 in Hidden Inlet.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Hidden Inlet, Alaska…Moderate wind, showers…Boat caught fire from burning buildings.”  “Gasoline, diesel fuel and fuel storage tanks caught fire.  Burning fuel oils flowed from storage tanks under buildings and boat destroying all.”  “Boat caught fire from burning buildings.”  “Destroyed by fire which destroyed cannery building and warehouses.”  “The Mary Louise was standing on a cradle on the beach close by the buildings, low tide, cradle dry.  Vessel had been berthed there all Winter, no captain or master assigned.  Completely destroyed by fire which originated in and around fuel tanks.”  “Complete loss.”

                The Mary Louise was valued at $5,000 and hadn’t been assigned a master.  She had last sailed out of Ketchikan August of 1936.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  54 57 N 130 21 W  Chart 17437

                Comment : Probably the abandoned cannery at Gwent Cove.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 19 Gross 15 Net, Built 1929, Registered Ketchikan, ON 228803, Owner Nakat Packing Corp. at Hidden Inlet, Insurance unknown

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty June 15, 1937 at Ketchikan by L F Ryan, Superintendent for Hidden Inlet Cannery

 

MAY (1919)     The 11 ton wooden gas screw May was forced ashore and lost on Prince of Wales Island at 6 p.m. Saturday December 20, 1919.  The vessel had departed Ketchikan December 7th with only owner and master John Leedy aboard.  He was expecting to return to Ketchikan.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Strong wind…heavy sea…dark night.”  “Lost wheel close shore”  “Wind and tide forced boat in”  “Prince of Wales Island, 2 miles south of Narrow Point.”  “put out anchor was on shore wind.”  “Broken plank and battered by high seas…considered not worth repairs.”

                John Leedy survived the tragedy, but the May, valued at $3,000 was abandoned.  The accident reports that the vessel had no insurance and was a $1,600 loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 47 30 N 132 28 30 W  Chart 17420

                Additional Information : Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Built 1913 at Ketchikan, Registered Juneau, ON 211493, Master and Owner John Leedy of Ketchikan

                Source : U S C G Report of Casualty February 3, 1920 at Wrangell by Leedy

 

MCKINLEY (1928)     The 56 ton diesel screw McKinley foundered near Cape Decision at 2:00 a.m. Saturday March 5, 1928.  The vessel departed Ketchikan February 11, 1928 with 10 crewmen aboard bound for “Sea Fisheries.”  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Spanish Reef Island, opposite Cape Decision.”  “Fog and tidal currents setting vessel off its course.”  “Struck reef and foundered.”  “TOTAL LOSS”

                The crew all made it to safety, but the vessel and her cargo were a total loss.  The McKinley was loaded with 54,000 lbs. of fish valued at $3,500.  The vessel was valued at $28,000.  Insurance on the vessel was $20,000 but there was none on the cargo of fish.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 57 N 134 07 W  Chart 17402

                Additional Information : Tonnage 56 Gross 38 Net, Built 1927, Registered Ketchikan, ON 226236, Master and part owner B Hanson of Ketchikan, Owners B Hanson and O Knutson

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty at Ketchikan by Hanson

 

MERCURY (1898)     The 1050 ton 193 foot wooden ship Mercury stranded in Skagway Harbor at 2 a.m. April 11, 1898.  The vessel had sailed out of Seattle, Washington March 27, 1898 with a crew of 40.  She was carrying 1,500 tons of general merchandise worth $20,000.  The Mercury drug anchor in a 60 mile an hour gale that was “blowing too hard”.  The Mercury was listed with of value $8,000 with $4,000 worth of damage as a result of the stranding.  The report also lists $10,000 worth of cargo lost.  There was no insurance on the Mercury.  The vessel was eventually refloated and put back in service as a barge.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  59 27 30 N 135 18 45 W  Chart 17317

                Additional Information : Tonnage 1050.29, Length 193, Breadth 39, Depth 22.2, Built 1851 at NY NY, Registered Seattle, ON 16948, Master Frank Anderson of Seattle, Owner E E Caine (M.O.) of Seattle, Last Port Seattle March 27, 1898, Destination Skagway

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report July 14, 1898 at Puget Sound by Frank Anderson

 

MEXICO (1897)     The 1,797 ton 275 foot steam powered wooden schooner Mexico struck a rock and foundered in Dixon Entrance at 4:20 a.m. Thursday August 5, 1897.  The vessel departed Sitka at 4:52 a.m. with 70 passengers and 71 crewmen bound for Victoria and ports on Puget Sound.  She was also carrying three tons of general merchandise of unknown value.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed at Willamette:

                “Weather smooth, partly foggy.”  “Struck a rock in Dixons Entrance, Alaska, supposed to be West Devil Rock.  Sunk in 85 fathoms of water in two hours.”  “Got everybody in boats with hand baggage, and landed at Metlakahtla.  From there brought to Puget Sound by str. City of Topeka.”  “Total loss”

                The Mexico was valued at $100,000 at the time of the disaster.  All passengers and crew made it to safety but the vessel and her cargo were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  54 40 N 131 36 W  (West Devil Rock) Chart 17434

                Comment : The 1883 Coast Pilot for Alaska puts West Devil Rock at 54 41.5 N 131 27.5 W  which is substantially East and slightly North of its actual location.  The wreck site is very near the border between Alaska and British Columbia.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 1797 Gross 1340 Net, Length 275, Breadth 26, Depth 20.7, Built 1882 San Francisco, NHP 1,500, Registered Portland OR, ON 91411, Master H C Thomas of San Francisco, Owner Oregon Improvement Co of Portland OR, Vessel Insurance $35,000

                Sources : 1.U S Customs Wreck Report August 26, 1897 by Goodall Perkins & Co General Agents, 2. Pacific Coast Pilot Alaska Part I  (1883) ADDENDA and ERRATA – Dangers in Dixon Entrance and Vicinity Pg 277

 

MIKKIDURA (1927)     The 10 ton wooden auxiliary schooner Mikkidura caught fire at 4:30 a.m. Wednesday July 27, 1927 in Barlow Cove.  The vessel departed Juneau July 26th bound for Lincoln Island via Barlow Cove with two aboard.  Pyrene and seawater were used to attempt to extinguish the blaze.  It was a clear night with calm seas and the Mikkidura had been at anchor all night.  The two aboard escaped to safety, but the vessel became a total loss.  The Mikkidura was valued at $7,000 and had no cargo at the time of the disaster.  The cause of the fire was unknown.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  58 24 N 134 55 W  Chart 17316

                Additional Information : Tonnage 10 Gross 8 Net, Built 1909, Registered Seattle, ON 225878, Master and owner J R Crawford of Juneau, Vessel Insurance $5,000

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty July 29, 1927 by J K Crawford at Juneau

 

MILDRED II (1928)     An engine backfire caused a blaze that destroyed the 45 ton wooden gas screw fishing vessel Mildred II at 7:30 a.m. April 30, 1928 near Turn Point Light.  The vessel departed Ketchikan April 16, 1928 bound for sea fisheries with 6 crewmen aboard.  They had 5,000 lbs of fresh halibut aboard worth $700 when the disaster occurred.  The following are statements from the casualty report:

                “near Turn Point Light, Alaska”  “Easterly wind, rainy”  “Engine back fired…Fire”  “Assistance rendered by Cannery tender Harolda.  Vessel appeared on the scene but could do nothing on account of the gallons of gas being aboard burning vessel which made it dangerous to get too close.”  “TOTAL LOSS”

                The Mildred II, worth $10,000 and her cargo of halibut were lost.  The crew made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  56 59 05 N 132 58 50 W  Chart 17375

                Comment : There are several Turn Point Lights in Southeast Alaska.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 43 Gross 31 Net, Built 1920, Registered Seattle, ON 220046, Master C Svendsen of Seattle, Owner Martin Johnson of Seattle, Insurance unknown

                Source : U S C G Report of Casualty May 2, 1928 by Svendsen at Ketchikan

 

MILLVILLE (1924)     A fire of unknown origin destroyed the 22 ton wooden gas screw Millville December 18, 1924.  The vessel was laid up for winter at Pybus Bay when the disaster occurred.  There was no one aboard and no cargo.  The Millville was valued at $2,000 and had $2,000 worth of insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  57 16 N 134 05 W  Chart 17320

                Additional Information : Tonnage 22 Gross 18 Net, Built 1915, Registered Ketchikan / Seatttle, ON 213011, Owner Alaska Pac. Fisheries of Seattle

                Source : U S C G Report of Casualty May 11, 1925 by J M Gelbert, Agt. Alaska Consol. Canneries for Alaska Pac. Fisheries

 

MINNIE (1935)     An engine room fire destroyed the 11 ton gas screw fishing vessel Minnie at 6:15 p.m. Wednesday December 18, 1935 at Clover Island.  The Minnie and her crew of two departed Ketchikan December 17th for the “crab and clam fishing grounds”.  Master and owner Earl K Goodwin of Ketchikan made the following statements in his casualty report:

                “Clover Pass and Clover Island”  “Wind blowing in sharp gusts, sea smooth in Pass.  Dark and thick, going at half speed trying to get bearings.”  “When in pilot house with my deckhand I heard engine miss and turned to look down companionway leading from pilot house to engine room and was met with a burst of flame.  Impossible to get at fire extinguishers which were hanging in this companionway.  We got skiff overboard and pulled away some 100 yards fearing explosion of tanks.  Boat burned for several hours drifting onto Clover Island.”  “Total loss.”

                The Minnie was valued at $4,500 at the time of the tragedy.  She had no cargo aboard.  Her insurance was in the amount of $3,111.11.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 29 N 131 48 W  Chart 17420

                Additional Information : Tonnage 11 Net, Age 25 years, Registered Ketchikan, ON 208079

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty December 21, 1935 by Goodwin at Ketchikan

 

MISSION (1927)     The 13 ton wooden gas screw Mission was destroyed by fire at midnight August 14, 1927 at Burnet Cannery.  The vessel and her crew of four departed Petersburg May 17, 1927 bound for Burnet Cannery.  The following is an accounting taken from the casualty report filed by Billy Hooper, master of the Mission:

                “two miles south of Burnet Cannery”  “Calm moonlit night.”  “Hand lantern falling ignited gasoline in bilge.  Pyrene fire extinguishers unavailing.”  “Used Pyrene fire extinguisher unavailingly to extinguish flames.  Took to dingy when efforts were useless.”  “When boat was about 15 feet from vessel, Mission blew up and wreck sunk in 22 fathoms of water.” 

                The Mission was valued at $2,000 and reported as a total loss.  It was unknown at the time of the report whether there was any insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  56 04 N 132 29 W  Chart 17382

                Comment : There is a Cannery Point at the west entrance to Burnett Inlet with the ruins of a cannery; probably the location of this wreck.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 13 Gross 8 Net, Built in 1910 at Sacramento, Registered Wrangell, ON 207771, Master William Hooper of Wrangell, Owner Wm. Tamaree of Wrangell

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty August 18, 1927 at Wrangell by Hooper

 

MIST (1894)     The 18 ton 50 foot wooden schooner Mist parted her anchor chains and was lost in a storm at 7:00 p.m. Friday October 12, 1894 at Sitka.  The crew of three survived and made it to safety, but the Mist drifted ashore and went to pieces.  High seas, high winds and a dark stormy night were reported at the time.  The Mist was valued at $600 and had no cargo and no insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  57 03 N 135 20 W  Chart 17327

                Additional Information : Tonnage 17.87 Net, Length 50, Breadth 12, Depth 3.5, Built 1865 at Oak Point WA, Registered Port Townsend WA, ON 17962, Master and Owner Wm H Smith of Sitka, Last Port Sitka October 11, 1899, Destination Hot Springs AK

                Comment: The wreck report mentions the Mist departed Sitka the day before the tragedy so it may be possible that the wreck occurred in Hot Springs Bay southeast of Sitka near Goddard.  WG

                Source : U S Customs wreck report October 15, 1894 by Smith at Sitka

 

MITCHELL (1930)     The 14 ton wooden gas screw Mitchell stranded and was lost on “Fanny Island Reef” at 11 a.m. Friday August 22, 1930.  Master J M Adamson was the only one aboard.  He had departed Juneau August 21st bound for “Speal River”.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Fanny Island reef…stranded…fog.”  “Calm sea heavy fog.”  “Running slow at about 5 miles an hour.”  “In attempting to raise the boat the gas line broke and in some manner the boat got on fire and burned up.”  “total loss”

                The Mitchell was valued at $2,000 and had no insurance.  Adamson made it to safety and filed an accident report in Juneau soon after.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  58 02 45 N 133 47 10 W  Chart 17313

                Comment : Fannie Island…Speel River.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 14 Gross 10 Net, Built 1902, Registered Juneau, ON 93286, Owner Robert E Coughlin of Juneau

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty August 29, 1930 by Adamson at Juneau

 

MOCKINGBIRD (1899)     The vessel Mockingbird was lost at Dyea Harbor December of 1899.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  59 29 35 N 135 21 45 W  Chart 17317

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

MONO (1898)     The 88 ton British steamer Mono was washed up on the rocks in Clarence Straits July 23, 1898.  She had been under tow by the vessel Fastnet along with the British steamer Stikine Chief, also in tow.  As the Fastnet made a turn down Snow Passage to escape freshening southeasterly weather, the towline to the Mono parted and the vessel was set adrift.  While the Fastnet was towing the Stikine Chief to safety on the northwest side of Bushy Island, the Mono drifted NW.  The crew aboard the Mono attempted to set anchors to slow the drifting vessel but the Mono blew up onto the rocks on the SE end of Bushy Island.  The tide was very high so the Mono was carried over the reefs and high onto the rocks at the south end of the Island.  Much of the cargo was salvaged when the tide receded but the Mono was a total loss. 

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  56 16 N 132 59 W  Chart 17382

                Comment : The Stikine Chief was lost in the Gulf of Alaska a week later near Yakutat

                Source :  U S Customs Wreck Report filed at Wrangell and accompanying letter from P F Armstrong, Master

 

MONTANA (1914)     The 65 ton wooden gas halibut schooner Montana caught fire and was lost at 1:00 p.m. Monday April 27, 1911 near Redoubt Bay.  The vessel departed Ketchikan April 8, 1914 with a crew of 15 on a fishing cruise.  At the time of the disaster, they had stowed 8,900 lbs. of halibut and 376 lbs. of bait worth a total of $4,000.  The following are excerpts from the Wreck Report filed by Michael Scott of Seattle, master of the Montana:

                “8 ¼ mi. SSE from Sitka Sound on small Island front Redoubt Bay…on reef…gentle breeze.”  “Vessel floated off reef without damage.  At anchor when fire occurred.  Engines… tried to extinguish fire.  Fire caused by backfire of engines.”  “Towed to beach by gas boats Star and Niagara.”  “Complete loss.”

                The Montana was valued at $16,000 at the time of the disaster and was a total loss including cargo.  The crew all made it to safety.  There was a total of $14,000 worth of insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  56 55 30 N 135 22 W  Chart 17326

                Additional Information : Tonnage 65 Gross 33 Net, Age 3 years, Registered Seattle, ON 208427, Owners W H Butt, E Cunningham and H Lee

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report April 30, 1914 by M Scott

 

MONTCLAIR (1925)     The 23 ton gas screw Montclair stranded in a storm off the south shore of Etolin Island at 6 p.m. Tuesday December 8, 1925.  The vessel departed Ketchikan November 23, 1925 with a crew of three bound for Onslow Island.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “South shore Etolin Is. nr. Double Is.”  “Storm”  “Stranded”  “80 mile gale, rough sea, dark.”  “Montclair was lying at anchor on the leeward side of Mable Is. storm came up about 12 M increased in fierceness until midnight, at 6 p.m. she began to drag anchor, another was thrown out but to no avail.  The vessel now rests on the beach in a cove on the south shore of Etolin Island, about halfway between Mable and Double Is the engines and other machinery have been salvaged, it is not yet fully decided whether the hull is worth repairing or not.”

                The Montclair was valued at $5,000 and was reported a total loss with no insurance.  The crew made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 52 30 N 132 22 W  Charts 17360 and 17423

                Additional Information : Tonnage 23, Age 17 years, Registered Seattle, ON 205622, Master Lewis A Stockley of Myers Chuck, Owner Fur Farms Finance Co of Seattle 42/50th

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty March 3, 1926 at Myers Chuck by Stockley

 

 

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