South East Alaska Shipwrecks ( L )

LA CONTE (1998)     The 77 foot wooden longline fishing vessel La Conte broke a plank in rough weather and sank January 30, 1998 approximately 60 nautical miles west of Cape Spencer.  Two of the five crewmembers aboard lost their lives including captain Mark Morley (35) of Sitka and crewman Dave Hanlon (47) of Hoonah.  William Mork, Mike DeCappa and Bob Doyle, all from Sitka, were rescued by U S Coast Guard Helicopter. Winds were reported to be 70 to 80 mph and seas 40 to 50 feet when the vessel, which was built in 1919 began taking on water. The La Conte did not have a life raft on board.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 12 45 N 136 39 30 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: Tonnage 66 Gross 55 Net, Length 77.1, Breadth 16.9, Depth 6.8, CS WA8541, Built 1919, ON 218507

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013), 3. U S C G Maritime Information Exchange “La Conte”, 3. Daily Sitka Sentinel (February 3, 1998) “CG to Investigate Why Boat Didn’t Have Raft” Pgs 1&8

 

LA FRANCE (1955)     The 18 ton 35 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel La France burned September 4, 1955 between Ketchikan and Moira Sound.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 05 N 132 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 18 Gross 12 Net, Length 35.7, Breadth 12.2, Depth 6.3, Built 1950 at Auburn WA, Horsepower 53, Owner Robert S Dowell, Registered Seattle, ON 260057

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) Pg 282, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 743

 

LACLABELL (1912)     The 12 ton 41 foot wooden gas screw Laclabell sank at 6:30 a.m. Wednesday June 13, 1912 a mile and a half west of Guard Island.  Joseph Rose, master of the Laclabell states in the wreck report that planks opened up and the vessel sank very quickly.  The conditions at the time were no wind, calm and daylight.  The Laclabell was valued at $2,000 with no cargo and no insurance.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 26 48 N 131 52 45 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 8 Net, Length 41.3, Breadth 11.4, Depth 4.8, Built 1897 Poulsbo WA, Service passenger, Registered Ketchikan, ON 141512, Owner A W Thomas of Ketchikan, Last port Ketchikan June 13, 1912, Destination Ship Island

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report filed June 13, 1912 at Ketchikan

LADY ANN (1965)     The 13 ton 39 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Lady Ann was caught in the ice,  destroyed and sunk January 3, 1965 near Ketchikan.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 20 30 N 131 38 45 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 13 Gross 9 Net, Length 39.6, Breadth 12.4, Depth 3.8, Built 1928 at Saxman, Former Name Mary J, Horsepower 90, Owner Manuel Macaguiwa, Registered Ketchikan, ON 227811

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 368, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1169

 

LADY B (2001)     The 17 ton 34 foot troller Lady B sank March 6, 2001 at the Petersburg Dock.  Sometime later the remains of the vessel were towed to deep water and sunk.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 48 10 N 132 58 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: ON 517624

Source: Burwell Alaska Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LADY LOUISE (1990)     The 49 foot wooden salmon troller Lady Louise struck a rock and sank July 14, 1990 at Point Turbot.  A private helicopter rescued the people on board.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 09 45 N 134 48 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: ON 284537, Built 1961

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LADY NOREEN (1985)     The wooden fish tender Lady Noreen was consumed by an electrical fire August 21, 1985 near Cape Chacon southwest of Ketchikan.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 41 30 N 132 00 50 W   Chart 17420

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LADY RAE (1948)     The 12 ton 32 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Lady Rae was destroyed by fire May 14, 1948 at the southeast end of Woronkofski Island.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 23 N 132 30 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 9 Net, Length 32.4, Breadth 11.2, Depth 4.2, Built 1948 at Wrangell, Horsepower 110, Owner Herbert J Bradley, Registered Wrangell, ON 254827

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1949) Pg 294, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1004

 

LAKE BAY (1922)     The 12 ton 50 foot wooden gas screw sealing vessel Lake Bay drifted onto the rocks and was lost June 5, 1922.  Part owner John Cameron drowned in the disaster.  The Lake Bay left Sitka April 17, 1922 bound for the sealing grounds off of Biorka Island with five passengers and three crewmen.  The following are statements made by part owner and master of the Lake Bay, Don Cameron:

“At mouth of Necker Bay, south side.  Strong westerly breeze, high sea.  Stranded on rock, slipped off, sank.”  “Attempted to swim from shore to boat, drowned.”  “The vessel lay at anchor, everyone having gone ashore but one small boy.  This lad neglected to care for the skiff which went adrift.  One of the owners the endeavored to swim out to the boat but the current carried him past.  On seeing this the boy aboard was told to loosen the anchor line and let the boat drift.  This was done but the boat did not drift near enough to the man in the water so a line or life preserver could be thrown to him.  The wind and tide carried her on the rocks from which she later slipped sinking in deep water.”

The Lake Bay was valued at $3,500 with a cargo of only ballast and stores.  She was not insured.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 40 N 135 05 W   Chart 17328

Additional Information: Tonnage 12 Gross 10 Net, Built 1916, Registered Wrangell, ON 213804, Owners D Cameron, J Cameron and C Search of Sitka

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed March 20, 1925 at Sitka

LAKEWOOD (1932)     An explosion and fire destroyed the 9 ton gas screw Lakewood in Thomas Basin, Ketchikan at 11:00 p.m. February 4, 1932.  W A Rhymes, owner and Master of the vessel was the only one aboard at the time of the disaster and gave the following explanation:

“No wind, calm, starlight.”  “I was reading and smelled gas fumes, looked at tank and discovered leak which I tried to stop with soap until could drain tank, but leak grew bigger and had to leave tank as was becoming overcome by gas.  Gas exploded and threw me on deck.  Took to skiff, vessel burned so rapidly could not extinguish and is a total loss.”  “Several small boats towed vessel out of channel.”

The Lakewood was valued at $1,500 with no cargo and no insurance.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 20 20 N 131 38 30 W   Chart 17430

Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 8 Net, Age 7 years, Registered Ketchikan, ON 213082

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed by Rhymes February 5, 1932 at Ketchikan

 

LALOWA (1967)     The 35 foot wooden gasoline powered fishing vessel Lalowa foundered April 17, 1967 at Pennock Island.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 19 15 N 131 37 30 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Length 35.4, Breadth 12, Depth 3.8, Built 1938 at Wrangell, 60 HP, SL WF5742, ON 237733

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1974) Pg 1257, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 372

 

LANG (1939)     Ernest Nelson of Wrangell was the only one aboard when his boat, the Lang, stranded and was lost at “Passage Point, Fishwater Bay” in Chatham Strait at 5:00 p.m. Monday July 31, 1939.  Nelson had departed Port Alexander July 29, 1939 bound for Sitka.  The 7 ton wooden gas screw Lang was valued at $1,500 and had no insurance.  Nelson attributes the accident to “carelessness on keeping course”.  The conditions at the time were a “medium SE wind, moderately rough seas and cloudy”.  Nelson was picked up by the vessel Nira.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 51N 134 56 W   Chart 17300

Comment: Probably Passage Point outside of Freshwater Bay.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 7 Gross 5 Net, Built 1923, Registered Wrangell, 232315

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed at Wrangell August 25, 1939

LANGLEY (1869)     The 16 ton 45 foot American trading schooner Langley struck a rock in Chatham Strait near Deep Bay and became a total loss December 28, 1869. The vessel was on a trading expedition with owner and master Michael Sullivan and mate Barney Goldman aboard. The two were rescued January 21, 1870 by a steam launch from the U S S Cyane from the village of Kootznahoo where they had taken shelter.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 134 32 W   Chart 17320

Comment: Deep Bay was the earlier name for Kelp Bay across Chatham Strait from Kootznahoo Village. Michael Sullivan was the skipper of the Louisa Downs which had wrecked in the same area the year before. WG

Sources: 1. Congressional Reports 1878-1879 (1879) “Public Service and Resources of Alaska”, 2. Boston Daily Advertiser (March 19, 1870) Col. 2, 3.  New York Irish Citizen (April 18, 1868) “The Trade and Commerce of Alaska” Pg 7, 4. London Times (November 20, 1860) “America” Pg 22 Col.2, 5. Daily Sitka Sentinel (April 1, 1986) “Early Day Skipper Found Sea Rough” Pg 5

LARK (1965)     The 47 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Lark burned December 29, 1965 at Point Baker.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 21 15 N 133 37 15 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: Tonnage 23 Gross 15 Net, Length 46.9, Breadth 12.2, Depth 5, Built 1907 at Dockton CA, SL WA9237, ON 204573

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1968) Pg 899, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1963) Pg 346

 

LASSIE (1959)     The 21 ton 42 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Lassie foundered May 9, 1959 near Midway Island in Stephens Passage.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 50 15 N 133 48 45 W   Chart 17300

Additional Information: Tonnage 21 Gross 17 Net, Length 42, Breadth 11.8, Depth 5.5, Built 1946 at Juneau, Horsepower 165, SL WA7023, Owner John E Crowley, Registered Juneau, ON 250514

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 305, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1961) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 861

 

LAURA (1924)     The 8 ton wooden fishing vessel Laura stranded on “Walton Rocks, on Black Island” and became a total loss.  Owner and master Ole Sivertsen of Seattle was the only one aboard when the casualty occurred.  The vessel was carrying 4,000 lbs of fresh fish worth $80.  The Laura was valued at $3,000 and was listed as a total loss with cargo.  There was no insurance.  Conditions at the time were “Wind, Gale, S.E., very dark, raining.”  Cause of the wreck was said to be “Light on Black Island was out.”  A small boat came to the assistance of Sivertsen.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 16 15 N 131 36 20 W   Chart 17434

Comments: Probably Waldon Rocks opposite Blank Island.  See wreck same vessel 1930.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 7 Net, Built 1920, Registered Seattle, ON 219923

Source: U S C G Report of Casualty filed January 5, 1925 by Sivertson at Ketchikan

LAURA (1930)     The 8 ton wooden fishing vessel Laura broke her anchor cable and drifted ashore at 2 a.m. November 9, 1930 near Grindall Point outside of Kasaan Bay.  Owner and master Ole Sivertson of Ketchikan was the only one aboard at the time.  The vessel was carrying 200 pounds of fresh salmon worth $60.  The following are statements from the casualty report :

“Near Grindall Point, Kasaan Bay, Alaska….Stranding”  “Gale blowing, dark and heavy sea running”  ”Was at anchor and cable broke and vessel drifted ashore.”  “Gale was extremely bad and vessel drifted ashore and broke up.”

The Laura was valued at $2,000 and had no insurance.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 27 10 N 132 09 15 W   Chart 17426

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 7 Net, Built 1920, Registered Seattle, ON 219923

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed November 12, 1930 by Sivertson at Ketchikan

LAWRENCE (1938)     The 370 ton wooden barge Lawrence foundered 15 miles SE of Cape Fairweather Thursday September 22, 1938.  The barge was under tow by the oil screw McCray.  They had departed Cordova September 9th bound for Ketchikan.  The barge had two crewmen and was loaded with 20 tons of cargo consisting of dredging equipment worth $20,000.  C. Dell, master of the McCray reported the following:

“Moderate gale.”  “Left Cordova under tow of Am. Ol. S. McCray.  Weather bound at anchor for several days.  Crossing Gulf of Alaska deck of Barge split wide open, seams of vessel opened up, and vessel foundered.  Crew of barge taken aboard towboat.”  “Coast Guard Vessel Cyane attempted to sink hull of vessel after barge foundered because deemed menace to navigation.  When last seen was drifting toward beach.”

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 48 30 N 137 56 45 W   Chart 16760

Additional Information: Tonnage 370 Gross 325 Net, Built 1913, Registered Seattle, ON 165479, Master Mike Bergman of Seattle, Owner Puget Sound Bridge and Dredging Co of Seattle, Vessel Value $5,000, Insurance unknown

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed at Juneau September 29, 1938 by C Dell

LAZARETTE (1972)     The crab fishing vessel Lazarette flooded in rough weather and sank November 1, 1972 in Peril Strait north of Sitka.  Two crewmembers were lost with the vessel.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 30 N 135 13 W   Chart 17320

Comment: This is possibly an error in reporting of the Dora R WG

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LEE WANG ZIN (1979)     30 Taiwanese crewmembers perished when the 741 foot Japanese ore ship Lee Wang Zin struck a reef and capsized December 25, 1979 in Dixon Entrance.  The vessel later drifted ashore at Kendrick Bay on Prince of Wales Island.  The Salvage Chief of Astoria, OR attempted to drag the vessel to deep water and scuttle her, but the tow line broke nine miles south of Forrester Island and the vessel plunged to the bottom in 1,000 feet of water.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 48 N 133 31 W   Chart 16016

Sources: 1. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 2. Crewmember conversation alaskashipwreck.com (December 29, 2018) “Alaska Commercial Fishing and Other Maritime Losses of 1979”

 

LEGASEA (1998)     The 51 foot seiner Legasea broke her boom and capsized January 3, 1998 in the Eastern Channel near Sitka.  The vessel made a set, pursed up and had a large catch of herring in her nets.  The starboard boom stay broke as the crew was attempting to bring in a bag of fish causing the vessel to heel over. Skiff man Ron Painter (44) was stuck in the head and injured by the rigging of the Legasea as it rolled over. Skipper and owner Samuel P. Mutch (29) was thrown into the icy water from the back of the wheelhouse. J.P. Stelzer (20), Ryan Lindholm (20) and Bill Davidson (48) were able to stay on the dry side of the Legasea as she rolled over. Davidson was an area management biologist for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game and manager of the annual Sitka Sound sac roe herring fishery. All five men were able to escape alive and were rescued a mile southwest of Surf Rock by Sitka rescue personnel on the pleasure boat Angler’s Choice. The hulk of the seiner was later towed into Jamestown Bay for salvage.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 01 N 135 20 W   Chart 17320

Comment: The 51 foot Legasea was salvaged, sold, refurbished and later is registered with a length of 56 feet. WG

Additional Information: ON 964898

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011), 3. Sitka Daily Sentinel (January 5, 1998) “All Safe After Seiner Flounders Near Sitka” Pg 1

 

LEGEND (2011)     The 58 foot wooden salmon fishing vessel Legend grounded, caught fire and was destroyed eight miles south of Ketchikan near Bostwick Point July 10, 2011. The Legend and her crew were on their way into Ketchikan with 5,000 pounds of freshly caught salmon on board when the helmsman fell asleep and the vessel ran aground. Attempts were made to refloat the Legend during which she rolled to starboard and caught fire. All five crewmembers escaped to a seine skiff and were rescued by Good Samaritan vessel Western Roamer. The Legend was a total loss.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 13 45 N 131 41 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 33 Gross 22 Net, Length 49.8, Breadth 15.3, Depth 7, Built 1929 Gig Harbor WA, ON 228640, Call Sign WA4669, Former Name Emblem

Sources: 1. U S Coast Guard News Release (July 11, 2011) “Coast Guard Responding to Grounding, vessel fire near Ketchikan”, 2. Anchorage Daily News (July 11, 2011) “Crew Escapes Grounded Boat Before it Catches Fire”, 3. USCG MISLE Case # 557256, 4. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1979) Pg 473

 

LELA MAY (1989)     The fishing vessel Lela May sank June 18, 1989 off of Chilkat Island.  All four crewmembers made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   59 02 N 135 16 W   Chart 17300

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LENA F (1957)     The 6 ton 29 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Lena F was consumed by fire November 26, 1957 at Wrangell.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 28 N 132 22 40 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: Tonnage 6 Gross 5 Net, Length 29.1, Breadth 8.8, Depth 3.3, Built 1929 at Bellingham WA, Horsepower 58, Owner Carl T Messinger, Registered Wrangell, ON 232086

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1958) Pg 302, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 802

 

LEO (1888)     The 155 ton wooden steam schooner Leo struck a rock and sank in Port Houghton Bay November 27, 1888.  The vessel departed Seattle a month before laden with cargo for Alaskan ports. She was on her return voyage loaded with furs when heavy weather forced her to anchor in Frederick Sound. When the tide receded the Leo was left high and dry on a ledge of table rock and boulders. The damage done by a tide drop of 24 feet was severe and the crew was forced to abandon the ship as a total loss. The vessel’s gear was salvaged and five crewmen went with a boat to Juneau for assistance. The rest of the crew remained on the beach for 22 days until help arrived. The machinery aboard the Leo, which was salvaged, was from the old Portland steamer Wildwood.  The Leo was refloated in February of 1889 using casks, taken to the cove on Japonski Island in Sitka Harbor and moored for the final time.  The vessel served as a quarantine station for a time and later as a jail.  The hulk of the Leo remained in the cove until WWII construction on Japonski Island covered the remaining exposed ribs of her hull.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 135 22 W   Chart 17327

Additional Information: Tonnage 158.98 Gross 152 Net, Length 102, Breadth 26.6, Depth 7.8, Built 1865 at Baltimore MD as a U S Revenue cutter, Construction Florida live oak, SL JQSM, ON 140071,  Owner Sitka Trading Company, Master Captain Whitford, Value $14,000

Sources: 1. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992), 2. Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1961) Pg 360, 3. San Francisco Chronicle (December 29, 1888) “Wreck of the Schooner Leo” Pg 6, 4. San Francisco Chronicle (February 12, 1889) “Wharf and Wave” Pg 8, 5. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1885) Pg 194

 

LETS GO (1991)     The 71 foot trawler Let’s Go flooded and sank September 14, 1991 southwest of Sitka off of Cape Ommaney.  All five crewmembers were rescued from a life raft.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 10 N 134 40 20 W   Chart 16016

Additional Information: ON 609344

Sources: 1. Unofficial Shipwreck List (Kodiak), 2. BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LEWIS MCDONALD (1919)     The 9 ton gas screw Lewis McDonald foundered while at anchor in Red Bay at 11:55 p.m. March 2, 1919.  She had departed Petersburg February 15, 1919 bound for Red Bay on Prince of Wales Island with two aboard.  The following are excerpts from the casualty report filed by owner G D McDonald of Petersburg:

“Cove SW Red Bay, Alaska…High Wind…Dark – snowstorm…wind estimate 60 miles per hour.”  “Vessel at anchor – waves broke in cabin and vessel foundered.”

The Lewis McDonald was valued at $5,500 at the time of the foundering.  The two aboard made it to safety.  The vessel had no cargo and no insurance.  The casualty report lists the loss to the Lewis McDonald as $1,100.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 20 N 133 18 W   Chart 17381

Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 7 Net, Built 1913, Home Port Port Townsend, Registered Juneau, ON 211078, Master T J McBryde of Petersburg

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed at Juneau May 19, 1919

LIAHONA (1935)     The 40 ton oil screw Liahona stranded and foundered near Red Bluff Bay in Chatham Strait at 4:00 a.m. September 29, 1935.  The vessel departed Ketchikan September 28 bound for sea fisheries with 10 crewmen.  John Hanson, one third owner, was master of the vessel.  Hanson states the following in the casualty report:

“Heavy fog…Baranof Island, Chatham Strait near Red Bluff Bay, Alaska.”  “Dark night, foggy and calm.”  “Ordinary and usual care in navigation…Stranding.”  “Vessel struck in fog causing great leakage, attempted to beach vessel to save her, but vessel foundered.”

The Coast Guard vessel Cyane assisted in the rescue of the crewmen of the Liahona.  The vessel was valued at $20,000 with no cargo aboard.  The loss to the vessel is noted as $4,000 in the report.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 50 30 N 134 42 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: Tonnage 40 Net, Built 1929, Registered Seattle, ON 228492, Owners Dave Daneman 2/3 and John Hansen 1/3, Vessel Insurance estimated at $15,000

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty filed at Ketchikan October 12, 1935

LIBBY MCNEILL & LIBBY No 1 (1929)     The 11 ton wooden scow Libby, McNeill & Libby No 1 foundered and sank in Dixons Entrance at 2:15 a.m. Saturday September 7, 1929.  The vessel had just departed Kelp Island and was being towed by the tug North Star.  They were bound for George Inlet with no persons or cargo aboard the No 1. Upon entering Dixon Entrance they encountered strong winds and heavy northwesterly weather and the scow, valued at $1,600 was lost.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 52 10 N 131 15 15 W   Chart 17434

Additional Information: Tonnage 11, Built 1913, Registered Ketchikan and Seattle, ON 165419, Owners Libby, McNeil & Libby of Seattle, Master D W Branch of Seattle, Insurance none

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty September 12, 1929 by F Svensson, General Supt.

LIBBY MCNEILL & LIBBY IX NO 16 (1950)     The 35 ton 60 foot wooden scow Libby McNeill & Libby IX No 16 was consumed by fire September 15, 1950 at George Inlet.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 20 N 131 30 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 35 Gross and Net, Length 59.9, Breadth 17.9, Depth 3.8, Built 1930 at Seattle WA, Owner Libby McNeill & Libby, Registered Seattle WA, ON 170564

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1951) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 939, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1950) Pg 312

 

LIBBY NO 9 (1974)     The 60 foot fishing vessel Libby No 9 foundered July 23, 1974 in Veta Bay near Craig.  Five of the six crewmembers were rescued by another fishing vessel. Lost with the Libby No 9 was Clyde Miyasharo of Wahiawa, Hawaii.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 21 N 133 39 W   Chart 17400

Source: The Oregonian (July 25, 1974) “Fisherman dies as boat sinks” Pg 28

 

LIBBY NO 12 (2002)     The 43 foot dive boat Libby No 12 flooded and sank after striking a log May 19, 2002 approximately five miles west of Craig.  The sole occupant of the vessel issued a May-Day and was rescued by the Craig Harbormaster who was first on scene.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 28 30 N 133 09 W   Chart 17400

Additional Information: ON 261726

Source: U S C G Enforcement Report (May 19, 2002)

 

LIBERTY (1956)     The 16 ton 39 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Liberty foundered September 11, 1956 off of the Barrier Islands.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 48 N 132 25 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 16 Gross 13 Net, Length 39.5, Breadth 11.2, Depth 4.7, Built 1911 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 30, Owner Jessie Thompson, Registered Ketchikan, ON 208713

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) Pg 294, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1957) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 756

 

LIEF H (1965)     The fishing vessel Lief H grounded on a shoal and sank November 16, 1965 in Wrangell Narrows near Channel Light 32A.  Lost were owner Livingston Desmond and Newton Cooday.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 31 N 132 55 W   Chart 17360

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LILA KI (1968)     The gas screw Lila Ki burned August 13, 1968 at Twin Points in Stephens Passage.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 54 45 N 133 59 30 W   Chart 17300

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LILLY (1928)     The 10 ton wooden gas screw Lilly caught fire and was lost in Badger Bay at 8:00 a.m. February 29, 1928.  The vessel departed Ketchikan February 23rd with two aboard bound for Boca De Quadra.  According to owner operator Charles F Wilson, Captain George Steele of the gas screw Palmer S loaned him a hammer and cold chisel so he could cut the anchor cable and tow the hull of the Lilly to shore.  The Lilly was valued at $6,500 before she burned.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 08 38 N 130 49 W   Chart 17434

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 8 Net, Built 1919, Registered Seattle, ON 218556

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty by Wilson at Ketchikan March 1, 1928

LIMIT (1937)     The 60 foot 50 ton wooden purse seiner Limit disappeared with all hands during the night of September 28-29, 1937.  The following is a statement from the casualty report filed by the owners:

“The Diesel boat Limit with a crew of eight men aboard, disappeared during the night of September 28-29, 1937.  They had been fishing in vicinity of Larch Bay, on the southwesterly side of Baranof Island.  Late in the evening of September 28 they presumably started back toward the Company’s fishing reduction plant at Washington Bay.  So far as any definite information goes, they were never seen again.  A strong, northerly wind was blowing in Chatham Strait and the Limit undoubtedly met this after rounding Cape Ommaney.”

“Careful and persistent search has revealed nothing, except some floating articles such as three hatch covers, side light and screens, identified as belonging to the Limit.  The inevitable conclusion is that the boat sank with all hands so suddenly that the crew did not even have time to cut loose or untie the skiff they carried on the stern.”

Lost in the disaster were Olaf Storfold, Gust Edwardsen, Carl H Carlson, S Birkeland, Ole Saterhaug, John Hansen, Oscar Torheim and Chris Solheim.  The Limit was valued at $9,000 and had an unknown amount of freshly caught herring aboard.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 43 N 134 23 20 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: Tonnage 50 Gross 34 Net, Length 59.6, Breadth 16.1, Depth 7.7, Built 1927 at Tacoma WA, Registered Seattle, ON 226780, Master Olof Storfold of Seattle, Owners Storfold & Grondahl Packing Co of Seattle, Last Port Washington Bay September 28, 1937, Vessel Insurance $8,000, Cargo Insurance none, Conditions strong northeast wind and dark night

Sources: 1. U S C G Casualty Report filed by John W Storfold, President, Storfold & Grondahl Packing on October 14, 1937 in Seattle, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1937) Pg 213

 

LINCOLN ROCK (1932)     The 9 ton wooden gas screw Lincoln Rock caught fire and was destroyed while at anchor in Wrangell Harbor at 9:00 a.m. Saturday August 20, 1932.  The five crewmen escaped the blaze and got ashore, but the Lincoln Rock, valued at $1,650, became a total loss.  The vessel had no cargo and no insurance.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 28 N 133 23 W   Charts 16382 & 16384

Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 8 Net, Built at Lake Bay 1915, Registered Wrangell, ON 213805, Master John McCullough of Wrangell, Owner Wrangell Packing Corp..

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty August 24, 1932 by W T Hale, Secretary for Owners

LINDA (1956)     The 30 foot troller Linda swamped and sank July 30, 1956.  A message in a bottle that was found a year later in the Gulf of Alaska off of Yakutat was the only testimony to the disaster.  Lost was 16 year old Orville Rude who was taking his father’s vessel Linda from Elfin Cove to fish in North Inian Pass.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 17 N 136 22 W   Chart 17300

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LINDA E (1995)     The 45 foot wooden fishing vessel Linda E struck a submerged object believed to be a log April 29, 1995 off of Point Howard, nine nautical miles northwest of Cape Decision.  All four crewmembers donned survival suits and abandoned ship.  They were rescued by the fishing vessel Connie Marie.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 04 10 N 134 13 45 W   Chart 17320

Additional Information: ON 253179

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LINNET (1929)     The diesel fishing vessel Linnet was lost in Chatham Strait September 28, 1929.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 03 N 134 32 W   Chart 17320

Source: The H W McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest (1966) Pg 403

LIZZIE S SORENSON (1900)     The 83 ton 84 foot wooden schooner Lizzie S Sorenson ran up on the reef at Killisnoo Monday March 12, 1900.  The vessel departed Seattle and was “fishing off Alaska” with a crew of 15.  Captain Frank Forward of Seattle was at the helm when “wind and rip tides” sent the vessel onto the rocks.  According to the wreck report filed by owner John P Fay of Seattle, the Lizzie S Sorenson was worth $6,000 and her cargo of fish, salt and supplies for fishing worth $2,000.  Fay further states the damage to the vessel was $6,000 and her cargo $2,000.  The vessel was insured for $2,500 and her outfit and cargo for $1,500.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 28 N 134 34 W   Chart 17320

Comment: Vessel refloated and sold, repowered and sinks again May 10, 1919 Southeast Alaska

Additional Information: Tonnage 83, Length 84.2, Breadth 20, Depth 8, Built 1898 Ballard Washington, Registered Seattle, ON 141523

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report January 24, 1901 by John P Fay

LIZZIE S SORENSON (1910)     The 76 ton 84 foot wooden gas screw Lizzie S Sorenson was struck by a whale and foundered at 8 p.m. May 10, 1910 in Iphigenia Bay.  The vessel departed Tyee and was cruising for whales with a crew of seven.  The following is an accounting found in the wreck report:

“8 miles SW of Cape Addington (Iphigenia Bay, Alaska).”  “Vessel was engaged in whaling and had harpooned a whale, which in its endeavor to get away, turned and stove a hole in her, on the starboard side.”  “Tried to plug the hole, but without success.  Pumps worked, but would not keep her free.  Gasoline tanks emptied, hoping they would keep her afloat.”  “No assistance rendered.  Vessel’s crew landed in ship’s boat and picked up May 12th by the tug Fearless.”

The Lizzie S Sorenson was valued at $25,000 and became a total loss with no insurance.  A wreck report was filed by William Walker, manager for Alaska for The Tyee Company of San Francisco.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 26 15 N 133 24 15 W   Chart 17400

Comment: Same vessel lost March 12, 1900 at Killisnoo.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 76.1 Gross, Length 84.2, Breadth 20, Depth 8, Built 1898 Ballard Washington, Registered San Francisco, ON 141523, Master A Selness of Seattle, Owners Tyee Co. of San Francisco

Source: U S Customs Wreck Report May 18, 1910

LOIS (1924)     The 21 ton gas screw Lois was destroyed by fire in Hoonah Harbor at 9:00 p.m. Wednesday February 20, 1924.  The vessel was at anchor with no one aboard prior to the tragedy.  The following are statements made in the casualty report by George J Beck, master of the vessel:

“Pitt Island, Hoonah Harbor, Alaska.”  “Driven ashore by heavy ice floe coming from head of bay, at 9 o’clock master entered vessel with lantern; explosion and fire followed; vessel total loss; master escaped with burns about head.  Apparently leaky gasoline tank allowing oil to be ignited by lantern.”  “Great assistance rendered by natives after the fire, in raising the hull. Vessels documents destroyed.”

The Lois was valued at $12,000 with no cargo.  The amount of insurance was not known at the time the casualty report was filed.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 07 N 135 27 45 W   Chart 17302

Additional Information: Tonnage 21 Gross 14 Net, Built 1911, Registered Juneau, ON 209196, Master George J Beck of Hoonah, Owner Presbyterian Church of U S A, Cargo none

Source: U S Coast Guard Report of Casualty March 3, 1920 at Juneau

LOIS M (1970)     The oil screw Lois M stranded and was lost August 7, 1970 near Point Couverden.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   58 11 25 N 135 03 10 W   Chart 17300

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LOOMIS (1953)     The 15 ton 45 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Loomis burned March 3, 1953 in Jamestown Bay, three miles south of Sitka.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 02 40 N 135 17 30 W   Chart 17326

Additional Information: Tonnage 15 Gross 10 Net, Length 45.8, Breadth 13.6, Depth 4, Built 1919 at Kake, Horsepower 140, Owner Charles Clark, Registered Sitka, ON 217992

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1959) Pg 320, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1961) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 862

 

LORETTA C (1998)     The 36 foot halibut longline fishing vessel Loretta C was consumed by fire from an oil stove March 27, 1998 in Petersburg Harbor.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 48 10 N 132 58 W   Chart 17360

Additional Information: ON 626868

Sources: 1. U S C G Shipwreck List (1989-2004), 2. Michael Burwell Shipwreck List (2013)

 

LORRAINE (1930)     The 9 ton 36 foot gas screw Lorraine foundered in Saginaw Bay on the north coast of Kuiu Island February 18, 1930.  The vessel was valued at $1,200 at the time of the tragedy.  No one was aboard and no lives were lost.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   56 55 N 134 16 W   Chart 17368

Additional Information: Tonnage 9 Gross 6 Net, Length 36, Breadth 9.9, Depth 4.0, Built 1911 at Olympia WA, Horsepower 40, Registered Petersburg, ON 208801, Owner Port Walter Herring and Packing Company

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1931) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 940, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1930) Pgs 400-1, 3. Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

LOS ANGELES (1881)     The vessel Los Angeles went down in Peril Strait in 1881

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 30 N 135 13 W   Chart 17320

Source: Shipwrecks of the Alaskan Shelf and Shore (1992)

LOUIS G (1981)     The seiner Louis G capsized and sank August 4, 1981 off of Cape Bartolome.  All five crewmembers were rescued by the fishing vessel Delight.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 14 N 133 37 W   Chart 17400

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LOUISE (1977)     The 10 ton 28 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Louise stranded and was lost October 12, 1977 in Bertha Bay.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 48 N 136 21 W   Chart 17321

Comment: The vessel Lula J is lost in the same bay two days later.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 10 Gross 9 Net, Length 28.4, Breadth 10.3, Depth 4.7, Built 1955 at Tacoma WA, Former Name Jayne L, ON 269870

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 396, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1978) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2118

 

LOUISE II (1971)     The seiner Louise II ran up on the rocks and broke up in rough weather November 17, 1971 on Clam Island between Klawock and Craig.  All three crewmembers were rescued.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 58 48 N 133 15 30 W   Chart 17405

Source: BOEM Alaska Shipwreck List (2011)

 

LOYAL (1954)     The 11 ton 37 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Loyal was consumed by fire May 15, 1954 at Kimshan Cove.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 41 20 N 136 07 W   Chart 17322

Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 9 Net, Length 36.9, Breadth 9, Depth 4.4, Built 1912 at Seattle WA, Horsepower 130, Owner Hans F Irrgang, Registered Seattle, ON 218968

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1955) Pg 304, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1956) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 744

 

LU (1935)     The 14 ton 38 foot wooden gas screw fishing vessel Lu foundered in Stephen’s Passage January 13, 1935.  The 9 crewmen aboard made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 13 N 133 39 W   Chart 17300

Additional Information: Tonnage 14 Gross 9 Net, Length 38.3, Breadth 10.7, Depth 4.4, Built 1924 at Juneau, Horsepower 40, Owner Mrs L P Dawes, Registered Juneau, ON 224156

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1935) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 1029, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1934) Pgs 426-7

LUCKY (1917)     The 8 ton 33 foot gas screw fishing vessel Lucky foundered August 6, 1917 near Cape Fox.  The three persons aboard made it to safety.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 46 10 N 130 50 45 W   Chart 17420

Additional Information: Tonnage 8 Gross 6 Net, Length 33.6, Breadth 10.2, Depth 3.1, IHP 16, Built 1908 at Seattle WA, Registered Ketchikan, ON 213932

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1918) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 441, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1916) Pg 267

LULA J (1977)     The 11 ton 36 foot wooden oil screw fishing vessel Lula J foundered October 14, 1977 in Bertha Bay.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   57 48 N 136 21 W   Chart 17321

Comment: The vessel Louise was lost in the same bay two days before.  WG

Additional Information: Tonnage 11 Gross 7 Net, Length 36.2, Breadth 9.3, Depth 4.2, Built 1918 at LaConner WA, ON 216138

Sources: 1. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1965) Pg 400, 2. Merchant Vessels of the U S (1978) “Vessels Reported Lost” Pg 2118

 

LUMMI BAY (1938)     The 43 ton wooden oil screw Lummi Bay foundered three miles north of Tree Point Light at 9:00 p.m. Friday August 19, 1938.  Her six crewmen escaped to safety, but the vessel, worth $15,000 was a total loss.  She was also carrying 15,000 salmon worth $900, also lost.  The following is an accounting by H D Stackpole, master of the Lummi Bay:

“Wind strong SW.  Sea Heavy. Night Dark.”  “1/4 mile north of “the reef”.  3 miles north of Tree Point Light, Southeast Alaska.”  “Vessel leaking”  “Believe damage was caused to vessel’s hull by pounding against fish trap while brailing.  Probably opened seams.  Attempted to beach vessel immediately after noticing that she was leaking.”  “Trap watchman took crew ashore in trap skiff in answer to distress signals.”

The Lummi Bay was insured for $8,000.  Her last port was Hidden Inlet that day.

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   54 48 15 N 130 55 45 W   Chart 17434

Additional Information: Tonnage 43 Gross 29 Net, Age 21 years, Registered Ketchikan, ON 215290, Master H D Stackpole of Seattle, Owner Nakat Packing Corporation of Seattle

Source: U S C G Report of Casualty August 22, 1938 at Ketchikan by Stackpole

LUNA (1932)     The 19 ton gas screw Luna was consumed by fire at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday March 30, 1932 at Osten Island.  The two aboard made it to safety but the Luna, valued at $4,000 was a total loss.  The following are comments taken from the casualty report by W H Roessel, owner and master of the Luna:

“Osten Island, Carroll Inlet…explosion of gas.”  “Calm and clear, light breeze.”  “Vessel completely burned, caused by explosion of gas after lighting galley stove.  Impossible to extinguish flames on account of danger of further explosions; vessel burned to water’s edge and beached on north end of Osten Island.”

Mapping and Location: Southeast Alaska   55 24 45 N 131 19 28 W   Chart 17428

Additional Information: Tonnage 19 Gross 13 Net, Age 20 years, Registered Ketchikan, ON 209816, Last  Port Ketchikan March 27, 1932, Destination Carroll Inlet

Source: U S C G Report of Casualty April 4, 1932 by Roessel at Ketchikan

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