Unknown or Uncharted Alaska Shipwrecks ( S )

S & E #3 (1926)     The 25 ton wooden scow S & E #3 was lost in Johnstone Strait at 5:25 p.m. Monday June 14, 1926.  She was under tow and carrying a deck load of 24 ton cargo of anchors, cables, wire netting and rails valued at $3,000.  The scow departed Seattle June 12th bound for Hidden Inlet.  The following are remarks from the casualty report filed by master C P Haugen:

                “Brisk northwest wind, sea choppy”  “Scow believed to have sprung sudden leak”  “South end of Hanson Isl. In Johnstone Strait, Alaska”  “Scow turned turtle”  “Tug towing scow altered course immediately and headed for shore”  “Scow was pumped dry and thoroughly inspected about five hours before disaster.  Four attempts were made to right scow after she turned turtle but strong ebb tide prevented this.  The tug was forced to let go about fifty feet from shore in order to avoid going ashore.  The tug worked from the time of the accident, 5:25 p.m. to 9:50 p.m. attempting to save the scow”  “Total Loss”

                The S & E #3 was valued at $600 and was a total loss along with her cargo.  The cargo was insured for $3,000.  The vessel had no insurance. There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : British Columbia

                Comment : Casualty Report mistakenly puts Johnstone Strait in Alaska.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 25 Gross and Net, Built 1919, Registered Seattle, ON 167640, Master C P Haugen of Seattle, Owner Dixon Entrance Fisheries of Yakutat

                Source : U S C G Report of Casualty at Ketchikan June 19, 1926

 

SAINT ALEXANDER (1799)     The Russian vessel Saint Alexander was lost between Alaska and Siberia in route to Okhotsk, in 1799.  The vessel, all hands and a cargo of furs were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Northern Alaska Unknown

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

SAN MATEO (1909)      The steamer San Mateo was damaged by ice and went aground in the Bering Sea in 1909.  The vessel was valued at $13,000 with cargo and became a total loss.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Unknown

                Sources : 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 165

 

SAPPHIRE (1897)     The 109 ton sealing schooner Sapphire was destroyed by fire 20 miles offshore from Ucluelet.  Aboard the vessel were captain William Cox and three crewmen.  The Sapphire caught fire, which quickly spread and ignited her powder kegs.  The crewmen aboard narrowly escaped before the explosion.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Vancouver Island, British Columbia

                Sources : 1. The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 24, 2. Victoria Daily Colonist April 27, 1897 Pg 2 Col 1 Entirely Discharged

 

SAPPHO (1882)     The 263 ton bark Sappho was stove in by ice and became a total loss while whaling in the North Pacific May 6, 1882.  The bark departed on her whaling voyage from San Francisco December 25, 1881.  The vessel had a value of $25,000 with her cargo of whale oil and bone.  The disaster occurred off Bukhta Provideniya, Chukotka, Russia, northwest of Saint Lawrence Island, Alaska.

                Mapping and Location : Russia  Chart 16006

                Sources : 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. The Northern Mariner (April 2006) Nineteenth Century Commercial Shipping Losses Pg 64

 

SARAH (1879)     The 142 ton two masted schooner Sarah became a total loss while cod fishing in the North Pacific in 1879.  The vessel was owned by Lynde and Hough of San Francisco.

                Mapping and Location : Alaska Unknown

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

SARANAC (1875)     The side wheel steam ship Saranac was lost in Seymour Narrows June 15, 1875.  The vessel with her 10 guns and crew of 300 men was out of San Francisco on a trip to Alaska to collect curios for the Centennial Exposition.  She was running at 14 knots when she struck heavily on her port side and began filling rapidly.  She was headed for Vancouver Island where she was grounded among the rocks.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Vancouver Island, British Columbia

                Source : Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1895) Pg 229

 

SEA LION (1895)     The 51 ton Canadian sealing schooner Sea Lion was lost with all hands in the North Pacific in 1895.

                Mapping and Location : Unknown

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

SEABREEZE (1872)     The 473 ton whaling vessel Seabreeze was abandoned in the Arctic in 1872.  The crew may have returned and rescued the vessel.

                Mapping and Location : Unknown Northern Alaska

                Source : Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914  (1966) Vessel Losses 1868-1888

 

SENORITA (1898)     The sloop Senorita disappeared in the north Pacific in 1898.  She departed Seattle for Juneau with seven men aboard February 1, 1898.

                Mapping and Location : Southeast Alaska Unknown

                Comment : Probably the 23.8 foot sloop Senorita built at Stanwood WA in 1896, ON 116718. WG

                Sources : 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. The San Francisco Call (June 20, 1898) Two Alaskan Vessels Given up as Lost Pg 2, 3. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1898) Pg 172

 

SIGRID (1924)     The 11 ton 36 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Sigrid stranded and was lost near Vancouver Island at 8 p.m. January 25, 1924.  James Hodnet, master and owner of the Sigrid was on board with his Wife and one crewman when the disaster occurred.  They had departed Seattle January 20, 1924 and were on their way to Katalla, Alaska.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by Mr. Hodnet:

                “Reef 7 mi. S. of Campbell River, Vancouver I.”  “Driven onto reef by wind in darkness”  “About 30 mile wind, weather wet, rainy, foggy, very dark night”  “Attempting to make shelter at lighthouse, miscalculated force of wind and nearness of reef”  “Came as a surprise”  “Total loss, engine later salvaged”

                The Sigrid had a value of $2,500 and the ton of supplies on board was worth $200.  The vessel and half her cargo were lost with no insurance.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : British Columbia

                Additional Information : Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Length 36.2, Breadth 10.3, Depth 4.9, Built 1917 at Seattle WA, IHP 20, Registered Seattle, ON 215615

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty August 16, 1924, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1924) Pg 273

 

SIMEON I ANNA (1797)     The Russian vessel Simeon I Anna was lost in 1797 on her way to the Pribilof Islands from Okhotsk, Russia.

                Mapping and Location : Unknown

                Source : Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

 

SOPHIA SUTHERLAND (1900)     The schooner Sophia Sutherland was lost in the Arctic August 31, 1900.  The vessel was towed into Baillie’s Island, Northwest Territories, Canada by the steamer Beluga, where she was lost in a gale.

                Mapping and Location : Northwest Territories, Canada

                Sources : 1. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 63, 2. The Daily Journal, Salem Oregon (November 1, 1900) Pg 1 The Fleet of Arctic Whalers

 

 

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