West Central Alaska Shipwrecks ( S )

SAIDIE (1904)     The 276 ton 150 foot steel side wheel steamer Saidie struck a rock and was lost near York City at 3:25 p.m. Sunday September 4, 1904.  The vessel departed Cape York that day bound for Kotzebue Sound and way ports.  She had 16 passengers and 22 officers and crew on board.  The Saidie was also carrying 50 tons of general merchandise and coal valued at $25,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “3 ½ miles off York City”  “Clear and calm, sea smooth, light NE winds”  “Struck uncharted rock, settled in 6 feet of water.  Ship filled from forward bulkhead after part of engine room”  “Sent chief officer to Nome for assistance.  Gas sch. Augusta C took mails and part of passengers to Nome.  Tightened up bulkhead in engine room and endeavored to pump out engine room without success.  Sept. 5 all cargo that could be got at was put ashore.  Sept. 6 had to leave ship on account of SE gale and heavy surf.  Sept 7 seas going over ship continually.  W C Co’s tug Meteor arrived and left again for Teller on account of gale.  Sept. 9 str. Seddon arrived and left on 10th for Nome with passengers.  Divers put chains and wire under ship.  Barge placed on each side of wreck and endeavored to pull wreck off, but without success” 

                The Saidie had a value of $70,000 and damages were reported at $75,000.  Her cargo loss was reported as $25,000.  The vessel was insured for $40,000 with no cargo coverage.  No lives were lost. 

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  65 30 N 167 41 W  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 276 Gross 145 Net, Length 150, Breadth 30, Depth 8, Built 1898 San Francisco, IHP 300, Registered San Francisco, ON 116831, Master P C Rickmerts of Seattle, Owner Northern Navigation Company of Camden NJ

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report January 7, 1905 by President of Northern Navigation at San Francisco, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1904) Pg 294

 

SAINT MICHAEL #1 (1899)     The 228 ton wooden barge Saint Michael #1 broke loose from her mooring and stranded October 17, 1899 near Nome.  The vessel was used as a lighter on the Nome Roadstead with a crew of four.  At the time of the disaster, the barge had a deck load of 175 tons of general cargo.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “Mouth of Snake River, Nome City, Cape Nome, Alaska”  “Strong gale, wind south, heavy sea”  “Sea so rough could not do anything”  “Stranding”  “Broke mooring”

                The Saint Michael #1 had a value of $2,500 and her cargo $10,000.  Both were total losses.  Neither the vessel nor her cargo was insured.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 30 N 165 25 W  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 228, Built 1896 at St Michael, Registered Saint Michael, ON 57983, Master G Lee of Nome, Owner A C Co of St Michael

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report April 4, 1900 at St Michael by W Hastings, Agent for owners, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1899) Pg 362

 

SAINT MICHAEL #8 (1899)     The 240 ton wooden barge Saint Michael #8 drug anchor, stranded and was lost west of St Michael at 4 a.m. Monday July 31, 1899.  The barge departed St Michael bound for Ft Gibbon in tow of the steamer Louise.  There were three crewmen on board the barge and 225 tons of government supplies valued at $6,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report;

                “About 6 miles west of St Michael” “Foundered and broke in two”  “Parted her lines from heavy seas”  “40 miles (wind), rough, daylight”  “Str. Louise towing the barge, was disabled by the breaking of machinery and anchored barge”  “Anchor line parted and barge broke in two by the heavy swells”  “Str. Louise crew got barge crew ashore”  “Str. Louise being disabled, drifted ashore and sank in 5 feet of water.  Was afterwards raised and is now in this harbor being repaired”

                The Saint Michael #8 had a value of $6,000 and became a total loss.  The disposition of the cargo was unknown at the time of the wreck report.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  63 29 N 162 02 W  Chart 16006

            Additional Information : Tonnage 240, Built 1898 at St Michael, Registered St Michael, ON 58052, Master S E Lancaster of St Michael, Owner Alaska Commercial Company of San Francisco

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report April 20, 1900 at St Michael by J E Hansen Supt. for owner, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1900) Pg372

 

SAINT MICHAEL #9 (1920)     The 366 ton wooden barge Saint Michael #9 sank at the dock in St Michael at 3:00 a.m. Wednesday July 21, 1920.  The barge had departed Tanana July 9, 1920 bound for St Michael and was loaded with 406 tons of fuel oil in tanks valued at $9,200.  An unusually heavy gale and heavy seas sank the Saint Michael #9 at the dock.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “St Michael, Alaska…dock”  “65 to 70 mile per hour, dark”  “Barge lay on south side of dock.  Tug Meteor lay on north side endeavored to pull barge out, wind too strong, could not move barge”  “Heavy sea, gale sprung up, heavy seas broke over barge, swamping her, could not rescue her”  “Total loss”

The Saint Michael #9 had a value of $14,426 which became a total loss with no insurance.  All cargo was salvaged.  There was no one aboard at the time of the casualty.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  63 29 N 162 02 W  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 366, Built 1898 at St Michael, Registered St Michael, ON 58053, Master none, Owner American Yukon Navigation Company

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty July 30, 1920 at St Michael by H P DePue, Agent for owners

 

SAMOA (1900)     The schooner Samoa was wrecked near Cape Rodney in the summer of 1900.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 39 N 165 24 W  Chart 16006

                Source : Alaska File of the Revenue Cutter Service 1867-1914  Vessels Lost in the Bering Sea Summer 1900

 

SAWTOOTH (1936)     The 11 ton 41 foot fishing vessel Sawtooth stranded and was lost in Golovin Bay at 6:30 p.m. August 19, 1936.  The vessel departed Golovin Cold Storage Plant bound for Golovin Village with two persons aboard and no cargo.   The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Near Caroline Island in Golovin Bay” “SW probably 30 mile wind”  “Stranded”  “Quadrant broke and boat headed for beach”  “Tried to hold tiller by hand, dropped anchor”  “After supper, Hjalmar Wiggen, Master, and Roy Ashenfelder took the Sawtooth and were going to Golovin Village so as to have more shelter in case it should be very stormy.  About 300 yards from the Plant the steering gear let go and rudder shipped around and headed the boat for the beach.  One man tried to hold the tiller by hand and the other man dropped the anchor, but the initial momentum carried the boat so close to the beach that when the chain tightened the stern struck bottom and it was not long before the surf had turned the bow around and up on the beach.  When the men saw they could do nothing more to save the vessel, they jumped and got ashore.  The direct cause of the accident is that the quadrant brace broke and then the rudder evidently shipped around and tore the quadrant off the tiller proper.  The ship’s papers were lost”

                The Sawtooth had a value of $10,000 and was a total loss.  There was no insurance on the vessel.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 33 N 163 02 W  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Length 41, Breadth 10.8, Depth 4.4, Built 1901 at Alameda CA, IHP 65, Registered Nome, ON 201441, Master Hjalmar Wiggen, Owner Lomen Commercial Company of Nome

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty August 25, 1936 by Arnold Nuden, agent for Loman Commercial, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1936) Pgs 558-9

 

SEA WOLF (1910)     The power schooner Sea Wolf foundered one mile from Nome in the late fall of 1910.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 30 N 165 25 W  Chart 16006

                Source : H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 180

 

SEQUOIA (1900)     The 341 ton 150 foot wooden schooner Sequoia was blown ashore and wrecked at Nome on Friday September 7, 1900.  The crew of eight escaped to safety, but the Sequoia, valued at $25,000 was a total loss.  There was no cargo on board.  The vessel was insured for $19,000.

Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 26 N 165 W  Chart 16006

Comment : The Sequoia was wrecked along with the 45 foot wooden schooner Prosper, and some reports indicate the two were salvaged in 1902.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 341 Gross 324 Net, Length 150, Breadth 35, Depth 11, SL KHMC, Built 1890 at Fairhaven CA, Registered Port Townsend WA, ON 116349, Master Capt. A G Banks, Managing Owner M A Walters of Port Townsend WA, Last Port – Port Townsend WA July 1, 1900

                Sources : 1. U S Customs Wreck Report December 28, 1900 at San Francisco by George D Gray, Managing Agent, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1900) Pg 173, 3. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 63

 

SESNON #2 (1928)     The 19 ton barge Sesnon #2 washed ashore at Nome and was lost at 4 a.m. Friday July 27, 1928.  The vessel was at anchor in the Nome roadstead with no one on board and no cargo.  The following are statements taken from the casualty report:

                “Strong southeast gale, weather stormy, sea very heavy, medium dark”  “Opposite Standard Oil Co. in the eastern end of the town of Nome”  “Stranding”  “Vessel broke loose from moorings, was driven ashore, thrown on beach and broken up by waves”  “TOTAL LOSS”

                The Sesnon #2 had a value of $1,500 and was not insured.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 30 N 165 25 W  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 19, Built 1899, Registered Nome, ON 162582, Master Alfred J Lomen of Nome, Owner Nome Lighterage & Commercial Co.

                Source : U S C G Report of Casualty at Nome July 28, 1928 by Charles J Milat, Cashier for Owner

 

SESNON #3 (1913)     The 21 ton barge Sesnon #3 stranded and was lost at Nome October 6, 1913.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 30 N 165 25 W  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 21, Built 1901 , ON 162583

                Source : Merchant Vessels of the U S (1914) Losses Reported Pg 431

 

SESNON #3 (1915)     The 41 ton scow Sesnon #3 foundered at Nome November 8, 1915.  No one was on board and no lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 30 N 165 25 W  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 41, Built 1900, ON 165705

                Source : Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Losses Reported Pg 422

 

SESNON #4 (1919)     The 23 ton wooden barge Sesnon #4 washed up on the beach at Nome and was lost at 3:00 a.m. Wednesday October 8, 1919.  There was no one aboard and no cargo at the time.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “S W gale, cloudy with a very heavy sea running”  “Moorings in Nome roadstead”  “Beach about 2 miles east from Nome, Alaska”  “STRANDING”  “Broke away from moorings during severe storm, driven on beach and broken up”  “…conditions impossible to reach the vessel on account of the prevailing storm”  “Vessel broke from her moorings in the Nome roadstead, came ashore, filled with sand and water, and was completely broken up by the storm”

                The Sesnon #4 had a value of $500 and was a total loss with no insurance.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 30 N 165 25 W  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 23, Built 1900, Registered Nome, ON 162584, Master A H Kellogg of Nome, Owner Alaska Lighterage & Commercial Co of Nome

                Source :  U S C G Report of Casualty October 18, 1919 at Nome by H Jacoken, Manager for Owner

 

SESNON #4 (1921)     The barge Sesnon #4 was lost at Bluff in 1924.

                Mapping and Location :Westcentral Alaska  64 34 N 163 45 W  Chart 16006

                Source : H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 329

 

SESNON #5 (1907)     The 27 ton wooden barge Sesnon #5 was blown onto the beach and lost at 10 a.m. Sunday October 21, 1907 near Nome.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report submitted by John H Bullock, master of the Sesnon #5:

                “Broke loose from moorings”  “Moderate gale, very heavy sea, wind southeast”  “Stranding”  “On beach 6 miles west of Nome”  “Anchored at fixed mooring in Nome roadstead when storm arose, causing moorings to break.  Completely demolished in storm of Jan. 4, 1907, by crushing of ice”

                The Sesnon #5 had a value of $1,500 and was a complete loss with no insurance.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 30 N 165 25 W  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 27, Built 1901 at St Michael, Registered Nome, ON 162585, Master John H Bullock of Nome, Owner John J Sesnon Co of Nome

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report September 1, 1907 at Nome

 

SESNON #5 (1920)     The 58 ton wooden scow Sesnon #5 stranded and was lost near Lost River at 2:30p.m. Thursday July 22, 1920.  The vessel was moored with no one aboard and no cargo at the time of the loss.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by George D Schofield, master and owner of the Sesnon #5:

                “S E gale, stormy weather, heavy on shore sea, daylight”  “Could not get aboard as weather was too rough”  “About one fourth mile west of the mouth of Lost River, Bering Sea”  “Heavy sea, on shore blow, dragged her anchor”  “STRANDING”  “Tried to get to vessel with a tram to pull her on shore, but could not”

                The Sesnon #5 was valued at $1,000 and was a total loss.  There was no loss of life.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  65 23N 167 09 W  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 58, Built 1900, Registered Nome, ON 165706

                Source : U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty August 16, 1920 at Nome

 

SESNON #6 (1910)     The 16 ton wooden barge Sesnon #6 stranded on the beach near Nome and was lost at 2 p.m. Tuesday August 16, 1910.  There was no one aboard and the vessel had no cargo at the time of the loss.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by W B Watts, Master of the Sesnon #6:

                “On beach 4 miles west of Nome”  “Stranded”  “Broke loose from moorings and went ashore during storm”  “Strong SE gale, cloudy and rainy”  “Broken to pieces by stranding in storm”  “Total loss”

                The Sesnon #6 had a value of $450 and was a total loss.  There was no insurance on the vessel.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 30 N 165 25 W  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 16, Built 1900 at St Michael,  Registered Nome, ON 162586, Master W B Watts of Nome, Owner John J Sesnon Co of Nome

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report August 31, 1910 by W B Watts at Nome

 

SESNON #7 (1910)      The 21 ton wooden barge Sesnon #7 stranded on the beach near Nome and was lost at 2 p.m. Tuesday August 16, 1910.  There was no one aboard and the vessel had no cargo at the time of the loss.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by W B Watts, Master of the Sesnon #7:

                “Strong S E gale, cloudy and rainy”  “Broke loose from moorings and pounded to pieces against wharf about 400 feet west of N A T dock in the city of Nome, Alaska”  “Drifted on the beach where she pounded herself to pieces against the North Coast wharf”

                The Sesnon #7 had a value of $450 and was a total loss.  There was no insurance on the vessel.  There was no loss of life.

Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 30 N 165 25 W  Chart 16006

Additional Information : Tonnage 21, Built 1900 at St Michael, Registered Nome, ON 162587, Master W B Watts of Nome, Owner John J Sesnon Co of Nome

Source : U S Customs Wreck Report August 31, 1910 by W B Watts at Nome

 

SESNON #8 (1910)     The barge Sesnon #8 is reported lost at Nome in 1910.

Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 30 N 165 25 W  Chart 16006

Source : H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 180

 

SESNON #8 (1915)     The barge Sesnon #8 is reported lost at Nome November 8, 1915.

Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 30 N 165 25 W  Chart 16006

Source : H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 258

 

SESNON #8(1928)     The 19 ton barge Sesnon #8 stranded and was lost August 22, 1928 at Teller.  No one was aboard when the casualty occurred and no lives were lost. 

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  65 16 N 166 22 W  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 19, Length 45.6, Breadth 16.4, Depth 4.2, Built 1899 at San Francisco, Registered Nome, ON 162588, Owner Nome Lighterage & Commercial Co

                Sources : 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1929) Pg 914, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1928) Pgs 728-9

 

SESNON #9 (1906)     The 18 ton wooden barge Sesnon #9 stranded and was lost near Nome at 10:30 a.m. Sunday October 21, 1906.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by John H Bullock, master of the Sesnon #9:

                “On beach about 6 miles west of Nome”  “Stranding”  “Broke loose from mooring”  “Moderate gale, very heavy sea, wind southeast”  “Anchored at fixed moorings in Nome roadstead when storm arose, causing moorings to break.  Completely demolished in storm of Jan. 4, 1907, by crushing of ice”

                The Sesnon #9 had a value of $1,500 and was a total loss.  There was no cargo on board and no insurance on the vessel.  No lives were lost.

Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 30 N 165 25 W  Chart 16006

Additional Information :  Tonnage 18, Built 1899 at San Francisco, Registered Nome, ON 162589, Master John H Bullock of Nome, Owner John J Sesnon of Nome

Source : U S Customs Wreck Report September 1, 1907 at Nome by John H Bullock

 

SESNON #10 (1919)     The 20 ton wooden barge Sesnon #10 stranded and was lost near Nome at 3:00 a.m. Wednesday October 8, 1919.  There was no one aboard and no cargo at the time of the loss.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “S W gale, cloudy with heavy sea, dark”  “Beach about 2 miles east from Nome, Alaska”  “STRANDING”  “Broke away from moorings during storm”  “Conditions impossible to reach vessel on account of storm prevailing”  “Vessel broke loose from moorings, came ashore, filled with water and sand, and was broken up by the storm”

                The Sesnon #10 had a value of $500 and was a total loss.  There was no insurance.  No lives were lost.

Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 30 N 165 25 W  Chart 16006

Additional Information : Tonnage 20, Built 1899, Registered Nome, ON 162590, Master A H Kellogg of Nome, Owner Alaska Lighterage & Commercial Company of Nome

Source : U S C G Report of Casualty October 18, 1919 by H Jacoken, Manager for Owner

 

SESNON #13 (1912)     The 24 ton barge Sesnon # 13 foundered at Nome November 1, 1912.  There was no loss of life.

Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 30 N 165 25 W  Chart 16006

Additional Information : Tonnage 24, Built 1906, ON 163139

Source : Merchant Vessels of the U S (1913) Reported Loss Pg 426

 

SESNON #15 (1919)     The 40 ton wooden scow Sesnon #15 stranded and was lost in Golovnin Bay at 10 p.m. October 3, 1919.  The scow departed Chinik with 6 crewmen aboard and was returning from a steamer in the bay when the disaster occurred.  Her cargo was 25 tons of general merchandise valued at $7,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report submitted by E H Pfaffle, master of the Sesnon #15;

                “Heavy S W gale, dark, high sea running”  “STRANDING”  “The Old Mission at Golovin Bay, Alaska”  “Cast adrift from steamer and went on rocks”  “Dropped the anchors but the sea was so rough that they would not hold and the vessel was cast on the rocks”  “The vessel was cast on the rocks by the gale, and completely demolished by the sea”

                The Sesnon #15 had a value of $1,500 which was a total loss.  Her $7,000 cargo was reported a $6,000 loss.  There was no insurance on the vessel.  No lives were lost in the disaster.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 26 N 162 50 W  Chart 16200

                Comment : Chinik was an early name of Golovin.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 40, Built 1900, Registered Nome, ON 165709, Master E H Pfaffle of Council, Owners Pfaffle & Porter of Council, Cargo insurance unknown

                Source : U S C G Report of Casualty November 4, 1919 at Nome

               

SESNON #21 (1913)     The 39 ton wooden barge Sesnon #21 stranded and was lost near Nome at 6 a.m. Monday October 6, 1913.  The barge was anchored in the Nome roadstead with no one aboard and no cargo.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “S E Gale blowing 50 miles per hour from 2 a.m. to 10 a.m. weather very stormy and night very dark”  “Stranding”  “On beach about two miles west of Nome”  “Broke loose from moorings, driven on shore by gale and broken to pieces after continual pounding”  “All vessels in roadstead were driven ashore by the gale and more or less damaged”

                The Sesnon #21 had a value of $3,200 which was a total loss with no insurance on the vessel.  There was no loss of life.

Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 30 N 165 25 W  Chart 16006

Additional Information : Tonnage 39, Built 1907 at Seattle, Registered Nome, ON 163210, Master A H Kellogg of Nome, Owner John J Sesnon Co of Nome

Source : U S Customs Wreck Report November 4, 1913 by E Chas. Elwood, Agent for Owner

 

SESNON #23 (1924)     The 39 ton wooden barge Sesnon #23 stranded and was lost near the Snake River at 11 p.m. Friday November 14, 1924.  The barge was anchored in the roadstead with no one aboard and no cargo.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Anchored in roadstead”  “2 mi. W. of Snake River”  “S E gale, cloudy, misty and heavy sea, dark”  “Stranded”  “Broke loose from mooring, drifted ashore and was broken up by force of the waves”  “When we found the vessel she was broken up and a total loss”

                The Sesnon #23 was valued at $5,000 and was a total loss with no insurance.  There were no lives lost.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 30 N 165 25 W  Chart 16200

                Additional Information : Tonnage 39, Built 1907, Registered Nome, ON 163211, Master and owner H G Gabrielson of Nome

                Source : U S C G Report of Casualty June 25, 1925 by E K Johansen, Agent

 

SEVEN SISTERS (1908)     The 129 ton 97 foot schooner Seven Sisters stranded and was lost near Cape Espenberg at 1:00 a.m. Tuesday September 1, 1908.  The vessel departed Nome August 7, 1908 with 9 crewmen aboard bound for “Kuwalisk” (probably Kiwalik).  Her cargo was 200 tons of coal of which 25 tons were on deck.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report:

                “About 5 miles to eastward of Cape Espenberg”  “Strong N W wind, dark, and heavy sea”  “Carried away steering gear”  “Dropped anchor, but before the chain became taught the vessel was aground”  “Stranding”  “After the steering gear was carried away the vessel was unmanageable and the wind was so strong from on the shore that before the anchor could be lowered the vessel had struck” 

                The Seven Sisters had a value of $7,000 and her cargo $3,000.  Both were total losses and neither was insured.  The crewmen managed to reach safety.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  66 33 N 163 36 W  Chart 16005

                Additional Information : Tonnage 129 Gross 122 Net, Length 97, Breadth 27.2, Depth 7.5, SL KFCR, Built 1888 at Benicia CA, Registered Nome, ON 116196, Master William S Thompson of Nome, Owner William McIntosh of Nome

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report September 10, 1908 by Fenlay McIntosh by power attorney for William McIntosh, owner

 

SILVER WAVE (1924)     The 32 ton 55 foot wooden gas screw power schooner Silver Wave became frozen in the ice and abandoned in Kotzebue Sound at 1:00 p.m. Wednesday October 29, 1924.  The vessel departed Nome October 8, 1924 bound for Kotzebue Sound with 5 passengers and 4 crewmen on board.  The Silver Wave was carrying 12 tons of general merchandise valued at $4,100.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Moderate wind.  Weather 10 below zero, in daytime”  “About 12 miles west of Cape Espenberg and about 8 miles off shore”  “Frozen in and carried away in ice”  “Unexpected change of weather and ice forming vessel was frozen in and strained causing to leak badly”  “Tried to work vessel out of ice and had U S cutter Mojave go to her assistance but the ice was so heavy she could not get near her and she was abandoned”  “The crew and 4 natives from shore and U S Coast Guard cutter Mojave (assisted)”  “The vessel left Nome with the U S mail for Kotzebue Sound points.  The ice formed earlier than usual and she was frozen in and it was necessary for the crew to abandon her after removing all mail”

                The Silver Wave was valued at $8,500 and was a total loss along with her cargo.  All passengers and crew made it to safety.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  66 33 N 163 36 W  Chart 16005

                Additional Information : Tonnage 32 Gross 21 Net, Length 54.8, Breadth 16.9, Depth 5.2, Service passenger, IHP 65, Built 1889 at Bandon OR, Registered Nome, ON 116255, Master John Hegness of Nome, Owner Lomen Reindeer and Trading Corp. of Nome

                Sources : 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty June 15, 1925 by J F Malen, Auditor for Owner, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1924) Pg 273

 

SKOOKUM (1900)     The 1,981 ton wooden schooner barge Skookum stranded and was lost near Nome at 8 p.m. Wednesday September 12, 1900.  The vessel departed Seattle May 18, 1900, passing through Ketchikan and Dutch Harbor before reaching Nome.  There were 2 passengers and eleven crewmen aboard when the disaster occurred.  There was also a 200 ton cargo of lumber, stores etc. valued at $5,000.  The following are excerpts from the wreck report filed by L O Waldo, master and managing owner of the Skookum:

                “Nome Beach in front of A E Co. Store”  “Stranding”  “Wind SE, velocity about 35 miles per hour.  Heavy gale.  Breakers two miles to windward.  Dark night”  “Vessel was laying at anchor.  In the heavy sea running vessel was breaking up; anchors were slipped and vessel allowed to drift ashore to save lives of crew.”  “Vessel waterlogged and breaking up rapidly; anchors slipped to avoid foundering”  “Received assistance from no one, but rescued two men from steamer America” 

                The Skookum had a value of $40,000 at the time of the casualty.  All passengers and crew were removed to safety.  The Skookum wreck was sold for $1,600 and her cargo for $400.  Neither the vessel nor her cargo had insurance.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 30 N 165 25 W  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 1,981 Gross 1,869 Net, Built 1898 at Tacoma WA, Registered Seattle, ON 57960, Master and owner L O Waldo of Tacoma WA

                Source : U S Customs Wreck Report September 27, 1900 at Sitka

 

SOPHIA (1913)     The 10 ton 35 foot gas screw Sophia foundered October 10, 1913 at Nome.  The crew of four escaped to safety, but the Sophia was a total loss.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 30 N 165 25 W  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 10 Gross 8 Net, Length 35, Breadth 12.6, Depth 4, IHP 5, Built 1904 at Unalakleet, Registered Nome, ON 209264

                Sources : 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1914) Pg 430 (Vessels Reported Lost), 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1913) Pg 297, 3. H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 231

 

SPIDER (1923)  The 7 ton 30 foot wooden gas screw Spider stranded on Caroline Island at 2 a.m. Thursday October 18, 1923.  The vessel was fishing out of Golovin Bay with two persons on board at the time of the disaster.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report:

                “Strong S W gale, stormy weather, dark, 2 a.m.”  “No one on board”  “Caroline Island in Golovin Bay, Alaska”  “Strong S W gale and anchor lines parted”  “Stranding”  “A severe storm came up during the night and the following morning the vessel was found on the beach in a very bad condition caused from the sea beating against her.  Also she was resting on the rocks which wore holes in her bottom”

                The Spider had a value of $1,000 and was damaged $400.  There was no cargo, no insurance and no loss of life.  Evidence of this wreck may still be on site and of interest.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 27 N 162 53 W  Chart 16006

                Comment : Probably Carolyn Island.  WG

                Additional Information : Tonnage 7 Gross 5 Net, Length 30.6, Breadth 10.8, Depth 2.8, Built 1912 at Iglutalik, Registered Nome, ON 210580, Master and owner John Olson of Haycock

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty. 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1923) Pg 279

 

STANDARD #1 (1920)     The 15 ton scow Standard #1 stranded and was lost in Norton Sound at 6:00 p.m. Tuesday July 6, 1920.  There was no one aboard the scow when the disaster took place.  The Standard #1 had departed Golovin July 3rd bound for Egavik.  The following are statements from the casualty report:

                “Westerly storm blowing about 20 miles an hour, strong wind, heavy sea, daylight”  “One half mile south of Egavik River, Norton Sound, Alaska”  “Stranding”  “The vessel was anchored about 200 feet from shore awaiting the arrival of the St. S. Ketchikan to discharge cargo.  A sudden storm came up, cast the vessel on shore, and before she could be hauled out, was broken up”

                The Standard #1 had a value of $500 and was a total loss with no insurance.  There was no cargo aboard at the time of the casualty.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 02 N 160 55 W  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 15 Gross and Net, Built 1918 at Nome, Registered Nome, ON 167340, Master Hans C Larsen, Owner Lomen & Co of Nome

                Sources : 1. U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty July 14, 1920 by Carl J Lomen, Managing Owner, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1919) Pg 417

 

SUDDEN (1913)     The motor vessel Sudden was wrecked and became a total loss at Kotzebue August 15, 1913.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  66 54 N 162 35 W  Chart 16005

                Source :  The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 231

 

SUTWIK (1939)     The 15 ton 42 foot gas screw towing vessel Sutwik was destroyed by fire at 10:00 a.m. September 6, 1939 off Sedge Island.  The vessel departed Solomon September 5th bound for Teller with two crewmen aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by Heinie Berger, master and owner of the Sutwik:

                “Off Sledge Island, Bering Sea, Alaska”  “Southwest wind, approx. velocity of 20 mph”  “Backfire of gasoline engine”  “As soon as port engine backfired, vessel took flames throughout, and in order to save our lives, it was imperative that we both jump overboard”  “Total loss”

                The Sutwik had a value of $3,000 and was not carrying cargo.  There was no insurance on the vessel.  No lives were lost.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 15 Gross 10 Net, Length 41.8, Breadth 11.6, Depth 4.3, Built 1916 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 40, Registered Juneau, ON 207228, Master and Owner Heinie Berger of Kasilof

                Sources : 1. U S C G Report of Casualty November 21, 1939 at Juneau, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1939) Pg 286

 

SWALLOW (1913)     The 9 ton 40 foot gas stern wheel steamer Swallow foundered at Nome October 6, 1913.

                Mapping and Location : Westcentral Alaska  64 30 N 165 25 W  Chart 16006

                Additional Information : Tonnage 9 Gross 5 Net, Length 40, Breadth 10.5, Depth 2.4, Built 1910 at Nome, Service freight, Registered Nome, ON 207831

                Sources : 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1914) Vessels Reported Lost Pg 430, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1913) Pg 302

 

 

2 Responses to West Central Alaska Shipwrecks ( S )

  1. Lloyd Smith says:

    I have a photo of the Seven Sisters in 1908.

    • captaingood says:

      I will be posting a great many photographs and other representations of lost vessels in the near future. If you could, please attach a high density copy of the Seven Sisters photo in your next communication. I will contact you by email. Thank you and smooth sailing.

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