South East Alaska Shipwrecks ( U-V-W )

UNDINE (1933)     The 9 ton 33 foot wooden gas screw Undine broke loose from her mooring and broke up on shore in Green Bay at 6:30 p.m. Monday December 18, 1933.  The vessel was at anchor with no one aboard and no cargo when the disaster occurred.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Green Bay, Alaska”  “Stranding”  “Mooring line pulled out forward butts vessel drifted ashore and broke up”  “Heavy gale”  “Vessel moored alongside Barge Griffon

                The Undine had a value of $1,000 and was a total loss.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  58 09 15 N 134 16 35 W  Chart 17315

                Comment : Probably Green Cove, 11 miles SE of Juneau.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 33.1, Breadth 12.2, Depth 3.5, Built 1910 at Bay Center, WA, HP 20, Registered Seattle, ON 207892, Master R Clithero of Seattle, Owner Norton Clapp of Tacoma

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty December 26, 1933 at Juneau by Agent of Owner, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1933) Pgs 578-0

 

UNILUCO (1929)     Fire destroyed the 17 ton 37 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Uniluco near Gravina Island at 2 p.m. January 21, 1929.  The vessel departed Ketchikan that day “cruising for logs” with only her master aboard and no cargo.  The following are statements from the casualty report submitted by Richard Thompson, master of the Uniluco:

                “Calm and clear”  “Black Point, Gravina Island”  “Backfiring of engine”  “Tried to put out fire with Pyrenes”  “After backfiring of engine vessel caught fire in engine room, and after using fire extinguisher found that the fire could not be put out, was forced to abandon vessel”  “Total Loss”

                The Uniluco was valued at $5,000 and became a total loss.  She was insured for $2,500.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 02 15 N 132 05 W  Chart 17420

                Additional Information : Tonnage 17 Gross 15 Net, Length 37.5, Breadth 11.8, Depth 5.5, HP 24, Built 1911 at Burton WA, Registered Ketchikan, ON 213648, Owner G F Heckman of Ketchikan

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty January 22, 1929 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) Pgs 528-9

 

UNITY (1917)     The 17 ton 39 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Unity was blown ashore and lost on Douglas Island at 2 a.m. Monday December 10, 1917.  The vessel departed Juneau December 9th bound for Excursion Inlet with 4 crewmen aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by Olaf Jacobson, master of the Unity:

                “Snowstorm, dark, about 25 miles (wind)”  “Outer Point, NW end Douglas Island, Alaska”  “Stranded, gale”  “Anchored in storm, driven ashore”  “Put out 2 anchors but wouldn’t hold”  “Vessel broke up immediately”

                The Unity was worth $1,500 and became a total loss with no insurance.  There was no cargo aboard.  No lives were lost in the disaster.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  58 18 05 N 134 41 15 W  Chart 17300

                Additional Information : Tonnage 17 Gross 11 Net, Length 39.5, Breadth 12.8, Depth 4, IHP 20, Built 1911 at Seattle WA, Registered Seattle, ON 208880, Master Olaf Jacobson of Excursion Inlet, Owner Astoria & Puget Sound Canning Company of Excursion Inlet

                Sources : 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty December 12, 1917 at Juneau, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Pg 318

 

UNKNOWN JAPANESE VESSEL (1805)     An unknown Japanese vessel wrecked in 1805 outside of present day Sitka.  The survivors were given temporary residence on Japonski Island by the Russian inhabitants of the area.  The name of the Island derives from the Japanese presence there.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  57 03 N 135 22 W  Chart 17320

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

UNKNOWN SCHOONER (1870)     An unknown schooner was wrecked in 1870 near Wrangell Island.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  56 16 N 132 12 W  Chart 17360

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

UNKNOWN COLUMBIA RIVER BOAT (1897)     An unknown Columbia River Boat was lost in Berners Bay in August of 1897.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  58 43 N 135 W  Chart 17300

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

UNKNOWN STEAMER SCOW (1898)     An unknown steamer scow was lost at Dixon Entrance January 31, 1898.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  54 30 N 133 W  Chart 16016

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

UNKNOWN IRON BARGE (1898)     An iron barge used for hauling ore was driven ashore and wrecked near Skagway February 21, 1898.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  59 27 30 N 135 18 45 W  Chart 17300

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

UNUK (1929)     The 12 ton 36 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Unuk collided with the gas screw vessel Confidence near Channel Island Light at 11:30 p.m. Sunday July 28, 1929.  The Unuk had departed Ketchikan and was headed for the fishing grounds with four crewmen aboard.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by Henry Denny, master and owner of the Unuk:

                “About 1 mile north Channel Island Light, near Ketchikan, Alaska”  “No wind, smooth sea, dark”  “Collision, gas screw Confidence of Ketchikan”  “Saw Confidence approaching on port.  Blew no whistle as everything looked clear to pass on port”  “All of a sudden Confidence turned to his port and before I could get away he struck Unuk on port”  “After collision Confidence immediately put lines on vessel and towed Unuk into Wards Cove, Alaska”  “Total loss”

                The Unuk had a value of $2,500 and was a total loss.  She had no cargo aboard.  There was no insurance on the vessel.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 24 30 N 131 43 30 W  Chart 17420

                Additional Information : Tonnage 12 Gross 8 Net, Length 35.8, Breadth 10.9, Depth 3.7, Built 1912 at Saxman, HP 16, Registered Ketchikan, ON 210448

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty August 1, 1929 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1929) Pgs 540-1

 

VENTURA (1932)     Fire destroyed the 13 ton 45 foot wooden gas screw Ventura near Juneau at 2 p.m. Monday May 16, 1932.  The vessel had departed Annex Creek that day bound for Juneau with 3 persons aboard and no cargo.  The following are statements taken from the casualty report filed by George Baggen, master and owner of the Ventura:

                “1/4 mile off Carlson Creek and 2 1/2 miles off Annex Creek Dock, near Juneau, Alaska”  “Engine base exploded, catching boat afire and burned it to water’s edge.  Vessel sank in about 24 fathoms of water”  “Calm weather in afternoon”  “Used all fire extinguishers I had, 2 Pyrenes and 1 3-gallon Foamite.  Had one more extinguisher but couldn’t get to it.  Vessel was in a blaze quickly”  “Crew got off in a skiff, after using all possible means to extinguish fire.  About 25 minutes after fire started an outboard motorboat owned by Ray Hyden came to our assistance and took us back to Annex Creek, from whence we came to Juneau aboard the oil screw Yakobi.”

                The Venture had a value of $4,000 and was insured for $2,500.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  58 18 20 N 134 08 30 W  Chart 17315

                Additional Information : Tonnage 13 Gross 11 Net, Length 45.5, Breadth 11, Depth 3.4, Built 1908 at Everett WA, HP 45, Registered Juneau, ON 206280, Master and owner George Baggen of Juneau

                Sources : 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty May 17, 1932 at Juneau, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1931) Pgs 538-9

 

VERNIA (1904)     The 6 ton 28 foot sloop Vernia struck a rock and was lost in Lynn Canal at 9:30 p.m. Monday January 4, 1904.  The vessel had departed Juneau December 9, 1903 and was bound for Hunters bay with 2 persons aboard.  Her cargo at the time of the disaster was 4,000 pounds of fish and fishing gear worth $200.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “9:30 p.m. dark”  “Darkness and squall”  “Struck rock”  “Kitten Island, Hunters Bay, Lynn Canal, Alaska”  “Squall struck her and she was blown on the rock.  Hole punched in her side”  “Sunk and was battered to pieces”

                The Vernia had a value of $150 and was a total loss along with her cargo.  There was no insurance and no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  58 15 N 134 56 W  Chart 17316

                Comment : Probably The Kittens near Funter Bay.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 6 Gross and Net, Length 28, Breadth 10.7, Depth 3.7, Built 1889 at Port Blakeley WA, Master and part owner William Beckler of Juneau, Owners William Beckler and Ernest King of Juneau

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report January 16, 1904 at Juneau by Ernest King for Beckler & King

 

VIGILANT (1903)     The steam tug Vigilant was lost in NE Dixon Entrance in August of 1903.  The vessel had departed Sunny Point and was on the Ketchikan mail route when the helmsman fell asleep and ran the Vigilant into the rocks at full speed on Fox Island off of Cape Fox.  One crewman was injured by a broken steam pipe.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  54 45 50 N 130 51 W  Chart 17420

                Sources : 1. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 94, 2. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

VIOLA (1935)     The 10 ton 32 foot gas screw fishing vessel Viola stranded and foundered near San Fernando Island at 8:00 p.m. January 28, 1935.  The vessel departed Craig January 26th and was bound for Waterfall with two persons aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by Harry Nelson, master and owner of the Viola:

                “Very strong wind, dark rainy night”  “Point Amargura on San Fernando Island about 10 miles SW of Craig”  “Stranded on rocks”  “Strong wind”  “When wind came up we tied boat securely at Waterfall Cannery”  “Gas screw Roal came to assist in bringing Viola back, but wind was too strong”

                The Viola had a value of $1,000 and became a total loss.  She was not carrying cargo and was not insured.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 27 N 133 21  30 W  Chart 17400

                Additional Information : Tonnage 10 Gross 6 Net, Length 32, Breadth 10.5, Depth 3.4, Built 1912 at Keyport WA, HP 15, Registered Ketchikan, ON 210766, Master and owner Harry Nelson of Craig

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty March 11, 1935 at Craig, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1934) Pgs 604-5

 

VIRGINIA IV (1935)     The 92 ton 97 foot oil screw motor freighter Virginia IV stranded and was lost off of Yakobi Island, near the entrance to Lisianski Strait, April 24, 1935.  The vessel was on her way to Kimshan Cove

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  57 50 N 136 27 W  Chart 17320

                Additional Information : Tonnage 92 Gross 59 Net, Length 97.6, Breadth 22.7, Depth 6.7, Built 1904 at Tacoma WA, HP 100, Home Port Tacoma WA, ON 200681

                Sources : 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1935) Vessels Reported Lost Pg 1030, 2. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 441, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1934) Pg 606

 

VIS (1925)     The 17 ton 41 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Vis stranded and was lost in Kasaan Bay at 4 a.m. May 20, 1925.  The vessel had come to Kasaan Bay from Ketchikan with two persons aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by Arthur Wadhams, master of the Vis:

                “Struck rock”  “Off Long Island (Kasaan Island) in Kasaan Bay”  “Sunk from striking rock”  “Southwest Gale”  “Tried to pull her off and after getting her off she sunk in deep water”  “Gas boat Louisiana helped pull her off”

                The Vis had a value of $3,000 and was a total loss.  She was not carrying cargo.  There was no insurance.  The two aboard made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 30 N 132 21 W  Chart 17426

                Additional Information : Tonnage 17 Gross 11 Net, Length 41, Breadth 12.9, Depth 4.5, IHP 32, Built 1910 at Tacoma WA, Registered Ketchikan, ON 207620, Master Arthur Wadhams of Ketchikan, Owner Joseph Dulskes of Ketchikan

                Sources : 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty July 7, 1925 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1924) Pg 293

 

VOLANTE (1916)     The schooner Volante broke away from the motor tugs Gjoa and Penguin and was lost during a heavy gale in Chatham Strait in 1916.  The vessel was built in 1891 and owned by Pacific Mild Cure Company.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  57 03 N 134 32 W  Chart 16016

                Source : H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 269

 

VOLANTE (1938)     The 18 ton 58 foot gas screw fishing vessel Volante was lost in the vicinity of Salisbury Sound on or about October 15, 1938.  The vessel departed Sitka bound for sea fisheries with only C N Robinson aboard.  She was never heard from again.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Believed lost off Point Amelia, Alaska”  “Not definitely known, believe swamped and broken up by heavy sea during storm”  “Believe vessel beaten to pieces”  “Unknown but believe to have been gale force, possibly 40 to 50 miles per hour”  “Unknown as the master was alone on the vessel and no other vessel was near”  “Nothing definite can be stated, however, he was a good navigator and had been in the waters where lost often enough to know conditions and familiar with all harbors or places of safety”

                The Volante was valued at $1,500 and may have been carrying fresh salmon.  There was no insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  57 13 30 N 135 52 30 W  Chart 17320

                Additional Information : Tonnage 18 Gross 16 Net, Length 57.9, Breadth 11.5, Depth 4.2, IHP 25, Built 1908 at Seattle WA, Registered Ketchikan, ON 200137, Master C N Robinson of Ketchikan, Owners C N Robinson and Estate of John C Waggoner of Port Orchard WA

                 Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty at Ketchikan March 14, 1939 by C R Bilderback, agent, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1938) Pg 304

 

WALRUS (1906)     Fire destroyed the 9 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw Walrus in Tongass Narrows at 1:30 a.m. Thursday September 6, 1906.  The vessel departed Bell Island September 5th on her way to Ketchikan with six passengers aboard.  The sole crewman was master and owner E W Gurney of Ketchikan.  The Walrus had 600 pounds of cargo on deck consisting of two stoves and two gas tanks.  Lost in the disaster were 6 year old Miss Emma McKay and 15 year old Miss Emma McKay.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Off East Clump Tongass Narrows”  “Light wind, cloudy night”  “Explosion of lantern”  “Fire”  “Caused by explosion, no measures could be taken”  “One passenger and myself launched lifeboat and took all except 2 passengers, of which were burned to death.  The 2 passengers lost were cut off by flames and could not be reached”

                The Walrus had a value of $2,500 and her cargo $43 both of which were total losses.  There was no insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 20 42 N 131 41 15 W  Chart 17428

                Additional Information : Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 30, Breadth 9.5, Depth 3.1, IHP 10, Built 1904 at Ketchikan, Registered Ketchikan, ON 201124

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report September 6, 1906 by Gurney, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1906) Pg 318

 

WARDS COVE (1929)     Fire destroyed the 34 ton 58 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Wards Cove in Clover Pass at 12:30 p.m. Monday December 30, 1929.  The vessel departed Ketchikan that day bound for Neets Bay with two persons aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report submitted by A W Brindle, master and managing owner of the Wards Cove:

                “Clover Pass, opposite Hump Island, SE Alaska”  “Fire”  “Back-fire from engine”  “Used fire extinguisher”  “I was draining the carburetor to remove water and the engine had stopped.  Then restarted engine and it began to miss again.  I opened cock and was draining out more water, and engine back-fired and ignited gas” 

                The Wards Cove had a value of $9,000 and was a total loss.  She was insured for $6,000.  There was no cargo.  The two aboard made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 30 N 131 45 W  Chart 17420

                Additional Information : Tonnage 34 Gross 23 Net, Length 58.1, Breadth 15, Depth 6.7, HP 50, Built 1916 at Tacoma WA, Registered Ketchikan, ON 213916, Master R W Brindle of Ketchikan, Owner Wards Cove Packing Company

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty December 31, 1929 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1929) Pgs 554-5

 

WASHINGTON (1851)     The ship Washington was lost at Pitt’s Island in 1851.  Her value at the time of the disaster was $25,000 with cargo.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  57 10 N 135 40 W  Chart 17320

                Comment : I have charted this wreck at Kruzof Island, which was named Pitt Island by Captain Nathanial Portlock in 1787.   The Island was later called Sitka Island, Croose Island, Edgecumb Island, Kruzow Island and finally Kruzof Island.

                Sources : 1. Marine Disasters of the Alaska Route (1916) Pg 31, 2. Dictionary of Alaska Place Names (1971) Pg 546

 

WASP (1922)     The 13 ton 38 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Wasp stranded and was lost at Metlakatla at 1:30 a.m. February 14, 1922.  The vessel broke loose from the dock in an 80 mile an hour northeasterly wind and broke up on the beach.  The Wasp had a value of $4,000 which was a total loss.  There was no insurance.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 07 45 N 131 34 30 W  Chart 17420

                Additional Information : Tonnage 13 Gross 9 Net, Length 38.6, Breadth 12, Depth 3.2, Built 1915 at Moira Sound, IHP 20, Registered Ketchikan, ON 213507

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty July 5, 1922 by Frank M Williams, Agent, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1922) Pg 349

 

WEST POINT (1921)     The 19 ton 44 foot gas screw fishing vessel West Point broke loose from the dock at Quadra Cannery and foundered October 28, 1921.  The vessel departed Ketchikan October 1, 1921 bound for Boca de Quadra with one person aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty reports:

                “Heavy gale, rough sea, dark”  “Strong gale, heavy chop, dark and heavy rain squall”  “Moored to dock with heavy lines”  “Broke adrift in a gale of wind”  “Went adrift at midnight, no one on board, started out after her as soon as possible”  “Foundered in 130 fathoms 8 miles from Quadra Cannery”

                The West Point had a value of $2,970 and was only insured for fire.  There was no cargo and no lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 04 N 131 01 W  Chart 17420

                Additional Information : Tonnage 19 Gross 17 Net, Length  44, Breadth 11.3, Depth 5.2, IHP 50, Built 1915 at Seattle WA, Registered Seattle, ON 213233, Master none (laid up for Winter), Owner Booth Fisheries Company of Seattle

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty November 15, 1921 at Seattle by Frank B Poul Co. Inc. Agents, 2. U S C G Report of Casualty October 31, 1921 at Ketchikan by R Pringle, Master, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1921) Pg 351

 

WHITE BEAR (1934)     The 27 ton 45 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel White Bear struck a rock and foundered near Killisnoo Island Monday January 1, 1934.  The vessel departed Killisnoo with two persons aboard and was travelling to Hood Bay.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Northwest wind, sea rough”  “Snowstorm”  “Going less than half speed”  “2 ½ miles SE of Killisnoo Island, Alaska”  “Struck a rock and sank”  “Vessel sank in 35 fathoms”  “(assistance rendered by) Al. Frish Boat and 3153”

                The White Bear was a total loss.  The vessel was not carrying cargo.  No lives were lost in the disaster.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  57 28 15 N 134 36 W  Chart 17320

                Additional Information : Tonnage 27 Gross 18 Net, Length 45.3, Breadth 14.1, Depth, 5.6, Built 1912 at Tacoma WA, HP 30, Registered Juneau, ON 210637, Master Fred Hucker of Hood Bay, Owner Hood Bay Canning Company of Seattle WA

                Sources : 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty February 10, 1934 at Juneau, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1933) Pgs600-1

 

WHITELAW (1898)     The 363 ton 145 foot passenger freight steamer Whitelaw burned while at anchor in Skagway Harbor March 4, 1898.  The vessel was out of San Francisco and in use by the British Steamship and Yukon Gold Dredging Company.  The freight, cargo and machinery were salvaged.  The Whitelaw had a value of $75,000 with cargo and the vessel was a total loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  59 27 30 N 135 18 45 W  Chart 17300

                Additional Information : Tonnage 363.14 Gross 210.46 Net, Length 145, Breadth 32, Depth 12, NHP 75, IHP 250, SL KMQL, Built 1896 at Alameda CA, Registered San Francisco CA, ON 81537

                Sources : 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 40, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1897) Pg 304

 

WINNIE (1913)     The 12 ton 40 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Winnie stranded near Metlakatla November 9, 1913.  The vessel had departed Metlakatla with two persons aboard.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by Charles Brendible, master and owner of the Winnie:

                “On island 1 1/3 miles west of Metlakatla”  “Stranded”  “Anchor lines being out”  “Dark stormy night and rough seas”  “The casualty happened sometime in the night unknown to any one, therefore no measures could be taken to avoid the casualty”

                The Winnie was only seven months old and had an estimated value of $2,800.  Damage to the vessel was reported as “not less than $500”.  There was no insurance.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 07 45 N 131 34 30 W  Chart 17420

                Comment : This vessel was salvaged and put back into service.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 12 Gross 9 Net, Length 40, Breadth 11.7, Depth 3.5, IHP 20, Built 1913 at Metlakatla, Registered Ketchikan, ON 211057, Master and owner Charles Bendible of Metlakatla

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report November 20, 1913 at Ketchikan, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1913) Pg 328

 

WINNIE (1926)     The gas screw Winnie was lost June 20, 1926 at Excursion Inlet.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  58 25 N 135 26 W  Chart 17300

                Comment : This is probably the 12 ton 40 foot Winnie first wrecked in 1913 at Metlakatla.  WG

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

WTB CO NO 7 (1937)     Fire destroyed the 488 ton 91 foot wooden scow WTB Co No 7 near Olga Straits at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday June 22, 1937.  The vessel was travelling from Appleton Cove to Olga Straits with one person aboard.  Her cargo was 5 tons of cans, crab traps and rope valued at $1,400.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Light westerly wind”  “Vessel destroyed by fire”  “Faulty stove pipe”  “Unable to do anything”  “Total loss”  “Assistance offered by Dave Hallick of Sitka, Alaska”

                The WTB Co No 7 had a value of $3,000 and was a total loss along with all cargo.  Neither was insured.  There was no loss of life. 

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  57 11 N 135 27 W Chart 17320

Additional Information : Tonnage 488, Length 91, Breadth 34.6, Depth 7.6, Built 1910 at Seattle WA, Owner John P Nyquist of Seattle, Registered Juneau, ON 164293

Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty June 23, 1927 at Sitka by C L Durgan, Caretaker, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1936) Pgs 828-9

 

WTB CO NO 33 (1927)     The 733 ton 160 foot wooden scow WTB Co No 33 was blown ashore and lost near Wards Cove at 11:30 p.m. Saturday March 5, 1927.  The vessel was at anchor with no one aboard.  The following are statements taken from the casualty report filed at Juneau:

                “High wind”  “Cove near Wards Cove, Alaska”  “Vessel moored for winter between four pile dolphins which apparently were weakened by being eaten by teredos”  “Blown ashore”  “High wind carried dolphins away allowing vessel to drift ashore”  “TOTAL LOSS”

                The WTB Co No 33 had a value of $7,000 which was a total loss without insurance.  There was no cargo aboard.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  55 23 30 N 131 44 30 W  Chart 17420

                Additional Information : Tonnage 733, Length 160, Breadth 36.8, Depth 7, Built 1902 at Port Blakely WA, Service freight, Registered Juneau, ON 48693, Master A Wood of Seattle, Owner Libby McNeil & Libby of Taku Harbor

                Sources : 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty March 30, 1927 by C E Thies, Agent of Owner, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1926) Pgs 754-5

 

 

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