South East Alaska Shipwrecks ( A )

 

ABERDEEN  (1923)     On Wednesday, August 8, 1923, at 3:45 p.m., the American gas screw Aberdeen burned and became a total loss on the north end of Gravina Island.  The vessel was captained by A G Burton of Ketchikan, where it had departed the same day bound for Clarence Straits with four other crew and no cargo.  The fire which is supposed to have started from an exhaust pipe, could not be put out with the extinguisher aboard the vessel.  The casualty was reported by the vessel’s master at Collection District 31, Ketchikan, on August 9th.

                Mapping and Location:  Southeastern Alaska  55 25 N 131 50 W  Chart 17428

                Additional Information:  Tonnage 42 Gross 29 Net, Built 1920, Registration Seattle, ON 220357, Construction Wood, Owner Peter Andrijasavich of Aberdeen, Washington, Estimated vessel value $11,000, Vessel Insurance $11,000.

                Source: U.S. Customs Wreck Report Collection District 31

 

ACTIVE (1928)     At 5 am on July 24, 1928, the wooden gas screw Active struck a submerged pile at Narrow Point, Prince of Wales Island, and beached.  She departed Ketchikan with two crew July 3rd under command of her owner, G P Marshal of Ketchikan, and was bound for Coronation Island.  The calm daylight conditions were no help. The vessel valued at $3,500 and cargo of 10 tons of fish valued at $2,079 became a total loss.  Assistance was rendered by the gas boat Chum who helped tie up the boat after it beached.  A wreck report was filed at Collection District 31, Port of Ketchikan on August 31 by the owner.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska 55 47 N 132 28 W  Chart 17420

                Additional Information : Tonnage 14 Gross 12 Net, Built 1911, Registration Ketchikan, ON 208672, Vessel Insurance $2,500, Cargo Insurance none.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ACUSHLA (1919)     The gas screw Acushla was lost at Bucarelli Bay December 8, 1919.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  55 13 N 133 32 W

                Source : H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966), Pg 312

 

ADMIRAL EVANS (1918)     On March 9, 1918 the 2393 gross ton passenger steamship Admiral Evans struck a reef and was beached in Hawk Inlet.  “The 91 passengers aboard were removed and the salvage steamer Salvor called in to refloat the vessel.  A hole in her bottom had to be patched before she could be pumped out.  The Evans, built at Toledo, Ohio in 1901 went back to work and was finally scrapped in Japan in the 1930’s.”  This information is included in this compilation as some shipwreck lists put down this incident as a total loss, which it wasn’t.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  58 05 N 134 46 W 

                Additional Information : Master Captain Charles Glasscock, Owner Pacific Steamship Company, Destination P E Harris Cannery.

                Sources : 1. Peril at Sea (1986) pg 170, 2. Encyclopedia of American Shipwrecks 3. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) pg 301.

 

ADVENTURE (1899)     At 12:30 a.m. Monday November 27, 1899 the American wood schooner Adventure drifted to shore and was lost at Point Arden off Admiralty Island.  A very dark night, heavy swells, and no wind to keep her off shore were listed as contributing to her demise.  The crew attempted to set anchors but no holding ground could be found.  Her cargo consisted of three tons of provisions and stores, nets and tackle valued at $200, only a small portion of which was saved.  The vessel’s value was listed at $300 and was considered a total loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  58 09 30 N 134 10 30 W  Chart 17300

                Additional Information : Tonnage 12, Built 1886 Seattle, Registration Juneau, ON 106459, Length 37.4, Breadth 12.3, Depth 3.5, Master Chas. A Joyce of Seattle, Owner Leonora Joyce of Seattle, Last Port Juneau November 26th, Destination Wrangel Straits, Insurance none, Crew 3.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

AGNES ANN (1936)     Friday at 1:00 pm on the 29th of October 1936, the American gas screw Agnes Ann caught fire at Escape Point in Behm Canal and became a total loss.  She had departed Ketchikan on October 27th captained by J B Jackson assisted by one other crewman and expected to return to Ketchikan in due course.  The estimated value of the vessel at the time of her loss was $3,000, which was fully covered by insurance.  She was carrying no cargo, but was towing logs.  The following is a description of the accident by her master found in the wreck report filed by him at Collection District 31, Ketchikan on November 2nd: 

“When abreast of Escape Point with tow of logs something went wrong with the engine allowing it to race and cause a lot of vibration before I could shut off the engine.  I immediately stepped on deck and tried to attract the attention of a vessel that had just passed going in the opposite direction.  I fired several shots from a shotgun and the deckhand waved a slicker coat, but failed to attract attention.  When on returning to wheel house found flames pouring up from engine room making it impossible to go below.  Took all possible measures to save ship.  Applied fire extinguisher through skylight.” 

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  55 39 N 131 43 W  Chart 17420

                Additional Information : Tonnage 8 Gross 5 Net, Age 9 years, Registration Ketchikan, ON 226489, Owner Mrs. Harry Benolkin.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

AKSALA (1925)     At 10:50 on the morning of Tuesday August 11, 1925 the American gas screw Aksala caught fire from an overheated stove and became a total loss.  She had departed Skowl Arm that day captained by Clyde Jackson of Ketchikan and was abandoned in Skowl Passage inside Skowl Island by Jackson and his crew.  They had attempted to douse the flames with fire extinguishers and water but were unable to get it under control.  They beached the vessel and sought safety.  There was no cargo aboard, but the estimated value of the vessel at the time of the loss was $4,000 of which only $3,000 was insured.  A wreck report was filed at Collection District 32, Ketchikan, by one S.T. Harrington the treasurer for the owner, Straits Packing Company of Seattle.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  55 25 N 132 16 W  Chart 17420, 17426

                Comments : H W McCurdy has this wreck listed in 1920. WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 13 Net, Age 8 years, Registration Ketchikan, ON 214828, Destination Island Point, S.E. Island.

                Sources : 1. US Customs Wreck Report 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 313

 

AL (1922)     On a calm cloudy November 24, 1922 the American wood boat Al experienced a gasoline explosion and caught fire south of Dixon Entrance at North Dundas and became a total loss.  She had departed Seattle April 22 captained by her owner, John Wilson of Seattle. In addition to her Captain there was one crewman aboard as the Al headed for Alaska.  At the time of the accident the vessel had no cargo and was valued at $1,200.  Assistance was rendered by the launch Ralph, who picked up the two aboard.  A wreck report was filed at Collection District 30, Seattle on December 1, 1922 by her owner.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska (B.C.) 54 35 N 130 45 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 6 Gross 5 Net, Registration Seattle, ON 218325, Insurance none.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

AL-KI (1917)     The Al-Ki, one of the most famous steamers of the Alaska gold rush era, was lost on November 1, 1917 at Point Augusta, 26 miles southwest of Juneau.  She had first gained fame in 1897 as the first scheduled vessel to leave the Seattle waterfront after the arrival of the Portland from the Klondike goldfields with “A Ton of Gold”, thus beginning the Klondike Gold Rush.  The following are a few of the peaks and valleys of the Al-Ki’s illustrious career:

                “The new steamer Al-Ki, for the coal trade, has been completed at Bath, Maine and will soon sail from New York for San Francisco, passing through the Straits of Magellan.  She is 201 feet long, 22 feet 7 inches breadth of beam, and 16 feet depth of hold.  The saloon is handsomely finished and she possesses stateroom accommodations for 50 passengers.”…West Shore, X(1884) Pg 222

                “…the Pacific Coast Steamship Company’s Al-Ki, advertised to leave the Oregon Improvement Company Warf at 9 a.m. on July 18 (1897), for Juneau, Douglas, Wrangell, Skagway, and Dyea.  A rush of last minute freight and passengers delayed her sailing until 5 p.m.  She was crowded to full passenger capacity, with more passengers already booked and waiting for arrival at Port Townsend and Victoria.  In addition to her regular cargo, she was laden with 350 tons of miners’ supplies, 900 sheep, 65 head of cattle and 50 horses, all in a small wooden steamer of 1200 gross tons.” H W McCurdy Pg 13

                “The October (1897) the United States Customs agents at Seattle were moved by complaints of Alaskans that northbound ships were carrying “too much whiskey and not enough food” to carry out the first really thorough inspection of a ship’s cargo ever made at that port.  Barrels, boxes, and cans in the holds of the Pacific Coast Steamship Company’s Al-Ki, scheduled to sail October 2, were opened and a full wagonload of undeclared whiskey, brandy and wine found in containers marked “sugar”, “coffee”, “oatmeal”, “kerosene”, “etc”. H W McCurdy Pg 18

                “The noted old Alaska steamer Al-Ki, laid up at Eagle Harbor in October, 1909 following her final voyage from the north in Pacific Coast Steamship Co. service, had been destined for reduction to a barge, but was sold, instead to Capt. Wallace Langley, who planned to enter her under British registry for service between Vancouver and Portland Canal ports.  In June, libels totaling $10,388 were filed against the veteran steamer as she lay at Eagle Harbor and she was sold to Struve and Bollong of Seattle.  The wooden vessel of 1,259 tons, 200 feet in length, was built at Bath, ME in 1884, her 600 horsepower compound engine giving her a speed of about 8 knots.  Surprisingly, when she was refitted with oil burners and given a new wheel, her commander, Capt. J.E. Guptill, found her capable of doing 11 knots, a speed which she had not attained in the memory of man.  Equally amazed Alaskans, who had followed her plodding progress for years, bestowed upon her the title of “the Sitka Flyer”. H W McCurdy Pg 184

                When the Al-Ki stranded at Point Augusta the 1st of November, 1917, a bizarre series of events brought her back into public notice, the particulars of which add a feeling of true legend to her already colorful history.  When the Al-Ki stranded, the crew was picked up by the steamer Mariposa.  Soon after the vessel left the scene, another vessel, the halibut steamer Manhattan, came upon the wreck and took it upon themselves to claim anything of use or value as their own.  Unfortunately the Manhattan herself ran into trouble a few days later, and her crew was forced to abandon ship coincidentally onto the same vessel, Mariposa, that had taken in the crew of the Al-Ki.  The Manhattan’s crew were taken to Juneau and promptly arrested for looting the Al-Ki.  In a final twist of fate, the Mariposa which had brought in the crews from both lost vessels, struck a reef and was lost on the next voyage.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  58 02 N 134 57 W  Chart 17300

                Additional Information : See Manhattan, Mariposa

                Sources : 1. Shipwreck of the Alaska Shelf and Shore (1992) Pgs 36-7 2. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pgs 13, 18, 184, 293.

ALASKA (1898)     In January of 1898 the small steamer Alaska, which had been “operating as a ferry between Wrangell and the Stikine River”, struck a rock and became a total loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  56 40 N 132 20 W  Chart 17360

                Source : H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 40

 

ALASKA (1929)     On Saturday November 9, 1929 the rotted hull of the wood steamer Alaska was towed three miles south of Wrangell to Zimovia Strait and at 2:00 p.m. was abandoned.  The vessel’s owner, Wilson and Sylvester Mill Co. Inc., considered the vessel to have lost all value.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  56 25 N 132 23 W  Chart

                Additional Information : Tonnage 53 gross 39 net, Built 1916, Registration Wrangell, ON 213960

Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ALASKA CHIEF (1938)     At 6:30 on the morning of March 28, 1938, the wooden gas screw cannery tender Alaska Chief exploded and foundered off N.E. Grindall Island with the loss of four of her five crew.  The following is an accounting of the tragedy from the wreck report filed at Ketchikan on April 5 by her Master and only survivor, Frank Ford:

                “Left Kassan at 5:00 a.m. bound for Ketchikan.  At about 6:20 a.m. I went into the engine room of the vessel to oil up at which time all was well.  After oiling the engine I went on the afterdeck to pump bilges by hand when suddenly an explosion occurred in the engine room and the vessel immediately began to sink. Delaman was on deck and after the explosion I could not see him and he must have gone overboard.  McCue did not reach the shore and Hatch died after regaining the beach.”

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  55 27 N 132 08 W  Chart 17360  Chart 16240

                Additional Information : Tonnage 16 Gross 10 Net, Age 31 years, Registration Seattle, ON 204302, Owner Pacific American Fisheries, Crew Lost A.A. McCue A.C. Delaman Earl Hatch Henry Andrews, Weather NW wind choppy sea.

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report 2. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 466

 

ALASKAN (1936)     At 8:00 p.m. on Saturday February 29, 1936 the American gas screw Alaskan foundered “about two miles north of Slocum Inlet, Stephens Passage, in about 115 fathoms of water.”  According to her master and owner, Arthur J. Lagasa of Juneau “…the line shaft carried away just forward of the tail shaft coupling allowing tail shaft to slip back out of stuffing box and stern bearing permitting water to enter.  Unable to pull tail shaft back in again due to sleeves being outside of shaft.”

                “Choppy seas would spin wheel which would force caulking from around the shaft.  Water finally got so high was unable to do anything more.”

                “Took Alaskan about 8 hours to sink during all of which time efforts were made by myself to keep her afloat until help could arrive.  Coast Guard Cutter Talapoosa went out to make search at scene of foundering about 1:30 a.m. Sunday March 1, 1936, and continued search until about 3:00 p.m. Sunday afternoon, without success of locating vessel.”

                “Vessel may tip over where sunk in such a manner that hatch cover might lift off and salvage gear be disenlodged, permitting vessel to raise of itself; such chances are small.”

                “Attempted to beach Alaskan with small gas boat Nip&Tuck, without success.”

                The Alaskan, her two crew, and cargo of diving equipment (salvage gear) departed from Hobart Bay, Frederick Sound, bound for Juneau.  The weather during the incident is reported to have been “about 20 miles wind; choppy seas; clear water.”  Although the crew was saved, her three tons of cargo valued at $1,000 and the vessel valued at $5,000 were total losses.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  58 09 N 134 05 W  Chart 17300

                Additional Information : Tonnage 29 Gross 19 Net, Built 1912, Registration Juneau, ON 209643, Insurance none.

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report 2. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 449

 

ALBATROSS (1926)     The gas screw Albatross caught fire and was destroyed on October 8, 1926 four miles NW of Ketchikan at the entrance to Wards Cove.  Captain and owner Harry W Benolkin and his single crewman escaped injury but the Albatross, valued at $5,000 was a total loss.  The fire was caused by an engine backfire around 4:00 p.m. and quickly spread.  The Helen H towed the Albatross to the beach in an attempt to have the fire extinguished by the Ketchikan Fire Department but the tide went out leaving the vessel high and dry where the fire department truck was unable to reach it.  The wood hulled vessel burned completely.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  55 23 30 N 131 44 30 W  Chart 17300

                Additional Information : Tonnage 21 Gross 14 Net, Built 1917, Registration Ketchikan, ON 215319, Last Port Ketchikan, Destination Ward Cove and return, Cargo none

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report filed at Ketchikan

 

ALCO (1927)     At 2:30 on the afternoon of September 29, 1927 while fueling gasoline at the Standard Oil Dock at Juneau, the wooden gas screw Alco caught fire and burned.  The two crew and three passengers escaped, but the vessel, valued at $5,000 was a total loss.  According to the wreck report filed at Juneau on September 30, 1927 by her master, Peter Simpson of Sitka, the boat caught fire probably from exhaust while fueling.  “The Progress and Three Brothers towed Alco to nearest beach where vessel burned to the waterline.”

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  58 18 N 134 24.5 W  Chart 17315

                Additional Information : Tonnage 15 Gross 10 Net, Built 1917, Registration Seattle, ON 214982, Owner Alaska Sanitary Package Company, Last Port Douglas September 29, Cargo none.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ALERT (1914)     At 10:00 p.m. September 9, 1914, on a voyage from Juneau to Tyee, the American gas screw Alert broke a tail shaft and went on the rocks at Point Styleman, Snettisham Inlet.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed at Juneau on September 11, 1914 by the master of the vessel, Alfred Cramer of Tyee:

                “Tail shaft broke causing vessel to go on rocks”

                “S.E. wind strong; rough sea; dark.”

                “Raised sail but tail shaft fouled rudder and we were unable to steer ; tried to tow but sea too rough; put over anchors but no bottom.”

                “Owing to depth of water anchor did not catch and tide carried vessel to point where she pounded holes in hull and finally sunk after Alfred Cramer and Andrews Johnson, crew swam ashore.”

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  57 58 30 N 133 53 45 W  Chart 17300

                Additional Information : Tonnage 12 Net, Age 4 years, Registration Juneau, ON 207215, Owner Vendeyssel Packing Co. Seattle, Crew 2, Value $4,500, Loss total.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ALFRED J BEACH (1898)     On July 4, 1898, while under tow of the steam schooner Noyo, on a trip from Vancouver to Saint Michael, the river steamer Alfred J Beach foundered 250 miles off of Dixon Entrance.  The passengers were taken to Saint Michael by the Noyo and some returned to Seattle aboard the Roanoke.  The steamer W H Evans is reported to have been traveling north with the other vessels.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  54 15 N 141 W

                Additional Information : Owner Alaska Mutual Transportation and Mining Company, Last Port Vancouver June 21, 1898, Value $42,000 with cargo.

                Source : The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 41

 

ALICE (1907)     At 2:40 a.m. on August 16, 1907, while on a fishing venture out of Petersburg, the wood steamer Alice struck a rock at Danger Point in Wrangell Narrows and sank with about 60,000 pounds of fish aboard.  The seven man crew, captained by C W Call of Tacoma, all were able to make shore.  Fog is reported to have been the cause of the casualty.  The $8,000 vessel has since been raised and repaired with only minor damage except for the loss of her cargo of fish valued at $250.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  56 31 N 132 55 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 55 Gross 27 Net, Built 1897 at  Tacoma, Registration Wrangel, ON 107327, Owner Pacific Coast and Narway Pkg Co of Petersburg, Length 61.6, Breadth 16.2. Depth 6.0

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ALICE (1914)     At 12:45 on January 31, 1914, while on a trip from Ketchikan to Fish Egg, the wooden gas halibut schooner Alice stranded on a rock in the dark during a strong westerly breeze and became a total loss.  Her master, A A Selig of Seattle, signaled for the engine full speed astern when he realized his proximity to the shore, but hit before the vessel responded.  An attempt was made to pull the vessel off but was unsuccessful, and the $9,000 Alice became a total loss.  Her 11 person crew made shore safely.  The casualty occurred at Cape Pole, Kosciusko Island, Sumner Strait.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  55 57 25 N 133 49 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 29 Net, Age 10 years, Registration Port Townsend Washington, ON 200704, Owners E A and M L Simms of Port Townsend.

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report, 2. U S Coast and Geodetic Survey Special Publication No.50, Safeguard the Gateways of Alaska (1918) Pg 24

 

ALICE (1930)     At 10:00 a.m. on December 17, 1930 while anchored in the Karta River, an engine backfire caused the gas screw Alice to catch fire and burn.  According to the wreck report filed at Ketchikan December 23, 1930 by her owner and master Steve Selig of Ketchikan, he and a trapper by the name of Davis, both in skiffs, “attempted to tow the vessel to shore but were unable to do so and the vessel burnt to water’s edge in about one hour and sank in eight or nine fathoms of water.”

                The vessel was valued at $10,000 with no cargo.  She was listed as having departed Ketchikan on December 13, 1930 bound for Karta Bay, with two crew, and to have met her fate at the Karta River.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  55 34 N 132 34 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Built 1921, Registration Ketchikan, ON 221275, Insurance $7,000, Cargo none

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ALICE (1931)     At 11:00 in the evening Tuesday July 21, 1931 the American gas screw Alice caught fire and was completely destroyed.  She left Ketchikan on July 20, 1931, with master and owner John G Young at the helm and one other crewman, on a trip to Port Alexander.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by Young at Wrangell on July 22, 1931:

                “Used up all our fire apparatus and used buckets to bail water from the sea”

                “After working on the fire for about one-half hour we thought it out and began pumping the vessel when the man on watch looked into the engine room and said he thought there was still fire there.  The master then stuck his head in the hatchway and immediately there was an explosion in the engine room and both men were hurled to the deck and immediately the vessel was in flames.  We took to the dory and layed away from the vessel about 600 feet until she burned up and sank.”

                The Alice (valued at $8,000) is reported to have burned eight miles south of Point Baker with no cargo on board.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  56 12 N 133 42 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 27 Gross 21 Net, Built 1923 at Seattle, Registration Ketchikan, ON 222927, Insurance $6,000

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ALT HEIDELBURG (1935)     On June 5, 1935 the 102 ton gasoline powered Alt Heidelburg caught fire and burned five miles west of Wrangell on Vank Island and became a total loss.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska 56 28 N 132 36 W

                Source : The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 441

 

ALTEN (1937)     About 12:00 noon on July 16, 1937 the wood oil screw halibut boat Alten collided with the U S Navy Cruiser Louisville in the Harbor at Ketchikan.  The wreck report filed by her master, David Hassel of Seattle, indicates the value of the vessel at $30,000 and the damage to the vessel at $30,000.  The Alten and her eleven crew were just leaving Ketchikan for sea fisheries on a clear calm day when the accident occurred.  According to Hassel “….stopped engine and turned Alten hard to port when Louisville approached, port to port.”  The crew was assisted by the Louisville and the Coast Guard boat Cyane and no one was lost. 

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  55 20 30 N 131 38 45 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 43 Net, Age 24 years, Registration Seward and Seattle, ON 211193, Owners David Hassel and Jacob Bassi of Seattle, Insurance none.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

AMERIC (1935)     At 10:00 a.m. on Friday October 25, 1935 the wood gas screw Americ exploded and became a total loss, while fueling at the Standard Oil Dock at Hoonah.  The vessel’s master, Pete Jorgensen of Petersburg, who filed the wreck report three days later at Petersburg, said the vessel blew up suddenly of unknown causes.  No one else was aboard the Americ at the time.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  58 06 30 N 135 26 30 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 23 Net, Age 25 years, Registration Petersburg, ON 210104, Owner Alaskan Glacier Seafood, Vessel value $3,000, Cargo none, Insurance none.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

AMERICA FIRST (1932)     At 10:00 a.m. on Sunday February 21, 1932 the oil screw America First caught fire and burned becoming a total loss, one half mile outside of Stockade Point, Stephens Passage.  The wreck report filed by her master and owner, John Haho of Douglas, lists the cause of the accident as “probably a faulty exhaust.”  The crew of three had left Taku Harbor that day bound for Juneau.  The weather at the time of the accident was reported as “heavy wind, moderate rough sea, and light snow.”  The following are quotes from the wreck report:

                “Intense heat forced crew to take to small boat, landed at Stockade Point; vessel Moira from cannery at Taku Harbor attempted to put line on America First but unable to do so.  Moira took crew of America First to cannery, and vessel Pacific brought crew to Juneau.

                “No chance to use fire extinguishers or save any of the vessel’s papers or equipment.”

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  58 03 30 N 134 01 45 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 36 Gross 28 Net, Built 1917, Registration Juneau, ON 215223, Vessel value $16,000, Cargo none, Insurance $9,000.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ANCON (1889)     On Wednesday August 28, 1889, at 3:15 in the morning, the American wood steamer Ancon stranded on a projecting rock in Naha Bay and become a total loss.  She was just leaving the area with 119 passengers, 72 crew, and a 500 ton cargo of salmon, bullion and general merchandise valued at $80,000.  A strong northeasterly wind, thick weather, rain, dark night and tide are said to have taken the vessel off course.  The following is an accounting from Lewis and Dryden:

                “The pioneer steamship Ancon came to an untimely end in the harbor at Loring, Alaska, August 28th.  She was in charge of D. Wallace, captain, Robert Hackley, chief engineer, H.H. Lloyd pilot, and was on the down trip.  When backing out from the wharf at three o’clock in the morning, she started to swing round on her stern line, which was made fast to prevent her from drifting on the reef.  An excited Chinaman on the dock cast off this line before the steamer brought up on it, and the strong tide set her over on the rocks before she could be controlled.  She drifted broadside on, punching a hole in her bottom, and as the tide receded, the great weight of her cargo broke her back, and she became a total loss.  The Ancon was an early day coal hulk at Panama and was brought to San Francisco in 1873 and rebuilt as a sidewheel steamship.  She was two hundred and sixty-six feet long, forty nine feet beam, and seventeen and one half feet hold.  The Pacific Coastal Steamship Company, who owned her, valued her at one hundred thousand dollars.”

                The wreck report of February 7, 1890, filed by Goodall Perkins Company, General Agent for Pacific Coast Steamship, valued the vessel at $60,000 at the time of the accident, and reported that $55,000 of the $80,000 cargo was saved.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska 55 36 12 N 131 38 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 1208.05, Built 1873 at San Francisco, Registration San Francisco, ON 1522, Destination Tongass Narrows, Horsepower 400, Signal letters JSTF, Vessel insurance none, Cargo Insurance estimated at $60,000.

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report 2. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1961) Pg 371

 

ANITA PHILLIPS (1923)     At 7:30 p.m. Thursday the 4th of January 1923, the wood gas boat Anita Phillips stranded at Port Snettisham, Stephens Passage, and sank in 35 fathoms of water.  She had departed Port Speel River on the 4th of January bound for Juneau with two passengers and two crew.  The cause of the stranding is reported to have been the engine breaking down on a lee shore during a rough dark night with 40 mile an hour winds.  Two anchors were cast but didn’t help.  The crew and passengers were picked up by the mail boat George Jr.  According to the wreck report filed by the owner and master, H G Bayers of Juneau, the vessel had no cargo and was valued at $6,500.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  58 06 45 N 133 41 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 21 Gross, Age 14 years, Registration Juneau, ON 205766, Insurance none.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ANNA BARRON (1930)     At 12:30 a.m. on Tuesday July 22, 1930 the wood steam cannery tender Anna Barron was forced onto the rocks and stranded at Ansley Point in Icy Strait and became a total loss.  The vessel had departed Funter on July 20th bound for Point Adolphys and way points with a crew of seven, captained by George D Black of Seattle.  The following is an accounting of the accident from the wreck report filed by Black at Juneau on July 23rd:

                “Attempting to reach dolphin situated in between two reefs off Port Ansley.  These reefs form sort of a cove or anchorage, and the owner of the boat has two dolphins situated therein at which it ties up its fish scows.  There were already two scows tied to one of the dolphins.  The Anna Barron had a half scow load of fish as she was making round of traps lifting fish.  She also had some of the lifting crew from the traps, and had to put them ashore onto one of the scows already tied up at the aforesaid dolphin, as those two men lived aboard that scow.  The Anna Barron also needed an anchorage for the night.  In going into the harborage in between the two reefs, which runs in a general southwesterly direction, the wind and tide carried vessel in past the dolphins and was unable to get rope ashore onto the scows that were already tied to the dolphin.  The anchorage is probably 200 feet wide and in endeavoring to turn around and keep off shore, the wind and tide forced vessel onto the rocks.  At time black darkness, with no light.”

                The captain also mentions in the wreck report that the vessel was valued at $20,000 at the time of the accident, and though a total loss, she may be raised at some later time.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  58 12 30 N 135 07 10 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 82 Gross 56 Net, Age about 38 years, Registration Ketchikan, ON 107759, Owner Alaska Pacific Salmon of Seattle.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ANNA CATHERINE (1903)     At 2:00 in the afternoon Friday November 20, 1903 the wood sloop Anna Catherine drifted ashore in a storm, stranded, and became a total loss.  In the wreck report filed by her master and part owner, L H France of Ketchikan, the vessel was in route from Kasaan to Hollis with two crew and no cargo when the accident occurred.  An unsuccessful attempt was made to get to deep water, but the sloop stranded and was lost, one half mile south of Hollis in Tongass Narrows.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  55 29 N 132 40 W

                Comments : The wreck report coverlet has this vessel spelled Anna Catherina.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 8, Length 30, Breadth 13.6, Depth 3.3, Built 1881 in San Francisco, Registration Ketchikan, ON 105965, Owners L H France and J R Crumb of Ketchikan, Vessel value $50, Insurance none.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report 

 

ANNA HELEN (1928)     At 10:00 in the morning of Monday October 22, 1928, about two miles out of the entrance of Funter Bay, at the junction of Icy Straits and Lynn Canal, the wood gas screw Anna Helen experienced a gasoline explosion caused by an engine backfire, caught fire, and became a total loss.  According to the wreck report filed at Juneau on October 23rd by her owner and master, W F Good of Seattle, the vessel had two crew and was carrying a cargo of 1000 pounds of dental equipment valued at $3,000.  She had left Hoonah that day bound for Haines.  The following are quotes from the report:

                “SE wind of about 30 miles per hour, sea choppy.”

                “Used contents of two fire extinguishers, (a Fyre-Fighter and Pyrene) and three dry powder extinguishers, without success.”

                “Escaped in vessel’s dory.  In about 20 minutes picked up American gas screw Gloria (217955), A E Carr of Sitka, Alaska master.  U S Lighthouse Tender Cedar stood by as well as the Gloria, but no assistance could be rendered as vessel was too far gone.  Watched vessel until she sank.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  58 13 N 134 55 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 12 Gross 10 Net, Built 1925, Registration Seattle, ON 224544, Vessel value $20,000, Vessel insurance $17,000, Cargo insurance $2,500.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ANNIE (1926)     At 2 in the morning on September 17, 1926, the American gas screw Annie collided with the gas screw Commonwealth, off Point Colpoys in Sumner Strait and became a total loss.  The Anne, valued at $3,000, with a crew of two aboard had taken on 8 tons ($32 worth) of ice and departed Ketchikan bound for Baranof Island.  The following is an accounting of the accident detailed in a casualty report filed by her master and part owner, Hans Danielson of Ketchikan:

                “…while proceeding to Baranof Island from Ketchikan we were abreast of Point Colpoys in Sumner Strait, we discovered that the bearing to engine were running hot.  I called the deck hand, Ben Lundin to take the wheel while I examined the engines bearing.  Found same hot and stopped the engine allowing the vessel to drift.  While in this position we were struck of the starboard side by the Gas. S Commonwealth which sunk the “Annine” in three minutes.  I was thrown into the water and later picked up by the “Commonwealth” and Ben Lunden jumped to the deck of the “Commonwealth” as she struck.  All of our lights were burning at the time of the collision and mast head light was burning when the vessel sunk.”

                The weather at the time of the casualty was reported to be a calm dark night with no wind and heavy dark shadows.  The master and crew of the Commonwealth “rendered all possible assistance rescuing the master and other members of the crew.”

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  56 20 N 133 12 W

                Comment : Hans Danielson refers to the Annie as the “Annine” in the Casualty Report

                Additional Information : Construction wood, Tonnage 11 Net, Built 1909, Registration Ketchikan, ON 206576.

                Source : U S Customs Report of Casualty filed September 17, 1926 at Collection District 31, Port of Ketchikan.

 

ANNIE M NIXON (1912)     On May 15, 1912 the gas schooner Annie M Nixon wrecked and became a total loss at Dixon Entrance.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  54 30 N 133 W

                Source : The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 211

 

APEX NO 8 (1923)     On May 20, 1923 the 32 ton scow Apex No 8 broke away from her moorings in Stone Rock Bay, Prince of Wales Island, and wrecked during a storm.  She had been tied to the pile dolphin with ¾ inch cables but the southeast gale still broke her loose causing the vessel, valued at $1,350 to founder and become a total loss.  According to the casualty report filed at Ketchikan July 11th by S J Beard, agent for the owners, Apex Fish Company of Anacortes, Washington, some of the $850 worth of fish trap gear on deck was salvaged but the vessel was a total loss.  No crew were aboard at the time of the casualty.  Master of the Apex No. 8, James Shelton of Ketchikan is reported to have departed from Ketchikan on May 15th bound for Cape Chacon on Prince of Wales Island.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  54 45 30 N 132 W

                Additional Information : Age 10 years, Registration Port Townsend Washington, ON 163205.

                Source : U S Customs Casualty Report

 

ARGO NO 2 (1898)     On June 21, 1898 the scow Argo No. 2 broke away from the Argo No. 1 off Dixon Entrance, foundered, and broke apart.  She was valued at $4,500 at the time, including her cargo of cattle.  Both vessel and cargo were lost.  The vessels were bound for Dutch Harbor in the Aleutians.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska 54 30 N 133 W

                Source : The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 41

 

ATLANTIC (1937)     At 9:00 p.m. Tuesday August 10, 1937 the purse seiner Atlantic stranded at Little Pybus Bay, NW Spruce Island, Frederick Sound and was lost.  All aboard survived but the vessel was a total loss except for the engine which was salvaged.  She had departed Chatham August 8th with five crew bound for the fishing grounds, and by the time of the casualty had approximately four tons of fresh fish aboard valued at $190.  Charles Smith of Sitka, master of the Atlantic, filed the wreck report at Chatham on the 18th detailing the incident as follows:

                “….dusk, 60 mile gale, misty weather….anchors set but unable to hold….vessel stranded in heavy weather and was lost….some equipment salvaged.”

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska  57 12 45 N 134 05 05 W

                Additional Information : Tonnage 14, Power gas screw, Construction Wood, Age built 1910, Registered Seattle, ON 207376, Owner New England Fish Co Seattle, Value $2,500.

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report

 

ATLANTIS (1898)   April 22, 1898 the steam-powered schooner Atlantis was lost at Yellow Rock Light six and a half miles south of Duke Island near Dixon Entrance.  The crew and passengers, bound for Skagway and the Klondike, were all saved.  The Atlantis and her 120 ton cargo were reported a total loss. 

            Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  54 47 30 N 131 13 45 W

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaska Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

AUDREY (1931)     Wednesday, May 13, 1931 at 3:00 p.m. the gas screw Audrey caught fire in Sukkwan Strait and became a total loss.  The crew of three survived but the vessel, valued at $6,000 was lost.  The Audrey had departed Craig earlier in the day on a trip to Hydaburg.  Master of the vessel, K A Anderson of Craig, filed a wreck report May 29th with the following description of the casualty:

                “Myself and crew were all in the pilothouse when we suddenly smelled smoke, we rushed out on deck and found that the whole engine room was afire, we went over the side in our row boat and stood by until she drifted ashore on the north end of Sukkwan Island.”

                Anderson also reported that the seas were calm at the time and he tried to put out the flames with a Pyrene extinguisher.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  55 10 N 132 46 W

                Additional Information : Construction wood, Tonnage 22 Gross 17 Net, Built 1914, Registration Juneau, ON 212154, Owner Hannah Cogo of Craig, Cargo none.

                Source : U S Customs Report of Casualty

 

AURORA (1929)     It was 7:00 in the evening on Tuesday August 27, 1929 when a backfire from the engine caused a fire aboard the gas screw fishing vessel Aurora.  Peter Sing of Sitka, master of the vessel, managed to escape with the crew but the 1,800 pounds of salmon, valued at $1,100 and the Aurora, valued at $1,500 were lost.  The loss occurred near Sanitarium (now Goddard), 16 miles from Sitka. When the owner of the Aurora, Fred Schray of Sitka, filed the casualty report at Sitka on August 28th he stated that there was no insurance on the vessel but the cargo of salmon was fully insured.

                Mapping and Location : Southeastern Alaska  56 50 05 N 135 22 20 W

                Additional Information : Construction wood, Tonnage 10 Gross 7 Net, Age 16 years, Registration Sitka, ON 211008, Last Port Sitka August 26th, Destination fishing banks.

                Sources : U S Customs Report of Casualty

 

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